Tough Mothers
The author of Rejected Princesses returns with an inspiring, fully illustrated guide that brings together the fiercest mothers in history—real life matriarchs who gave everything to protect all they loved.Mothers possess the "maternal instinct"—an innate fierceness that drives them to nurture, safeguard, fight, and sacrifice for the most important things that matter to them. For some mothers, it’s their children. For others, it’s artistic expression, invention, social cause, or even a nation that they helped to birth. In Tough Mothers, Jason Porath brings his wisdom and wit to bear on fifty fascinating matriarchs.In concise, deeply researched vignettes, accompanied by charming illustrations, Porath illuminates these fearsome women, explores their lives, and pays tribute to their accomplishments. Here are famous women as well as lesser known figures from around the globe who have left their indelible mark as they changed the course of history, including:The Mother Who Sued to Save Her Children from Slavery—Sojourner TruthThe Mother of Rock n’ Roll—Sister Rosetta TharpeThe Mother of Holocaust Children—Irena SendlerThe Mothers of The Dominican Republic—The Mirabal SistersThe Mother of Yemen’s Golden Age—Arwa al-SulayhiA celebration of motherhood and female achievement, Tough Mothers reminds us of the power of women to transform our lives and our world. 

Tough Mothers Details

TitleTough Mothers
Author
ReleaseApr 3rd, 2018
PublisherDey Street Books
ISBN-139780062796097
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Feminism, Historical, Biography, Adult

Tough Mothers Review

  • Rachel Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    I was excited to read Tough Mothers the follow-up to Jason Porath's successful first book, Rejected Princess, detailing the unknown lives badass women in history. I enjoyed this book overall too, but I felt it was somewhat lacking in information and cohesion compared to the first one. Porath includes lots of interesting women in this book as well, leaders and diplomats and outlaws, which is all well and good; but he seemed to insert himself into the book a lot more than in the previous book, whi I was excited to read Tough Mothers the follow-up to Jason Porath's successful first book, Rejected Princess, detailing the unknown lives badass women in history. I enjoyed this book overall too, but I felt it was somewhat lacking in information and cohesion compared to the first one. Porath includes lots of interesting women in this book as well, leaders and diplomats and outlaws, which is all well and good; but he seemed to insert himself into the book a lot more than in the previous book, which I wasn't thrilled by. That was a criticism I had of Rejected Princesses too, that Porath had too many snarky comments and opinions that didn't fit, but in Tough Mothers it got even more annoying. I enjoyed learning about new women I hadn't heard of before, and I still have lots of research to do, but I'll admit this book wasn't as interesting to me as the first one. I still love the concept, and I appreciate the variety of the women included in Tough Mothers, but at times it seemed like Porath was grasping at straws for what to say about women who he disagreed with. Not sure if it was the mere content of the women covered in it, or if Porath's writing seemed different, but something was missing this time around.
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  • Rhiannon Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Looking for a Mother's Day gift idea? Jason Porath's Tough Mothers: Amazing Stories of History’s Mightiest Matriarchs (April 3, 2018 from Day Street/Harper Collins #partner) is "an inspiring, fully illustrated guide that brings together the fiercest mothers in history—real life matriarchs who gave everything to protect all they loved."This fully illustrated anthology features fifty fascinating matriarchs from "all corners of the globe and span from ancient times to modern day." The Mother Who In Looking for a Mother's Day gift idea? Jason Porath's Tough Mothers: Amazing Stories of History’s Mightiest Matriarchs (April 3, 2018 from Day Street/Harper Collins #partner) is "an inspiring, fully illustrated guide that brings together the fiercest mothers in history—real life matriarchs who gave everything to protect all they loved."This fully illustrated anthology features fifty fascinating matriarchs from "all corners of the globe and span from ancient times to modern day." The Mother Who Invented Rice-A-Roni, The Mother of Rock n' Roll, and The Mothers Who Toppled a Dictatorship, are just a few tough mothers featured. I loved Porath's previous release, Rejected Princesses, and am looking forward to many more biographical collections from him in the future.
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  • Nefertari
    January 1, 1970
    Just as amazing and eye-opening as I'd hoped. Please, Porath, continue this tremendous series!!! These stories take a global perspective, finding women from across the globe and throughout history and illuminating their lives and actions. Porath also brings a healthy amount of skepticism to the way these women have often been portrayed, refreshing when compared to so many people who would believe the worst of a ludicrous rumor about a woman, rather than a horrible truth about a man.
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  • Ben Truong
    January 1, 1970
    Tough Mothers: Amazing Stories of History's Mightiest Matriarchs by Jason Porath turns the seemingly stereotypical mothers as only passive, gentle, and loving on its head. Instead this book pays homage to a collection of the fiercest mothers in history with real life matriarchs who gave everything to protect all they loved. In some cases, their innate fierceness of "maternal instinct" drives them to nurture, safeguard, fight, and sacrifice for the most important things that matter to them. For s Tough Mothers: Amazing Stories of History's Mightiest Matriarchs by Jason Porath turns the seemingly stereotypical mothers as only passive, gentle, and loving on its head. Instead this book pays homage to a collection of the fiercest mothers in history with real life matriarchs who gave everything to protect all they loved. In some cases, their innate fierceness of "maternal instinct" drives them to nurture, safeguard, fight, and sacrifice for the most important things that matter to them. For some it's their children, for others it's artistic expression, invention, social cause, or even giving birth to a nation. This is a companion book to Rejected Princesses: Tales of History's Boldest Heroines, Hellions, and Heretics .Porath seemingly mixes biography, imagery, and humor rather well and writes in a refreshing youthful manner. Each fifty entries are well researched and explore and elevate these fierce mothers from history and around the world. Each entry centers on one mother who all have fierce determination to change history and the world. The illustrations have an animated feeling to it and it aids and exemplifies the text rather well and for the most part each illustration captures the women in question rather well.Furthermore, I enjoyed the fact that Porath rated each entry by maturity level and possible trigger warnings and placed it on the page before the entry. So one could read any entry knowing what to expect and parents could determine which entries they would read to their children. Although, I wished that Porath would have included these caveats on the Table of Contents for more ease of use of this system.All in all, Tough Mothers: Amazing Stories of History's Mightiest Matriarchs is a wonderfully written book of a magnificent collection of mini-biographies of diverse mothers from all walks of life and from different parts of the world. It is a good read and reference book for anyone who wants to learn more about these fantastic women in history.
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  • Skye
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Rejected Princesses. I loved this. There are no other words for my feelings when it comes to this book. Finally, finally there are some great books out there on the many women in history! The fact that this is one about women who are mothers and also completely kick ass makes it much better. It’s a reminder that we can be mothers as well as politicians, doctors, just women of power and change in general. I actually can’t wait to show these books to my future (theoretical) children – to s I loved Rejected Princesses. I loved this. There are no other words for my feelings when it comes to this book. Finally, finally there are some great books out there on the many women in history! The fact that this is one about women who are mothers and also completely kick ass makes it much better. It’s a reminder that we can be mothers as well as politicians, doctors, just women of power and change in general. I actually can’t wait to show these books to my future (theoretical) children – to show them the many different things that they can become. And even the women who have helped to pave the way for this.I had only one small issue (if you can call it that) with this book – there are a lot of American women in these pages. Now, granted, I almost never see an Australian woman in well, anything (unless she’s some random bikini clad surfer, not sure how we got that rep)… so I wasn’t expecting to see anyone from my country in there (there were 2, I danced around my loungeroom when I read about them). But, I swear Rejected Princesses had a lot more people from the international stage than Tough Mothers. I kind of put it down to the fact that the author is American – there is a lot of amazing history there, and, really, you could write a whole book just about some of those women.This was the perfect book for me to read while I was trying to slog through some articles for my lit review. Each entry was a quick, interesting read that helped to keep my mind engaged. It was also visually engaging and beautiful, so that made it all the more pleasant and pleasing. I’m actually really disappointed that it’s come to an end…
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. I'm so glad I preordered this. While some of the entries I had read before, there was a lot that was new in this book (I mean, they were all newly in print- previous entries had simply shown up on rejectedprincesses.com). I will definitely be picking this one up again and again to reference various Matriarchs for some inspiration (or warnings- gosh!). Either way, it's always interesting to read Jason Porath- he's got a fun voice in his descriptions that keeps heavy subjects from getting too Wow. I'm so glad I preordered this. While some of the entries I had read before, there was a lot that was new in this book (I mean, they were all newly in print- previous entries had simply shown up on rejectedprincesses.com). I will definitely be picking this one up again and again to reference various Matriarchs for some inspiration (or warnings- gosh!). Either way, it's always interesting to read Jason Porath- he's got a fun voice in his descriptions that keeps heavy subjects from getting too heavy or gives heavy subjects all the weight they deserve. But I think one of the greatest things about his style of writing is he acknowledges so many different sides of the story- and isn't afraid to point out that history is written by the victors and that, often, they were pretty racist, so take things with a grain of salt. Did I enjoy this as much as the first volume? I think the squeal I let out when it was delivered, when I first opened it, and when I finished it speaks for itself.
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  • Alice Wulf
    January 1, 1970
    Really great book! (A little less so than the first, if only because I've read the majority of the entries on the site, I was expecting more new content.)The amount of information in this book is just awesome. There seems to be a booming trend of "Kickass Women" books, (which is amazing, don't get me wrong), but the majority of said books put more focus on the art than the facts or writing quality.I also really enjoy this series because the author points out some of the women's nastier qualities Really great book! (A little less so than the first, if only because I've read the majority of the entries on the site, I was expecting more new content.)The amount of information in this book is just awesome. There seems to be a booming trend of "Kickass Women" books, (which is amazing, don't get me wrong), but the majority of said books put more focus on the art than the facts or writing quality.I also really enjoy this series because the author points out some of the women's nastier qualities that most people would gloss over. (Mother Jones was racist towards the Chinese, Marie Equi was abusive, etc.)Actual quote from the book: "All your faves are problematic."And the book is funny, too! All-around great read.
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  • Becki
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this just as much as Rejected Princesses, not that I’m surprised. As always I loved the detailed descriptions and the overall writing style/tone, accompanying the beautiful illustrations. The women included are so different, and I only knew of a few before reading this. A few of my favourites were - in the order they appear - Masako Hojo, Mother Lu, the Mirabal sisters, Jeanne de Clisson and Irena Sendler. Honestly though they were all interesting, strong and amazing in their own way. Yo I loved this just as much as Rejected Princesses, not that I’m surprised. As always I loved the detailed descriptions and the overall writing style/tone, accompanying the beautiful illustrations. The women included are so different, and I only knew of a few before reading this. A few of my favourites were - in the order they appear - Masako Hojo, Mother Lu, the Mirabal sisters, Jeanne de Clisson and Irena Sendler. Honestly though they were all interesting, strong and amazing in their own way. You guys should go read this and the other book ASAP.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    A worthy successor to Rejected Princesses.
  • Kaila
    January 1, 1970
    cool book, lots of great info. passing on to my mom for mother's day!
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