The Displaced
In January 2017, Donald Trump signed an executive order stopping entry to the United States from seven predominantly Muslim countries and dramatically cutting the number of refugees allowed to resettle in the United States each year. The American people spoke up, with protests, marches, donations, and lawsuits that quickly overturned the order. But the refugee caps remained.   In The Displaced, Pulitzer Prize–winning writer Viet Thanh Nguyen, himself a refugee, brings together a host of prominent refugee writers to explore and illuminate the refugee experience. Featuring original essays by a collection of writers from around the world, The Displaced is an indictment of closing our doors, and a powerful look at what it means to be forced to leave home and find a place of refuge.

The Displaced Details

TitleThe Displaced
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherAbrams Press
ISBN-139781419729485
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Writing, Essays, Autobiography, Memoir, Anthologies

The Displaced Review

  • Taryn
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful and moving. I read the sampler that includes ten essays. The final book will have a total of 20 essays. All royalties will be donated to the International Rescue Committee. Full review to come._____________I received this book (PDF) for free from NetGalley and ABRAMS. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. It will be available on April 10, 2018.
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  • Mimi
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent collection of essays about refugees by refugees, and extremely relevant in these turbulent times.Proceeds from sales are donated to the IRC (International Rescue Committee).I have always preferred the word "refugee" to "immigrant" myself. There's something urgent and immediate about the sound of refugee, whereas immigrant sounds more sanitized, wholesome. Immigrant is what you see on clean official documents, if you're one of the lucky few; refugee is the reality of refugee camps an An excellent collection of essays about refugees by refugees, and extremely relevant in these turbulent times.Proceeds from sales are donated to the IRC (International Rescue Committee).I have always preferred the word "refugee" to "immigrant" myself. There's something urgent and immediate about the sound of refugee, whereas immigrant sounds more sanitized, wholesome. Immigrant is what you see on clean official documents, if you're one of the lucky few; refugee is the reality of refugee camps and escaping a hometown that's been decimated, knowing you can never go back. When spoken aloud, refugee paints a more desperate picture, and it's always been one that's closest to my existence, so I prefer it. And Professor Viet is on the same page, but he's much, much better at expressing his sentiments. A big thanks to Goodreads giveaways and ABRAMS books for sending me an advanced reader's copy, which I have loaned to friends and coworkers. Summaries and direct quotes will be added when my copy arrives in a few weeks.
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    We’re facing a crisis of empathy when it comes to speaking about displacement, migration, and borders. The Displaced is a moving and timely collection of essays that explores these ideas through the experiences of 20 authors, spanning decades and the globe.I’m a huge fan of Viet Thanh Nguyen’s work, The Sympathizer and short story collection The Refugees being two of my favourite books. I have worked for the International Rescue Committee, the organization receiving donations from sales of The D We’re facing a crisis of empathy when it comes to speaking about displacement, migration, and borders. The Displaced is a moving and timely collection of essays that explores these ideas through the experiences of 20 authors, spanning decades and the globe.I’m a huge fan of Viet Thanh Nguyen’s work, The Sympathizer and short story collection The Refugees being two of my favourite books. I have worked for the International Rescue Committee, the organization receiving donations from sales of The Displaced, and currently work with a community-based organization out of Portland (Refugee Assistance and Information Network International, check us out!). I’ve been waiting for this book since I heard it was in the works, and I can’t speak highly enough of the way that the writers challenge the nativist and bigoted narratives about refugees and “economic migrants.” In particular, I’ve reread Dina Nayeri’s “The Ungrateful Refugee” several times already. It’s searing and gets to heart of the power dynamics inherent in how we talk about and conceive of the right to move and seek safety.I’m traveling to Buffalo to see Viet Thanh Nguyen speak at a Just Buffalo Literary Center event tomorrow night, and I’m really looking forward to it. We need more voices like his and the authors in this book amplified right now, and I strongly recommend The Displaced for nuanced and beautiful takes on the refugee experience, narrated by refugees themselves.Disclaimer: I received an advance copy through a Goodreads giveaway from ABRAMS. It contained 10 of the final 20 essays. This has not affected my review— promise.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book through the First Reads giveaway program.I received an advance review copy containing 10 essays, while the book that will be published will have more.Many of the stories brought tears to my eyes. Even though the book I was given was small, I had to take my time reading it because these essays were powerful. They resonate with me. It's a book that will not only stay with me long after I have closed it's pages, but I will probably find myself picking up again in the future to I received this book through the First Reads giveaway program.I received an advance review copy containing 10 essays, while the book that will be published will have more.Many of the stories brought tears to my eyes. Even though the book I was given was small, I had to take my time reading it because these essays were powerful. They resonate with me. It's a book that will not only stay with me long after I have closed it's pages, but I will probably find myself picking up again in the future to reaquaint myself with these amazing people.
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  • Max
    January 1, 1970
    "The Displaced" contains no surprises. These are stories of refugees from across the globe – from Mexico to Bosnia to Iran to Thailand – in their uncensored form. Many of the essays contain reflections on what refugee identity means to them, most contain stories of flights on foot to what were supposed to be safe havens, and some contain graphic images of torture and death. It is my worry that the only eyes that will read these essays belong to those that already sympathize with the plight of re "The Displaced" contains no surprises. These are stories of refugees from across the globe – from Mexico to Bosnia to Iran to Thailand – in their uncensored form. Many of the essays contain reflections on what refugee identity means to them, most contain stories of flights on foot to what were supposed to be safe havens, and some contain graphic images of torture and death. It is my worry that the only eyes that will read these essays belong to those that already sympathize with the plight of refugees. Nonetheless, the stories are important to be told. Some of the essays are so well-written and leave the reader with so many questions that they could be extended to standalone books. While the contexts are of course different for each situation, the essays seem to be meant to bring us to a better understanding of the humanity that is often lost in political discourse surrounding refugees. To put a story to the struggle. To make us ask not "Aren't you grateful to be here?" but "What did you leave behind?" [Disclaimer: I read an advance copy of "The Displaced," which contains only 10 of the 20 final essays to be included in the book.]
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    GoodReads giveaway winner...Thank you!
  • Rita
    January 1, 1970
    I was offered a digital incomplete ARC by the publisher. Full review to come closer to publication.Great essays. I was going to read just one but ended up reading them all.I will post my review on my blog on the day of the release. In the meantime, you can visit it HERE.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    This book made me think about the difference between and immigrant and a refugee. An immigrant is a person who chooses to leave his/her country.Looking back at my family tree, most of my ancestors were immigrants. For example my great great great grandmother and her youngest son came to the United States soon after the Civil War. Her husband had died recently and the factory where they worked in Carlisle, England had to be closed down. She and her younger son were both out the only jobs that the This book made me think about the difference between and immigrant and a refugee. An immigrant is a person who chooses to leave his/her country.Looking back at my family tree, most of my ancestors were immigrants. For example my great great great grandmother and her youngest son came to the United States soon after the Civil War. Her husband had died recently and the factory where they worked in Carlisle, England had to be closed down. She and her younger son were both out the only jobs that they had ever down. She decided to go with her younger son and meet with her two older boys who were already in United States so that they could obtain employment. Yet one of my friend's parents were both refugees. They had no choice but to leave their countries because they were descendants for Jews and lived in Nazi controlled countries. They had to flee or die. What forces people out can also be a natural disasters or wars. There are other differences like a lack of documentation. This book is a collection of essays written by the refugees. They told told of the situations that caused them to leave,the process traveling, what experiences they had after to getting to the country, assimilating or remaining separate. The people came from Viet Nam, Mexico, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Hungary and others. Many of the stories are ones of fear and desperation, others tell of how they felt they never belonged to their new country. These stories are all recently written and reflect how they felt about being depicted by the current administration.I received advanced reading of half of the essays n the finished this finished copy of The Displaced from the Publishers as a win from FirstReads but that in no way influenced my thoughts or feelings in my review.
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  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    The Displaced is a collection of essays from noted writers, each of whom has a background as a refugee. Each of these stories illuminates a different aspect of the refugee experience.The authors have a range of origins: a Hungarian who fled from the USSR, a person left stateless at the end of the second world war, and people who have fled wars and repressive regimes in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and South America.This is a book that really makes you think. 'How much do refugees need to try to The Displaced is a collection of essays from noted writers, each of whom has a background as a refugee. Each of these stories illuminates a different aspect of the refugee experience.The authors have a range of origins: a Hungarian who fled from the USSR, a person left stateless at the end of the second world war, and people who have fled wars and repressive regimes in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and South America.This is a book that really makes you think. 'How much do refugees need to try to fit into their new country? What sort of welcome do they experience? Are they obliged to be grateful, or do we owe them help? And how does the experience of past waves of refugees compare with the people currently seeking asylum?There are 65 million displaced people in the world, according to the UNHCR. The plight of the displaced is one of the biggest human problems that we face. This book is a valuable contribution to our thinking on the problems that they encounter, and how we might help.
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