I'm Still Here
From a powerful new voice on racial justice, an eye-opening account of growing up Black, Christian, and female in middle-class white America. Austin Channing Brown's first encounter with a racialized America came at age 7, when she discovered her parents named her Austin to deceive future employers into thinking she was a white man. Growing up in majority-white schools, organizations, and churches, Austin writes, "I had to learn what it means to love blackness," a journey that led to a lifetime spent navigating America's racial divide as a writer, speaker and expert who helps organizations practice genuine inclusion.In a time when nearly all institutions (schools, churches, universities, businesses) claim to value "diversity" in their mission statements, I'm Still Here is a powerful account of how and why our actions so often fall short of our words. Austin writes in breathtaking detail about her journey to self-worth and the pitfalls that kill our attempts at racial justice, in stories that bear witness to the complexity of America's social fabric--from Black Cleveland neighborhoods to private schools in the middle-class suburbs, from prison walls to the boardrooms at majority-white organizations.For readers who have engaged with America's legacy on race through the writing of Ta-Nehisi Coates and Michael Eric Dyson, I'm Still Here is an illuminating look at how white, middle-class, Evangelicalism has participated in an era of rising racial hostility, inviting the reader to confront apathy, recognize God's ongoing work in the world, and discover how blackness--if we let it--can save us all.

I'm Still Here Details

TitleI'm Still Here
Author
ReleaseMay 15th, 2018
PublisherConvergent Books
ISBN-139781524760854
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Race, Autobiography, Memoir, Social Movements, Social Justice, Religion, Christian

I'm Still Here Review

  • Leigh Kramer
    January 1, 1970
    If you're at all familiar with Austin Channing Brown, you know she is a gifted communicator as both a writer and speaker. I had high hopes for her first book and I was hooked from the first page. I had intended to only read the first few chapters and before I knew it, I chucked my plans for the day and wrapped myself up in the pages of Austin's story.By the time I finished reading, I was even more in awe of Austin. I'm Still Here is truly phenomenal.Austin shares how even her very name challenge If you're at all familiar with Austin Channing Brown, you know she is a gifted communicator as both a writer and speaker. I had high hopes for her first book and I was hooked from the first page. I had intended to only read the first few chapters and before I knew it, I chucked my plans for the day and wrapped myself up in the pages of Austin's story.By the time I finished reading, I was even more in awe of Austin. I'm Still Here is truly phenomenal.Austin shares how even her very name challenges people's assumptions. People expect to a white man when they see the name Austin; they don't always know what to do with the Black woman before them. She grew up and has worked in majority-white schools, organizations, and churches. And with those majority-white spaces come stereotypes, biases, and prejudices.Austin shares her trajectory from believing she was the white culture whisperer after college to seeing how white supremacy infected programs supposedly dedicated to racial reconciliation. "The role of the bridge builder sounds appealing until it becomes clear how often the bridge is your broken back." p. 42In chapter 5, titled Whiteness At Work, Austin details the microaggressions she experienced in her average workday at a Christian organization. It was staggering to see them listed out and know this was just an average day. One of many. And then to see how the organization had no interest in changing when Austin pointed out the biases present, despite its supposed commitment to diversity in the workplace. It is little wonder why Austin finds white people so exhausting. I can only imagine the bone-deep tiredness that comes after a lifetime of existing as a Black woman in primarily white spaces. White readers will need to pay special attention to the sections exploring the difference between white fragility and taking full ownership of facing your own racism. If you are white, you have internalized racism, even if you don't see it. This is what it is to live in a society stacked in your favor from the moment you are born and this is why it's important for us to confront our privilege and interrogate our biases.More importantly, we cannot—we must not—rely on People Of Color to help us do that. As Austin notes, she is "not the priest for the white soul" (p. 65.) I was very moved by Interlude: Letter To My Son. I was also moved when Austin shared about her fears that crop up whenever her husband or dad travels. She worries they'll be pulled over and won't make it home. It's horrifying that this is not an unrealistic fear, that there's nothing we can say in reassurance. It's a profound reminder of why we need to keep fighting for justice and the eradication of white supremacy at every level. There are tough truths here but there is also joy as Austin reflects on the gifts the Black church has given her and what she loves about being a Black woman. I loved reading about her memories of her childhood and time with her family, as well as her love for books and the library.Each chapter builds upon the one before it in a way that is masterful. This mastery becomes especially clear in the final two chapters. The last chapter is a reflection on hope and hopelessness and it is precisely what I needed to read for so many reasons. "This is the shadow of hope. Knowing that we may never see the realization of our dreams, and yet still showing up." p. 105Then I read the final paragraph and Austin brought it all home and my only thought was, "holy shit." It was that powerful. I read it again and then again and let her words sink in. The whole book builds toward that moment and it is absolutely incredible getting there. Highly recommended.Disclosure: I was provided a review copy from Convergent in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Dale
    January 1, 1970
    At its core this is a hard book full of hard teachings. This I know - she has many more valid points than I would like to admit.To be published in May of 2018 by Convergent Books.Let me address the title of the book for all of you that will get hung up on the word "whiteness."Let me use a rough analogy to explain it.I am an overweight person. I used to be even more overweight (I have lost 85 pounds). I weighed enough that I had to buy almost all of my clothes online or in special stores. Most ma At its core this is a hard book full of hard teachings. This I know - she has many more valid points than I would like to admit.To be published in May of 2018 by Convergent Books.Let me address the title of the book for all of you that will get hung up on the word "whiteness."Let me use a rough analogy to explain it.I am an overweight person. I used to be even more overweight (I have lost 85 pounds). I weighed enough that I had to buy almost all of my clothes online or in special stores. Most major chains literally sold nothing that would fit me. Certain brands make it very clear that they refuse to make clothes for heavy people because they don't want them wearing their brand. Once, I had a salesperson yell at me from across her empty mall store when she saw me walk in that they didn't carry my size (I was looking for something for my daughter).The normal (easy to find, available everywhere) clothing world was not made for me. I was living in a world designed for thinner people.This is how the author, Austin Channing Brown, feels about modern America. It is designed for white people. Period. Everyone else makes large accommodations to the majority while white America makes small ones. For example, in media most television shows feature white characters with maybe a token non-white character. For example, just this month the Marvel movie Black Panther came out. It is the eighteenth Marvel movie. It is also the first one with a main character who is not a white man. 1 of 18 is not a very good ratio.Brown grew up in White America in suburban parochial schools. She is not a stranger to the mostly white religious organizations that she has been hired to help with their diversity issues. But, too often, she has been hired as a token hire rather than a guide to how to truly embrace a different part of the body of Christ. It is not enough to get the numbers right.I understand her first sentence of the book: "White people are exhausting." I am a white man who teaches at a majority minority school. The culture of the school is simply not mine (separated by race and at least one generation) and there are times when I leave school exhausted by the constant mental translating I have to do just to keep up. I understood her comment immediately.There are weird things that Brown experiences that I also have experienced. For example, she has white people at work that want to ...Read more at: http://dwdsreviews.blogspot.com/2018/...
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  • Shayla Mays
    January 1, 1970
    In the same way that not everyone was ready and could handle, Between the World and Me, this is another that some will have a hard time with. It was not meant to comfort white people. It's written to share a black experience. With that being said, if there is one book that could most accurately define my Christian black womanhood... my thoughts, my pain, my fear, my concerns, my frustrations, my awareness that I MUST press on despite not having much to cling to for hope... it's this book. I read In the same way that not everyone was ready and could handle, Between the World and Me, this is another that some will have a hard time with. It was not meant to comfort white people. It's written to share a black experience. With that being said, if there is one book that could most accurately define my Christian black womanhood... my thoughts, my pain, my fear, my concerns, my frustrations, my awareness that I MUST press on despite not having much to cling to for hope... it's this book. I read it in one sitting. It was that relatable. So grateful for Austin's willingness to share her perspective and a part of her story which so many of us black women can Amen to.
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  • Adam Shields
    January 1, 1970
    Short Review: Read it!Slightly longer review: I'm Still Here is a memoir about the experience of a Black Woman within predominately White cultural spaces. She grew up in mostly White neighborhoods, going to mostly White schools. She didn't have her first Black teacher until college. She has mostly worked for Christian non-profits that were also mostly white. But being saturated in White culture does not change her appearance or make those that are inclined to judge her based on her gender and sk Short Review: Read it!Slightly longer review: I'm Still Here is a memoir about the experience of a Black Woman within predominately White cultural spaces. She grew up in mostly White neighborhoods, going to mostly White schools. She didn't have her first Black teacher until college. She has mostly worked for Christian non-profits that were also mostly white. But being saturated in White culture does not change her appearance or make those that are inclined to judge her based on her gender and skin color any less likely to judge her. Part of what has been assumed by many is that if we just get kids a good education and help them 'speak white' or even give them White sounding names as Austin's parents intentionally did, that integration will be made easier. But Austin is here to say, racism is still real. This is a book that needs to be read. Not just by Black Women, although I think that is the primary audience, but by everyone else that is not a Black Woman because those of us that are not Black Women need to hear what a Black woman is saying about the work it takes to be a Black woman in the world.This is not a 'everything is going to be all right because of Jesus' book. This is a 'Jesus may be in charge, but sin is real' book. My full review is on my blog at http://bookwi.se/im-still-here/
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  • Shannon Whitehead
    January 1, 1970
    There’s much for everyone to learn from this book—the black community, the Church, and the majority culture. It’s eye-opening for those who choose to see, educational for those willing to learn, and inspiring for those ready to act.My full review: https://thewitnessbcc.com/review-im-s...*An advance copy of this book was provided to me for free by the publisher for the purpose of writing this honest review. The opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Krystal
    January 1, 1970
    Austin Channing Brown has delivered a powerful statement on the harm that Christian white supremacy does to black bodies and everyone would benefit from reading her brilliance!
  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    We’ve seen this before: persistent white refusal to acknowledge structural racism, the softening of America’s racist history, the lone black person as reluctant racism confessor for white colleagues. Yet Brown explores racial ignorance within the white church, noting how Christian values of hope, forgiveness and unconditional love do not seem to apply to black people, but instead give “nice white people” a pass on their racism. Brown poignantly describes the death of her cousin in jail, “I had t We’ve seen this before: persistent white refusal to acknowledge structural racism, the softening of America’s racist history, the lone black person as reluctant racism confessor for white colleagues. Yet Brown explores racial ignorance within the white church, noting how Christian values of hope, forgiveness and unconditional love do not seem to apply to black people, but instead give “nice white people” a pass on their racism. Brown poignantly describes the death of her cousin in jail, “I had to reject the notion that my cousin's life was somehow less valuable because he did not meet “Christian criteria” of innocence and perfection” (p 150). In contrast, the “Black Jesus” of her home church “understood the accused, the incarcerated, the criminals” (p 152), and expressed righteous anger towards the corrupt.Brown passionately rejects facile reliance on “hope”, stating that “in order for me to stay in this work, hope must die...The death of hope gives way to a sadness that heals, to anger that inspires, to a wisdom that empowers me” (p 184). An eloquent argument for meaningful reconciliation focused on racial injustice rather than white feelings
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  • Rob Carmack
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. It is prophetic, convicting, and absolutely necessary. And I don't mean that it's convicting on a theoretical level or for someone else to learn from; I mean that I personally feel convicted, and I think that's a really good thing.I don't really know what to say, other than I think this book is important, and I hope it finds a big audience. Austin Channing Brown is a wonderful writer, and she builds her book by telling stories of her own life and how her experiences in the wor I loved this book. It is prophetic, convicting, and absolutely necessary. And I don't mean that it's convicting on a theoretical level or for someone else to learn from; I mean that I personally feel convicted, and I think that's a really good thing.I don't really know what to say, other than I think this book is important, and I hope it finds a big audience. Austin Channing Brown is a wonderful writer, and she builds her book by telling stories of her own life and how her experiences in the world have shaped her and given her the perspective that she has today. She is brilliant and fearless, and we need to hear what she has to say.
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  • Mandi Ehman
    January 1, 1970
    I’m not sure I’ve ever listened to an entire audiobook in just 24 hours, but Austin Channing Brown’s writing is engaging, hard-hitting, gut-wrenching and unputdownable. Many of her stories are hard to hear and harder still to *really* comprehend, but I’m thankful for the experiences she shared and the call for us to recognize whiteness that we might otherwise ignore so that we can move toward true reconciliation within the church.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    This book is beautifully written and full of insight and wisdom. I listened to the audio version, and I'm planning to buy the hard copy as well. I can't wait to dive into it again with other people so that I can process the information and find ways to move forward with action.
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  • Cathy A.
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book in an evening, I couldn’t put it down. As a white woman, I wasn’t sure this book was for me. But, Austin Channing Brown is phenomenal and says what we need to hear. Everyone who claims to be in the fight for equality & equity needs this. Everyone who works with minorities needs this. White NGOs need this. Well-meaning folks are so capable of damage, and we need to listen well and understand the ways we cause pain. Whether you’re starting to understand race, racism, and white I read this book in an evening, I couldn’t put it down. As a white woman, I wasn’t sure this book was for me. But, Austin Channing Brown is phenomenal and says what we need to hear. Everyone who claims to be in the fight for equality & equity needs this. Everyone who works with minorities needs this. White NGOs need this. Well-meaning folks are so capable of damage, and we need to listen well and understand the ways we cause pain. Whether you’re starting to understand race, racism, and white supremacy, or you’ve been working for justice for years, Austin Channing Brown’s book has the ability to open your eyes wider.
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  • Katharine
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy of this at a conference. It tore me up. Brown doesn't pull any punches about the difficulty of being black in America. She doesn't put a happy ending on it all. She also doesn't paint the black experience as negative. Brown brings out the strength, beauty and dignity of being black.I'm grateful for authors like Brown who are willing to help educate the world about harsh realities....to educate well-intentioned yet still so ignorant white people like me about racism. T I received an advanced copy of this at a conference. It tore me up. Brown doesn't pull any punches about the difficulty of being black in America. She doesn't put a happy ending on it all. She also doesn't paint the black experience as negative. Brown brings out the strength, beauty and dignity of being black.I'm grateful for authors like Brown who are willing to help educate the world about harsh realities....to educate well-intentioned yet still so ignorant white people like me about racism. There is a lot of power in this book.
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  • Amanda (Books, Life and Everything Nice)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free through Goodreads Giveaways. As always, an honest review.Austin Channing Brown tells the story of her life experiences and perceptions as a black woman in America. She doesn’t sugar coat things, but does explain to the reader her point of view. She makes us think about the injustices, our perceptions, our actions, the system in place, and so much more. What are we doing wrong in this country? What do we need to do better?I liked I’m Still Here for it’s honesty, empa I received this book for free through Goodreads Giveaways. As always, an honest review.Austin Channing Brown tells the story of her life experiences and perceptions as a black woman in America. She doesn’t sugar coat things, but does explain to the reader her point of view. She makes us think about the injustices, our perceptions, our actions, the system in place, and so much more. What are we doing wrong in this country? What do we need to do better?I liked I’m Still Here for it’s honesty, empathy, and look into the author’s life experiences. While the book intrigued and educated me, it didn’t absolutely captivate me. The memoir is short, making for a quick read, but it didn’t pull me in as much as I originally thought. I still really enjoyed the reading experience. Also religion was a fairly main aspect, which I didn’t realize. So some references were a bit unfamiliar to me, as I’m not well versed in the genre.I felt the story was especially strong when showing the blunt examples of racism, microaggressions, and generally unfair behavior. For example, her parents named her Austin, in part so people would assume she is a white male and not prejudge her. It’s sad, but unfortunately necessary. Austin also shows us a small glimpse into her life; what it feels like to almost always be different than most people in the room. And also what it finally feels like to fit in with people who get it. People who understand why an example of a mundane daily task, using washing one’s hair isn’t a relevant example for all people. Overall, I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness is another relevant memoir that people should definitely read. A quick book that you can easily read a few pages or chapter wherever you are.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I'm Still Here by Austin Channing Brown is a collection of essays that talk about her experiences growing up as an African America female. And no that isn't a typo. Austin is a woman who was given a traditionally white male name by her parents in the hopes that her life would be a little be easier when applying for jobs. Austin talks a lot about her upbringing in Toledo where she attended private school and lived in a predominantly white neighborhood. Not only does she mention how her upbringing I'm Still Here by Austin Channing Brown is a collection of essays that talk about her experiences growing up as an African America female. And no that isn't a typo. Austin is a woman who was given a traditionally white male name by her parents in the hopes that her life would be a little be easier when applying for jobs. Austin talks a lot about her upbringing in Toledo where she attended private school and lived in a predominantly white neighborhood. Not only does she mention how her upbringing affected her but also how she was finally introduced into black culture and how she fell in love with the black church. She also talks a lot about her experiences in college and in the workplace, navigating prejudice and so-called "well-intentioned" white people.While this book covers a lot about race and how black people are perceived, the thoughts and ideas she discussed weren't things I didn't already know. However, that doesn't mean that I didn't enjoy this book. I appreciated getting to see the world through her eyes, growing up in situations that were very similar to my own upbringing. If you want to learn more about how racism has evolved in America, I think this is a good place to start. Austin's story is very approachable and she mentions a lot of other literature that can further someone's knowledge on this topic. Overall, I really enjoyed her story and am so glad that more black people are getting the opportunity to tell their stories.** Thank you Crown Publishing and NetGalley for giving me an ARC of this book in return for an honest review **
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    I have been struggling with how to review this book. It's brilliant and important and, frankly, it made me very angry with myself. And no, this isn't white guilt talking. This is "How could I just be so unaware of some of these issues, and what can I do to get better" anger.Author Austin Channing Brown talks frankly about what it's like to be a person of color in primarily white spaces like evangelical Christianity. She addresses white fragility, white guilt, and microaggressions alongside overt I have been struggling with how to review this book. It's brilliant and important and, frankly, it made me very angry with myself. And no, this isn't white guilt talking. This is "How could I just be so unaware of some of these issues, and what can I do to get better" anger.Author Austin Channing Brown talks frankly about what it's like to be a person of color in primarily white spaces like evangelical Christianity. She addresses white fragility, white guilt, and microaggressions alongside overt racism and bigotry. (For those who aren't sure about the difference, racism is about systemic power and bigotry is individual).One of the most important chapters (okay, they're all important, but still ...) was entitled "How to Survive Racism in an Organization that Claims to be Anti-racist." In this chapter, Brown addresses diversity policies that turn out to be more lip service than reality; this is, sadly, a common occurrence.Brown also has a chapter called "Nice White People." This is the place where she addresses the important matter of microaggressions. It is indeed possible to display bigotry if one has friends of color. It is indeed possible to display bigotry without using the n-word or belonging to the KKK.I truly believe this book is a vital, eye-opening read. Those of us who are determined to confront our own privilege and do better would be well-advised to read it.
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  • Charlene
    January 1, 1970
    This book. I couldn't put it down. It really grabbed my attention and gave me much food for thought. If you only read one book about racism, this is it. It's clear, concise, passionate, and given a chance, it will unapologetically change you forever. It belongs on every bookshelf. One of the many things I loved about this (and trust me, there's lots to love) was that even before I had finished it I was tweeting for recommendations for important books on the same subject. The author quotes some i This book. I couldn't put it down. It really grabbed my attention and gave me much food for thought. If you only read one book about racism, this is it. It's clear, concise, passionate, and given a chance, it will unapologetically change you forever. It belongs on every bookshelf. One of the many things I loved about this (and trust me, there's lots to love) was that even before I had finished it I was tweeting for recommendations for important books on the same subject. The author quotes some important works so I know what I'll be searching for in the very near future. Is the book likely to cause some discomfort? Absolutely but then change is never comfortable and this book definitely calls for change. There are so many quotes I highlighted in this e-book advance reading copy and I dearly want to repeat some but I'm going to wait until release day and do a longer review when I check the quotes against the finished book.
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  • Alexneil2112
    January 1, 1970
    Poignant and challengingA few chapters in to this book, I finally let my defenses down enough to let Austin's story come through. A quick but engaging read, "I'm Still Here" is a memoir that everyone should read. It's a book to revisit too. The way she fuses personal and family stories with current events and deeper reflection on our (post)modern American political situation creates just the right fusion for a great auto biographical account that does provoke questions and challenges but is simp Poignant and challengingA few chapters in to this book, I finally let my defenses down enough to let Austin's story come through. A quick but engaging read, "I'm Still Here" is a memoir that everyone should read. It's a book to revisit too. The way she fuses personal and family stories with current events and deeper reflection on our (post)modern American political situation creates just the right fusion for a great auto biographical account that does provoke questions and challenges but is simply beautiful in its own right
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    This is a powerful piece on the experience of being black in America. Channing Brown curates a poignant portrait of the personal, the intimate and the daily truths and burdens a white America enacts and extracts from people of color. It is her deep religious reflections that reverberate in my consciousness reminding me of why I first began a journey to educate myself about race in America, from those who can't escape it. Channing Brown convicts me that as a (white) mother, pastor and citizen I m This is a powerful piece on the experience of being black in America. Channing Brown curates a poignant portrait of the personal, the intimate and the daily truths and burdens a white America enacts and extracts from people of color. It is her deep religious reflections that reverberate in my consciousness reminding me of why I first began a journey to educate myself about race in America, from those who can't escape it. Channing Brown convicts me that as a (white) mother, pastor and citizen I must continue do better for all our sakes. This is an engaging and relevant work of memoir written for everyone!
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  • Leslie Welton
    January 1, 1970
    White readers, if at any point you pause in a chapter and think “but this isn’t ME...” go back and read it again and again until you see the truth about how whiteness hurts black and brown lives. This book is a gift and worth sitting with in reflection and the love with which Austin wrote each page. It’s also a call out of complacency and into real social change.
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  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    So it's hard for me to read this and not compare it to "So You Want to Talk about Race," since I just finished it earlier this month and they are both books by Black women about race. They are both excellent, important books, but the faith angle in this one could be really useful in having productive conversations within that community.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    A hard book for an old white man to read, but MS Brown tells about her experience with racism. The open minded reader will recognize the reality of inequity and hopefully want to be part of change. To deny there is racism is to deny reality. Austin Channing Brown witnesses her Christian faith in hope for true reconciliation.
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  • David A.
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been waiting for this book, the first from this brilliant writer, for a long time. As bracingly honest as Ta-Nehisi Coates, she changed my thinking about such seemingly straightforward things as desegregation, such sweetly ethereal things as hope. Read it and you’ll get it.
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  • Adena
    January 1, 1970
    I won an advance copy of Austin’s book from a Convergent giveaway on Goodreads. I’m familiar with Austin’s work, and as a Black woman who frequently occupies majority white spaces (with the exception of my faith community), I can relate to much of her story. “I’m Still Here” did not disappoint. Austin speaks openly and honestly about her experiences—from “being the only one” to the interlude on “Why I Love Being a Black Girl”—while effectively breaking down how racism can still flourish in insti I won an advance copy of Austin’s book from a Convergent giveaway on Goodreads. I’m familiar with Austin’s work, and as a Black woman who frequently occupies majority white spaces (with the exception of my faith community), I can relate to much of her story. “I’m Still Here” did not disappoint. Austin speaks openly and honestly about her experiences—from “being the only one” to the interlude on “Why I Love Being a Black Girl”—while effectively breaking down how racism can still flourish in institutions and organizations that focus on loving thy neighbor.
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  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent and challenging. Loved the writing and the voice, even when it left me feeling uncomfortable. Thought-provoking. Highly recommend.I received an electronic review copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful and hard to read because truth is dripping from the pages. Austin pulls no punches. Every person should read this book but not everyone will be ready to confront the truths in this book.
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Must read
  • Kris Wise
    January 1, 1970
    Written review coming soon.
  • Brian Cambra
    January 1, 1970
    It is difficult to put into words the impact of this book. It should be mandatory reading. I simply cannot recommend it enough.
  • Lindy Casteel
    January 1, 1970
    I was uncomfortable during a few sections of this book but thankfully I’ve learned that discomfort teaches me something and it’s a requirement for change. Great book!
  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Such a powerful read. Finished in a day...so much to unpack! I already know I need to read it again!
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