I'm Still Here
From a powerful new voice on racial justice, an eye-opening account of growing up Black, Christian, and female in middle-class white America. Austin Channing Brown's first encounter with a racialized America came at age 7, when she discovered her parents named her Austin to deceive future employers into thinking she was a white man. Growing up in majority-white schools, organizations, and churches, Austin writes, "I had to learn what it means to love blackness," a journey that led to a lifetime spent navigating America's racial divide as a writer, speaker and expert who helps organizations practice genuine inclusion.In a time when nearly all institutions (schools, churches, universities, businesses) claim to value "diversity" in their mission statements, I'm Still Here is a powerful account of how and why our actions so often fall short of our words. Austin writes in breathtaking detail about her journey to self-worth and the pitfalls that kill our attempts at racial justice, in stories that bear witness to the complexity of America's social fabric--from Black Cleveland neighborhoods to private schools in the middle-class suburbs, from prison walls to the boardrooms at majority-white organizations.For readers who have engaged with America's legacy on race through the writing of Ta-Nehisi Coates and Michael Eric Dyson, I'm Still Here is an illuminating look at how white, middle-class, Evangelicalism has participated in an era of rising racial hostility, inviting the reader to confront apathy, recognize God's ongoing work in the world, and discover how blackness--if we let it--can save us all.

I'm Still Here Details

TitleI'm Still Here
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 15th, 2018
PublisherConvergent Books
ISBN-139781524760854
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Race, Social Movements, Social Justice

I'm Still Here Review

  • Shayla Mays
    January 1, 1970
    In the same way that not everyone was ready and could handle, Between the World and Me, this is another that some will have a hard time with. It was not meant to comfort white people. It's written to share a black experience. With that being said, if there is one book that could most accurately define my Christian black womanhood... my thoughts, my pain, my fear, my concerns, my frustrations, my awareness that I MUST press on despite not having much to cling to for hope... it's this book. I read In the same way that not everyone was ready and could handle, Between the World and Me, this is another that some will have a hard time with. It was not meant to comfort white people. It's written to share a black experience. With that being said, if there is one book that could most accurately define my Christian black womanhood... my thoughts, my pain, my fear, my concerns, my frustrations, my awareness that I MUST press on despite not having much to cling to for hope... it's this book. I read it in one sitting. It was that relatable. So grateful for Austin's willingness to share her perspective and a part of her story which so many of us black women can Amen to.
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  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    Update on the second read-through. Turns out I gave that first copy away to my student, a senior black student, my advisee, who's "so done" (for good reason) with the institution where I work--an institution like many of the institutions Brown works for. I bought another copy to teach from this week in a Theology and Literature of the Black Body. Finished this book today. Handed it to my white kids as soon as I closed the cover. Listen, I said.
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  • Rincey
    January 1, 1970
    Yeah, I'm going to need my own copy of this book so I can re-read it and mark it up. So many good truths in here.Watch me discuss this book in my July wrap up: https://youtu.be/8kaQcaNn9uw
  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    The best time for me to read a memoir is after finishing a fantasy novel – in this case The Wicked King – because while fiction and non-fiction do share similarities (at least they should), plunging into something very different makes you even more aware of what you’re reading currently.This is the kind of memoir I like reading. I recently learned that the word ‘‘memoir’’ can apply to both an exploration of someone’s life, like a biography, or writing on a specific topic, like an essay. Although The best time for me to read a memoir is after finishing a fantasy novel – in this case The Wicked King – because while fiction and non-fiction do share similarities (at least they should), plunging into something very different makes you even more aware of what you’re reading currently.This is the kind of memoir I like reading. I recently learned that the word ‘‘memoir’’ can apply to both an exploration of someone’s life, like a biography, or writing on a specific topic, like an essay. Although I don’t exclusively read memoirs that fit the first definition, I do prefer it. It’s then no surprise that I was immediately captivated by this book. It’s not only that the author talks about her early life – childhood, adolescence and coming of age in general – all of which I adore reading about, it’s that she uses her communication skills to share her views and explore her past and present in such an honest and relatable way. She denounces racism and questions today’s society’s view of Blackness and Whiteness using examples easy to understand and comparisons that immediately put things in perspective. One metaphor she used that especially spoke to me was how the world is so much like vanilla ice cream – white – with only a few chocolate sprinkles on the top, but that this is not how it should be, because although the sprinkles add flavour, they are dispensable. And Blackness should not be replaceable. It is here to stay.It also never crossed my mind that some companies may hire people of color and of other ethnicities simply to take pride in their own ‘‘inclusivity,’’ while not necessarily wanting to hear any of those people’s ideas or welcome their culture with them. Many assume they will ‘‘assimilate.’’ Some are even baffled by their new black employees who refuse to assimilate, choosing to keep their individualities.I have read non-fiction books that discuss discrimination and race relations in the past, but the truth is that I will never stop learning. Even if I was aware of some of the things mentioned in this memoir, I still ended up learning a lot. That’s because we never do stop learning. Nor should we ever want to. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Leigh Kramer
    January 1, 1970
    If you're at all familiar with Austin Channing Brown, you know she is a gifted communicator as both a writer and speaker. I had high hopes for her first book and I was hooked from the first page. I had intended to only read the first few chapters and before I knew it, I chucked my plans for the day and wrapped myself up in the pages of Austin's story.By the time I finished reading, I was even more in awe of Austin. I'm Still Here is truly phenomenal.Austin shares how even her very name challenge If you're at all familiar with Austin Channing Brown, you know she is a gifted communicator as both a writer and speaker. I had high hopes for her first book and I was hooked from the first page. I had intended to only read the first few chapters and before I knew it, I chucked my plans for the day and wrapped myself up in the pages of Austin's story.By the time I finished reading, I was even more in awe of Austin. I'm Still Here is truly phenomenal.Austin shares how even her very name challenges people's assumptions. People expect to a white man when they see the name Austin; they don't always know what to do with the Black woman before them. She grew up and has worked in majority-white schools, organizations, and churches. And with those majority-white spaces come stereotypes, biases, and prejudices.Austin shares her trajectory from believing she was the white culture whisperer after college to seeing how white supremacy infected programs supposedly dedicated to racial reconciliation. "The role of the bridge builder sounds appealing until it becomes clear how often the bridge is your broken back." p. 42In chapter 5, titled Whiteness At Work, Austin details the microaggressions she experienced in her average workday at a Christian organization. It was staggering to see them listed out and know this was just an average day. One of many. And then to see how the organization had no interest in changing when Austin pointed out the biases present, despite its supposed commitment to diversity in the workplace. It is little wonder why Austin finds white people so exhausting. I can only imagine the bone-deep tiredness that comes after a lifetime of existing as a Black woman in primarily white spaces. White readers will need to pay special attention to the sections exploring the difference between white fragility and taking full ownership of facing your own racism. If you are white, you have internalized racism, even if you don't see it. This is what it is to live in a society stacked in your favor from the moment you are born and this is why it's important for us to confront our privilege and interrogate our biases.More importantly, we cannot—we must not—rely on People Of Color to help us do that. As Austin notes, she is "not the priest for the white soul" (p. 65.) I was very moved by Interlude: Letter To My Son. I was also moved when Austin shared about her fears that crop up whenever her husband or dad travels. She worries they'll be pulled over and won't make it home. It's horrifying that this is not an unrealistic fear, that there's nothing we can say in reassurance. It's a profound reminder of why we need to keep fighting for justice and the eradication of white supremacy at every level. There are tough truths here but there is also joy as Austin reflects on the gifts the Black church has given her and what she loves about being a Black woman. I loved reading about her memories of her childhood and time with her family, as well as her love for books and the library.Each chapter builds upon the one before it in a way that is masterful. This mastery becomes especially clear in the final two chapters. The last chapter is a reflection on hope and hopelessness and it is precisely what I needed to read for so many reasons. "This is the shadow of hope. Knowing that we may never see the realization of our dreams, and yet still showing up." p. 105Then I read the final paragraph and Austin brought it all home and my only thought was, "holy shit." It was that powerful. I read it again and then again and let her words sink in. The whole book builds toward that moment and it is absolutely incredible getting there. Highly recommended.Disclosure: I was provided a review copy from Convergent in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Chanequa Walker-Barnes
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely breathtaking! Just a few pages into this book, I knew that I had to finish it in one day. Austin Channing Brown does what many of us have been needing for so long: she centers her Black womanhood in her memoir of racial justice, reconciliation, and Christianity. By doing so, she demonstrates what womanist theologians have consistently claimed: when you begin with the experiences and needs of Black women, you articulate a theology that encompasses all. This is a memoir, to be sure, but Absolutely breathtaking! Just a few pages into this book, I knew that I had to finish it in one day. Austin Channing Brown does what many of us have been needing for so long: she centers her Black womanhood in her memoir of racial justice, reconciliation, and Christianity. By doing so, she demonstrates what womanist theologians have consistently claimed: when you begin with the experiences and needs of Black women, you articulate a theology that encompasses all. This is a memoir, to be sure, but it is every bit a work of theology, in which Brown makes bold claims about who God is and who God intends for us to be to one another.
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  • Raven
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book with the hope that Ms Brown would illuminate what actual justice or equality would look like. It was largely a memoir and a good one. I went school in the 70s and 80s so my experience was different but I was surprised to hear about hers as I had assumed things had changed somewhat since I had been in school. She seemed put off by the fact that the predominantly white school she attended taught and treated her through the lens of 'whiteness', but I am not sure how they could have I read this book with the hope that Ms Brown would illuminate what actual justice or equality would look like. It was largely a memoir and a good one. I went school in the 70s and 80s so my experience was different but I was surprised to hear about hers as I had assumed things had changed somewhat since I had been in school. She seemed put off by the fact that the predominantly white school she attended taught and treated her through the lens of 'whiteness', but I am not sure how they could have done any different seeing as how her classmates and teachers were white. I see that as a frame of reference problem (if I am not black or French or Chinese how can I treat you culturally the way your people would?) not so much as a discrimination issue. I would not expect a predominantly black congregation to start conforming to my cultural 'white' requirements or needs so I am not sure why the expectation is there in the reverse setting. Again, how would we know what is the right thing to do?I was steadfastly behind her with regards to her outrage at being touched without permission, called names, assumed to be a welfare recipient instead of an employee, and being yelled at by anyone for having different views. Everyone's personal experience is valid -- afterall it is theirs. However, I don't think the answer is to be racist against whites. Many 'whites' would like to know what it is that is wanted from us in this racial justice regard and this book did not have any real answers. I have the impression that nothing I did or said as a white woman were I to meet Ms Brown would be the correct response. She herself indicated in several places in the book that she knew what white people were thinking when they met her or talked with her. This is extremely judgmental and if it were to be said about black people would be considered racist without question. If we are hurt by this prejudgement we are considered 'fragile'. So, basically, it is not okay for white people to express their feelings with regards to this topic, but it is fine for black people to do so. The bottom line is people are ALL different. We were all raised in different home situations, cultures, neighborhoods, etc. I don' t believe it is really possible to reconcile an entire people group to another one. Even Jesus worked on an individual basis and sent his disciples out to also work on an individual basis.
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  • Mehrsa
    January 1, 1970
    Everything Brown says is right and true. She writes it clearly and well. And everyone who has not already internalized the message of white privilege needs to keep reading these books until they can understand what it is like to not have white privilege. However, there is so little in this book and in others that might push us forward. And don't get me wrong, I don't mean optimism and hope, but change. I get the feeling in all these books that white supremacy is so ingrained that whatever is don Everything Brown says is right and true. She writes it clearly and well. And everyone who has not already internalized the message of white privilege needs to keep reading these books until they can understand what it is like to not have white privilege. However, there is so little in this book and in others that might push us forward. And don't get me wrong, I don't mean optimism and hope, but change. I get the feeling in all these books that white supremacy is so ingrained that whatever is done is an indication of white supremacy. and sometimes, I think that's right. But I also feel ready for some books about going forward. A branch of help for those who might want to help. Maybe more akin to Bryan Stevenson's Just Mercy that gives that mercy to those who want to change and understand.
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  • Erin *Help I’m Reading and I Can’t Get Up*
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely magnificent. The female, Christian answer (not critique, not correction, but response— as in, call and response) to Coates’s Between the World and Me. A must read for Christians of conscience. 5 stars.
  • Raymond
    January 1, 1970
    "This book is my story about growing up in a Black girl's body.""I am not a priest for the white soul.""Our only chance at dismantling racial injustice is being more curious about its origins than we are worried about our comfort."This is a powerful book. Many of Brown's experiences being black in a white world have echoed my own. However, they are more visceral because she lives with the double bind of being a black female. Her book is part memoir and also has elements of James Baldwin and Ta-N "This book is my story about growing up in a Black girl's body.""I am not a priest for the white soul.""Our only chance at dismantling racial injustice is being more curious about its origins than we are worried about our comfort."This is a powerful book. Many of Brown's experiences being black in a white world have echoed my own. However, they are more visceral because she lives with the double bind of being a black female. Her book is part memoir and also has elements of James Baldwin and Ta-Nehisi Coates. Her voice is unique because she focuses alot on her interaction with white Christians, especially those who purport to be "nice" and not racist. Chapter 8-"The Story We Tell" and Chapter 14-"Standing in the Shadow of Hope" are my favorite chapters in the book. Brown has a way with words, this is clear in Chapter 14 when she writes about her relationship with "hope".
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  • April
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fantastic book and a must read for anyone who identifies with any of the following:-is white-is a person of color -is Christian-does anti racist work -wants to do anti racist work -anyone and everyoneI identified with so many of her experiences. It was just empowering to read stories that spoke directly to my own experiences and to have this book to point to as a reference point for white friends/allies/acquaintances looking to me to explain things to them.
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  • Ali Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    There is nothing else to say besides this: this is an important book that should be read by everyone. Stories matter, especially those who have been marginalized over history.
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Austin Channing Brown is straightforward & honest about her experiences as a black woman in America, making this a great addition to the ongoing racial justice conversation.
  • chantel nouseforaname
    January 1, 1970
    You know this is the second time I started reading this book. A few months ago I read the first chapter and was like.. okay, I get it but it wasn't enough to draw me in. This time around I was like, I should give this book the attention it deserves and I'm glad that I did. The second maybe third to the fourth chapter was really where it jumped off. There is so much power in this book. Austin Channing Brown started off mad slow, taking her time to dive into the contents on the cover. Maybe it's b You know this is the second time I started reading this book. A few months ago I read the first chapter and was like.. okay, I get it but it wasn't enough to draw me in. This time around I was like, I should give this book the attention it deserves and I'm glad that I did. The second maybe third to the fourth chapter was really where it jumped off. There is so much power in this book. Austin Channing Brown started off mad slow, taking her time to dive into the contents on the cover. Maybe it's because I couldn't necessarily relate to her growing in the church, my parents never gave me "the talk" narrative at the beginning that had me rolling my eyes. Maybe it's just that I don't trust organized religion like Christianity and am skeptical of all literature coming from a place rooted in Christianity, but once I got past that she had so much to say about the everyday injustices that exist towards people of colour, especially within academic establishments as well as career-wise, post-academia. I really felt like this is an employment book rooted in navigating microaggressions as a black person in predominantly white, pretend-to-be-inclusive places of employment. There are so many dope segments in this book. So many places to look towards for understanding and to share with others as a means of highlighting truths of the black experience. Every page forward in this book until the very end was more informative and freeing and space creating and life-affirming than the page before it. Her letter to her son was just beautiful; conjuring Ta-Nehisi Coates and walking in that path of sharing truths from this generation to leave behind for future generations. Even though the start was a little too high-brow for me, a little too privileged for me to get into; I really enjoyed this and think that it is a high-quality piece of work. Austin Channing Brown gives you nothing but black truth here.
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  • Meaghan Lee
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I could give this ten stars.
  • Dale
    January 1, 1970
    At its core this is a hard book full of hard teachings. This I know - she has many more valid points than I would like to admit.To be published in May of 2018 by Convergent Books.Let me address the title of the book for all of you that will get hung up on the word "whiteness."Let me use a rough analogy to explain it.I am an overweight person. I used to be even more overweight (I have lost 85 pounds). I weighed enough that I had to buy almost all of my clothes online or in special stores. Most ma At its core this is a hard book full of hard teachings. This I know - she has many more valid points than I would like to admit.To be published in May of 2018 by Convergent Books.Let me address the title of the book for all of you that will get hung up on the word "whiteness."Let me use a rough analogy to explain it.I am an overweight person. I used to be even more overweight (I have lost 85 pounds). I weighed enough that I had to buy almost all of my clothes online or in special stores. Most major chains literally sold nothing that would fit me. Certain brands make it very clear that they refuse to make clothes for heavy people because they don't want them wearing their brand. Once, I had a salesperson yell at me from across her empty mall store when she saw me walk in that they didn't carry my size (I was looking for something for my daughter).The normal (easy to find, available everywhere) clothing world was not made for me. I was living in a world designed for thinner people.This is how the author, Austin Channing Brown, feels about modern America. It is designed for white people. Period. Everyone else makes large accommodations to the majority while white America makes small ones. For example, in media most television shows feature white characters with maybe a token non-white character. For example, just this month the Marvel movie Black Panther came out. It is the eighteenth Marvel movie. It is also the first one with a main character who is not a white man. 1 of 18 is not a very good ratio.Brown grew up in White America in suburban parochial schools. She is not a stranger to the mostly white religious organizations that she has been hired to help with their diversity issues. But, too often, she has been hired as a token hire rather than a guide to how to truly embrace a different part of the body of Christ. It is not enough to get the numbers right.I understand her first sentence of the book: "White people are exhausting." I am a white man who teaches at a majority minority school. The culture of the school is simply not mine (separated by race and at least one generation) and there are times when I leave school exhausted by the constant mental translating I have to do just to keep up. I understood her comment immediately.There are weird things that Brown experiences that I also have experienced. For example, she has white people at work that want to ...Read more at: http://dwdsreviews.blogspot.com/2018/...
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  • Columbus
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars for me without a doubt.Why I put off reading this incredibly important, incredibly relevant, incredibly brilliant book of essays, I don’t know. Why this book is not being talked about and discussed more by the bookworld, I don’t know.This short book of essays dealing with racism in all its ugliness is powerful and is easy to read. It certainly can be read in one sitting, but try and avoid doing that so these pieces will soak in thoroughly. But if you must read it quick, then read it agai 5 stars for me without a doubt.Why I put off reading this incredibly important, incredibly relevant, incredibly brilliant book of essays, I don’t know. Why this book is not being talked about and discussed more by the bookworld, I don’t know.This short book of essays dealing with racism in all its ugliness is powerful and is easy to read. It certainly can be read in one sitting, but try and avoid doing that so these pieces will soak in thoroughly. But if you must read it quick, then read it again and again and again. You’ll see what I mean once you get into it.I don’t have a favorite essay because they all are on par with each other for the most part, with the very first essay White People Are Exhausting getting the ball started. She was given the name Austin by her parents to avoid employers and others discriminating against her based on name alone. Just a fantastic collection from this author, speaker and inclusion practitioner. I’ll be reading this again, hopefully soon, with a more thorough analysis of these brilliant essays later. Thank you, A.C.B.!
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  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    Some honest, poignant, and approachable conversation on race. I've read a lot of books on race, and sometimes they can be intimidating. The topic is heavy enough, but sometimes the books are academic in nature or are such a high level that you really have to wade through them. Brown's feels much more approachable. That's not to say she doesn't tackle heavy stuff (she does) or have hard things to say (she does) or is intellectually light (it's not), but it just feels very conversational. It's als Some honest, poignant, and approachable conversation on race. I've read a lot of books on race, and sometimes they can be intimidating. The topic is heavy enough, but sometimes the books are academic in nature or are such a high level that you really have to wade through them. Brown's feels much more approachable. That's not to say she doesn't tackle heavy stuff (she does) or have hard things to say (she does) or is intellectually light (it's not), but it just feels very conversational. It's also a book I felt like I needed to read again as soon as I finished it.
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  • Katharine
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy of this at a conference. It tore me up. Brown doesn't pull any punches about the difficulty of being black in America. She doesn't put a happy ending on it all. She also doesn't paint the black experience as negative. Brown brings out the strength, beauty and dignity of being black.I'm grateful for authors like Brown who are willing to help educate the world about harsh realities....to educate well-intentioned yet still so ignorant white people like me about racism. T I received an advanced copy of this at a conference. It tore me up. Brown doesn't pull any punches about the difficulty of being black in America. She doesn't put a happy ending on it all. She also doesn't paint the black experience as negative. Brown brings out the strength, beauty and dignity of being black.I'm grateful for authors like Brown who are willing to help educate the world about harsh realities....to educate well-intentioned yet still so ignorant white people like me about racism. There is a lot of power in this book.
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  • Adriana
    January 1, 1970
    THIS. This book RIGHT HERE is the actual epitome of transformative literature.
  • Elizabeth Green
    January 1, 1970
    While I am giving this book a two star rating I do believe that I did in fact learn a few things from this book and am better for it. Also it did cause me to think and evaluate how I perceive the world and if my thought process needs some tweaking.What I liked:Brown was honest and wrote with so much passion. Brown also shared some of her personal life expierence regarding racism and talks about sometimes theses things are not seen by the majority of the the United States. I also like how she tal While I am giving this book a two star rating I do believe that I did in fact learn a few things from this book and am better for it. Also it did cause me to think and evaluate how I perceive the world and if my thought process needs some tweaking.What I liked:Brown was honest and wrote with so much passion. Brown also shared some of her personal life expierence regarding racism and talks about sometimes theses things are not seen by the majority of the the United States. I also like how she talked about suggestions for reducing racism and the need for more education on harmful stereotypes.“Even if you put it back on the shelf, Austin, you can’t touch store products and then put your hands in your pockets,” he explained as his large hands gently removed mine from their denim hiding place. “Someone might notice and assume you are trying to steal." Austin's illustration such as a simple shopping trip really point out something I've never noticed or thought about before. People of Color are thought a different set of rules due to systematic racism.The next quote is reason enough to read this book: “What would you think of those guys if you hadn’t just spent the afternoon with them?” It only took her a moment to tell the truth. “I would have looked at their skin color and tattoos, the way they dress and their playfulness and assumed they were gang members.” I have really be thinking about how I double check to make sure my doors are locked when I drive through a rough area. I'm not 100% positive its just because bars are on windows of houses and business or if it's the color of peoples skin. Quite frankly I don't know I've have ever driven in an area with bars on the windows where the dominate race is white. But it really makes me think if there is some subconscious racism in me.What I had problem's with:Austin failed to mention that identifying/ stereotyping a person by their skin color is harmful no matter what the color is. In fact she had no problem describing racism as something all white people did. Not some white people it was just simply "white people"Some of Austin's illustration to point out a point simply aren't an illustration of racism and things that all of us go through. At one point Austin describes and entrance when a women mistakes her for another person of color are claims that its because she black and that no one can see past her skin color. I can't tell you as a white person how many times someone has emailed me and talked to me in person and it was clear I wasn't the person they thought I was. The message: My body, my person is not distinct; I am interchangeable with all other Black women. At times it seems that Austin believes that simply being white makes a person racist and that there is nothing they can do that will not make them racist. That if they smile at people of color, hire a person of color, read books by people of color, marry or adopt a person of color, we won’t sense the ugliness of racism buried in the psyche and ingrained in the heart. At one point she mentions that "People of color are told that... that white people’s needs, feelings, and thoughts should be given equal weight.". It really infuriated me that she would think that everyone's needs, and feelings should not be equal. In fact throughout the book the words "Black" and "Blackness" are capitalized while "white" and "whiteness" are not. This demonstrates that Blacks are supior to whites and not promoting a message that all people should be equal regardless of skin color. It really goes against the argument she makes against racism. Aprrently it is okay as long as its against whites and not people of color. There are many other instances of this throughout the book. Also there was no data that she gave in the book that supported her claims. I know that there is I just wish she would have provided it. Also I was left to question the legatmicy of her claims after she made a claim that Christopher Columbus's landed on the United States of America when in fact he never did step foot onto this country. And the complete lack of data or evidence toward her other claims left me with some doubt that she fact checked what she was claiming.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    For such a heavy topic as race equality, it’s a quick read and Austin explains what it means to be a black woman in today’s society with such ease and grace. It’s an eye opening account of how far we still have to go for race equality in this country. In my opinion, this should be mandatory reading for everyone. It would be a great start for tackling this issue.
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  • Stacy
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful. Review coming soon.
  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. Just, wow. A truly inspiring call to ACTION and not merely talk about race and diversity. So many parts of this book were challenging to me in all the right ways. I listened to the audio (read by the author). Her bravery at calling out real and hard things while at the same time offering a way forward was everything. I will definitely read this again. Highly recommend.
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  • Ericka Clouther
    January 1, 1970
    I was a little dubious when I was reading the first two chapters, but then she gets to the meat of the book, and I thought the rest of it was really great. Very rarely do I think a book could be longer, but this was one I thought could have been expanded with relevant history and policy. Of course, that is an unreasonable desire on my part, because this is a memoir, but I just think she'd cover the relevant details really well. It is a great book.Lately, I read a lot about both racism and femini I was a little dubious when I was reading the first two chapters, but then she gets to the meat of the book, and I thought the rest of it was really great. Very rarely do I think a book could be longer, but this was one I thought could have been expanded with relevant history and policy. Of course, that is an unreasonable desire on my part, because this is a memoir, but I just think she'd cover the relevant details really well. It is a great book.Lately, I read a lot about both racism and feminism (the latter is not really mentioned in this book but it's relevant) and I think that's why a lot of what she said made a lot of sense to me and Brown was really great at tying together a lot of issues. I'm not certain if it would be as clear if you don't already have a lot of background in the history of race relations in the country and the institutionalization of racist laws and policies. Definitely one worth reading, regardless.
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  • Ronin2
    January 1, 1970
    I am an old white guy and I read the book to get a better understanding of race in America. Overt racism is an evil easily understood. It is the structural and accepted racism less easy to understand. It is the micro aggression and implicit biases less easy to understand. Being a pragmatist, I want a path forward to a more equitable America. Unfortunately, though well written, I was little aided by the book. I am sure I will be lambasted for this review as "another white guy that just doesn't ge I am an old white guy and I read the book to get a better understanding of race in America. Overt racism is an evil easily understood. It is the structural and accepted racism less easy to understand. It is the micro aggression and implicit biases less easy to understand. Being a pragmatist, I want a path forward to a more equitable America. Unfortunately, though well written, I was little aided by the book. I am sure I will be lambasted for this review as "another white guy that just doesn't get it." But, the point is, many white people, many people of all backgrounds, want to get it. Still looking for a book that helps the understanding and offers a path forward.
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  • Annie Rim
    January 1, 1970
    "I'm Still Here" was written for black women. As a white woman, I spent the majority of the book feeling like a voyeur - I learned from the stories but rarely connected with Austin's. And that's the point. I need to read more stories in which I don't see any part of myself. I need to listen and learn and listen some more. Austin Channing Brown reminds me that it's not her job to educate me on my journey to understanding racial justice. But this book definitely helped me see my own uncomfortable "I'm Still Here" was written for black women. As a white woman, I spent the majority of the book feeling like a voyeur - I learned from the stories but rarely connected with Austin's. And that's the point. I need to read more stories in which I don't see any part of myself. I need to listen and learn and listen some more. Austin Channing Brown reminds me that it's not her job to educate me on my journey to understanding racial justice. But this book definitely helped me see my own uncomfortable privilege and biases.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    This was a tough read for a do-gooder white lady to read. Very convicting about the ways that my needs trump those of people of color and how much I want them to adapt to me and my group. I want diversity without having to change. Very personal and explicit. Not for the faint of heart—but more of us white people should be brave.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    4.45 stars. This is a powerful book! Review to follow
  • Amy Hughes
    January 1, 1970
    This is a MUST read. I'm grateful to Channing Brown for opening up her life in this beautiful and vulnerable memoir and reflecting upon her experience as a black woman in white spaces.
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