Under a Dark Sky
“Fans of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None will be riveted by Rader-Day’s latest psychological thriller, which makes you question who you really know and trust and whether you should be afraid of the dark.”—Library Journal, Starred Review"A brilliant concept, brilliantly told!" --Jeffery Deaver, New York Times Bestselling AuthorOnly in the dark can she find the truth . . .Since her husband died, Eden Wallace's life has diminished down to a tiny pinprick, like a far-off star in the night sky. She doesn't work, has given up on her love of photography, and is so plagued by night terrors that she can't sleep without the lights on. Everyone, including her family, has grown weary of her grief. So when she finds paperwork in her husband's effects indicating that he reserved a week at a dark sky park, she goes. She's ready to shed her fear and return to the living, even if it means facing her paralyzing phobia of the dark. But when she arrives at the park, the guest suite she thought was a private retreat is teeming with a group of twenty-somethings, all stuck in the orbit of their old college friendships. Horrified that her get-away has been taken over, Eden decides to head home the next day. But then a scream wakes the house in the middle of the night. One of the friends has been murdered. Now everyone—including Eden—is a suspect.Everyone is keeping secrets, but only one is a murderer. As mishaps continue to befall the group, Eden must make sense of the chaos and lies to evade a ruthless killer—and she'll have to do it before dark falls…     

Under a Dark Sky Details

TitleUnder a Dark Sky
Author
ReleaseAug 7th, 2018
PublisherWilliam Morrow Paperbacks
ISBN-139780062560308
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

Under a Dark Sky Review

  • Lori Rader-Day
    January 1, 1970
    I love it that I am the first person to mark a book read on Goodreads because I wrote it. Five stars, you betcha. Hope you like it, too.
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Book review can be found on my blog here: https://booksonthebookshelf.wordpress...Thank you to William Morrow Books and Harper Collins for the free ARC of this book to read and review.This book follows the story of Eden Wallace who lost her husband. Since her husband passed away, Eden finds she is not the same person that she once used to be and is a shadow of her former self. She is afraid of the dark and has trouble sleeping, and even has nightmares. She finds some papers indicating that her h Book review can be found on my blog here: https://booksonthebookshelf.wordpress...Thank you to William Morrow Books and Harper Collins for the free ARC of this book to read and review.This book follows the story of Eden Wallace who lost her husband. Since her husband passed away, Eden finds she is not the same person that she once used to be and is a shadow of her former self. She is afraid of the dark and has trouble sleeping, and even has nightmares. She finds some papers indicating that her husband had planned a trip away for their anniversary before his death, and Eden decides to take the trip anyways even though her husband is no longer there to go along with her.When Eden arrives at the retreat house she finds out she is not alone. The place has also been rented out to a group of six friends all in their 20s and Eden is not happy with this. She thought she would have the week to herself to reflect and face her fears of the dark. She decided to stay the one night after a long drive, then head home in the morning. After she has gone to bed for the night everyone in the house is awoken by a scream in the house. Confused and afraid, they all look around the house trying to find the source of the scream, only to find one of the six friends dead on the floor - everyone, including Eden, is now a suspect.This book was a great read. I enjoyed the different characters in the book and reading about them and what makes them who they are. A group of friends who argue and share secrets and lies. So thrilling. I enjoyed the character building of each character in the book and the "who done it" that kept you guessing and second guessing.The book was written in a way to keep you the reader interested in finding out what would happen next. The pages turned themselves, and it was hard to out down. This was my first book I read by this author and it was a great read from beginning to end.
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  • Linda Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    While I have loved all of Rader-Day's books, I think this is the best one yet. Fast paced, lots of tension and enough twists to keep you guessing until the end. This will be a thriller I'll be recommending to everyone.
  • Lesa
    January 1, 1970
    Darn that Lori Rader-Day. I am not a night person, but once I started Under a Dark Sky, I had to stay up and finish it. It's the story of a troubled woman, caught up in an Agatha Christie nightmare. And, it's just right.Eden Wallace's husband, Bix, a war hero, has been dead for nine months when she uses his reservation at Straits Point International Dark Sky Park in Michigan. She's hated the dark for years, but, after Bix's death, she's terrified. The stay at the park may send her screaming back Darn that Lori Rader-Day. I am not a night person, but once I started Under a Dark Sky, I had to stay up and finish it. It's the story of a troubled woman, caught up in an Agatha Christie nightmare. And, it's just right.Eden Wallace's husband, Bix, a war hero, has been dead for nine months when she uses his reservation at Straits Point International Dark Sky Park in Michigan. She's hated the dark for years, but, after Bix's death, she's terrified. The stay at the park may send her screaming back to Chicago, or help her find solutions to her fears. But, Eden's reservation at the park isn't what she anticipated, a few nights all to herself in a guest house. Instead, she's just one of seven guests in the house. Yes, she has the suite to herself, but her fellow guests are three couples in their mid-twenties. Five of them went to college together, and it's an anniversary that reunites them.When one of Eden's fellow guests is murdered in the middle of the night, the police consider all of them suspects. Eden's a stranger, so all the young people view her with suspicion. As she sees it, she's the only one with no motive. Now, she has two mysteries on her hands. The most immediate mystery is which of the other guests is a killer?Eden's other mystery is one that has troubled her for nine months. Although she claims Bix made the reservations at the park as an anniversary present, he knew she didn't like the dark and had little interest in the stars. Why is she here? And, what's the truth behind her marriage? She isn't even sure they would have made it to ten years with Bix' PTSD, and other issues. As she observes the relationships between her fellow guests, Eden recalls stories and incidents that help her identify her own feelings towards her late husband, the past, and the future. As in The Day I Died, Rader-Day introduces an intriguing protagonist with a complicated past. She slowly reveals Eden's story to the reader, through conversations and memories. While there's a locked-room mystery, and Eden is "mixed up in some Agatha Christie shit", as her sister says, Eden herself is the most fascinating part of the story. She's an awkward, haunted woman, trying to find the courage to live with herself.Under a Dark Sky is another intense, compelling mystery from an author who excels in placing unconventional characters in dramatic, disturbing situations. To say it's a page-turner is an understatement. Lori Rader-Day's latest book will keep you reading into the dark.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    The phrase “off the chain” is a term often used to describe something fantastically good, and so it is in that sense that I say Under a Dark Sky is off the chain. However, the chain runs smooth with the structure and flow of Lori Rader-Day’s brilliant writing. She has everything under control, even the missteps the readers make in assigning guilt to the wrong characters. It’s a dark tale played out in a dark park, a locked room environment with a guest house of slowly diminishing numbers. Oh, an The phrase “off the chain” is a term often used to describe something fantastically good, and so it is in that sense that I say Under a Dark Sky is off the chain. However, the chain runs smooth with the structure and flow of Lori Rader-Day’s brilliant writing. She has everything under control, even the missteps the readers make in assigning guilt to the wrong characters. It’s a dark tale played out in a dark park, a locked room environment with a guest house of slowly diminishing numbers. Oh, and the main character has a phobia about the dark. Life for thirty-something Eden Wallace has been a nightmare since the recent death of her husband, or it would be a nightmare if she could sleep and she didn’t spend the night with lights blazing all over her house. Afraid of the dark doesn’t quite cover the paralyzing phobia that Eden has, unable to step foot outdoors from nightfall until daybreak. Realizing that she is far too young to become a recluse, Eden makes a decision contradictory to her phobia. Upon finding paperwork in her husband’s desk where he had reserved a vacation at Straits Point International Dark Sky Park in Michigan, Eden steels herself to go to this place where lights are kept to a bare minimum and stars are the only lights of attraction. She feels she might actually find some solace and strength from a change of scenery in a retreat by herself, and her husband, Bix, did plan it to coincide with their 10th wedding anniversary. But, just about everything she thinks this trip will be is turned on its head from the moment she arrives at the reserved guest house. She has only a suite in the house and must share the rest of the house with a group of twenty-something strangers who are coming together for a college reunion of sorts. Not wanting to stay with arrangements as they are, but with night getting close to falling, Eden knows she is stuck for one night where she is. One night with all the lights in her room on and leaving the next day seems an option she will have to live with. And then there is someone dead on the kitchen floor with a screwdriver stuck in the throat. No one is going anywhere right away. Everyone is a suspect, including Eden, and the secret of her phobia and her marriage and her husband’s death make their way to the surface. But, she isn’t the only one with secrets. The six friends all seem to have different agendas for the reunion and different issues from the past to resolve. And, there is the ghost of a past friend the six share. This locked room is a Pandora’s box of ills, including jealousy, greed, lying, and revenge. No one is innocent and, thus, everyone is guilty, at least of some regrettable sin. When another death occurs, it’s clear that the retreat Eden had hoped would revive her life will change it in ways she never saw coming. Who is the killer, what is her/his motive, and who will be next? For Eden, the answers mean clearing her name and staying alive.Lori Rader-Day hit the ground running with her first book, the Anthony Award winning The Black Hour, and her next two books, Little Pretty Things and The Day I Died won awards and nominations and placement on “best” lists, too. Her storytelling and writing talents won me over at the beginning. Her stories are always uniquely interesting, no trace of having read this set-up before. But, I think that with Under a Dark Sky, she has achieved a stellar status that will catapult her into the highest stratosphere of fame.
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  • Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    Eden Wallace's life has been a mess since her husband, Bix died in an accident 5 years ago. However she decided to fulfill a reservation he made for 5 years in the future. She has now arrived a private house on a lake north of Chicago, only to find that there had been a mix up in the reservations. 3 other couples had reservations at the same resort. After the initial mix-up it was determined that the private suite in the rear of the building could be used by Eden. Eden has never been able to get Eden Wallace's life has been a mess since her husband, Bix died in an accident 5 years ago. However she decided to fulfill a reservation he made for 5 years in the future. She has now arrived a private house on a lake north of Chicago, only to find that there had been a mix up in the reservations. 3 other couples had reservations at the same resort. After the initial mix-up it was determined that the private suite in the rear of the building could be used by Eden. Eden has never been able to get out of the 'funk' re: Bix's death but she was going to try. But everything was about to change with the murder of the most popular member of the other group, Malloy ! Now Eden would have to stay because the police need to find the murderer! The pace of this book was much to slow for me. So many quirky facts about all the characters until we find out who the murdered.....yes , towards the end the pieces start to fall into place but it is a labor to get there
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  • Alissa K
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was a fun read. Lots of potential suspects and sorting through the changing possible murderer made it hard to put down. Great beach read or to pass a snowy Saturday. Being perfectly candid though, it’s not the best of its genre and it certainly isn’t a 5-Star book. (The author rated her own book as five stars? That seems rather tacky.)
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  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    This is such a fascinating story. Like Eden, we are dropped into this situation with no knowledge of who the friends are. There is a lot of backstory that we're not privy to and, as a result, it's impossible to know who we can trust (if anyone). The situation is made even more complicated by the fact that, since her husband died, Eden's developed a paralyzing fear of the dark. And I don't just mean "sleeps with a light on." I mean "Even when there is a literal murder and police order her to leav This is such a fascinating story. Like Eden, we are dropped into this situation with no knowledge of who the friends are. There is a lot of backstory that we're not privy to and, as a result, it's impossible to know who we can trust (if anyone). The situation is made even more complicated by the fact that, since her husband died, Eden's developed a paralyzing fear of the dark. And I don't just mean "sleeps with a light on." I mean "Even when there is a literal murder and police order her to leave, she physically cannot bring herself to step out of the well-lit room she's in." This is the second book I've read recently that mentions dark sky parks, and the idea is fascinating but not for me. I'm really only afraid of the dark in unfamiliar places and so the idea of being in essentially pitch black conditions is unnerving anyway, but especially when you factor in strangers, let alone "strangers and a body count."This book is amazing and really well done. It feels like Agatha Christie, almost, but not really suitable for all ages. Lori Rader-Day only gets better with each novel, and I can't wait to see where the next one goes. (It may literally kill me.)Highly recommended.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for an advance egalley in exchange for an honest review!These days, with a busy life outside of reading and far too many books on the TBR, my enjoyment of a book can be marked not just by how quickly I read it but by how obsessively I want to pick it up and want to read it. I stayed up late last night sneaking in a few more pages (chapters) and then woke up early this morning to finish. Under a Dark Sky totally caught my attention with a main character who Thanks to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for an advance egalley in exchange for an honest review!These days, with a busy life outside of reading and far too many books on the TBR, my enjoyment of a book can be marked not just by how quickly I read it but by how obsessively I want to pick it up and want to read it. I stayed up late last night sneaking in a few more pages (chapters) and then woke up early this morning to finish. Under a Dark Sky totally caught my attention with a main character who is sad, broken, and just trying to find a little peace when she realizes that instead of the secluded getaway she'd imagine, she'll be sharing the house with six younger, happier friends. Eden quickly is swept up in their drama and history, and when one of them dies, suspicion is cast on everyone- including her. Frantic to prove her innocence and help pinpoint who the real murderer is, Eden works hard to cobble together her memories and knowledge of the night, while dealing with her own history. Eden has secrets, but if you're sick of reading about unreliable narrators, that's not really the case here- just some slow reveals that aren't plot twists. Engrossing and perfect for summer nights.
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  • Elena Hartwell
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the book. Very different kind of mystery. Though the story is intriguing, it's very much a psychological exploration as much as who commits the murder. The dynamic of a recent widow stuck with a group of strangers provides an excellent situation for her story to come out. There is some on-the-page violence- okay for cozy readers if they can handle darker material.
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  • Emily Green
    January 1, 1970
    I received Under a Dark Sky through GoodReads FirstReads in exchange for an honest review. With the intent of confronting her paralyzing fear of the dark, Eden checks into the dark sky park.Since her husband’s death, there has been a lot of life she cannot confront, but when she found the reservations for the park among his papers, she decided that she would go on the anniversary outing he had planned. She is shocked to discover that she is not the only one in the cabin. Eden finds herself envel I received Under a Dark Sky through GoodReads FirstReads in exchange for an honest review. With the intent of confronting her paralyzing fear of the dark, Eden checks into the dark sky park.Since her husband’s death, there has been a lot of life she cannot confront, but when she found the reservations for the park among his papers, she decided that she would go on the anniversary outing he had planned. She is shocked to discover that she is not the only one in the cabin. Eden finds herself enveloped in a group of college friends who have gathered for a reunion. Just as unwillingly, she is pulled into the middle of a murder mystery. As she takes it upon herself to determine who the killer is, she also begins to deal with the loss of her husband and her marriage, including admitting the true nature of their relationship. Under a Dark Sky is a murder mystery, but Eden’s unpacking makes it more than the simple mystery or thriller. It offers a raw an honest look at grief and reconciling who we allow ourselves to think a loved one is and the more real person with all the faults and failures. Entertaining and engaging.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    From the back cover comes "a terrifying twist on a locked room mystery". I disagree with all of that.Terrifying never happened. The book is too plodding for any suspense. That includes Eden's fear of the dark. The author had her tell the reader about her fear but failed to make it believable. That made the setting of a dark sky park worthless.Twists didn't happen. This was paint by numbers predictable. Locked room generally means the killer could neither enter nor the room where the murder occur From the back cover comes "a terrifying twist on a locked room mystery". I disagree with all of that.Terrifying never happened. The book is too plodding for any suspense. That includes Eden's fear of the dark. The author had her tell the reader about her fear but failed to make it believable. That made the setting of a dark sky park worthless.Twists didn't happen. This was paint by numbers predictable. Locked room generally means the killer could neither enter nor the room where the murder occurred. But here Eden hears someone running off into the dark just before the body is found. That defeats the purpose of the locked room mystery.Mystery doesn't really apply when the author points a flaming red neon arrow at the murderer. There's no fun when you know who did it.Then there's the problem that none of the characters are likable. You are not supposed to want them all to die. That is particularly true for Eden. She is so self absorbed and whiny that you want to put her out of her misery.This author goes on my list of "do not bother with".I received a free copy of this book through the First Reads program.
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  • Debby
    January 1, 1970
    I was able to read an ARC earlier this year and just finished the audiobook. The book kept me up reading all night, a rarity these days, and I blazed through the audiobook! This is a compelling read! Being an amateur astronomy buff, I was excited about the setting. The dark sky park and its isolated location provide a great closed community for the mystery. The main character Eden cannot reach her usual support network (such as it is after her recent widowhood and subsequent withdrawal) so must I was able to read an ARC earlier this year and just finished the audiobook. The book kept me up reading all night, a rarity these days, and I blazed through the audiobook! This is a compelling read! Being an amateur astronomy buff, I was excited about the setting. The dark sky park and its isolated location provide a great closed community for the mystery. The main character Eden cannot reach her usual support network (such as it is after her recent widowhood and subsequent withdrawal) so must look around her—who can she trust? Can she even trust herself? The motley cast includes the group of former college friends unexpectedly sharing her lodgings, now a few years out but still shifting alliances, still trying to figure out who they are in the adult world; local law enforcement, more used to dealing with accidents than murder; and the people who service the park and its tourists. Lori writes characters with a keen insight into what motivates them and she gives unlikely heroes their due. These characters move through the twists and turns toward a resolution for not only the murder but past transgressions as well. Looming over it all is that dark sky, its terror infused into the story, its vast beauty contrasted with the ugliness of small human actions.
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  • Irene
    January 1, 1970
    Fast-paced, easy read. Lots of surprises within this mystery.Even though it's well written, I thought some parts were overly wordy, so I skimmed them and was still able to maintain plot continuity.Some may like the extended descriptions, but I didn't think they were necessary.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Last year I read THE DAY I DIED by Lori Rader-Day and knew I'd read anything she wrote going forward, so I was thrilled to get a chance to read UNDER A DARK SKY which is coming out in August. (Thank you to William Morrow/HarperCollins for the ARC). This novel has an Agatha Christie feel in that there are a group of people in a house, with hidden secrets, motivations, resentments, and then violent things start happening; but who is responsible for them? That's the mystery. But this book is more t Last year I read THE DAY I DIED by Lori Rader-Day and knew I'd read anything she wrote going forward, so I was thrilled to get a chance to read UNDER A DARK SKY which is coming out in August. (Thank you to William Morrow/HarperCollins for the ARC). This novel has an Agatha Christie feel in that there are a group of people in a house, with hidden secrets, motivations, resentments, and then violent things start happening; but who is responsible for them? That's the mystery. But this book is more than just a who-done-it. It addresses themes of loss, grief, emotional trauma, revenge and justice wrapped in a mystery that isn't easy to figure out. I wasn't sure "who-done-it" until the very end, which is always a plus in a mystery! The characters aren't always likable, but we gradually come to understand why they are the way they are, and at least feel some sympathy for most of them. Eden Wallace, who has developed Nyctophobia after the loss of her husband, Bix, finds a reservation for a vacation at a dark sky park in Michigan after Bix's death. She decides to keep the reservation, which coincides with what would have been their 10th anniversary, as she wants to use the time to try to figure out what her life will be like going forward. When she arrives at the park, she is surprised when the house that was reserved by Bix has other guests: a group of twenty-somethings who are there for the week for their own celebration of sorts. Since it's already too late for her to leave (it's dark outside, after all), she decides to stay one night. That turns out to be a mistake, because one of the group is murdered the first night, and she becomes a suspect. There are a lot of surprises gradually revealed about all the characters in the book, and the author does a great job of dropping surprises into the narrative at just the right time. The story holds, which is my way of giving praise to an author's efforts to keep all the parts of the story in a fine balance. This one kept me up past my bedtime!
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    Review of Uncorrected ProofThe death of Eden Wallace’s husband, Bix, has left her shattered and caught in the clutches of nyctophobia. This debilitating fear causes her to make certain she’s inside before darkness settles and to turn on all the lights to make her space as bright as possible. Sleep is elusive and everyone around her has grown weary of her all-consuming grief.While going through Bix’s papers, she finds a reservation for a week at a guest house in a dark sky park and, seeking a way Review of Uncorrected ProofThe death of Eden Wallace’s husband, Bix, has left her shattered and caught in the clutches of nyctophobia. This debilitating fear causes her to make certain she’s inside before darkness settles and to turn on all the lights to make her space as bright as possible. Sleep is elusive and everyone around her has grown weary of her all-consuming grief.While going through Bix’s papers, she finds a reservation for a week at a guest house in a dark sky park and, seeking a way to move past her fears and grief, Eden decides to claim the reservation and spend a week at the dark park. But her expected-to-be-private place of retreat also houses six young adults coming together for a reunion. Upset, Eden plans to leave, only it’s late in the day and darkness is near, so she decides to remain overnight and drive back to Chicago in the morning. But there’s a scream in the night and someone lies dead in the guest house kitchen . . . .Filled with unexpected twists, pervasive underlying tension, and ever-building suspense, the narrative focuses as much on Eden’s coming to grips with her loss and finding a way to move on with her life as it does with the who and the why of the murder. Despite Eden’s occasional tendency to overthink things [coming to terms with grief is different for every person], readers will find much to appreciate in this thoughtful look at moving on and dealing with the hard truths we’d prefer to ignore. The mystery is first-rate; readers will find this to be a compelling read.Highly recommended.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.Under a Dark Sky by Lori Rader-Day is a riveting, suspense-laden murder mystery.Eden Wallace is still grieving the death of her beloved husband, Bix, when she discovers he planned a surprise anniversary getaway for them before his death. Eden goes on the trip which she hopes will be a turning point in coming to terms of her loss. Eden is optimistic the time away will help her turn the corner on the paralyzing fear of the dark she has experienced ever since the night he died. Upon her a 4.5 stars.Under a Dark Sky by Lori Rader-Day is a riveting, suspense-laden murder mystery.Eden Wallace is still grieving the death of her beloved husband, Bix, when she discovers he planned a surprise anniversary getaway for them before his death. Eden goes on the trip which she hopes will be a turning point in coming to terms of her loss. Eden is optimistic the time away will help her turn the corner on the paralyzing fear of the dark she has experienced ever since the night he died. Upon her arrival at Dark Sky Park, she discovers she is sharing her getaway with six twenty-something strangers. Deciding to stay the night and leave in the morning, Eden is awakened in the middle of the night when one of the men is murdered. The local sheriff insists everyone remain during the early phase of the investigation and Eden tries to piece together who would have reason to murder their friend.Eden has found it impossible to move past Bix’s death. Their life together was spent moving from base to base where her larger than life husband was always the center of attention. After his retirement from the military, they moved to Bix’s hometown of Chicago where Eden was hopeful his PTSD, nightmares and self-medicating with alcohol would improve. While Bix transitioned into civilian life with relative ease, Eden could not resist his efforts to “improve” her career choices. In the months since his shocking death, Eden has withdrawn from her family and friends and due to her sleep deprivation, she no longer works.Although Eden is uncomfortable staying with strangers, her fear of the dark overrides this discomfort. The dynamics of the group are fascinating to her but she is quickly made to feel unwelcome by much of the group. She picks up on some tense undertones between the friends, and she is relieved to leave them to their own devices. She is of course upset by the murder, but Eden is confident the sheriff will quickly release her to return home.However, Eden is stunned by the unexpected revelations that put her smack dab in the middle of the investigation. Unable to convince the sheriff she has no reason to kill anyone, she must remain in town while the police try to sort through the evidence and leads they uncover. When it appears someone has attempted to murder two other members of the group, the sheriff grows even more suspicious of Eden. She attempts to put her fragmented memories into some semblance of order to try to unmask the killer. At the same time, secrets about Eden’s husband are revealed and Eden is forced to confront the truth about Bix.With unanticipated twists, shocking turns and fantastic red herrings, Under a Dark Sky is an intriguing mystery that is absolutely spellbinding.  Eden becomes increasingly unreliable due to her lack of sleep and her troubling realizations about Bix. The plot is rife with clever misdirects, an atmospheric setting and plenty of suspicious characters.  Lori Rader-Day keeps readers guessing the identity of the perpetrator and the reason for the murder right up until the novel’s dramatic conclusion. A brilliantly executed mystery that fans of the genre do not want to miss!
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  • Regan
    January 1, 1970
    UNDER A DARK SKY is my first Lori Rader-Day read. It is not my last. She’s quickly moved to the top of my “must read” list. Each character has their own issues, their own demons they are running from…demons many of us have. They are bits and pieces of lives that make us who we are. Each character had something likeable about them. But they also had something that would make you question whether or not you would want them for a friend. Could you trust them? I loved the setting. Even with the dang UNDER A DARK SKY is my first Lori Rader-Day read. It is not my last. She’s quickly moved to the top of my “must read” list. Each character has their own issues, their own demons they are running from…demons many of us have. They are bits and pieces of lives that make us who we are. Each character had something likeable about them. But they also had something that would make you question whether or not you would want them for a friend. Could you trust them? I loved the setting. Even with the danger lurking, it was the people creating it, not the otherwise peaceful lake. The lack of cell service or ability to get a signal added to the suspense and harkened back to the closed room mysteries of the 40’s and 50’s. We think that with our cell phones today there is always the chance to get help…but cell towers go down, mountains block even texts, and phones can be broken. We are not as connected as we think and Rader-Day brings that situation to the fore as different characters fight for their lives. But the idea of a place to go to sky watch – star watch – without light pollution is so appealing. I wouldn’t mind going there myself.
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  • Dan Radovich
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of Rader-Day since book one, her works are all peopled with real characters, like your neighbors; and UNDER A DARK SKY is her best work to date in my opinion. Eden opts to go on the vacation get-away her husband booked before his sudden death. She expects to be alone so she can regroup and confront some personal issues, but a group of twenty-somethings is also booked at the retreat. Someone is murder on night one and the story picks up speed from there. Rader-Day brings a psych I have been a fan of Rader-Day since book one, her works are all peopled with real characters, like your neighbors; and UNDER A DARK SKY is her best work to date in my opinion. Eden opts to go on the vacation get-away her husband booked before his sudden death. She expects to be alone so she can regroup and confront some personal issues, but a group of twenty-somethings is also booked at the retreat. Someone is murder on night one and the story picks up speed from there. Rader-Day brings a psychological study of people 'locked in a house' to brilliant life. You slowly learn secrets of those involved in the reunion as well as of Eden and her past. Unlike many of the bestselling 'thrillers' today, her characters are likeable. (I am getting so tired of the cookie-cutter agoraphobic, drug addicted/booze-swilling, 'protagonists'). With each new novel, you can see her writing skills grow stronger. Impressive twist to the genre. Lori Rader-Day works her talents in a 'Christiesque ' mystery to perfection.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Eden Wallace is a young widow who’s afraid of the dark. When she discovers a reservation for a dark sky park in Upper Michigan that her late husband had booked months in advance for their ten-year anniversary, she decides to go. The only problem is she’s not the only person at the guest house. Six college friends are also there celebrating their own sort of reunion. Irritated, Eden plans to leave the next day, but in the middle of the night, one of the six friends is murdered. Now the guest hous Eden Wallace is a young widow who’s afraid of the dark. When she discovers a reservation for a dark sky park in Upper Michigan that her late husband had booked months in advance for their ten-year anniversary, she decides to go. The only problem is she’s not the only person at the guest house. Six college friends are also there celebrating their own sort of reunion. Irritated, Eden plans to leave the next day, but in the middle of the night, one of the six friends is murdered. Now the guest house is a crime scene, and Eden and the five remaining friends aren’t going anywhere. In classic locked-room mystery style, everyone points the finger at the other and it’s anyone’s guess who the killer is. Rader-Day pieces together an engrossing and compelling whodunit, but it’s Eden’s harrowing, emotional journey that will resonate with readers. A brutally honest, raw look at grief and forgiveness.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    Under a Dark Sky is the second book of Lori Rader Day's that I have read. I have really enjoyed both books.A dark sky park in Michigan is the setting for the book. I had never heard of a dark sky park before...have you? So great new setting! People go to dark sky parks to see the sky. Living in Canada and having plenty of dark skies, I did not know there was such a thing. Now I do!Fascinating story about a woman who finds a reservation to a hotel she has never heard of among her deceased husband Under a Dark Sky is the second book of Lori Rader Day's that I have read. I have really enjoyed both books.A dark sky park in Michigan is the setting for the book. I had never heard of a dark sky park before...have you? So great new setting! People go to dark sky parks to see the sky. Living in Canada and having plenty of dark skies, I did not know there was such a thing. Now I do!Fascinating story about a woman who finds a reservation to a hotel she has never heard of among her deceased husband's belongings. She believes he prebooked it for their anniversary. What she finds is a rented house full of people she does not know. And then one of them dies....Eden seems to be living in Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None. But what Eden really finds out is a lot about herself, her marriage and her future. Great storytelling! Loved this book!Highly recommend Under a Dark Sky.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Nicely written locked room mystery combined with examination of grief. Yes that is an odd combination but it works. Eden is a widow who is afraid of the dark, which her husband Bix definitely was not. She opts, thinking it will help her, to take advantage of his long planned stay at a dark house. To her surprise, she's not the only one there- there are 6 others and that's how things get interesting. There's a murder and creepy happenings and everyone is pointing fingers. Eden doesn't know any of Nicely written locked room mystery combined with examination of grief. Yes that is an odd combination but it works. Eden is a widow who is afraid of the dark, which her husband Bix definitely was not. She opts, thinking it will help her, to take advantage of his long planned stay at a dark house. To her surprise, she's not the only one there- there are 6 others and that's how things get interesting. There's a murder and creepy happenings and everyone is pointing fingers. Eden doesn't know any of these people and it's her voice throughout the novel so you learn things as she does. I found this interesting from the perspective of how she worked through her pain as well. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. This is not necessarily a page turner, at least in the beginning, but you're definitely going to find yourself eager to know the answers.
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  • Nancy Ash
    January 1, 1970
    While the circumstances and settings for each book are different, her main characters share similar traits. Each is a woman who is strong, but deeply flawed, and a loner for the most part. Eden, the main character in this book, shares those traits, but grows throughout the twisting plot lines and revelations of her past.Lori’s prose is sprinkled with imagery that begs you to stop and appreciate each passage even as the story draws you forward. The setting for this novel is a Dark Sky Park in Mic While the circumstances and settings for each book are different, her main characters share similar traits. Each is a woman who is strong, but deeply flawed, and a loner for the most part. Eden, the main character in this book, shares those traits, but grows throughout the twisting plot lines and revelations of her past.Lori’s prose is sprinkled with imagery that begs you to stop and appreciate each passage even as the story draws you forward. The setting for this novel is a Dark Sky Park in Michigan near Mackinaw. It’s based on the Headlands International Dark Sky Park and is beautifully drawn, making it another living character, one I would like to visit. In fact, it would be a special treat to read this book in that setting, finishing it beachside as the sun sets.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Under A Dark Sky is a great page-turner that I really, really didn’t want to put down. (However, unlike the main character of the novel, I don’t have a problem sleeping, and so I did put it down a couple of times.) I’ve read one other book by this author (Little Pretty Things) and it was equally thrilling. I am convinced that anything Lori Rader-Day writes is going to be a five-star read.I received an ARC of this book from Goodreads.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Eden Wallace is recently widowed. When she discovers a reservation for 2 for a week at a dark sky park, she decides to go even though she is terribly afraid of the dark. She expected to be alone but found that she was sharing a house with 6 college friends. When one of the friends is murdered during the night, everyone is a suspect in this locked room mystery. This one is a bit slow at the beginning but stick with it. Lori Rader-Day is one of my new favorites.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    This is the kind of thriller that kept me guessing until the end. First impression is completely different from how the novel developed. The intriguing part is the way the friends are willing to throw one another under the bus then suddenly be best friends again. The POV is told by Eden, the outsider. Very difficult to put down.
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  • Ellen Whitfield
    January 1, 1970
    Another amazing thriller from one of my favorite authors! She builds an atmosphere of darkness that made me a little claustrophobic (in a good way), and does a great job making Eden's grief palpable. You empathize with her, while at the same time understanding the point of view of the people who love her and want to move on. And the central mystery? Brilliant.
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  • JK Gagnon
    January 1, 1970
    I read an ARC of this book and really enjoyed it. The way the characters are developed feels very natural and believable and was what really made this book. I found very few of the characters to be actually likable but I felt that I gained empathy for many of them over the course of the book. I would recommend this book for those who enjoy mysteries with careful unpacking of a convoluted plot.
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  • L.D. Barnes
    January 1, 1970
    This is a cross between Agatha Christie and Alfred Hitchcock! Lori gives us a roller coaster of twists and turns, a host of suspects and keeps the reader going until the very end. I'm a jealous mystery writer who really enjoyed this novel. Buy it on a Friday night because you will need every moment of the weekend to read it - you will not be able to put it down!
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    This slower-paced thriller was a well-written and interesting read. The author keeps the reader guessing, which always makes for a good who-done-it! There is one unrealistic plot point that keeps me from giving 5 stars, but overall, a very good story.
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