The Trailing Spouse
Do you really want to know the truth?Amanda Bonham moved halfway around the world to be with the man she loves. Although expat life in Singapore can be difficult, Edward Bonham is a dream husband and a doting father to his teenage daughter, Josie.But when their maid dies in an apparent suicide—and Amanda discovers the woman was pregnant and hiding a stash of drugs prescribed to Edward—she can’t help but wonder if her perfect husband has a fatal flaw. And if he can’t resist temptation under their own roof, what does he get up to when he travels?Camille Kemble also has questions for Edward. Recently returned to Singapore, Camille is determined to resolve a family mystery. Amid a jumble of faded childhood memories, she keeps seeing Edward’s handsome face. And she wants to know why.For one woman, the search for answers threatens everything she has. For another, it’s the key to all she lost. Both will follow his trail of secrets into the darkness to find the truth.

The Trailing Spouse Details

TitleThe Trailing Spouse
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 14th, 2018
PublisherLake Union Publishing
Rating
GenreFiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Mystery

The Trailing Spouse Review

  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    "Nobody in Singapore drinks Singapore Slings." (Anthony Bourdain)Is this all an elusion of the beauty, the jaw-dropping landscapes, and the towering buildings created from an architect's dream? Singapore seems to hide secrets well within its tropical foliage and its darkened streets have very limited access.Amanda Bonham knows this full-on. She's the wife who trails behind her husband's successes in foreign lands. Ed Bonham rests on the laurels of being an ex pat pilot who brokers sales of priva "Nobody in Singapore drinks Singapore Slings." (Anthony Bourdain)Is this all an elusion of the beauty, the jaw-dropping landscapes, and the towering buildings created from an architect's dream? Singapore seems to hide secrets well within its tropical foliage and its darkened streets have very limited access.Amanda Bonham knows this full-on. She's the wife who trails behind her husband's successes in foreign lands. Ed Bonham rests on the laurels of being an ex pat pilot who brokers sales of private jets. Amanda knows that she's been limited in her own career by strict Singapore laws of employment as a dependant of Ed's. Singapore can show you the Exit sign in a heartbeat.With no other options, Amanda spends her days as step-mother to seventeen year old Josie who is overflowing with teenage angst and spoiled by her doting father. Her days are spent sorting through a closet full of designer clothes and handbags. She's constantly online seeking advice from fellow ex pat spouses. But Amanda has a dark secret that even Ed doesn't realize. She's selling his expensive gifts online in order to continue to pay for IVF treatments after three miscarriages. Ed won't even consider adoption. Now if you think that this is the height of the problems of being Amanda, you are definitely wrong. The story opens with the apparent suicide of their live-in maid. Amanda was the one to come across the body. She later finds Ed's prescription drugs in Awri's room. Why? As Ed flies out to his business destinations, bodies of young women are being found in the same hotels that Ed stayed in. Amanda is now panicking. Could Ed be connected somehow? Jo Furniss adds more tension to this storyline with a parallel thread. Camille Kemble was raised in Singapore since she was a child. Her yacht leasing parents suddenly disappeared when she was ten. Camille works as a press officer for the British High Commissions. She accompanies her boss to the crime scene of Awri's death. Something about Ed is familiar. But what?Furniss presents a top-draw thriller here. Her research is quite thorough in Singapore customs, laws, and social mores. The Singapore setting adds just the right amount of snap and the chosen characters deliver straight out. Furniss builds upon the tension with each new scene of action. She pulls the reader into the escalating onset of no return. Quite the unexpected little treasure of a read.I received a copy of The Trailing Spouse through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Lake Union Publishing and to Jo Furniss for the opportunity.
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  • Berit☀️✨
    January 1, 1970
    4 Singapore Stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟A “trailing spouse“ is someone who follows their significant other to another country for work... this was a compelling domestic thriller... but I really enjoyed learning about the ex-pat life in Singapore.... in Singapore if you are the significant other you are considered a “dependent“ and you basically have no rights... can’t imagine being an independent successful woman and moving to Singapore for your husband’s job where all the sudden you are considered a second-class 4 Singapore Stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟A “trailing spouse“ is someone who follows their significant other to another country for work... this was a compelling domestic thriller... but I really enjoyed learning about the ex-pat life in Singapore.... in Singapore if you are the significant other you are considered a “dependent“ and you basically have no rights... can’t imagine being an independent successful woman and moving to Singapore for your husband’s job where all the sudden you are considered a second-class citizen, that would be tough!In this book our trailing spouse is Amanda... Amanda appears to have it all a loving husband, a darling stepdaughter, and a beautiful high-rise apartment.... she’s got Prada... she’s got Gucci... she’s got Louis Vuitton... but what she doesn’t have is a child of her own.... I really found Amanda a very empathetic character, her plight for a baby was so powerful....This Book is told from dual points of view... Amanda of course, and Camille... Camille is obsessed with her past and what really happened to her parents.... after meeting Ed Amanda‘s husband, Camille is convinced he is the key to her past... camille’s character wasn’t quite as interesting to me, admittedly I did enjoy Amanda story more in this book.... but I can see where someone else would see it completely differently.... also both of these characters were very essential to the story....The story starts out with Ed and Amanda’s “helper“ taking her life by swallowing bleach.... I really cannot imagine a worse way to go and this was a very impactful start to the story.... Camille volunteers for an agency who looks out for immigrant workers and that’s what brings her into the lives of Ed and Amanda.... that is really all I’m going to say about the plot.... you really need to read the book to find out what happens... was this really suicide? Or something more sinister? this sure was a book filled with secrets and misdirection.... not only were we the readers misdirected but so were the characters... I was convinced the story was going one way and then... BAM this book took a crazy turn and then kept turning until it came to an unbelievable end! Great book, spectacular ending!Absolutely recommend to fans of a well-done domestic thriller with the added bonus of the ex-pat Singapore culture....*** many thanks to Lake Union for my copy of this book ***
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  • Mackey
    January 1, 1970
    The Trailing Spouse follows the story of three characters, each of whom have a relationship with a man, Edward Bonham. Amanda, his wife, who traveled around the world to Singapore to be with Edward. She is "the trailing" spouse, a phrase used to describe the spouse who follows the person with a job wherever that job takes them. Here, Amanda has left Great Britain to move to Singapore, a city built on illusion, beautiful yet filled with horrors. This imagery is present throughout the marvelously The Trailing Spouse follows the story of three characters, each of whom have a relationship with a man, Edward Bonham. Amanda, his wife, who traveled around the world to Singapore to be with Edward. She is "the trailing" spouse, a phrase used to describe the spouse who follows the person with a job wherever that job takes them. Here, Amanda has left Great Britain to move to Singapore, a city built on illusion, beautiful yet filled with horrors. This imagery is present throughout the marvelously crafted story.  Camille Kimball has returned to Singapore to find answers from her childhood, her missing parents, and closure to her past. And, there is Josie, Edward's daughter who still is recovering from her mother's apparent suicide. Her relationship with Edward is a strange one, to say the least. As the story progresses, the web around these characters grows and becomes more intricately tangled until the climactic conclusion.  Furniss has woven a story that is both beautiful and frightenly realistic. Amanda is, at first, described as the very typical "trailing spouse" who is interested only in being in a glamorous place and with the money that most often goes with the move. These spouses have no rights, very little ability to work independently, in many countries - such as Singapore - they cannot have a bank account in their name or conduct financial transactions on their own. They are, therefore, totally reliant upon their spouses for all of their needs. After her maid, the helper, is found dead, Amanda's precarious life begins to unravel. As we watch her life come undone, we are left to ask ourselves "who is sane, who is not and how can we know who is telling the truth." The answers will shock you!  I will admit that I was fascinated with the story and its setting. I had heard from those who had traveled to Singapore about its beauty but, more often, about the illusion upon which this city is built. It has more millionaires and billionaires than any other country; it is, quite literally, one of the richest places on earth. And yet, its people have limited freedom and its immigrants, often used for servitude and menial jobs, are often abused and exploited. Furniss does an excellent job recreating this side of Singapore's tale. Her writing is skilled, filled with picturesque imagery and it was this  craftsmanship that elevated the book for me. However, there are parts that drag as a result of too much detail. There were times that I really did not want to read another word about Amanda's embryos calling out to her or dancing in the freezer.  While this storyline added depth to Amanda's character, it wasn't entirely necessary to the actual plot so, for me, it dragged on too long and too often. It does not take away from the overall suspense of the book, but it does keep it from being a non-stop, page turning thriller. Despite this, I loved the book and absolutely recommend it for all who enjoy suspenseful tales. You won't be disappointed. 
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  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    Oh how I do love it when a domestic thriller surprises me. I was expecting the typical story as there has been an abundance lately in the thriller world but nope! Here's something a little bit different that will surprise and please thriller lovers everywhere.What I loved was the expat life and the different rules that apply when living overseas. Coming from a military family and having expat friends all over the world, I all too well know how this can go so it's fascinating and fun to see in a Oh how I do love it when a domestic thriller surprises me. I was expecting the typical story as there has been an abundance lately in the thriller world but nope! Here's something a little bit different that will surprise and please thriller lovers everywhere.What I loved was the expat life and the different rules that apply when living overseas. Coming from a military family and having expat friends all over the world, I all too well know how this can go so it's fascinating and fun to see in a novel. This story bounces between Amanda and Camille - Amanda, a "trailing spouse" (I actually just learned this terminology and it is SO FITTING), having marital and reproduction problems, whose maid just committed suicide by drinking bleach (I'm not sure I can think of much worst ways to kill yourself) and Camille, obsessed with what happened with her parents. Both in Singapore, their paths cross and will change their lives irrevocably. I honestly didn't see that ending coming. I knew there was something weird.. I KNEW IT... but yeah, THAT wasn't quite what I was expecting though I had an inkling. Am I losing you yet? Read the book so you know what I'm saying! This moves at a great pace and you end up being just as confused and misdirected as the characters - personally, I love that.Thank you to Lake Union Publishing and Random Things Tours for this copy <3
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  • Ann Marie (Lit·Wit·Wine·Dine)
    January 1, 1970
    There's a U.S. only GIVEAWAY for this one on my Instagram account!Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Trailing Spouse by Jo Furniss. I’m very happy to be sharing my thoughts on this book as I thoroughly enjoyed it! I’ve been on a roll – in a good way – with thrillers lately and this book was no exception. And can I just say… COVER LOVE!The Trailing Spouse is original in a number of ways. The first is the setting. I don’t think I’ve ever read a book set in Singapore. I enjoyed learning a There's a U.S. only GIVEAWAY for this one on my Instagram account!Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Trailing Spouse by Jo Furniss. I’m very happy to be sharing my thoughts on this book as I thoroughly enjoyed it! I’ve been on a roll – in a good way – with thrillers lately and this book was no exception. And can I just say… COVER LOVE!The Trailing Spouse is original in a number of ways. The first is the setting. I don’t think I’ve ever read a book set in Singapore. I enjoyed learning a little about the culture and ex-pat life. Next, and most importantly, is the plot. This book has a lot going on. There are at least 3, you could maybe say 4, mysteries with this mystery/domestic thriller. The phrase “falling down the rabbit hole” came to mind as the pace quickened about 1/3 of the way in. And I just kept falling, and falling, and falling. In the past I’ve been critical of a few books with a similar number of subplots. I felt these books tried too hard, opining that the authors need to reel in their imaginations. For whatever reason, Jo Furniss has managed to pull it off!Meticulous character development ensured non-stop head spinning. Who should I be rooting for? Who should I suspect? While I had a slight inkling of where one of the lines might be going, I was truly conflicted about the “main event” until the very end. Ancillary characters where just as carefully rendered and helped to create a level on depth not always present in this genre. I would definitely place The Trailing Spouse on the “smart” side of the spectrum.I’d not read Jo Furniss’s previous novel, All the Little Children, but reading this book has made me add it to my already toppling TBR. I’d certainly be very happy to read her future work.4.5/5 starsMany thanks to Anne Cater at Random Things Blog Tours and Lake Union Publishing for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.You can read all of my reviews at www.litwitwinedine.com
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  • Nicki
    January 1, 1970
    This mesmerising character driven drama is the twisty tale of two women's obsessive search for the truth. For Amanda the answers to her questions could result in the lose of everything. For Camille it's the key to all that she lost years ago.The chapters are written in varying lengths and alternate between Amanda and Camille.Amanda's perfect ex pat life in her high rise condo starts to unravel when her helper Awmi dies in an apparent suicide.Some prescription drugs belonging to Amanda's husband This mesmerising character driven drama is the twisty tale of two women's obsessive search for the truth. For Amanda the answers to her questions could result in the lose of everything. For Camille it's the key to all that she lost years ago.The chapters are written in varying lengths and alternate between Amanda and Camille.Amanda's perfect ex pat life in her high rise condo starts to unravel when her helper Awmi dies in an apparent suicide.Some prescription drugs belonging to Amanda's husband Edward are found in the maids room and then Amanda is informed that Awmi was pregnant. Amanda begins to have doubts about her handsome husband. If he can't resist temptation under their own roof then what does he get up to when he is away on his travels for work. When she starts to uncover the possibility that Edward might be involved in a series of terrifying crimes,Amanda finds herself feeling more and more isolated. Trapped in her luxurious apartment with its stunning views of the ships in the harbour,she is like a bird trapped in a gilded cage. As a trailing wife she has no rights and can't even get access to her own money. She also doesn't want to leave her seventeen year old step daughter Josie. The poor girl has had enough trauma in her life,her mother committed suicide three years ago and now their maid has just killed herself. It's no wonder that the poor girl's behaviour has suddenly gone off the rails. With her father always away,she needs to know that she has the support of at least one of her parents. Our second protagonist Camille is a press officer who works for the British High Commission as well as being a volunteer at HELP,an organisation that campaigned for the rights of foreign domestic workers.Camille grew up in Singapore but was sent away to boarding school after her parents mysteriously disappeared when she was ten years old.She has just returned after fifteen years and is determined to solve the mystery of what happened to her parents all those years ago. When Camille is sent to Amanda and Ed`s apartment after Ahmi`s body is discovered,she is shocked to discover that she recognises Ed. She is certain that he knew her parents and therefore has the answers to some of the questions that have plagued her for so many years.Although I had mixed feelings about her character and didn't like her at times,Amanda's chapters were my favourite parts of the story. Ed certainly had issues but was he really capable of committing the crimes that Amanda suspected him of committing? What was the significance of the mysterious countdown on Josie`s blog? So much mystery and intrigue whereas I wasn't drawn into Camille`s story. I enjoyed her parts of the story enough that I wasn't tempted to skim read or skip any of her chapters,I just didn't care what the outcome of her story was going to be.This is a well written,character driven,twisty,thought provoking drama that culminates in a conclusion that is shocking and intense. Although I personally enjoyed some parts more than others,I did enjoy this book and would gladly recommend it to other thriller readers.Many thanks to Lake Union Publishing and Anne Cater for the opportunity to read and review this thriller and the opportunity to take part in the blog tour
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  • Hannelore Cheney
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for the eARC.This is my favorite read of the year so far, I loved it.Amanda has left her life behind in England to marry her dream husband, Ed. They live in Singapore in a luxurious apartment, complete with a live-in 'helper' (maid) and Ed's teenage daughter, Josie. Ed travels an enormous amount for business and always brings back expensive presents for Amanda. Life is perfect until their helper Ahmi commits suicide and it turns out she was pregnant. Thank you NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for the eARC.This is my favorite read of the year so far, I loved it.Amanda has left her life behind in England to marry her dream husband, Ed. They live in Singapore in a luxurious apartment, complete with a live-in 'helper' (maid) and Ed's teenage daughter, Josie. Ed travels an enormous amount for business and always brings back expensive presents for Amanda. Life is perfect until their helper Ahmi commits suicide and it turns out she was pregnant. This is the start of the nightmare that becomes Amanda's life.Camille grew up in Singapore until she was 10, when her parents went missing and she and her brother returned to England. The next 15 years her life was miserable, she couldn't get over the mystery of her parent's disappearance, so returns to Singapore, determined to find answers. Her job at the British High Commission means she ends up at Amanda's and Ed's apartment after Ahmi's suicide where, on meeting Ed, she instinctively knows she's met Ed before...Was it with her parents?As an expat brat (in Mumbai), I was riveted from the very start of the book. The descriptions of the life of the expats are slightly unnerving, especially in regard to the 'trailing' wives. Legally they have no rights without their husband's o.k., and even though Singapore is the safest city in the world, I couldn't shake a feeling of dread that accelerated as the story continued. As an adult looking back to my happy childhood in India I realized the atmosphere (and cloying heat) was the same, but I lived in the innocent bubble of childhood and the selfish teenage years; totally unaware of the realities of life around me.The characterizations were excellent, the two women and their obsessions understandable even though they make you cringe at times. I did find Amanda annoying at times, she was so caught up in her obsessions, she made thoughtless fatal mistakes, teetering on the edge of sanity. Camille was more sympathetic to me, trying to find the closure she's sought for so long.The ending was a shocker, wow! This is such a great book, I would love to give it more than 5 stars, so I give it 5+++, highly recommended!
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  • Louise Beech
    January 1, 1970
    The writing was so beautiful - the kind with lines you read back again and again - that the reveals in the story came as a complete surprise. Furniss is a master storyteller. Highly recommend.
  • Julie Parks
    January 1, 1970
    This is a captivating and engaging marital drama that makes you feel pity a lot. I think the best thing about this book was the emotional portrayal of an expat life in Singapore. I loved it. I've never been but between the pages of this book, I was really there. And that made the story so much more real, adding it a dense layer of genuine human spirit.Thank you NetGalley for the chance to read this.
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  • Joanne Robertson
    January 1, 1970
    I read All The Little Children earlier on this year and really enjoyed it although I found it very difficult to work out which genre to file it under. The Trailing Spouse is much easier to pigeonhole as a domestic thriller but don’t expect your usual run of the mill drama as it definitely brings something very special to the genre!Told from the viewpoint of two women living in Singapore, the expat community is perfectly explored through their eyes. Amanda is enjoying a wonderful lifestyle marrie I read All The Little Children earlier on this year and really enjoyed it although I found it very difficult to work out which genre to file it under. The Trailing Spouse is much easier to pigeonhole as a domestic thriller but don’t expect your usual run of the mill drama as it definitely brings something very special to the genre!Told from the viewpoint of two women living in Singapore, the expat community is perfectly explored through their eyes. Amanda is enjoying a wonderful lifestyle married to the very generous Edward, and being stepmother to his teenage daughter Josie. They have a maid but it’s the suicide of this young woman that sets in motion a series of events to threaten Amanda’s idyllic existence. Is her perfect husband hiding something from her? Camille is also investigating Edward after recognising his face from her past and as the two women search for answers there are some shocking twists that threaten to change their lives forever.I could not put this book down for one minute! As I read it until the early hours of the morning, I was desperate to discover the secrets that hid behind the glamorous and often bitchy expat lifestyle in Singapore. I thought it was a detailed and realistic portrayal of English speaking women abroad who often take second place to their husbands jobs and the related social networking. And don’t get me started on their finances!! The fact that they had maids as well meant that they even more time on their hands to fill their boring lives. Amanda wasn’t always an incredibly likeable character (in fact I don’t think many of them were!) but I did get behind her as she tried to get to the bottom of her maids supposed suicide. Camille was much more sympathetic in my opinion and helped to balance out the exceptional characterisation that drove The Trailing Spouse. There were some gasp-out-loud twists for me as this dark and oppressive drama built up to its climax.Jo Furniss has definitely found her niche here as this book showed off her exquisitely crafted storylines and well written narrative to perfection. It surprised me which doesn’t happen very often and is one of those books that will stay with me long after I have finished reading it.Highly recommended by me!
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  • Beverley
    January 1, 1970
    Earlier this year I read and reviewed All The Little Children by Jo Furniss and really enjoyed the clever slice of dystopian fiction. Her latest novel, The Trailing Spouse is different in both tone and style and could be described as a domestic thriller. Set in Singapore it explores the lives of two women; Amanda and Camille, who are both British expats. Amanda is married to Edward and lives with him and his teenage daughter Josie, in a beautiful apartment. When their maid commits suicide their Earlier this year I read and reviewed All The Little Children by Jo Furniss and really enjoyed the clever slice of dystopian fiction. Her latest novel, The Trailing Spouse is different in both tone and style and could be described as a domestic thriller. Set in Singapore it explores the lives of two women; Amanda and Camille, who are both British expats. Amanda is married to Edward and lives with him and his teenage daughter Josie, in a beautiful apartment. When their maid commits suicide their perfectly balanced life is unsettled with the visit of Camille who is sent to visit the family as part of the investigations. She recognises Edward and thinks that he may be able to shed light on the events in her childhood that have haunted her into adulthood but she is unsure if he is all that he seems.This is a book that is led by two strong female protagonists who were at first glance very different; career woman Camille versus kept wife Amanda, but in reality they are very similar. They have both had difficult paths which have motivated their futures and the choices they have made in life. I really liked both of them and found them to be well drawn and realistic. I also found that Amanda’s relationship with her step-daughter was brilliantly written – Josie is a typical prickly teenage girl who is full of secrets. Her mother is dead and Amanda is an interloper into the world she and her dad have created. I loved the way the dance between these two was depicted with missteps and boundaries being both respected and crossed.I think for me, the part I found most terrifying, was the erosion of power if you are a trailing spouse in Singapore. Amanda is deemed to be a dependent who does not have any rights and her days are spent in the gilded cage of their apartment or meeting with other women who are also trailing spouses. Facebook groups are filled with wives who gossip and snark at one another and for whom life is one long game of one-upmanship; the right clothes, the right shoes, the right brands and being seen in the right bars and restaurants. This glimpse into a world which appears to be beautiful and envy inducing is, when you scratch the surface, rotten. Amanda knows how precarious her situation is so turns a blind eye to Edward’s suspicious behaviour, but is this the right thing to do?The death of their maid is a catalyst for the unravelling of Amanda’s life. A postmortem reveals that the maid was pregnant, Amanda discovers condoms in her husband’s washbag, prescription pills belonging to him in the maid’s belongings and when she sees a photo of him on the Facebook group dancing with a woman in a strip club she starts to put together a picture of Edward that she doesn’t really like. Once she starts to pick she finds out more and more about his life and she wonders if he is linked to some heinous crimes. Is he capable of those things? How well does she know him really?I really can’t tell you anymore than this as it will spoil what is a great read and an accomplished thriller. I loved the setting of the book as it was so different and I really felt like I was there in Singapore. It also had the benefit of disorientating me so when the shocks came I was totally blindsided. This is an excellently plotted and paced book with lots going on and I found it to be a clever and insightful piece of fiction which ticked lots of boxes for me.
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  • Imogen
    January 1, 1970
    I have never been to Singapore nor been part of the expat community there but having read The Trailing Spouse by Jo Furniss it really feels as though I have. The author describes the setting of the book- the heat, the frustrations with bureaucracy, the back-biting – so evocatively and with such great insight that it almost becomes a character in its own right. The story itself twists and turns quickly, leaving the reader breathless and desperate to work out who is telling the truth and who canno I have never been to Singapore nor been part of the expat community there but having read The Trailing Spouse by Jo Furniss it really feels as though I have. The author describes the setting of the book- the heat, the frustrations with bureaucracy, the back-biting – so evocatively and with such great insight that it almost becomes a character in its own right. The story itself twists and turns quickly, leaving the reader breathless and desperate to work out who is telling the truth and who cannot be trusted. A fascinating read. I received an ARC from NetGalley in return for an honest review.
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  • Amber Cowie
    January 1, 1970
    Furniss has created a world that is magical and eerie in the ex-pat community of Singapore. Using beautiful, intricate language and spellbinding plot points, this quiet thriller left me in awe. Like Mary Kubica, Emily Carpenter and Megan Abbott, Furniss' writing is subtle, haunting and mesmerizing.
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  • Kerry
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! What a jaw dropping conclusion to what is a tense and suspenseful story.Amanda Bonham is an expat, married to Edward, living in Singapore. She is step-mother to his teenage daughter, Josie, but desperate for their own baby. To others they probably seem like they have the perfect life, but Amanda doesn't cope well with Edward spending so much time away. When their maid (apparently) commits suicide in their house she isn't convinced and her suspicious mind starts to consume her. She also stru Wow! What a jaw dropping conclusion to what is a tense and suspenseful story.Amanda Bonham is an expat, married to Edward, living in Singapore. She is step-mother to his teenage daughter, Josie, but desperate for their own baby. To others they probably seem like they have the perfect life, but Amanda doesn't cope well with Edward spending so much time away. When their maid (apparently) commits suicide in their house she isn't convinced and her suspicious mind starts to consume her. She also struggles to connect with Josie, although I don't think there's anything particularly unusual about that. I can't say I particularly warmed to Amanda, but I could empathise with her lonely lifestyle. Their luxury apartment should have seemed enviable, but somehow I almost felt claustrophobic whenever it was described. Not somewhere I would like to live, at all. I have lived in different counties with my husband, when he was a serving soldier, but I don't think I would have coped with a posting abroad if he was to be away for most of it, however much he got paid!I didn't warm to Edward at all, but he is a fascinating character. He comes across as arrogant and self-absorbed and almost seems like he thinks Amanda should be thankful she has him, until he meets Camille and we see a slightly different side to him. He makes you question if you can ever really know someone though.Josie comes across as a typical teenager, acting out after the death of their maid. Amanda is torn between trying to take care of her and trying not to be over protective.Camille is another interesting character with a different tie to Edward Bonham. He seems so familiar to her and she needs to know why. Could he know what happened to her missing parents? This book is so full of secrets and lies, I didn't know what to believe one minute to the next. It has kept me on the edge of my seat as I was desperate to find out what was going on.Intelligently written with intriguing characters and a fascinating plot, it certainly kept me guessing. I highly recommend.https://chataboutbooks.wordpress.com/...
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  • Fiona Mitchell
    January 1, 1970
    The pages of Furniss’ book brim with all the colour and humidity of Singapore, and having lived in the country for almost three years, what a pleasure it was to go back. Furniss gives voice to the challenges faced by the thousands of foreign domestic helpers working there through one of her main characters Camille, a volunteer for an organisation that campaigns for helpers’ rights. But for me, it’s Amanda that steals the show. She’s rather dislikable, yet utterly compelling. Pushed into being a The pages of Furniss’ book brim with all the colour and humidity of Singapore, and having lived in the country for almost three years, what a pleasure it was to go back. Furniss gives voice to the challenges faced by the thousands of foreign domestic helpers working there through one of her main characters Camille, a volunteer for an organisation that campaigns for helpers’ rights. But for me, it’s Amanda that steals the show. She’s rather dislikable, yet utterly compelling. Pushed into being a stay-at-home wife by Singapore’s restrictive employment laws, her life centres around lunches, expat online forums and the secret she’s keeping from her husband - she’s selling the gifts that he buys her to pay for IVF treatment. What a fine writer Furniss is, and there’s lots of beautiful lines in this book. A most enjoyable read.
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  • Amiee
    January 1, 1970
    I was basically thinking about the other books on my TBR that i wasn’t reading because I was reading this crap book!So mad.
  • Cheryl M-M
    January 1, 1970
    The paths and stories of two women collide in this thriller. The common denominator between Amanda and Camille is Amanda’s husband Edward. The man Amanda knows as a loving single parent and supposedly caring husband appears to be hiding a double-life. Is he hiding a more sinister side to his personality or is Amanda just paranoid, because their live-in maid took her life in the most horrific manner.Camille is trying to solve the disappearance of her parents, which happened over a decade ago. She The paths and stories of two women collide in this thriller. The common denominator between Amanda and Camille is Amanda’s husband Edward. The man Amanda knows as a loving single parent and supposedly caring husband appears to be hiding a double-life. Is he hiding a more sinister side to his personality or is Amanda just paranoid, because their live-in maid took her life in the most horrific manner.Camille is trying to solve the disappearance of her parents, which happened over a decade ago. She uses the death of the maid to connect with the man she thinks she remembers in relation to her parents. Does he have any answers for her or is he just another dead end?One of the elements I enjoyed in this story was the situation of ex-pats (expatriate – a person temporarily or permanently residing in a country other than their native country) and their dependants. It takes one to know one, so some of the situations and dialogues had me nodding along the way. I know a lot of ex-pats who don’t realise why it is important to integrate in their country of residence, as opposed to pretending they are still part of some ‘jewel in the crown’ and living in their little Britain away from home.Although I will say that there are behaviours and attitudes more specific to certain countries, especially Asia. There is almost an inbred sense of colonialism, an attitude of superiority and of first class human beings living among the inferior. That attitude speaks to the way the ex-pats treat the natives who work for them, often treated no better than slaves or unwilling captives.Furniss presents a slow burning read that lets the reader become almost comfortable and complacent in the exotic aura of the surroundings, despite the crispy white starched collar feel of the characters. The truth lurks in the background and is easy to ascertain if you read between the lines. If you don’t then it will probably bite you in the butt while you are looking in the wrong direction.It’s more of a subtle read, like the salt on your margarita glass, you don’t taste the salt until you have tasted the sugary sweet of the drink. A thriller, I agree, and yet it is so much more than that.*I received a copy courtesy of the author*
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  • Mystica
    January 1, 1970
    Singapore can be a dream destination for many. For expatriate workers too, life can seem to be an endless round of relaxation and parties and the very good life. For the blue collar workers it may not be so.Wives who are not working in Singapore are there at the mercy of their husbands. If the husbands visa is revoked, they have thirty days grace to get out of Singapore. Amanda lives a luxurious life with her husband and their step daughter. It is not an ideal relationship but Amanda tries to ma Singapore can be a dream destination for many. For expatriate workers too, life can seem to be an endless round of relaxation and parties and the very good life. For the blue collar workers it may not be so.Wives who are not working in Singapore are there at the mercy of their husbands. If the husbands visa is revoked, they have thirty days grace to get out of Singapore. Amanda lives a luxurious life with her husband and their step daughter. It is not an ideal relationship but Amanda tries to make it work. Their maid is Filipina and very pleasant with no signs of any dissent. When an apparent suicide takes place and her husband's medication is found in the maid's room, Amanda is left questioning her husband's past and present.We have Camille working for the British High Commission but whose sole purpose is to find out what happened to her parents when she was a child in Singapore. They disappeared and were never found. Camille is very sure they are alive. Somehow Edward Bonham Amanda's husband seems to be the link and little memories that were hidden now keep popping up.How Edward's secrets of so long ago are going to be an unexploded bomb in both Camille and Amanda's lives and the secrets of the maid's life are all innocently explained away but far too late for all of them. The story unravels slowly and though you think it is a huge conspiracy there is a simple explanation for it all. Unfortunately too late for many of the people in the story.Very well told and very descriptive of life in Singapore amongst the expat community.
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  • Cristie Underwood
    January 1, 1970
    Two women's lives collide in this suspenseful novel. The author wrote a brilliant book that has a well developed plot and characters. Definitely recommend!
  • Rhonda Lomazow
    January 1, 1970
    So well written so chilling.An expatriate in Singapore a woman living life in a foreign country with her family.When their maid turns up dead & pregnant her life all she knew falls apart is questioned.So well written so unputdownable.Highly recommend.#netgalley #lakeunionpublishing.
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  • Leanna Mattea
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from Net Galley for my honest review. This is a well written mystery, set in the expatriate community of Singapore. Amanda lives with her husband Ed and step daughter Josie, who is still recovering from her mother’s suicide 3 years earlier. Their lives seem ideal until the apparent suicide of their foreign house helper, as their lives begin to unravel. Amanda suspects Ed may have been involved and begins to monitor His frequent business travels, with suspicions of infidelity, I received this ARC from Net Galley for my honest review. This is a well written mystery, set in the expatriate community of Singapore. Amanda lives with her husband Ed and step daughter Josie, who is still recovering from her mother’s suicide 3 years earlier. Their lives seem ideal until the apparent suicide of their foreign house helper, as their lives begin to unravel. Amanda suspects Ed may have been involved and begins to monitor His frequent business travels, with suspicions of infidelity, drugs and criminal activity. Meanwhile Josie is experimenting with a dark web blog that leaves her vulnerable and in trouble at school. Camille is a young women that is working for a government agency and volunteering for a crises group for foreign workers, while trying to find answers about her parents disappearance 15 years earlier. This is a real twister with complicated characters that drew me into the story. A real page turner until the unexpected conclusion. Excellent writing that immerses you into the shaky expatriate lifestyle. I enjoyed the opportunity to review it and know readers will enjoy this book.
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  • Karen Cole
    January 1, 1970
    Amanda Bonham is a trailing spouse which means she has left her old life in London to be with her husband, Edward who lives in Singapore. At first glance it would appear that Amanda leads a charmed life; she has money, an attractive husband and a beautiful apartment. However, when she finds condoms in her husband's travel bag she suspects he may cheating on her when he travels away for business. Before she has time to decide what to do their young maid, Awmi is found dead, presumably by suicide. Amanda Bonham is a trailing spouse which means she has left her old life in London to be with her husband, Edward who lives in Singapore. At first glance it would appear that Amanda leads a charmed life; she has money, an attractive husband and a beautiful apartment. However, when she finds condoms in her husband's travel bag she suspects he may cheating on her when he travels away for business. Before she has time to decide what to do their young maid, Awmi is found dead, presumably by suicide. She discovers that Awmi was pregnant and when a stash of drugs prescribed to Ed is found in her room, Amanda begins to wonder just how well she knows her husband. She's his second marriage but did his first wife really die by suicide as Amanda has been led to believe? As she begins to look more closely at his activities, she starts to fear for the safety of herself and her stepdaughter. Josie's behaviour means she isn't a particularly easy character to like - she's belligerent and secretive but is she just another teenager acting out or does her behaviour suggest a darker path?Camille Kemble works for the British High Commission and volunteers for HELP, an NGO which campaigns for the rights of foreign domestic workers - it's strikingly clear that there's a world of difference between expats and migrants in Singapore and yet as the book progresses the lines become more blurred as we learn how few rights those living in the country on a Dependent's Pass actually have. Amanda hears about a woman who has lived there for thirteen years but is given a month to leave after her husband is killed in an accident. As the book follows Amanda and Camille in turn it soon becomes obvious that the affluent lives of the expats may not be as trouble-free as it first appears. Not only do the trailing spouses have few rights but the community itself is a fragile one and is marked by gossip and competitiveness, based as it is on the constant movement of its members. Camille has her own investigation to pursue as she is tormented by the mystery of what happened to her parents fifteen years ago. Just a child when they disappeared, she is desperate to find out the truth and thinks she may have a lead when she realises Edward Bonham may be a face from her past.Both Camille and Amanda start from positions of relative disadvantage; one is hindered by her shaky memory of the past and her questions as to what her parents work really entailed, while the other realises that her discoveries could put her at risk, although quite what that risk could be is something she can't quite fully comprehend as the facade of her life begins to crumble. However, these are tenacious and ultimately strong women who keep pushing even if the simpler path would be to stop. Amanda is driven by a desire to have children but in the meantime struggles with her role as stepmother to Josie. She is never quite sure whether she is overstepping the mark, she wants to be there for her stepdaughter, particularly when she begins to suspect they are both in danger but she can't quite bridge the distance between them and continues to keep the girl at arm's length.The Trailing Spouse is a novel about relationships and they are so perceptively described throughout; this is domestic noir at its most insightful. As the story continues, Jo Furniss' knowledge of the area pays dividends and the humid setting is brought vividly to life, helping create an oppressive, almost feverish hue to the proceedings. The creeping sense of danger is like a vine from the jungle surrounding the city, unrelenting as it twists its way around all in its path. Shocking, immersive and convincing, The Trailing Spouse is a clever and beautifully written book. Highly recommended.
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  • Steph Lawrence
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank the author and Lake Union Publishing for the review copy which I won in a giveaway through Jo Furniss’ Facebook page. I give my honest opinion in this review.It’s my first by this author and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Told mostly in alternating chapters by Amanda and Camille. I found the story and background information very interesting. The expat community seems very tight knit. I have relatives who’ve lived in these kind of areas, working for the Foreign Office and in the p I would like to thank the author and Lake Union Publishing for the review copy which I won in a giveaway through Jo Furniss’ Facebook page. I give my honest opinion in this review.It’s my first by this author and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Told mostly in alternating chapters by Amanda and Camille. I found the story and background information very interesting. The expat community seems very tight knit. I have relatives who’ve lived in these kind of areas, working for the Foreign Office and in the private sector, with the domestic staff provided. I now realise that two of my relatives were the trailing spouse. I think I would struggle with the lack of independence if it wasn’t me with the work permit, but the rich trappings Amanda had would definitely help big-time.Cleverly told and eloquently written. The scenes around Singapore were so well described that I felt I was there.I think the cover is gorgeous too.Well-paced and kept me hooked, I thoroughly recommend this bookhttps://steflozbookblog.wordpress.com...
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  • Kaye
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed Jo Furniss's first novel, All the Little Children, so I was eager to read this, her second book. The Trailing Spouse was a delightful surprise: It's as well written as the first book, but had a starkly different voice, a different, exotic setting, and wildly different themes -- all of them engrossing.Some of my favorite bits: Furniss created male characters as compelling as the two female leads, Amanda and Camille. I was equally intrigued with Amanda's step-daughter and her I thoroughly enjoyed Jo Furniss's first novel, All the Little Children, so I was eager to read this, her second book. The Trailing Spouse was a delightful surprise: It's as well written as the first book, but had a starkly different voice, a different, exotic setting, and wildly different themes -- all of them engrossing.Some of my favorite bits: Furniss created male characters as compelling as the two female leads, Amanda and Camille. I was equally intrigued with Amanda's step-daughter and her mother. As a former American expat and military wife, I strongly identified with the dependency forced on the women who follow their husbands to other cultures. (It's all true, folks!) And the multi-layered culture shock, alien-ness and glamour of Singapore carried the story while the mystery (mysteries?) slowly developed. Then in the final 20%, the book took off, with one fully-plausible shock after another. I can't stop thinking about the issues woven through the story: domestic workers are exploited, yes -- but so are husbands and wives, by each other. I received an ARC of this book through NetGalley.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    ooh-ooh- read this one if you're looking for a thriller that will surprise you! The story starts wth the suicide of Amanda's maid- a critical person to the expat Singapore household, and rockets on from there. What happened? Amanda's stepdaughter Josie is deeply affected and she starts to spin, Amanda thinks, into a dark place. And what about her husband Edward? There's something odd there. At the same time, Camille, now an employee of the British government, is looking for her parents, still af ooh-ooh- read this one if you're looking for a thriller that will surprise you! The story starts wth the suicide of Amanda's maid- a critical person to the expat Singapore household, and rockets on from there. What happened? Amanda's stepdaughter Josie is deeply affected and she starts to spin, Amanda thinks, into a dark place. And what about her husband Edward? There's something odd there. At the same time, Camille, now an employee of the British government, is looking for her parents, still after they disappeared 15 years before. How these two strands come together will surprise you. They did me and I'm an inveterate reader of this genre. Furniss has captured the expat wife experience, the thriller, the golly, lots of other stuff in this terrific read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC>. This is a page turner!
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  • Joann
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed that this novel takes place in the big bustling multi-cultual city of Singapore. We have Amanda Bonham and her husband, Ed and his teen-age daughter, Josie. Oh, and yes, their maid who dies in an apparent suicide - and Amanda, the wife, discovers the woman was pregnant and hiding a stash of drugs that are prescribed to her husband, Ed. This was a thrilling book and I was really on board with everything and then the author really does a switcheroo that did me for a loop. I'm still debat I enjoyed that this novel takes place in the big bustling multi-cultual city of Singapore. We have Amanda Bonham and her husband, Ed and his teen-age daughter, Josie. Oh, and yes, their maid who dies in an apparent suicide - and Amanda, the wife, discovers the woman was pregnant and hiding a stash of drugs that are prescribed to her husband, Ed. This was a thrilling book and I was really on board with everything and then the author really does a switcheroo that did me for a loop. I'm still debating if I liked the ending or not? A solid 3.5 star.
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  • Bambi Rathman
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a little bit to get into this book but when I did, it was with a rush! I was taken on a trip to Singapore in a suspense/mystery that twisted and turned in ways I sure didn't expect. The main character, Amanda, had me guessing the plot and I sure didn't get it right. I like being surprised and this book had the surprises! This is a great book for readers who like a suspense/mystery/murder story. Just when you think you have it figured out....nope.....try again. There are multiple story It took me a little bit to get into this book but when I did, it was with a rush! I was taken on a trip to Singapore in a suspense/mystery that twisted and turned in ways I sure didn't expect. The main character, Amanda, had me guessing the plot and I sure didn't get it right. I like being surprised and this book had the surprises! This is a great book for readers who like a suspense/mystery/murder story. Just when you think you have it figured out....nope.....try again. There are multiple story lines that start out in the book and soon they become intertwined and connected. I enjoyed this book and I want to thank Netgalley and Lake Union for the opportunity to read it.
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  • Vincent Bange
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get an ARC of this brilliant novel and I couldn’t put it down. While this was a completely different type of story from her superb debut novel, All The Little Children, Jo Furniss continued her great storytelling in this page turning thriller. Furniss writes in a style that makes you WANT to read. In this novel she created a taut story that keeps you engrossed long past your bedtime. The premise of the story is highly intriguing yet not predictable and the characters are au I was lucky enough to get an ARC of this brilliant novel and I couldn’t put it down. While this was a completely different type of story from her superb debut novel, All The Little Children, Jo Furniss continued her great storytelling in this page turning thriller. Furniss writes in a style that makes you WANT to read. In this novel she created a taut story that keeps you engrossed long past your bedtime. The premise of the story is highly intriguing yet not predictable and the characters are authentic. I’m so happy that Jo Furniss decided to become a novelist and share her incredible talent with the world... I’m also Very Happy I was able to read this outstanding book early BUT now I have to wait even longer for her next page turner.... oh well, the wait will be worth it. Needless to say, The Trailing Spouse has my highest recommendation.
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a very engaging one, but it was so engaging that there were times I felt too emotional to continue in the world the author created. I am not quite sure how much was the book and how much was my emotions and the tiny portions of my own life and history that resonated with the characters in this book and their lives. At its simplest an least spoilery, I would describe this book as the story of a woman who has moved to another country coming to better know her husband and his daughter This book was a very engaging one, but it was so engaging that there were times I felt too emotional to continue in the world the author created. I am not quite sure how much was the book and how much was my emotions and the tiny portions of my own life and history that resonated with the characters in this book and their lives. At its simplest an least spoilery, I would describe this book as the story of a woman who has moved to another country coming to better know her husband and his daughter, as well as living in a country that both is and isn't her own.
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  • Noreen
    January 1, 1970
    The author does a great job in character development. It’s a mystery thriller to the end and it surprised me. I thought It dragged a little in the beginning until some of the action and suspicion started to unravel. Overall I really enjoyed this book. I received a copy from NetGalley and this review is my own.
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