The Bridge
More than 130 years after its completion, the Brooklyn Bridge remains one of the most extraordinary landmarks and symbols of Brooklyn and New York City—and the story behind this architectural marvel is just as extraordinary.The Brooklyn Bridge was originally designed by John Augustus Roebling, but it was his son, Washington, and his daughter-in-law, Emily, who oversaw the bridge’s construction. As work on the bridge went on, Washington developed caisson disease, leaving him bedridden for the majority of the bridge’s 14-year construction. Washington’s wife, Emily Roebling, took his place running the work site, deftly assuming the role of chief engineer, supervising the project and overseeing the workers, contractors, a hostile press, and greedy city politicians—an unusual position for a woman to take on at the time.In this inspiring graphic novel, author Peter J. Tomasi and illustrator Sara Duvall show the building of the Brooklyn Bridge as it has never been seen before, and the marriage of the Roeblings—based on intellectual equality and mutual support—that made the construction of this iconic structure possible.

The Bridge Details

TitleThe Bridge
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 17th, 2018
PublisherHarry N. Abrams
ISBN-139781419728525
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, History

The Bridge Review

  • Katie.dorny
    January 1, 1970
    Received an arc in exchange for an honest review.This was an enjoyable graphic novel about the building of Brooklyn Bridge. I literally knew nothing about this feat before starting the book and with that being said, i feel a hell of a lot more educated now. However, I'm still not the biggest fan of non-fiction but this did make the reading more enjoyable being in this format.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Being an architecture and engineering nerd, I found this book very entertaining. The Brooklyn Bridge is a remarkable feat of engineering especially considering it was built in the 1800's. Tomasi gives us great insight into just how dangerous the construction was and the forces needed to be overcome just to build the foundations of the bridge. It's really quite remarkable. Tomasi humanizes the story by focusing on it's chief engineer Washington Roebling and his wife Emily. During construction Was Being an architecture and engineering nerd, I found this book very entertaining. The Brooklyn Bridge is a remarkable feat of engineering especially considering it was built in the 1800's. Tomasi gives us great insight into just how dangerous the construction was and the forces needed to be overcome just to build the foundations of the bridge. It's really quite remarkable. Tomasi humanizes the story by focusing on it's chief engineer Washington Roebling and his wife Emily. During construction Washington became debilitated from the bends from coming and going in the high pressure areas needed to build the caissons, the foundations for the bridge. For the last 11 years of construction he supervised the bridge from his apartment with the aid of his wife who acted as the chief engineer on site. Sara DuVall's art is crisp and clear with smooth, clean lines. Highly recommended to anyone curious about the history of New York City or just architecture in general.
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  • Ron Samul
    January 1, 1970
    At a glance, we can look at buildings, memorials, and landmarks and immediately sense their place in the world. In this stunning graphic novel, The Bridge tells the story of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge through the family that made it all possible. Originally designed by John Augustus Roeblings, the Brooklyn Bridge became more than just one man’s obsession, but a family quest to see it through in a monumental vision of the impossible. In fact, it was John Roeblings son Washington who came back fro At a glance, we can look at buildings, memorials, and landmarks and immediately sense their place in the world. In this stunning graphic novel, The Bridge tells the story of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge through the family that made it all possible. Originally designed by John Augustus Roeblings, the Brooklyn Bridge became more than just one man’s obsession, but a family quest to see it through in a monumental vision of the impossible. In fact, it was John Roeblings son Washington who came back from the Civil War to take up this colossal municipal project. After working on the caissons and suffering from what would eventually be termed “Caisson Disease”, Washington Roeblings was bedridden with his chronic condition. Not to be defeated, he explained everything to his wife Emily who went to the site, supervised the construction, contractors, shifty politicians, and carried the weight of all those naysayers as they pushed to finish the project.While this book chronicles the historical elements of the bridge and its complicated engineering feats - this is a story of two people who married and brought their unending admiration for each other to this epic feat of design and engineering. While it spans over more than fourteen years, the story moves with clarity and purpose and it feels like no scene or idea is wasted in the telling. This is far from a historical lesson on the bridge construction, this is a story about two innovators, husband and wife, working together. It is their vision together that makes this story so compelling. This is a defining story about love and respect as much as it speaks to structural engineering and caisson building.Peter Tomasi, a superb storyteller known for his DC Comics influence and his distinction as a New York Times best-selling author, has shaped a stunning and epic story that turns an average, kind, and smart couple into a different kind of superhero, one based in history and the fate of a great city. Sara DuVall’s artwork is more than a compliment to this story. It seems that a story about engineering and building is illustrated with the precision and vision of a beautiful schematic for the story. The black and white illustrations are intentionally tall and elongated and really speak to a vision and style that matches the vision of the story being told. It is through the story and the illustrations that this story is a woven detailed history of two unlikely heroes and their journey from the shores of New York over a bridge to Brooklyn. This excellent graphic novel belongs on your spring reading list.For more reviews:https://ronsamulreview.blogspot.com
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I grew up on the West Coast of the United States. The big important bridge here is the Golden Gate Bridge. Many people think that the bridge itself is the Golden Gate, but the bay that it crosses is what bares that name. It was built during the depression, and despite it being there, along with the Bay Bridge, the Richmond Bridge, the San Mateo Bridge, and the San Rafael Bridge, ferry service still happens across the bay.When the start of this story happens, there are ferries that go across the I grew up on the West Coast of the United States. The big important bridge here is the Golden Gate Bridge. Many people think that the bridge itself is the Golden Gate, but the bay that it crosses is what bares that name. It was built during the depression, and despite it being there, along with the Bay Bridge, the Richmond Bridge, the San Mateo Bridge, and the San Rafael Bridge, ferry service still happens across the bay.When the start of this story happens, there are ferries that go across the East River, but because of the ice, they have trouble getting across, or the pilots can not stere, or they are drunk. For whatever reason, the father of Washington Roebling was not happy with the state of the ferry services, and so proposed that a bridge be built and he would design it, along with his son. This all was taking place a few years after the American Civil War, in 1869, and it was not completed until 1883. This was one of the first of its kind, and it killed many people, including, almost killing Washington Roebling himself. It is all an amazing story, filled with great detail, and tragedy, and joy, and all those things you want in a good story.That a great thing to have it in such an accessible book. It is a little wordy, for those who want to look at pictures only, you can get the heart of the story, just thumbing through it, but to find out the suffering, and courage it took to keep going, and completing the bridge, it helps if you read all the words.It was hard to choose which illustrations best represented what you would find in this book, but these are the ones I chose.A great way to learn about New York history.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York by Peter J. Tomasi I am a huge history buff and love to learn about different landmarks. This book is about the building of the Brooklyn Bridge. It is not really my type of book as it is done in Graphic novel or Comic book style. It was still a great book. It takes you from the beginning of the the idea by John Augustus Roebling to the completion 14 years later of the bridge which was oversaw by his son Washington, and his daughter-in- The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York by Peter J. Tomasi I am a huge history buff and love to learn about different landmarks. This book is about the building of the Brooklyn Bridge. It is not really my type of book as it is done in Graphic novel or Comic book style. It was still a great book. It takes you from the beginning of the the idea by John Augustus Roebling to the completion 14 years later of the bridge which was oversaw by his son Washington, and his daughter-in-law, Emily. This book is great for kids and adults alike. It is actually a very short read since most of the book is pictures. But it does give you all the information you need to understand the idea and need for the bridge, how the spot was chosen, and how the construction began and all the way through to the completion. The book tells of how Washington Roebling developed caisson disease and was pretty much bedridden for most of the 14 years it took to build the bridge but his wife Emily stepped up and pretty much became the chief engineer on site. At the time this was pretty much unheard of for a woman to take this type of role in well pretty much anything. This book really is worth the time it takes to read it and you come out on the other end knowing a lot about a iconic landmark in the United States history. I received this book from the Author or Publisher via Netgalley.com to read and review.
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Fourteen years, deaths, illnesses, corruption and kickbacks! Who knew a history of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge could be so interesting?It takes a family (and a lot of immigrants) to build the Brooklyn Bridge in The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York. The story begins when John Augustus and his son Washington Roebling are trapped by ice in a ferry from Brooklyn to New York City. Washington was still a high school student but he figured out how to free the ferry u Fourteen years, deaths, illnesses, corruption and kickbacks! Who knew a history of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge could be so interesting?It takes a family (and a lot of immigrants) to build the Brooklyn Bridge in The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York. The story begins when John Augustus and his son Washington Roebling are trapped by ice in a ferry from Brooklyn to New York City. Washington was still a high school student but he figured out how to free the ferry using materials on board. Later, Washington’s life is shown from college to war to marriage to a family of his own. Once the bridge construction begins, it is interesting how many new techniques are used. In the nineteenth century, America was inventive and proud of their new technologies. At times, politics and corruption appeared. However, the bridge continued to be built though behind schedule and over budget. Government hasn’t changed much in the past 130 years.This is a great adventure story. Sure everyone knows that the bridge was built. Few know the technology used to build it. I doubt that the loss of life and expense in 2018 dollars would allow it to be built today. It is a fascinating look at the hubris of early America, where anything seemed possible. It is also a unparalleled love story between Washington and his wife, Emily. Emily was willing to fight gender prejudice and high-powered politicians to ensure her husband’s dream reached fruition.Surprisingly, this is the first graphic novel to tackle the Brooklyn Bridge’s story. I think the beautiful art and color work add to the story. With only words, it would be difficult to imagine the toughness needed by the men to risk death and illness to dig the caissons that support the bridge. The partially completed scenes in The Bridge were particularly instructive. It didn’t take long to start to see its familiar shape.The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York is highly recommended for both graphic novel readers, students writing papers about the bridge’s construction and to anyone who wants a good read. 4 stars!Thanks to the publisher, Abrams Comic Arts, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.
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  • Swati
    January 1, 1970
    The Golden Gate suspension bridge in San Francisco is one of the most widely known icons of America for non-Americans. But the Brooklyn Bridge is not too far behind, with countless movies familiarizing it for those of us who have never visited New York or Brooklyn. The Bridge recounts the story of how this icon of America was built, and we see it through the wonderful sketches of Sara DuVall, and words of Peter J. Tomasi. It was a project of epic proportions, and one of great responsibility but The Golden Gate suspension bridge in San Francisco is one of the most widely known icons of America for non-Americans. But the Brooklyn Bridge is not too far behind, with countless movies familiarizing it for those of us who have never visited New York or Brooklyn. The Bridge recounts the story of how this icon of America was built, and we see it through the wonderful sketches of Sara DuVall, and words of Peter J. Tomasi. It was a project of epic proportions, and one of great responsibility but it appears that the Roebling family was the one best suited to execute it. Designed and envisioned by John Roebling, and made a reality by his son, Washington, the Brooklyn Bridge took 14 years to finish. In the process, workers fell sick and died, and Washington himself was rendered ill due to long hours spent at the site. Tomasi details the painstaking work that went behind the building of the bridge with a great passion, and I immensely enjoyed reading it. It is very clear that Tomasi himself is very invested in the city, and its landmarks from the minutiae that the book is filled with. But at times the same details, particularly concerning the engineering, made my mind wander. It did give an in-depth feel of what went into the building of the bridge but sometimes I wish there was more of the family in it. It was great to see that Washington's wife Emily played an important role in making his dream of building the bridge a reality but that aspect somehow felt incomplete. Emily was, no doubt, an exceptional woman given that she was able to handle complicated architectural desgins and make sense of them as well as manage the workers on the site, all of which was unheard of for women in those times. I wanted to know more about Emily other than the fact that she was a very devoted wife. What made her unconventional? What was Emily as an individual? I would have loved to know some of these aspects of her.Otherwise, this was a delightful read for me, and I look forward to more from Peter J Tomasi and Sara DuVall!Thank you NetGalley for sending me this book :)
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  • Wayne McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    'The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York' by Peter J. Tomasi with art by Sara DuVall is a wonderful non-fiction graphic novel.This is the story of how the Brooklyn Bridge was built. How a father named John Augustus Roebling conceived it, but also how his son Washington with Washington's wife Emily completed it. There are construction problems as the caissons are driven in to the river bed. There are political problems as the project runs over time and budget. There is scanda 'The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York' by Peter J. Tomasi with art by Sara DuVall is a wonderful non-fiction graphic novel.This is the story of how the Brooklyn Bridge was built. How a father named John Augustus Roebling conceived it, but also how his son Washington with Washington's wife Emily completed it. There are construction problems as the caissons are driven in to the river bed. There are political problems as the project runs over time and budget. There is scandal as one of the suppliers swaps out good materials for bad. It is about the men who gave their lives to build the bridge.The story is engaging and covers a lot of time, but moves along fluidly. The art is black and white lines, but perfect in form and fits the function of engineering. I learned things I never knew about the bridge, and I'm so very glad I got a chance to read this.I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Abrams ComicArts and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    This book is very strong. Tomasi builds the relationships very organically, giving John, Washington, and Emily each plenty of page time and establishing the connections between them. DuVall's artwork is very striking and clear, easy to read (there are a few small storytelling hitches - it's not really clear how John's foot is crushed, for example, or a building-site accident that is hard to follow, but those incidents are infrequent).The book is definitely worthwhile for anyone, but particularly This book is very strong. Tomasi builds the relationships very organically, giving John, Washington, and Emily each plenty of page time and establishing the connections between them. DuVall's artwork is very striking and clear, easy to read (there are a few small storytelling hitches - it's not really clear how John's foot is crushed, for example, or a building-site accident that is hard to follow, but those incidents are infrequent).The book is definitely worthwhile for anyone, but particularly those interested in local NYC history, engineering marvels, or simply a compelling family history.Advance PDF
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  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Tomasi tells a nice and tidy story about the toll building the Brooklyn Bridge had on the Roebling family. He manages to dredge up quite a lot of fascinating details and keeps the story flowing along quickly. While the artist's simple, minimalist style worked well enough on the characters and general layout, I found it quite lacking when depicting the architectural and engineering details at the heart of the story. A background artist extraordinaire like Gerhard from Cerebus could have taken thi Tomasi tells a nice and tidy story about the toll building the Brooklyn Bridge had on the Roebling family. He manages to dredge up quite a lot of fascinating details and keeps the story flowing along quickly. While the artist's simple, minimalist style worked well enough on the characters and general layout, I found it quite lacking when depicting the architectural and engineering details at the heart of the story. A background artist extraordinaire like Gerhard from Cerebus could have taken this book to the next level.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    On the evidence of an uncoloured proof, we have an enjoyable slice of history. It takes no side, as such, but rather gives us a very clear presentation of the times when the Brooklyn Bridge was being built, from deep under the river level in search of bedrock, to the times ships' masts were still interfering with the crew, to potentially lethal result. There will be people who wanted the feminism of the industrialist's wife helping him foregrounded, or this or that issue bolted on; as someone wh On the evidence of an uncoloured proof, we have an enjoyable slice of history. It takes no side, as such, but rather gives us a very clear presentation of the times when the Brooklyn Bridge was being built, from deep under the river level in search of bedrock, to the times ships' masts were still interfering with the crew, to potentially lethal result. There will be people who wanted the feminism of the industrialist's wife helping him foregrounded, or this or that issue bolted on; as someone who knew very little (and cared less) about the story, I think the straightforward approach is commendable. The politics of it all were sucky, the obstinacy of the couple involved deserve their place in history, and the awful adages, lessons and opinions offered by the father figure here clearly had a quite awesome outcome. It's surprising to read this book took almost as long as the bridge itself in being formed, but it too is worth it.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating way to learnI am sure there are more comprehensive books on the Brooklyn Bridge but this one told me a lot of what I wanted to know. I now have a better idea of the people involved and how the bridge was built. And l found, again, that learning history through a graphic novel is fun. Indeed, I had read and loved the graphic novel “The Invisible War: A Tale on Two Scales” and I hoped that The Bridge would be as good. I was not disappointed. I recommend this book for someone who wants Fascinating way to learnI am sure there are more comprehensive books on the Brooklyn Bridge but this one told me a lot of what I wanted to know. I now have a better idea of the people involved and how the bridge was built. And l found, again, that learning history through a graphic novel is fun. Indeed, I had read and loved the graphic novel “The Invisible War: A Tale on Two Scales” and I hoped that The Bridge would be as good. I was not disappointed. I recommend this book for someone who wants a quick history of the Brooklyn Bridge or is curious how history can be taught through graphic novels. Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book via Netgalley for review purposes.
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  • Zuberino
    January 1, 1970
    I haven’t read too many “graphic novels” in my time, Spiegelman’s Maus and Satrapi’s Persepolis standing out through their rarity. Ordinarily there would be no call for me to pick up this volume either, two days ago at my favourite used bookstore on Charing Cross Road, had it not been for the fact that I had come across the story of the Roeblings only very recently in Auster’s New York Trilogy and for the additional fact that I had just come back from a short (first) trip to Brooklyn just three I haven’t read too many “graphic novels” in my time, Spiegelman’s Maus and Satrapi’s Persepolis standing out through their rarity. Ordinarily there would be no call for me to pick up this volume either, two days ago at my favourite used bookstore on Charing Cross Road, had it not been for the fact that I had come across the story of the Roeblings only very recently in Auster’s New York Trilogy and for the additional fact that I had just come back from a short (first) trip to Brooklyn just three weeks ago. All in all, I was pretty primed to lift this chunky comicbook from the shelves - all 200 handsome pages of it - and boy am I glad I did. The Bridge is a story full of heart and humanity, a tale of what the best instincts in man - and yes, woman - can accomplish. Had it not been for the pivotal figure of wife Emily, bed-bound engineer Washington Roebling never would have been able to finish the Brooklyn Bridge! As far as Victorian feminist exploits go, therefore, this one is pretty fantastic. Small wonder that the NYT honoured Mrs Roebling with a (very) belated obituary a few weeks ago.The entire narrative arc - stretching from a wintry day in 1852 stuck on the icebound Fulton ferryboat to the gala opening, 31 years later, of the world’s biggest bridge, attended by a sitting US president and the mayor of Gotham - is told with great panache and, fittingly for its subject, careful attention to detail. Tomasi, a Manhattanite born and bred, is evidently no slouch at research, but he also has an eye for human drama - the bends, the deaths, the endless political shenanigans, the sturdy domesticity of the hero and the heroine. Inasmuch as is possible, he also supplies a decent overview of the severe technical challenges of such a monumental feat of engineering. Sara Duvall handles the artwork with the assurance of an experienced pro; if it hadn’t said so on the back flap, I’d never have believed this was her debut graphic novel! All in all, a very rewarding book - and all thanks to the miracle of chance encounters.
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  • thereadingowlvina (Elvina Ulrich)
    January 1, 1970
    The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the most iconic and oldest bridges in the United States. Although it was the brainchild of John Roebling, but it was his son Washington, and daughter-in-law Emily, who oversaw its construction and completion. However, when Washington's health deteriorated by Caisson disease, Emily with the guidance from Washington acquiescently became the engineer for the whole project until its completion. Behind every success story, there is a story of love, passion, determination The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the most iconic and oldest bridges in the United States. Although it was the brainchild of John Roebling, but it was his son Washington, and daughter-in-law Emily, who oversaw its construction and completion. However, when Washington's health deteriorated by Caisson disease, Emily with the guidance from Washington acquiescently became the engineer for the whole project until its completion. Behind every success story, there is a story of love, passion, determination, hope & sacrifice waiting to be told. Thus, through the black & white illustrations of this inspiring graphic novel, the author brilliantly chronicles this historical event from the bridge's inception in 1869 to its completion in 1883.I am quite the history buff and always enjoy history told through beautiful illustrations. The illustrations in this graphic novel accurately captured the era's setting. My only wish is that the illustrations are in colors. I enjoy the storytelling part albeit it was a little confusing for me in the first few pages. But read on! You will find that the story is intriguing specifically when Emily had to be the hands and feet of Washington. She had so much faith and hope in Washington's dream and was such a support to her husband. Their love for one another is an admirable one. The story on bridge construction (materials, calculations, etc) were quite insightful. I didn't know there were so much involved and the workers could also be at health risk, as they were infected with Caisson disease.In a nutshell, this graphic novel is a good way to learn about the history of Brooklyn Bridge. It is brief but insightful, and the language used was clean.***Sincere gratitude to NetGalley and the publisher for a free ecopy of this book in exchange for an honest review.***
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    I received this as an advanced copy from Netgalley.com for an honest review.There are countless stories rich in history interlaced in the concrete, wire, and foundations of human civilization;  whether it be a tower in Pisa or a bridge that spans the waters between New York City and Brooklyn; every brick, trestle, and pylon could tell a story.  It is up to us, the stewards of the past, to recognize, learn from, and appreciate these works.  We would not be where we are as a society without people I received this as an advanced copy from Netgalley.com for an honest review.There are countless stories rich in history interlaced in the concrete, wire, and foundations of human civilization;  whether it be a tower in Pisa or a bridge that spans the waters between New York City and Brooklyn; every brick, trestle, and pylon could tell a story.  It is up to us, the stewards of the past, to recognize, learn from, and appreciate these works.  We would not be where we are as a society without people like the Roeblings. I can now say after reading this novel the Roeblings are added in my mind to the likes of Guggenheim, Olmstead, and Vaux.The novel is not the dry telling of pounds per square inch of pressure in the caissons or the tensile strength of the wires; It is the story of a monumental project and the people who dedicated their lives to see it through. Specifically, a husband and wife team whose love and respect for each other are tantamount, as well as their mutual intelligence shines throughout the story much to the credit of the author Peter J. Tomasi. Graphically it is beautiful. They set the historical tone without being overly fussy and fastidious to detail. Sarah Duvall did her research into the period. Pictures of the bridge are not overly technical. I would assume this is a stylistic choice, yet they convey all the necessary information to the reader. This allows the story to move at a good place and pause when necessary for reflection. I would definitely recommend this to anyone who appreciates a good history lesson that is so intriguing it could be written as a work of fiction. I look forward to reading many more works by the author and enjoying the art of the illustrator.
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  • Janet Slipak
    January 1, 1970
    More than 130 years after its completion, the Brooklyn Bridge remains one of the most extraordinary landmarks and symbols of Brooklyn and New York City—and the story behind this architectural marvel is just as extraordinary.The Brooklyn Bridge was originally designed by John Augustus Roebling, but it was his son, Washington, and his daughter-in-law, Emily, who oversaw the bridge’s construction. As work on the bridge went on, Washington developed caisson disease, leaving him bedridden for the maj More than 130 years after its completion, the Brooklyn Bridge remains one of the most extraordinary landmarks and symbols of Brooklyn and New York City—and the story behind this architectural marvel is just as extraordinary.The Brooklyn Bridge was originally designed by John Augustus Roebling, but it was his son, Washington, and his daughter-in-law, Emily, who oversaw the bridge’s construction. As work on the bridge went on, Washington developed caisson disease, leaving him bedridden for the majority of the bridge’s 14-year construction. Washington’s wife, Emily Roebling, took his place running the work site, deftly assuming the role of chief engineer, supervising the project and overseeing the workers, contractors, a hostile press, and greedy city politicians—an unusual position for a woman to take on at the time.In this inspiring graphic novel, author Peter J. Tomasi and illustrator Sara Duvall show the building of the Brooklyn Bridge as it has never been seen before, and the marriage of the Roeblings—based on intellectual equality and mutual support—that made the construction of this iconic structure possible.Out for April 2018BIO"Peter J. Tomasi is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics."MY THOUGHTS:I was sent this ARC in exchange for my honest review. My family is always laughing at what I am reading next because it could be just about anything. I'm always with my head in a book, and they're always fascinated with what I discover and share. They both love to read too, so we share our fascinations with each other over the family meal or when we're out having a coffee or doing yardwork together. I have to admit that when I started reading "The Bridge," my husband thought I'd lost my mind lol--a Canadian reading about the Brooklyn Bridge. But this book is so much more than a book about a bridge in the United States.This book is also about a family, in particular a woman, who carried out something not heard of during this particular time in history. Yes, the building of the bridge is also really fascinating lol, but when John Roebling met an untimely death, it was up to his son and daughter-in-law to finish it. However, when the son became incapacitated from a debilitating illness, it was Emily Roebling, a woman in 1869 none-the-less, who deftly assumed the major role/the controlling role in the bridge's construction against all odds, contrite work crews who had to now answer to a woman, reluctant contractors, nasty and hostile press ("...what does a woman know about building bridges..."), and then, there were the greedy, lurking politicians waiting in the wings for her to fail so that they could take all the credit for the magnificent bridge slowly becoming erect across the East River.This is the story, that I was interested in. I was not disappointed in the least!A graphic novel (my uncorrected proof was in black and white) in full color filled with wonderful artwork and a great history lesson. I learned more about the people involved with building this bridge and what they (Emily especially) was up against. This should be a movie.Excellent work by both author and illustrator, this is highly recommended for everyone, not just graphic novel and history lovers. I would even recommend this book to schools.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you! I had entered the giveaway not realizing it was a graphic novel. I had never read one before. I enjoyed this very much.This is a very informative and entertaining work depicting the story of the Brooklyn Bridge, highlighting the role of Emily Roebling, wife of Washington Roebling the chief engineer. I am a former residents of Brooklyn Heights and I have long loved walking over and just looking at this marvelous, beautiful structure. I woul I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you! I had entered the giveaway not realizing it was a graphic novel. I had never read one before. I enjoyed this very much.This is a very informative and entertaining work depicting the story of the Brooklyn Bridge, highlighting the role of Emily Roebling, wife of Washington Roebling the chief engineer. I am a former residents of Brooklyn Heights and I have long loved walking over and just looking at this marvelous, beautiful structure. I would think this is a great book for anyone interested in engineering, especially a young person who might be interested in the field. And I mean "person" given Mrs. Roebling's role in finishing the bridge after her father-in-law's death and husband's illness.
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  • Geoffrey
    January 1, 1970
    (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)This was not the story that I anticipated. I admittedly expected a work that focused on the technical aspects of building the Brooklyn Bridge. What I found instead was a far more comprehensive story that not only told me everything that I needed to know on how one builds a massive bridge in the late 1880's, but told me this through the lens of an engaging, at times heart-rending, and beautiful story of the family th (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)This was not the story that I anticipated. I admittedly expected a work that focused on the technical aspects of building the Brooklyn Bridge. What I found instead was a far more comprehensive story that not only told me everything that I needed to know on how one builds a massive bridge in the late 1880's, but told me this through the lens of an engaging, at times heart-rending, and beautiful story of the family that saw this project through from start to finish. If anyone wants to know about how this iconic New York landmark came to be, I would highly recommend this work that so skillfully tells it on such a personal level.
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  • Cassandra
    January 1, 1970
    As a huge fan of all things New York, I jumped with excitement when I seen this graphic novel on NetGalley. This graphic novel shares the history behind the Brooklyn Bridge, and the family that built it. Starting off with a little family history of the Roeblings, then moving on to the 14 years of hard work and dedication it took to get that beautiful bridge safely standing. I thoroughly enjoyed the story, though i would have liked to see a little color in the illustrations. All in all, this is a As a huge fan of all things New York, I jumped with excitement when I seen this graphic novel on NetGalley. This graphic novel shares the history behind the Brooklyn Bridge, and the family that built it. Starting off with a little family history of the Roeblings, then moving on to the 14 years of hard work and dedication it took to get that beautiful bridge safely standing. I thoroughly enjoyed the story, though i would have liked to see a little color in the illustrations. All in all, this is a recommend from me. I received this from #NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kimmie
    January 1, 1970
    Lucky winner of an ARC given through goodreads giveaway. This is a very intriguing graphic novel about the engineer who constructed the brooklyn bridge. It's the true story of sheer determination of Washington and Emily Roebling and the roles each one played in the construction. Emily Roebling is an inspiration taking her husbands place and being the eyes and ears of the construction site (esp during the 1870s), while her husband was ill after working in the caisson. I will definitely read this Lucky winner of an ARC given through goodreads giveaway. This is a very intriguing graphic novel about the engineer who constructed the brooklyn bridge. It's the true story of sheer determination of Washington and Emily Roebling and the roles each one played in the construction. Emily Roebling is an inspiration taking her husbands place and being the eyes and ears of the construction site (esp during the 1870s), while her husband was ill after working in the caisson. I will definitely read this again and now appreciate knowing more about the construction of the beautiful Brooklyn Bridge.
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  • Linda Donohue
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting story about the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge. Intriguing was the dream of a gentleman which passed to his son and was concluded by the daughter-in-law. A hidden talent of a woman in the later 1800s. Tomasi brings forth a forgotten part of history. I received the book as a Goodreads Giveaway. I thank the author and publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book. This book belongs in New York City classrooms.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    This book is told in comic format. It Tells the story of the building of the bridge that connects Brooklyn and Manhattan. I really enjoyed the format and see this type of book as a way to get younger readers interested in historical stories like this. I received a free copy from Goodreads but my opinions are my own.
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    While my attention often strayed at the engineering details, I really liked the overall recounting of this historical endeavor. I became more invested as the story progressed and the stakes steadily rose. I liked DuVall's artwork as well and look forward to checking out more of her work as her career takes off.Thank you to Abrams ComicArts and NetGalley for the advanced copy of this book.
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  • Laura Harrison
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! What a great idea creating a graphic novel based on a historic piece of architecture. Even better for me is that it is a New York (yeah!) landmark. My only regret regarding this incredible and absolutely fascinating book is that I haven't seen it in full color. Black and white is fine but I can't wait for the final version. I bet it will be a beauty.
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  • Leah Boylan
    January 1, 1970
    Such a fun piece of history to display in colorful detail as a graphic novel. I knew the general process, but it seemed the great use of this book was understanding how dangerous and fraught the process of connecting Brooklyn and Manhattan was at the time (just after the civil war).
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  • Janis
    January 1, 1970
    The building of the Brooklyn Bridge was an incredible achievement, told here in graphic novel-format. I really enjoyed the historical details, the personal background of those involved, and the artwork which, for me, was a great asset in understanding technical details. Well done!
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  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    I became lost in the story of how one man’s ambitious dreams came true. The graphic novel is really an homage to the sacrifices made, the lives lost, and the unsung heroes who helped bring The Brooklyn Bridge to fruition.
  • Ela
    January 1, 1970
    I am glad that the sacrifices of the blue collar workers were featured in this book. The book went by too fast; I feel it could have had more detail. Of course, the large span of time it takes place over necessitates cutting out a lot.
  • pati
    January 1, 1970
    Incredible story of perserverance and fortitude.
  • Brian Salvatore
    January 1, 1970
    Disappointing in almost every way. A fantastic story, told in a predictable, sanitized style.
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