Summer of a Thousand Pies
A heartfelt contemporary middle grade novel, perfect for fans of The Thing About Jellyfish and Fish in a Tree, about a girl who is sent to live with her aunt and must try to save their failing pie shop.When twelve-year-old Cady Bennett is sent to live with the aunt she didn’t even know she had in the quaint mountain town of Julian, she doesn’t know what to expect. Cady isn’t used to stability, or even living inside, after growing up homeless in San Diego with her dad.Now she’s staying in her mother’s old room, exploring the countryside filled with apple orchards and pie shops, making friends, and working in Aunt Shell’s own pie shop—and soon, Cady starts to feel like she belongs. Then she finds out that Aunt Shell’s pie shop is failing. Saving the business and protecting the first place she’s ever really felt safe will take everything she’s learned and the help of all her new friends. But are there some things even the perfect pie just can’t fix?Summer of a Thousand Pies is a sweet and satisfying treat of a novel full of friendship, family, and, of course, pie.

Summer of a Thousand Pies Details

TitleSummer of a Thousand Pies
Author
ReleaseApr 16th, 2019
PublisherBalzer + Bray
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fiction, Contemporary

Summer of a Thousand Pies Review

  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus After the death of her mother, Cady's father has found it hard to keep a job, stay away from alcohol, and to provide Cady with a stable home and supervision. He has enrolled her in a very good school, and her teachers are understanding and supportive, but when she gets in trouble for defending another student and her father shows up to the office inebriated, Cady ends up with children's protective services. They locate a sister of her mother's Cady didn't know ab E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus After the death of her mother, Cady's father has found it hard to keep a job, stay away from alcohol, and to provide Cady with a stable home and supervision. He has enrolled her in a very good school, and her teachers are understanding and supportive, but when she gets in trouble for defending another student and her father shows up to the office inebriated, Cady ends up with children's protective services. They locate a sister of her mother's Cady didn't know about, and soon Cady is whisked away from San Diego in the country to live with her aunt Shell and her companion Suzanne. Cady would love to cook and has a cookbook of her mother's, so she is enthralled that Shell has a pie shop. She meets Jay, the son of a woman who works for Shell, and they start hanging out at the shop and doing some baking. Cady misses her old school and Jenna, her first grade reading buddy who has various health issues including celiac disease but is glad to be in a house with a steady source of food. She also is glad of some connection to her mother. The pie shop is not doing well financially, and along with learning how to bake, Cady and Jay try various ways to help the shop, such as new flavors and marketing techniques. It's important to Jay, because his family is undocumented, and they survive because they live in Shell's housing and work at her shop. They eventually realize that there aren't many gluten free pies in their area, and do a cost-benefit analysis with a helpful older shop patron and realize that, with his help, the business can expand and succeed. Strengths: I loved the small town setting and the involved townspeople. The intricacies of running a small business are well addressed. Jay and Cady have a very nice friendship. Cady has a difficult life but manages to move forward, while still reminiscing about the good things in the past. Weakesses: While all of the different issues are handled realistically and well, there are a lot of them. No one really blinks at same sex parenting, but we also have drug and alcohol issues, as well as immigration ones on top of the financial insecurity. And, of course, yet another father so bereft that he can't function. It's a lot of heavy topics to have in one book. What I really think: Even though this had a lot of sad things in it, it was still fairly hopeful. Since Kids Who Do Things is a always a popular topic, and the cover of this is adorable, I'll buy it for my readers who like a good cooking story.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent and engaging story about a young girl dealing with the effects of her father's mental illness and the ensuing instability. When her father is arrested, twelve-year-old Cady is sent to live with her aunt, the proprietor of a pie shop. Nestled in the mountains above San Diego, in the town of Julian, Shell's Pies is struggling to stay afloat. As Cady and her aunt Shell navigate the boundaries of their burgeoning relationship, Shell simultaneously attempts to keep her shop in business. An excellent and engaging story about a young girl dealing with the effects of her father's mental illness and the ensuing instability. When her father is arrested, twelve-year-old Cady is sent to live with her aunt, the proprietor of a pie shop. Nestled in the mountains above San Diego, in the town of Julian, Shell's Pies is struggling to stay afloat. As Cady and her aunt Shell navigate the boundaries of their burgeoning relationship, Shell simultaneously attempts to keep her shop in business. Cady, wary of assistance and angry about her circumstances, comes to learn there are people worth trusting in this world, people who care deeply about her well being. Over the course of one summer, young Cady bakes one thousand pies (and a few cakes for good measure) learning much about herself in the process. In fact, it is Cady's developing baking skills, creativity, and concern for a friend with celiac disease that just might be the ticket to the shop's success.This middle grade novel is perfect for foodie fans, viewers of The Great British Bake Off, and anyone who enjoys a good coming-of-age tale. Several recipes are included.
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 3.5 StarsCady had to grow up fast. As the child of an addict, she knew homelessness, abandonment, and hunger. All things I wished she had never known. When her father was taken into custody, she was placed in the care of an aunt she never knew she had, and that was when Cady started to see things a little differently. First and foremost, I really did like Cady. She had it tough, and because of that, she had trust issues. Her mother died, her father was unreliable, and she was forced to d Rating: 3.5 StarsCady had to grow up fast. As the child of an addict, she knew homelessness, abandonment, and hunger. All things I wished she had never known. When her father was taken into custody, she was placed in the care of an aunt she never knew she had, and that was when Cady started to see things a little differently. First and foremost, I really did like Cady. She had it tough, and because of that, she had trust issues. Her mother died, her father was unreliable, and she was forced to depend on herself. Given her history of being in and out of the foster care system, being homeless, and being bullied, among other things, she was still able to maintain some sort of optimism. Which was why I loved seeing her grow and flourish once she moved in with her aunt Shell and her partner, Suzanne. Cady had to learn a lot about living with a family and trusting people, but she did, slowly but surely. Her connection to Shell was very special. Shell was a little hard on the outside, but she shared her love of baking with Cady, and Suzanne was there to nurture when needed. Together, they were a great team, and it wasn't just Suzanne and Shell, who were there for Cady. There was actually a big community element in this book, which was quite lovely, and reinforced the idea, that it's ok to accept help from others, when you need it. I did feel like there were a lot of side issues incorporated into the story, which didn't necessarily fit with the central plot. I understand the author may have felt compelled to included these issues, but I didn't feel they advanced Cady's story, and I thought that in a book packed with quite a few issues (and almost 400 pages in length), it made the story longer than it needed to be, and it dragged a little under all that weight. Overall, this was a lovely story of family, friendship, and community. The final event was so joyful, and it warmed my heart seeing everyone pull together. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Laura (bbliophile)
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a lovely story! Full review to come.
  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    Summer of a Thousand Pies is a sweet middle-grade contemporary novel. A story about family and belonging, set amongst the backdrop of food, glorious food, Summer of a Thousand Pies touches on some deep and troubling themes such as homelessness, financial hardship, and the constant fear and struggle to belong faced by illegal immigrants. With diverse characters and a strong -if a little too headstrong at times- lead characters, Summer of a Thousand Pies is sure to delight young readers.Cady knows Summer of a Thousand Pies is a sweet middle-grade contemporary novel. A story about family and belonging, set amongst the backdrop of food, glorious food, Summer of a Thousand Pies touches on some deep and troubling themes such as homelessness, financial hardship, and the constant fear and struggle to belong faced by illegal immigrants. With diverse characters and a strong -if a little too headstrong at times- lead characters, Summer of a Thousand Pies is sure to delight young readers.Cady knows what it is like to go without, or to be judged for living in her dad’s van rather than a house like everyone else. So when her dad is arrested and she is sent to live with her aunt, Cady knows she just has to survive a few months until her dad will come to get her. But Cady’s aunt Shell is nothing like she expected, and having the freedom to eat as much as she likes and explore Shell’s property is a new experience for Cady. But the best bit is Shell’s pie shop, where Cady can help out, learn to make pies and finally get to try some of the recipes she has collected over the years. But Shell’s pie shop is being threatened with overwhelming debt and Cady wants to do everything she can to rescue the new home and family she has come to love so much. If you are looking for a book that features cooking and recipes, then Summer of a Thousand Pies is perfect. Cady is mad about baking. From growing up in an environment with limited food and poor cooking conditions to moving in with her aunt, Cady discovers a whole new world of techniques, ingredients and the celebration all things cooking. The Great British Baking show is featured a lot, and Cady experiments with recipes and mixing new ingredients. Each of the main recipes she tries are included in the back of the book, along with notes from Cady herself about the ingredients or tips for following the method.But Summer of a Thousand Pies isn’t just about cooking and food. It is also about family. Cady slowly comes to understand and love her aunt Shell, warms to Shell’s effusive partner Suzanne and learns about friendship and getting along with others as she becomes friends with Jay, who, along with his family, also lives and works with Shell. From the pie shop’s customers to the town’s people, Cady’s summer is spent learning about others’ lives, feelings and how to live with people, rather than shutting them out.There is so much to discuss, so many layers to this story. Whether it’s Jay, who fears being forced to leave the US due to his illegal immigrant status, homelessness, alternative families, financial hardship, or Cady’s growth to someone who considers others and controls her emotions, Summer of a Thousand Pies has something that will touch every reader.The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    This beautiful book is going to stay in my heart forever, and I already know will be one of my top favorites this year. When Cady goes to live with her Aunt Shell after her father is arrested, her whole world flips. She has a bed, a room, and there's always food. There's also The Great British Bake Off to watch. Through this summer of change, she vows to bake a thousand pies at her aunt's pie shop, befriends an undocumented family, thinks about her dad, and embraces this sweet & exciting sma This beautiful book is going to stay in my heart forever, and I already know will be one of my top favorites this year. When Cady goes to live with her Aunt Shell after her father is arrested, her whole world flips. She has a bed, a room, and there's always food. There's also The Great British Bake Off to watch. Through this summer of change, she vows to bake a thousand pies at her aunt's pie shop, befriends an undocumented family, thinks about her dad, and embraces this sweet & exciting small town life where your neighbors lend a hand. Award worthy, any realistic reader will fall in love.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    This book is sweet and will help to start a conversation about a few of life's difficulties, including homelessness. I really enjoyed the main character, Cady. I think kids will identify with some of her fears even though they may not experience the same challenges she does. Cady's story might also bring about compassion and more understanding for those kids whose families might be struggling. Plus, the pie references are great for anyone who likes to bake! Recipes included!DRC provided by the p This book is sweet and will help to start a conversation about a few of life's difficulties, including homelessness. I really enjoyed the main character, Cady. I think kids will identify with some of her fears even though they may not experience the same challenges she does. Cady's story might also bring about compassion and more understanding for those kids whose families might be struggling. Plus, the pie references are great for anyone who likes to bake! Recipes included!DRC provided by the publisher and edelweiss.
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  • Jenn Bishop
    January 1, 1970
    This story absolutely charmed me. Cady hasn't known a home for a long time. Her mother died when she was little and she and her father have recently been experiencing homelessness in San Diego. But when his troubles land him in jail, her estranged aunt Shell, her mother's sister, steps in to care for Cady. Cady's resistant at first, and Shell and her partner Suzanne aren't exactly used to having a twelve-year-old around, but they bond over a love of pie and The Great British Bake-Off. Set in the This story absolutely charmed me. Cady hasn't known a home for a long time. Her mother died when she was little and she and her father have recently been experiencing homelessness in San Diego. But when his troubles land him in jail, her estranged aunt Shell, her mother's sister, steps in to care for Cady. Cady's resistant at first, and Shell and her partner Suzanne aren't exactly used to having a twelve-year-old around, but they bond over a love of pie and The Great British Bake-Off. Set in the tiny Southern California mountain town of Julian, this is a sweet story about a girl finding a family, friendship, and community in unexpected places. It's also about the way that food connects us -- to home, and to each other. The appended recipes are PERFECT for budding young bakers. Fans of cooking shows and fans Lynda Mullaly Hunt will find much to savor in this story.
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  • Robin Yardi
    January 1, 1970
    So sweet!Cady was so easy to care for and her story is filled with all sorts of the difficulties that plague adolescence. Kids will find a friend here in this book. More than one. Plus a thousand pies. Need I say more?
  • Bella
    January 1, 1970
    The Great British Baking show?!I'm already sold :)
  • Tina Reisdorf
    January 1, 1970
    A sweet middle grade book. As a lover of pies and the Great British Bake-off, this was a perfect winter break read. It was heavy in some ways, but never in a way that made me anxious or unhappy.
  • Susannah
    January 1, 1970
    So many YA novels try desperately to expose readers to uncomfortable concepts in an accessible way. Summer of a Thousand Pies succeeds. From the first page to the last you can't help but become invested in the characters. There are valuable life lessons to be found in these pages, and because the protagonist is learning them too it doesn't feel forced. I read this book in one sitting, wishing simultaneously to know what happens and for it to never end. Definitely pick this book up for the young So many YA novels try desperately to expose readers to uncomfortable concepts in an accessible way. Summer of a Thousand Pies succeeds. From the first page to the last you can't help but become invested in the characters. There are valuable life lessons to be found in these pages, and because the protagonist is learning them too it doesn't feel forced. I read this book in one sitting, wishing simultaneously to know what happens and for it to never end. Definitely pick this book up for the young reader in your life!Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for this gem of an ARC.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Dilloway masterfully handles tough issues such as homelessness and substance abuse with a deft hand by first introducing you to Cady, and getting you to care about her. The fact that I also love the Great British Baking Show was simply an added bonus. Well done!
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  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet coming of age tale of sorts involving some very mouth watery pie recipes.
  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Cute book, but nothing memorable other than the descriptions of making pies
  • Cynthia Reeg
    January 1, 1970
    San Diego girl, Cady Bennett is only twelve but she’s already had more than her fair share of troubles. Her mom died when she was five. Her dad had a meltdown that’s lasted years, leaving the two of them homeless. Now as the story begins Cady finds herself alone, her dad in jail, and a stranger who says she’s a long lost aunt stepping in as foster guardian. Soon a bewildered and frightened Cady finds herself whisked away to a small California mountain town, living with two aunts, two dogs, a cat San Diego girl, Cady Bennett is only twelve but she’s already had more than her fair share of troubles. Her mom died when she was five. Her dad had a meltdown that’s lasted years, leaving the two of them homeless. Now as the story begins Cady finds herself alone, her dad in jail, and a stranger who says she’s a long lost aunt stepping in as foster guardian. Soon a bewildered and frightened Cady finds herself whisked away to a small California mountain town, living with two aunts, two dogs, a cat, and assorted chickens. Cady takes a chance and makes a friend. In fact, as she learns to trust, she makes a townful of friends, and she accepts the challenge to master pie making. But when her aunt’s pie shop faces hard times, she accepts an even greater challenge to garner the needed support to keep the pies coming. This truly heart-warming story of trials and determination highlights issues of at-risk youth, as well as the plight of illegal aliens—especially the young DREAMERS facing such an uncertain future. This book is a truly scrumptious treat for middle graders, filled with heart, humor, and characters who will earn a sweet spot in your heart. Don’t miss it!
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  • Salena Moffat
    January 1, 1970
    🏵🏵🏵🏵 out of 5 🏵s#SummerOfAThousandPies by #MargaretDilloway***Cady Bennett is the child of a widower who is suddenly incarcerated, causing the system to place 12 year old Cady into the care of her aunt, her mother's sister Michelle. Up to this point, Cady's father's addictions and bizarre religious beliefs have meant that Cady has spent the majority of her life either homeless or living in seedy motels.***All this changes drastically as Cady lives with her aunt and her aunt's partner Suzanne. Ca 🏵🏵🏵🏵 out of 5 🏵s#SummerOfAThousandPies by #MargaretDilloway***Cady Bennett is the child of a widower who is suddenly incarcerated, causing the system to place 12 year old Cady into the care of her aunt, her mother's sister Michelle. Up to this point, Cady's father's addictions and bizarre religious beliefs have meant that Cady has spent the majority of her life either homeless or living in seedy motels.***All this changes drastically as Cady lives with her aunt and her aunt's partner Suzanne. Cady meets and becomes fast friends with a family of illegal immigrants who are basically being sheltered by Michelle. Cady also becomes proficient at baking pies, as her aunt teaches her baking skills. She gains calmness from the very act of baking.***Wrenchingly timely, this beautiful book (dedicated "to DREAMers everywhere") is a richly textured feel-good read. Yes, it's classified as Juvenile Fiction, but trust me, look beyond that.***#bookstagram #librarylabellove #readersofinstagram #DREAMers #baking #pies #addiction #familyissues #homelessness #hope #friendship #illegalimmigration #lgbtqia
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  • Kathleen Burkinshaw
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky to receive an ARC of SUMMER OF A THOUSAND PIES. It obviously involves baking pies, but it’s so much more than that. It's a story of Cady Bennett being thrust into a relative's life that she had never met and only heard bad things about. She finds family and friends where she least expected. And an opportunity to take a stand for what she believes is worth fighting for. However, can she trust herself enough to receive and accept it? I really enjoyed the baking aspect and that the Brit I was lucky to receive an ARC of SUMMER OF A THOUSAND PIES. It obviously involves baking pies, but it’s so much more than that. It's a story of Cady Bennett being thrust into a relative's life that she had never met and only heard bad things about. She finds family and friends where she least expected. And an opportunity to take a stand for what she believes is worth fighting for. However, can she trust herself enough to receive and accept it? I really enjoyed the baking aspect and that the British Bake-Off show is mentioned because I've binged watched a few seasons myself. You will enjoy this novel but prepared to be craving some pie when you are done! 😊Some of my favorite lines:“I’m not going to get attached to it. I don’t want to miss it when I leave.”“Guilt wraps itself around me like a too small sweater.”“I guess maybe people who don’t show their feelings might still have them.”“I inhale deeply feeling like I’m getting close to end of a good book. I want it to keep going forever.”“At this, I get a warm bubbly feeling like pie when it’s ready to come out of the oven.”“You shouldn’t assume things are really awful before they had a chance to finish.”
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  • Janelle Hackbarth
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review from Eldeweiss Plus. Thanks, Eldeweiss Plus!Just like a lot of books I've reviewed in the past, the plot of this book is what initially drew me in. I loved the idea of a girl moving in with her mom's sister in the mountain town of Julian where her mother grew up and also helping out in her aunt's pie shop. So, I requested it.Cady has a tough, protective armor-like attitude at the beginning of the book, and after growing up for the p I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review from Eldeweiss Plus. Thanks, Eldeweiss Plus!Just like a lot of books I've reviewed in the past, the plot of this book is what initially drew me in. I loved the idea of a girl moving in with her mom's sister in the mountain town of Julian where her mother grew up and also helping out in her aunt's pie shop. So, I requested it.Cady has a tough, protective armor-like attitude at the beginning of the book, and after growing up for the past few years with her father homeless, I can understand why. But gradually, through time, I saw her slowly start to soften and allow people in, so to speak.This story felt real, and it was delicious. It made me hungry for pie (wish I had some in the kitchen). When I read the "thousand pies" part (not spoiling), I thought it would take FOREVER to make the pies, but it wasn't too long and it wasn't too quick either.Just like the summary said, this is a sweet and savory story, one you should definitely add to your bookshelf.
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  • Andrea Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I won an Advance Reader's Edition through a Goodreads giveaway and would like to thank Harper Children's for my copy. I would also like to say that the opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.This beautifully written book is a middle school contemporary novel. There are many real life topics that come up in this book and I think children in this age group will relate to. Some of the topics are homelessness, financial hardships, living with a parent who is dealing with substance abu I won an Advance Reader's Edition through a Goodreads giveaway and would like to thank Harper Children's for my copy. I would also like to say that the opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.This beautifully written book is a middle school contemporary novel. There are many real life topics that come up in this book and I think children in this age group will relate to. Some of the topics are homelessness, financial hardships, living with a parent who is dealing with substance abuse and mental illness, and a family of illegal immigrants who work hard to build a life they wouldn't otherwise have and fearing deportation. Margaret Dilloway does a fantastic job handling these topics in a way that isn't too heavy or burdensome for young minds but yet provides a shining example of why having hope for the best possible outcome and being willing to accept help when you need it is important for success in living and in relationships throughout your life.
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  • Madeline
    January 1, 1970
    When Cady's dad shows up to school for a meeting drunk, Cady expects to be put back into foster care. It's happened before and she's sure her dad will get it together enough to get her out. But this time her Aunt Shell shows up to take her, and Cady is unsure. Her dad told her that Aunt Shell didn't want anything to do with them. But Cady quickly finds her place with Shell and her partner Suzanne, in the pie shop Shell runs. She wants to be a master pie maker but in order to do that, Shell tells When Cady's dad shows up to school for a meeting drunk, Cady expects to be put back into foster care. It's happened before and she's sure her dad will get it together enough to get her out. But this time her Aunt Shell shows up to take her, and Cady is unsure. Her dad told her that Aunt Shell didn't want anything to do with them. But Cady quickly finds her place with Shell and her partner Suzanne, in the pie shop Shell runs. She wants to be a master pie maker but in order to do that, Shell tells her she needs to make a thousand pies. But when Cady finds out that Shell's shop is in financial trouble she's worried she'll loose the best home she's ever had. With the help of friends Cady is determined to save the pie shop.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    My 9 year old son finished the book last night and here’s his review... “The book was really interesting. There were some happy parts, sad parts, and parts that were in between. It shows friendship and that you should practice and persevere to get to your goal. The first person present tense makes it seem like you’re actually there. I think people that like stories about failing but persevering should read this book. I think this is a good book for lots of ages, not just kids. I would give it fi My 9 year old son finished the book last night and here’s his review... “The book was really interesting. There were some happy parts, sad parts, and parts that were in between. It shows friendship and that you should practice and persevere to get to your goal. The first person present tense makes it seem like you’re actually there. I think people that like stories about failing but persevering should read this book. I think this is a good book for lots of ages, not just kids. I would give it five stars because it was just so good! At the end of the book there were actually recipes. There was a strawberry basil pie that sounded good and also apple fennel that I think would be delicious! I think baking these would be fun too.”
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and Harper Collins Children’s for sharing this ARC with our #bookexpedition group. After her father shows up at her school under the influence, 12 year old Cady is sent to live with an aunt she didn’t know she had. Living with Aunt Shell & her partner Suzanne, Cady spends lots of time in her aunt’s pie shop where she learns how to develop trust in others and in herself. Favorite line:“Sometimes there are no good choices, and we can only do our best.”A wonderful realis Thank you to the author and Harper Collins Children’s for sharing this ARC with our #bookexpedition group. After her father shows up at her school under the influence, 12 year old Cady is sent to live with an aunt she didn’t know she had. Living with Aunt Shell & her partner Suzanne, Cady spends lots of time in her aunt’s pie shop where she learns how to develop trust in others and in herself. Favorite line:“Sometimes there are no good choices, and we can only do our best.”A wonderful realistic fiction novel with themes of family, friendship, hope, love and community. Highly recommend for 5th graders and up!
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  • Niki
    January 1, 1970
    NOTE: I received an ARC from a book sharing group in exchange for my honest review.Summer of Thousand Pies is a charming, heartfelt middle grade, realistic fiction novel about relationships, family, and baking. Cady's had a tough life growing up with her father, but in a life-changing moment, she finds herself living in a new town with an aunt she didn't know before. Her aunt, who owns a quaint pie shop, helps her feel secure, build new relationships, and, of course, learn how to bake pies!I rec NOTE: I received an ARC from a book sharing group in exchange for my honest review.Summer of Thousand Pies is a charming, heartfelt middle grade, realistic fiction novel about relationships, family, and baking. Cady's had a tough life growing up with her father, but in a life-changing moment, she finds herself living in a new town with an aunt she didn't know before. Her aunt, who owns a quaint pie shop, helps her feel secure, build new relationships, and, of course, learn how to bake pies!I recommend Summer of Thousand Pies for libraries serving children in grades 4-6.
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  • Tiffani Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my heart! This is the second book that I have read this year that is about a girl in the foster system that has tugged at my heart strings. In this novel, the main protagonist (Cady) learns to heal and grown through making 1000 pies over the summer in her aunt’s bakery. She learns that practice makes perfect, sometimes you have to learn to accept help from others, and how to be a part of a family/community after being previously homeless. I can completely relate to this novel in the sense tha Oh my heart! This is the second book that I have read this year that is about a girl in the foster system that has tugged at my heart strings. In this novel, the main protagonist (Cady) learns to heal and grown through making 1000 pies over the summer in her aunt’s bakery. She learns that practice makes perfect, sometimes you have to learn to accept help from others, and how to be a part of a family/community after being previously homeless. I can completely relate to this novel in the sense that I know what the author was getting at by the healing properties that baking possesses. There is nothing that calms my soul more than mixing up a batch of cookies. When your life is going to hell in a hand basket, sometimes all you need is some butter and exact measurements to fix all life’s problems.
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  • Jacob Collier
    January 1, 1970
    This is a life changing book that I have read after a long time. You can buy this and many other bestsellers at great discounts from here: https://www.amazon.com/s?i=stripbooks...
  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come soon.
  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    Kids today have so many better book choices than I did when I was their age! Middlegrade books are amazing now, and I'm honestly jealous.I loved Margaret Dilloway's first two adult novels (and just found out that there's a third I haven't read!) and so getting to read her middlegrade book---I think it's a debut!---was a no-brainer. Her ability to make her characters immediately seem so vibrant is incredibly rare.I felt like I had known Cady forever, and felt her nervousness at going with an aunt Kids today have so many better book choices than I did when I was their age! Middlegrade books are amazing now, and I'm honestly jealous.I loved Margaret Dilloway's first two adult novels (and just found out that there's a third I haven't read!) and so getting to read her middlegrade book---I think it's a debut!---was a no-brainer. Her ability to make her characters immediately seem so vibrant is incredibly rare.I felt like I had known Cady forever, and felt her nervousness at going with an aunt she'd never met and had barely heard of to a town she's never been while her dad is out of the picture. I completely understood why she barely trusted anyone (she had basically one friend back home; people and especially young kids aren't exactly kind to homeless people, even if one of them is a kid, too) and how she didn't really understand the concept of...well, anything.Her only real treasured possession is a cookbook of her mom's (who died when Cady was five) and so learning that her aunt Shell was a baker too was a dream come true. It's how they initially connect and so Cady decides (OK, more accurately is told) that she will make a thousand pies over the summer because that's the best way to become great at something. (Which is true---practice and repetition goes pretty far in love.)I loved the town and its residents (it almost seemed like a west coast Stars Hollow, in that everyone genuinely cared for each other and it's also far less quirky). Highly recommended.
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