Body Full of Stars
"This book is an ancient call from our first mothers to connect to our bodies―for our own good and for the good of humanity . . . It is healing, illuminated." ―Laura Munson, New York Times bestselling author of This Is Not The Story You Think It Is... What if labor does not end with pregnancy but continues into a mother's postpartum life? How can the fiercest love for your child and the deepest wells of grief coexist in the same moment? How has society neglected honest conversation around the significant physical changes new mothers experience? Could real healing occur if generations of women were fluent in the language of their bodies? Molly Caro May grapples with these questions as she undergoes several unexpected health issues after the birth of her first child Eula: pelvic floor dysfunction, incontinence, hormonal imbalance. As she and her husband navigate new parenthood, May also moves between shock, sadness, and anger over her body’s betrayal. She finally identifies the roots of her anguish as Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder and what she calls female rage. The process leads May to a long-desired conversation with her body in an attempt to balance the physical changes she experiences with the emotional landscape opening up before her. Body Full of Stars is one woman's story―dark and tender, honest and corporeal― that reveals deeper truths about how disconnected many modern women are from their bodies. It is her "postpartum awakening." It is also a joyful and tenderhearted celebration of the greatest story of all time: mothers and daughters, partners and co-parents, and the feminine power surging beneath it all.

Body Full of Stars Details

TitleBody Full of Stars
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 16th, 2018
ISBN-139781619024892
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction

Body Full of Stars Review

  • Mary Nee
    January 1, 1970
    I recommend this book, and I am glad I read it.
  • Mel
    January 1, 1970
    "She is, after all, the greatest story of all time."*I received an ARC of this book in a giveaway in exchange for an honest review*Sometimes a book in the giveaways stands out as one you are particularly excited about, despite the odds of actually winning. This was one of those books. Although I have never been pregnant and have no plans on it in the near future, the element of body fluency caught my attention. Plus, the cover is gorgeous. After getting about 50 pages in, I went back and got a p "She is, after all, the greatest story of all time."*I received an ARC of this book in a giveaway in exchange for an honest review*Sometimes a book in the giveaways stands out as one you are particularly excited about, despite the odds of actually winning. This was one of those books. Although I have never been pregnant and have no plans on it in the near future, the element of body fluency caught my attention. Plus, the cover is gorgeous. After getting about 50 pages in, I went back and got a pencil and started re-reading and marking the parts that stood out to me or made an impact: discussions of food, body healing, and the inextricable link between how we treat the earth and how we treat women. The postpartum challenge, as May calls it, is a reality that is pressing, yet unsurprisingly hidden. This is a story that needed to be told. Body Full of Stars is about more than postpartum challenge(s), though. It takes us to womanhood at its core. "I don't know what gender is anymore but I do know what the presence of trusted women does to me.""Dreams of women lovemaking, me lovemaking with other faceless women, only women. Lesbian sex dreams the entire pregnancy. Woman, love yourself, love your mother, love your daughter growing with you, but start with love of self and all women."I very much appreciate how, although this is not a queer book, May sprinkles throughout an acknowledgement of the inseparable connection between lesbian connections/women loving women in this. I give this book four stars. After getting 150 pages in, I lost some steam because the incessant need to be noticed and honored became somewhat gratuitous and self-indulgent. Yet, I recognize the necessity for this. After all, a key part of the story calls attention to the need for women to finally be heard, to gain attention, to be the epicenter of conversation. My mixed feelings on this went until the end of the story. Additionally, it read heavily like a female rage and mental/emotional/spiritual connection with one's body version of Eat, Pray, Love. This can be a good thing but can also get quickly tiresome. Overall, I recommend this book, and I am glad to have read it.
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