Hands Up!
This triumphant picture book recasts a charged phrase as part of a black girl's everyday life--hands up for a hug, hands up in class, hands up for a high five--before culminating in a moment of resistance at a protest march.A young black girl lifts her baby hands up to greet the sun, reaches her hands up for a book on a high shelf, and raises her hands up in praise at a church service. She stretches her hands up high like a plane's wings and whizzes down a hill so fast on her bike with her hands way up. As she grows, she lives through everyday moments of joy, love, and sadness. And when she gets a little older, she joins together with her family and her community in a protest march, where they lift their hands up together in resistance and strength.

Hands Up! Details

TitleHands Up!
Author
ReleaseJan 22nd, 2019
PublisherDial Books
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Cultural, African American

Hands Up! Review

  • Carmen
    January 1, 1970
    So this book shows a little black girl growing up in America. It has her raising her hands up for various things in her life. Greeting the sun, playing peek-a-boo, getting dressed, stretching to reach something on a shelf, using the sink, holding her hair back, swinging on her mom and dad's arms, raising hands in class, reaching for the book on the high shelf, going into fifth position in ballet, riding a bike with hands in the air, accepting help when she falls, raising her hands at a concert, So this book shows a little black girl growing up in America. It has her raising her hands up for various things in her life. Greeting the sun, playing peek-a-boo, getting dressed, stretching to reach something on a shelf, using the sink, holding her hair back, swinging on her mom and dad's arms, raising hands in class, reaching for the book on the high shelf, going into fifth position in ballet, riding a bike with hands in the air, accepting help when she falls, raising her hands at a concert, in defense playing basketball, raising a trophy in triumph, giving high fives.This all culminates with her being a teenager and raising her arms in protest.THE ENDTHE GOOD - Love the positive, warm family shown in this book. Grandma doing Viv's hair, mom and dad playing with her. - I like how it shows strong community. - I like how it shows different slices and ages of Viv's life.THE BADI'm not sure you can divorce the phrase, "Hands up!" from what is going on in BLM today and the phrase, "Hands up! Don't shoot!" being so prevalent and scary right now. I know what McDaniel is doing,For many people, the phrase "hands up" brings forward difficult emotions like anger, sadness, frustration and fear. With this story, I wanted to emphasize the ways I've experienced that phrase as part of my everyday life: at home, at play, in church, and at protests with young people leading the way.I understand what she's saying, but I think it's hard for any adult to read this book to a child without a horrible sinking feeling in their stomach - I know it was in mine. The child won't know anything, but as an adult it's pretty depressing. Something to consider if you are going to be reading this to children.TL;DR I'll leave it up to you to decide whether this book makes you depressed and if that's a consideration in reading it to children. I couldn't stop thinking about the child(ren) I was reading to growing up and getting shot to death, so... the book wasn't worth that to me. You could say, "Oh, but that's good you felt that way! People should feel terrified and then do things to change the world!" but I don't need help being terrified for both people now and future generations, so... this is just a little sprinkling of depression I'd rather not have. Just my two cents.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful and beautifully crafted book that celebrates all the joyful ways to have your Hands Up! This is a much needed reminder (and counter story) to the negative and usually less than nuanced single narrative of the phrase Hands Up!
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A positive portrayal of being told to put your "hands up!"--singing in church, getting dressed, fixing hair, 5th position in ballet ("graceful like Ms. Misty"), playing defense in basketball, and high fives. Last page shows everyone with hands up at a rally holding signs that say, "Black Lives Matter," "Water=Life," and "Ningun ser humano es ilegal." Not many words on each page--short and simple. Would be great for reading to a group of children as they could put their hands up for each action. A positive portrayal of being told to put your "hands up!"--singing in church, getting dressed, fixing hair, 5th position in ballet ("graceful like Ms. Misty"), playing defense in basketball, and high fives. Last page shows everyone with hands up at a rally holding signs that say, "Black Lives Matter," "Water=Life," and "Ningun ser humano es ilegal." Not many words on each page--short and simple. Would be great for reading to a group of children as they could put their hands up for each action. Digital mixed media for the illustrations--looks like boxy, crayon-ish drawings that are bold and simple. This is perfect for social justice displays for the little ones.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Hands Up is learning, growing, and reaching. It's praise, it's perseverance, it's love. Wonderful, colorful illustrations with a beautiful depiction of family, achievement, and self-confidence. This picture book has captured my heart, and I can't wait to share it with everybody! Audiences young and old will adore Hands Up.
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  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    Lift your hands in joy and celebration! This book helps students see how important their voices and lives are. Its sure to be a favorite for adults and kids. Thank you #BookPosse for the early read.
  • Yapha
    January 1, 1970
    There is hidden power in this book, reclaiming the act of "hands up" and putting a positive, joyful spin on it.
  • Cheryl Gladfelter
    January 1, 1970
    Shows all the ways a young black girl raises her hands during her life--getting dressed, ballet class, basketball, and protests are some examples. A beautifully illustrated book.
  • Jamila
    January 1, 1970
    This picture book is beautiful, honest, relevant, thought-provoking, and sweet. I am grateful it exists for children, students, and families everywhere. #BlackJoy
  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    Don't miss the author & illustrator notes at the end that explain the deeper meaning behind this book.
  • Piper Hale
    January 1, 1970
    This beautifully illustrated children's book celebrates the joy and exuberance of the main character's (Viv's) daily life. The story provides an uplifting take on the phrase, "hands up," and offers a reclamation of those words. The illustration style is colorful and jubilant, and the message is a positive one for any young reader (or pre-reader).
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  • Lindsay Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a celebration! HANDS UP! for all the good things, for reaching new heights, for trying but needing help, for protest, for sustenance, for love and respect. And don't miss the author's note at the end. Read it and then reread it.
  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    Cute positive book. Did anyone else hear Luda's name when they read "hands up"?Just me? ok
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Note from the author: “You matter. Your joy will be celebrated. Your struggles will be supported. Your love will be returned. You deserve to thrive” ❤ Note from the author: “You matter. Your joy will be celebrated. Your struggles will be supported. Your love will be returned. You deserve to thrive” ❤️
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommended for ages 3-6.
  • Linda Atkinson
    January 1, 1970
    Love!
  • Rachelle
    January 1, 1970
    This book is positive, powerful, and a platform to have a discussion with children about resistance and social activism.
  • Kazia
    January 1, 1970
    This book. THIS BOOK! What a gorgeous story.
  • sans from minecraft
    January 1, 1970
    i remember the cops reading the cover to me this one time
  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely, affirming book about stretching our hands up.
  • Sheri Dillard
    January 1, 1970
    Hands up for joyful (and important!) picture books! I can't wait to read this one to my preschoolers! :)
  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful children’s picture book! Very proud to read it with my daughters!!
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