Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties
From bestselling author Camille Pagán comes a hilarious and hopeful story about a woman on the verge of a nervous breakthrough.At fifty-three, Maggie Harris has a good marriage and two mostly happy children. Perpetually anxious, she’s also accumulated a list of semi-reasonable fears: falling air conditioners, the IRS, identity theft, skydiving, and airbag recalls. But never once did Maggie worry that her husband of nearly thirty years would leave her.On the day Adam walks out the door, everything that makes Maggie secure goes with him. Only then does she realize that while she’s been busy caring for everyone else, she’s become invisible to the world—and to herself.Maggie cautiously begins to rebuild her life with a trip to Rome, a new career, and even a rebound romance. But when a fresh crisis strikes and an uncertain future looms, she must decide: How much will she risk to remain the woman she’s just become?

Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties Details

TitleWoman Last Seen in Her Thirties
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 27th, 2018
PublisherLake Union Publishing
ISBN-139781503936997
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary

Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties Review

  • Bianca
    January 1, 1970
    I'll come out and say it - I requested this novel solely because the title grabbed my attention.Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties was relatable. Despite that, I couldn't get into it at all. The heroine, Maggie Harris finds herself in her early fifties divorced, as her dependable husband of nearly thirty years leaves her for a much younger woman. How cliche, right?The kids are grown up.. Who's Maggie without her partner? Unsurprisingly, she's confused, depressed, and very lonely.After moping and gr I'll come out and say it - I requested this novel solely because the title grabbed my attention.Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties was relatable. Despite that, I couldn't get into it at all. The heroine, Maggie Harris finds herself in her early fifties divorced, as her dependable husband of nearly thirty years leaves her for a much younger woman. How cliche, right?The kids are grown up.. Who's Maggie without her partner? Unsurprisingly, she's confused, depressed, and very lonely.After moping and grieving her relationship, Maggie has to re-discover who she can be, what she wants and so on. She's in a pretty good financial position, so she doesn't have the struggles of other women in a similar position.There's travelling to Italy, a new romance, ups and downs. The writing is simple and utilitarian. While it's not fluffy, it's not particularly engaging either. It was actually pretty flat, so I had to force myself to get back to it.When the story is so familiar, I need something special to keep my interest. I'm afraid this novel didn't quite deliver.I've received this novel from Lake Union Publishing via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.
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  • da AL
    January 1, 1970
    At the start, I worried my fellow book lovers had led me astray. Perhaps they'd been seduced by the catchy title and book cover? The setup boded cliched characters and story line... but hurrah! The author more than made up for the so-so start with an ultimately wise, satisfying book. Plus, the audiobook reader was outstanding!
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  • BIBLIOMANIAC MJ
    January 1, 1970
    Maggie is shell shocked as her world is turned upside down when, out of nowhere, her husband declares after almost 30 years of marriage that he doesn't love her any more. As Maggie goes through the grieving process of a broken marriage, she slowly comes to the realisation that she has lost herself in the process of caring for everyone else in her family. She gingerly begins building a new life, embarking on a journey of self discovery, coming out the other side a much stronger, resilient woman, Maggie is shell shocked as her world is turned upside down when, out of nowhere, her husband declares after almost 30 years of marriage that he doesn't love her any more. As Maggie goes through the grieving process of a broken marriage, she slowly comes to the realisation that she has lost herself in the process of caring for everyone else in her family. She gingerly begins building a new life, embarking on a journey of self discovery, coming out the other side a much stronger, resilient woman, no longer afraid of the unknown and up to the challenge of life's little surprises along the way. I enjoyed embarking on this journey with Maggie. However this story provided nothing new to the concept of starting over after divorce and was therefore rather predictable. I needed something more from the story to make it stand out above the rest. This could have been achieved if the book made good on its blurb that it was a "hilarious" read, but I found the humour sadly lacking. I was expecting more laughs and giggles in order to balance out the seriousness of the book.All in all, a good read of reinventing oneself after divorce, growing older and opening up oneself to unexpected , unforeseen possibilities.Many thanks to the author, Netgalley and Lake Union Publishing for an advanced readers copy in exchange for my honest opinion of this book.
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  • [Shai] The Bibliophage
    January 1, 1970
    Maggie Halfmoon and her husband, Adam, is nearing their retirement and their 28th year of being married. However, Maggie’s worst nightmare came when Adam just suddenly dropped the bomb that he’s leaving their home because he no longer loves her. Aside from this, he told her that there’s another woman in his life; he sent a divorce paper few weeks after he was gone, and Maggie was left thinking what went wrong in their marriage. She kept on wishing that Adam will have a change of heart; that he w Maggie Halfmoon and her husband, Adam, is nearing their retirement and their 28th year of being married. However, Maggie’s worst nightmare came when Adam just suddenly dropped the bomb that he’s leaving their home because he no longer loves her. Aside from this, he told her that there’s another woman in his life; he sent a divorce paper few weeks after he was gone, and Maggie was left thinking what went wrong in their marriage. She kept on wishing that Adam will have a change of heart; that he will come back and they will fix their relationship. Maggie went through the stages of grief: denial of what happened; anger to the man he loves since college; she even bargain with Adam when she drunk called him while he was in Rome; she had a mild depression, it was shown when she was slowly becoming an alcoholic particularly in the beginning, and she finally comes to acceptance after she met Adam again in the hospital.While reading Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties, it reminds me of the bestselling novel of Elizabeth Gilbert. Although I haven’t read the aforementioned, I was able to watch the movie based on the book; hence I was able to compare this novel of Camille Pagán to it. The similarities between the two are that both protagonists went to Italy; they went through grief and confusion, and they both want to know what they want in their life now that they are single.The story of Maggie in this novel and those other divorced women will teach us that it’s not the end of the road if your marriage failed. Hence, we should relish every phase of grief; seek peace; try to forgive those who hurt us, and keep moving forward because behind those failures might be a better life ahead.
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  • Brandice
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars - Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties starts with Maggie, a 53 year old, being blindsided by her husband, Adam, announcing he wants to separate and isn’t happy anymore. Maggie didn’t see it coming, and struggled to find how this happened and how she’s lost herself over the last several years supporting him and raising their two (now adult) children. “When you think you are bypassing heartache, all you’re really doing is borrowing happiness from another day.”While I can’t imagine having to 3.5 stars - Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties starts with Maggie, a 53 year old, being blindsided by her husband, Adam, announcing he wants to separate and isn’t happy anymore. Maggie didn’t see it coming, and struggled to find how this happened and how she’s lost herself over the last several years supporting him and raising their two (now adult) children. “When you think you are bypassing heartache, all you’re really doing is borrowing happiness from another day.”While I can’t imagine having to deal with this and feeling blindsided by such a bombshell, I initially wasn’t that into the story - I felt Maggie was being naive and acting a bit too old-school with her behavior and train of thought. However, we don’t know how we’ll act in certain situations sometimes until we’re facing them ourselves. ”Sometimes you’ve got to take a hammer to life’s hard edges.”I’m not a mom and closer to Maggie’s kids’ ages than her, but there were enough elements throughout the story that I still found relatable. The heart of the story is focused on finding yourself, at any age, but again later in life if you’ve lost some parts of who you once were. Being courageous enough to know change is hard sometimes, but can also be good, and to embrace it. I enjoyed the story, especially as Maggie’s journey to find herself again progressed.
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  • Nicole (TheBookWormDrinketh)
    January 1, 1970
    “It’s an age-old story: woman meets man, man woos woman, woman spends her best years believing their love is the everlasting kind. The pair watches with teary eyes as their progeny take flight from their suburban nest, knowing they’ll return in times of crisis or when their laundry needs to be washed and folded. Woman embraces aging with hair dye and ample amounts of wine . Man faces his impending mortality by convincing himself that a younger woman is the answer to his waning energy and flaggin “It’s an age-old story: woman meets man, man woos woman, woman spends her best years believing their love is the everlasting kind. The pair watches with teary eyes as their progeny take flight from their suburban nest, knowing they’ll return in times of crisis or when their laundry needs to be washed and folded. Woman embraces aging with hair dye and ample amounts of wine . Man faces his impending mortality by convincing himself that a younger woman is the answer to his waning energy and flagging libido. Certain their sparkling future is worth the collateral damage, the May–December duo ride into the sunset as our heroine stands in the shadows, stunned by this unexpected rewrite. Yes, mine is a tale as old as time. Beauty replaces the beast.”When Maggie’s husband leaves her later later in life, she has to figure out once again who she is without him. How do you find yourself after decades of marriage when you’ve always been an “us” and never an “I”? How do you make people see you again as the person you were? How do you make people see you AT ALL??“When had I ceased to be a human and metamorphosed into a windowpane? Maybe people had been looking right through me for years, and I was only now realizing it. Ladies and gentlemen, the Amazing Invisible Woman has been spotted!”Now in her 50’s with grown children and a husband who no longer thinks he loves her she has to wonder, “Where was the bright-eyed girl who had dreamed of a happy nuclear family and actually lived to see her dream come true?”So, Maggie decides to go on her Anniversary trip to Rome that was already booked to try to find herself as her own person again. Learning to put down the bottle and be her best self… or, at least the self that is recognizable once more.“After seven months of numbing my worst feelings, I was ready to feel them, even the ones that made it seem like life was nothing but a big fat cosmic joke.”This book is equal parts “Eat Pray Love” and “Bridget Jones’ Diary” all at once touching and funny. I loved the character of Maggie as she was written very real. She wasn’t perfect, but she was strong and she was weak all at the same time. It wasn’t a pretty transition from wife and mother to single woman again, and it wasn’t one of those books where she just fell into the arms of some hunky man who sweeps her off her feet and they live happily ever after. It’s messy and it’s up and down as we follow Maggie on this beautiful journey where she learns that you can always change your mind because “Life is nothing if not full of twists and turns.”
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t know if there’s a mother on the planet that hasn’t felt like they lost a piece of themselves at some point since having their children. It’s SO incredibly easy to throw your heart and soul into being a mom, it’s a gigantic responsibility and one most don’t take lightly. Along the way it’s far too easy to put yourself last in order to keep your family functioning happily and you don’t even notice until you’ve been doing it for years, decades even. That is the crux of Maggie’s problem, she I don’t know if there’s a mother on the planet that hasn’t felt like they lost a piece of themselves at some point since having their children. It’s SO incredibly easy to throw your heart and soul into being a mom, it’s a gigantic responsibility and one most don’t take lightly. Along the way it’s far too easy to put yourself last in order to keep your family functioning happily and you don’t even notice until you’ve been doing it for years, decades even. That is the crux of Maggie’s problem, she has lost herself and it takes her husband leaving her for her to even realize it.I could completely relate to Maggie even though she’s a bit older than me, she’s a normal, everyday wife and mom who doesn’t even really know what makes her happy. She knows what drives her kids and her husband, but herself? The last time she followed her dreams was when she married her husband decades ago. Pagan created such a realistic character in Maggie, she was warm and kind and also insecure and unsure of her place in the world and lacking confidence in a major way. Who can’t relate to that?! She also had a dark sense of humor at times that I loved! The way the whole book unfolded was so true to real life, you know those books where a woman gets divorced then moves someplace new, falls in love and gets a second chance at happiness super quickly? This isn’t that book and I so appreciated that, it’s an extremely well written and accurate portrayal of what a woman would do after her life is shattered.Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties in three words: Honest, Relatable and Hopeful.
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  • Anne ✨
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoy Camille Pagan’s writing - her stories are funny, poignant, relatable and uplifting.This is a story about Maggie, a 53-year-old woman whose life has revolved around 30years of marriage and staying at home to raise their two now-adult kids. When her husband, Adam, goes through a mid-life crisis and ends their marriage, Maggie must begin the process of rediscovering who she is again. Maggie goes through all the emotions you’d expect (shock, sadness, anger, hurt), but this story is an I really enjoy Camille Pagan’s writing - her stories are funny, poignant, relatable and uplifting.This is a story about Maggie, a 53-year-old woman whose life has revolved around 30years of marriage and staying at home to raise their two now-adult kids. When her husband, Adam, goes through a mid-life crisis and ends their marriage, Maggie must begin the process of rediscovering who she is again. Maggie goes through all the emotions you’d expect (shock, sadness, anger, hurt), but this story is an uplifting and hopeful one, thanks to Pagan’s trademark use of wit, and Maggie’s character growing into a place of greater understanding, forgiveness, and excitement for the future. You will empathize with Maggie, and feel for her situation, but you’ll also cheer for her as she takes her life back one adventurous, and hopeful step at a time.Audio Notes: Amy McFadden perfectly delivers Pagan's wit, and reinforces Maggie as such a believable character, capturing all the nuances of her thoughts and emotions. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award.And of course... ♥ Book cover love ♥
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  • Melindam
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received by the Publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.2.75 starsI requested this ARC, because I found the title intriguing and that alone made me think and reflect on Things-In-Life. DDespite the cover blurb revealing the gist of the story, I was somehow hoping for more... more depth, layers, insight, inner journey. So maybe it was a mistake on my part to start reading with these expectations in mind, but I couldn't help them, they were there and unfortunately they were no ARC received by the Publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.2.75 starsI requested this ARC, because I found the title intriguing and that alone made me think and reflect on Things-In-Life. DDespite the cover blurb revealing the gist of the story, I was somehow hoping for more... more depth, layers, insight, inner journey. So maybe it was a mistake on my part to start reading with these expectations in mind, but I couldn't help them, they were there and unfortunately they were not met. Pretty much everything was kept close to the surface.This does not mean that the book was bad, not at all. It was a nice read altogether with an OK, but very generic story. There is not really anything to make it stand out among the others of its kind. It is about how a woman in her fifties who has to start life all over again, re-discovering herself in the process.When it came to her travel to Rome, I started to get nervous, getting some very unwelcome Eat, Pray, Love-vibes (am not a fan of that book, in case you are curious). I think the author must have been conscious of this herself as there was a direct, tongue-in-cheek denial about it. The writing was good, but bland and did not really help me connecting to Maggie. Closing conclusion: if you are in need of some hen-lit, go for it, just don't expect anything earth-shattering.
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  • Myrna
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes you don’t need this..... that.... or this.... or that..... to enjoy a good story.... This plotline has been done before by other authors but Camille does it so well (except for the part about Texas....LOL).
  • Lisa Montanaro
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this book! Maggie is such a great character. The story line is interesting and kept me glued to the page. I really liked that the characters were multi-dimensional and had depth. There is something so satisfying and inspiring when someone triumphs over a tough situation and this book delivers in that regard. Let’s hear it for second chances!
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  • Sherri Thacker
    January 1, 1970
    Well this book was a pleasant surprise. It’s my first book written by Camille Pagan and I love her style of writing. I’m in my 50’s too and it made me think what would happen if my hubby of 27 years also said “I’m done with our marriage”. It’s scary to start over after 2 kids ... etc. But one has to move on. This book was very enjoyable and I can’t wait to read her other books.
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  • Linda Zagon
    January 1, 1970
    My Review of “Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties” by Camille Pagan Lake Union Publishing February 27,2018Kudos to Camille Pagan , Author of “Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties” for such a wonderful, emotional and encouraging read. Can you imagine thinking you have it all, married for thirty years, two grown children, a house , and friends, and finding that everything in your life is about to change? How would you feel if said husband informs you that he no longer wants to be married? You’re 53 years o My Review of “Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties” by Camille Pagan Lake Union Publishing February 27,2018Kudos to Camille Pagan , Author of “Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties” for such a wonderful, emotional and encouraging read. Can you imagine thinking you have it all, married for thirty years, two grown children, a house , and friends, and finding that everything in your life is about to change? How would you feel if said husband informs you that he no longer wants to be married? You’re 53 years old and you realize that your husband is not coming back. What should you do? What do you do?Camille Pagan describes her characters as flawed, complex and complicated. Maggie Harris has a load of insecurities and anxieties, but there was no way that she can believe that this has happened to her. Of course, she is hoping Adam will change his mind. Maggie is starting to feel invisible. She had left her career as a social worker years ago, to take care of her children and husband. She works part-time for a dentist for the convenience. Many times she feels lonely, and goes through the gamut of emotions.Maggie goes to Rome by herself. She makes a special friend and meets people and takes the time to reflect. The friend that she meets in Rome suggest that Maggie stay in her home, when she goes back to the United States. Maggie has to learn to take care of herself. The blurb from NetGalley says that Camille Pagan writes about “a woman on the verge of a nervous breakthrough.”I appreciate that the author discusses the importance of believing in yourself, having self-esteem, and learning what you want. The author also stresses the importance of family, , emotional support, love and hope. I like that age is just a number , and you can do what you want to. I would recommend this enjoyable story to readers that like Woman’s Fiction. I received An Advanced Reading Copy from NetGalley for my honest review.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    When I first saw the title of this book, I thought it would be about a woman in her 30s. Was I ever wrong - it's about a woman in her 50s and I was thrilled. I feel that this is an age group that is being ignored in modern books and it was great to have such a multi-dimensional and well written character take the lead. Kudos to Camille for writing such a fantastic main character and a great book.After 30 years of marriage and being part of a couple who were well matched and happy, Maggie's husba When I first saw the title of this book, I thought it would be about a woman in her 30s. Was I ever wrong - it's about a woman in her 50s and I was thrilled. I feel that this is an age group that is being ignored in modern books and it was great to have such a multi-dimensional and well written character take the lead. Kudos to Camille for writing such a fantastic main character and a great book.After 30 years of marriage and being part of a couple who were well matched and happy, Maggie's husband decides that he no longer loves his wife and wants a divorce. He has found another woman who is as young as their two children and wants to start his life over. Maggie is shocked and at first thinks that he will be back soon. She even plans a family Thanksgiving dinner several months later so he can see what he's missed and beg to come home. It doesn't work that way and Maggie has to re-invent herself and her life and at 53 that's a tough thing to do. She ends up taking a solo trip to Italy and then moves to another state to try to find herself and figure out what she wants out of life and what her life will look like as she moves forward. I loved Maggie and I laughed with her and cried with her and was rooting for her to find a way to move forward with her life. This book doesn't disappoint and you don't want to miss it. Thank you to the author and the Great Thought's Ninja Review Team for the review copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I did not see this one coming! I had not read any novels by this author, but the cover captured my eye first. When I read the blurb about it, I couldn't resist.How many women over 40 feel like all the world revolves around 20-somethings or, dare I say it, milennials? I don't think I did at 40, but in my 60's I really feel it. TV commercials, TV shows...it runs through our entire society! So this particular book caught my eye right away. And, it succeeded in holding my attention throughout. Wow! I did not see this one coming! I had not read any novels by this author, but the cover captured my eye first. When I read the blurb about it, I couldn't resist.How many women over 40 feel like all the world revolves around 20-somethings or, dare I say it, milennials? I don't think I did at 40, but in my 60's I really feel it. TV commercials, TV shows...it runs through our entire society! So this particular book caught my eye right away. And, it succeeded in holding my attention throughout. Maggie spoke to me and I wanted to be in my 50's again and fly off to Rome and live some of my dreams. I did, vicariously, through this book. I loved it!Thank you to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for providing me with a "dream come true" book that was a great read and an easy to review book! I look forward to reading more by this author.
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  • Susan Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    Whenever I pick up a book by Camille Pagan, I know I will get a novel filled with multi-dimensional characters and a story filled with the ups and downs, and twists and turns of life. In Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties, the author has given us Maggie; a 53-year-old woman, content in life with her husband and two adult children, although she is a bit of a worry wart! The one thing she never worried about, never questioned, was her marriage...until the day her husband tells her that he is leaving Whenever I pick up a book by Camille Pagan, I know I will get a novel filled with multi-dimensional characters and a story filled with the ups and downs, and twists and turns of life. In Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties, the author has given us Maggie; a 53-year-old woman, content in life with her husband and two adult children, although she is a bit of a worry wart! The one thing she never worried about, never questioned, was her marriage...until the day her husband tells her that he is leaving her for another woman. Suddenly she begins to question everything in her life, all of the decisions she's made, all of the things she took for granted, and she must somehow figure out if her life is over, or if it's just beginning. I loved Maggie so much....she was so relatable, so honest, and her emotions so raw. As I followed along with her on her journey, I laughed, I smiled, I cried, I cringed...but above all I felt hopeful. Maggie's resilience, her strong sense of self-worth, empower her through the darkest of days. This story is compelling and poignant, filled with relationships and emotions that are sure to fill readers' hearts. I finished this book with tears in my eyes and a smile on my face.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Maggie is a worrier. It’s who she is. When her husband tells her that he’s in love with someone else, 30 years of marriage passes through her brain. She doesn’t know how to function without being married. She’s been a mom and a wife for most of her adult life. As Maggie tries to figure out life without being a wife, she also tries to reconnect with who she was in her 30s, when she was in her prime and happy.Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties is a book for those who might have lost their way but can Maggie is a worrier. It’s who she is. When her husband tells her that he’s in love with someone else, 30 years of marriage passes through her brain. She doesn’t know how to function without being married. She’s been a mom and a wife for most of her adult life. As Maggie tries to figure out life without being a wife, she also tries to reconnect with who she was in her 30s, when she was in her prime and happy.Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties is a book for those who might have lost their way but can have hope to find it again. It’s about learning to let go and have a leap of faith that things will be alright.Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher .
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  • Storiesandcoffee
    January 1, 1970
    "Familiar is good, but maybe sometimes unfamiliar is even better.” - Woman Last Seen in Her ThirtiesAt the age of fifty-three, Maggie Harris is thrown for a loop when her husband decides to up and leave her without any warning. Sure, their lives have fallen into a boring routine, and they haven’t had a passionate marriage in years, but the divorce still comes as a shock. Now, she is forced to figure out who she is and what she wants to do next. Her kids are fully grown, and while her son still d "Familiar is good, but maybe sometimes unfamiliar is even better.” - Woman Last Seen in Her ThirtiesAt the age of fifty-three, Maggie Harris is thrown for a loop when her husband decides to up and leave her without any warning. Sure, their lives have fallen into a boring routine, and they haven’t had a passionate marriage in years, but the divorce still comes as a shock. Now, she is forced to figure out who she is and what she wants to do next. Her kids are fully grown, and while her son still depends on her financially, they don’t really need her anymore. She hasn’t worked in years, dedicating her life to raising her children and maintaining her household. For the first time in a long time, Maggie gets to make choices for herself, without any consideration for what others think.Maggie’s journey takes her to Rome and Ann Arbor, meeting knew people along the way while also still dealing with relationships from her past. But when a medical emergency occurs, taking her back to her life in Chicago, Maggie is forced to decide if she wants to go back to her old life, or stick it out and see where her new journey takes her.Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties is an inspiring novel, forcing the reader to evaluate their own situation and ask themselves, “Am I truly living, or am I fading into the background of my own life instead of being present in it?” It’s also a lighthearted read, with Camille Pagan bringing lots of subtle humor to the pages with her wonderful writing.As a woman turning thirty later this year, and as a stay at home mom, this book really hit home. It’s easy to put everyone else before yourself (isn’t that what moms do?) but it’s also easy to lose yourself by doing it. Reading has always been my favorite hobby, but this novel inspired me to focus more on my other passions too. Once our kids are grown and leave the nest, we have to live with the life that we’ve created for ourselves. Do we want that life to be full of wonderful memories, or full of regret that we didn’t do more?I highly recommend this novel to fans of women’s fiction. It’s a quick, enjoyable read that is also very relatable. I would recommend Camille Pagan’s other novels, as well. Forever is the Worst Long Time was one of my favorite reads in 2017.I would give this book 🌟🌟🌟🌟/5 stars.**Thank you to Lake Union Publishing for being so wonderful and sending me this finished copy in advance. All opinions are my own.**
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  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    We've all been through heartache right? The person you think you're going to spend the rest of your life with ups and decides it's over... seemingly out of nowhere? And the first thing you do? You blame yourself. What could you have done to make it better? Where did you go wrong? HOW COULD THEY DO THIS TO YOU?! And then there's the truth to time healing all wounds and you WILL move on and find something better - whether with someone else or with YOURSELF.So yes, this is a story we've seen time a We've all been through heartache right? The person you think you're going to spend the rest of your life with ups and decides it's over... seemingly out of nowhere? And the first thing you do? You blame yourself. What could you have done to make it better? Where did you go wrong? HOW COULD THEY DO THIS TO YOU?! And then there's the truth to time healing all wounds and you WILL move on and find something better - whether with someone else or with YOURSELF.So yes, this is a story we've seen time and time again. However, Camille Pagan does this story with humor, truth and relatability. We see Maggie go through all the stages of her marriage ending. Her two children are polar opposites and while one would love to see them get back together, the other hopes that they don't. You know why? Because children see way more than you give them credit for. Watching Maggie grieve the loss of her relationship and go through the various stages was cathartic and reminiscent of what we all go through. Dealings with the heart are the hardest - what you feel far outweighs what your brain will tell you most of the time, which is why it hurts so damn much when it happens. I love that the saying "everything happens for a reason" is not a theme in this book! It's more a "take what life gave you and then make it your bitch"... or something along those lines. 🤣 What's fantastic about this book is Maggie. I thoroughly enjoyed her character, the humor, the wit, the realism is how she dealt with everything, being in her 50s and single again. It's never easy - but it IS doable. I highly recommend this fantastic contemporary read. Especially if you've ever gone through a horrid breakup thinking there was no light on the other side. Because let me tell you, you might not see it right away, but it's there... it's what you do with it that makes all the difference. Thank you so much to Amazon Publishing and Lake Union for this delightful read!
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  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties is the story of Maggie and how she copes when her husband of almost thirty years suddenly wants a divorce. The main premise is all so familiar. And unfortunately others have done it better.I did read to the end but once there, I had the feeling that I’d read a book where nothing really happened. Or the things that did happen were a series of boring and cliched tropes. For starters, there was the ‘seachange’ type of move to another town, the new job, the adventurou Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties is the story of Maggie and how she copes when her husband of almost thirty years suddenly wants a divorce. The main premise is all so familiar. And unfortunately others have done it better.I did read to the end but once there, I had the feeling that I’d read a book where nothing really happened. Or the things that did happen were a series of boring and cliched tropes. For starters, there was the ‘seachange’ type of move to another town, the new job, the adventurous holiday, the hot sex with a new man, the being assertive to boss/husband/younger patronising characters, and the coming to terms with addiction plotlines. I felt like Pagan had a list of scenes she thinks one must tick off to write a ‘women of a certain age rediscovering themselves after divorce’ novel. The fact Maggie is 53 is completely wasted. Other than this enabling her to have grown up children, Maggie could have been any age. I took a bit of offence to the title actually. It suggests that the last time Maggie really lived was when she was in her thirties. Obviously quiet hobbies, part time jobs, and successfully raising two children are completely discounted when it comes to living. To live, one must travel overseas, drink champagne, and dance on table tops! Sure. Her age never came up when she was mingling with any of her potential new boyfriends either. Not that I really could say I remember the age of any of Maggie’s men. Nor any other details of their personalities. They weren’t fleshed out enough for me to form an opinion on who I should be cheering on fanatically either. Maggie could have gone for any of them and I’d have still just shrugged. The only time her age was really raised is to explain why she is working in a dead end job. This is very common issue when women leave their employment to spend a few years at home with their children and sacrifice their career in the process. However, this book offers no new insights into the issue, nor any sort of suggestion on how anyone can change it.I must add it wasn’t only the men in Maggie’s life I found underdone. I don’t think any of the supporting characters were particularly impressive. Maggie’s ex, her kids, and her friends… I can’t say any of them stood out. I'd have preferred the quirky annoying character even to this lot. The blurb says this book is hilarious and hopeful. I would suggest ho-hum and hackneyed.Sorry. 3 out of 5 is probably generous
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  • Jamie Rosenblit
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first book by Camille Pagán & will definitely not be my last. At first, I wasn't sure if I would be able to relate to the main character, Maggie, a 50 something year old woman who's husband is done with their marriage, after her giving him everything & raising two adult children together. I'm 30 & single, but I went in with an open mind and I'm glad I did. Maggie was an incredibly likable character and I enjoyed sharing her journey with her. I was angry at Adam for her and This is my first book by Camille Pagán & will definitely not be my last. At first, I wasn't sure if I would be able to relate to the main character, Maggie, a 50 something year old woman who's husband is done with their marriage, after her giving him everything & raising two adult children together. I'm 30 & single, but I went in with an open mind and I'm glad I did. Maggie was an incredibly likable character and I enjoyed sharing her journey with her. I was angry at Adam for her and wanted to scream when he pulled his guilty punches, I was smiling alongside Maggie when she goes on a trip to Italy herself that was supposed to be for their anniversary. I thought the character development was very strong and I enjoyed following Maggie's progression very much. I received an advance copy from the Great Thought's Ninja Review Team. All opinions are my own.
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  • Caryn
    January 1, 1970
    Having never read Pagan before, I know I’ll have to make a point to grab her earlier novels. She writes relatable characters well. Maggie is in her 50s and content until her husband of 30 years tells her he’s no longer happy and is leaving her. She raised two children with him and doesn’t know any other life. How can she just be alone?While I’m happily married, I can relate to the character’s feeling of “Is this it?” Does anyone in a relationship know how they would be on their own when they’re Having never read Pagan before, I know I’ll have to make a point to grab her earlier novels. She writes relatable characters well. Maggie is in her 50s and content until her husband of 30 years tells her he’s no longer happy and is leaving her. She raised two children with him and doesn’t know any other life. How can she just be alone?While I’m happily married, I can relate to the character’s feeling of “Is this it?” Does anyone in a relationship know how they would be on their own when they’re so used to being committed? And I appreciated Maggie struggling with her choices because I imagine anyone in her situation would feel the same. It was an honest portrayal of a woman needing to find herself.My thanks to the publisher and author’s street team for a copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book so much! I could relate to Maggie so much even though I remain happily married. Christ on a cracker! I laughed out loud so many times! Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties is a heartwarming tale of finding happiness after bad times. And of the ability to fold life's bad moments into the good!I received an advanced review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Lisa (Remarkablylisa)
    January 1, 1970
    MY RATING: 4.5/5 STARSI received a copy from Thomas Allen and Sons in exchange for an honest review.Honestly, when I asked to review this book, I was looking for a woman's fiction novel that was realistic and well written enough to make me feel like the main characters. Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties is that novel. And it was fantastic. WLSIHT (my own short form) follows Maggie Harris, a 53 year old woman, who cannot believe after thirty years of marriage, her husband decides that she no longer MY RATING: 4.5/5 STARSI received a copy from Thomas Allen and Sons in exchange for an honest review.Honestly, when I asked to review this book, I was looking for a woman's fiction novel that was realistic and well written enough to make me feel like the main characters. Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties is that novel. And it was fantastic. WLSIHT (my own short form) follows Maggie Harris, a 53 year old woman, who cannot believe after thirty years of marriage, her husband decides that she no longer loves her anymore. Adam, her husband, leaves her, claiming he loves another woman and cannot live the same mundane life he's been living since they got married. It's traumatic to Maggie. She copes by drinking too much cheap wine, not really eating full healthy meals, and trying to keep in touch with her two children who are now fully grown and with high profile careers. It can be a bit depressing at times as Maggie tries to figure out the year she's separated from Adam. She goes on vacation by herself in Italy. She drinks, eats delicious food, and meets new friends. When she returns, she changes into a new woman. Maggie is no longer weak and depressed. She's strong and optimistic about the future. Moving into a smaller town, far away from her ex who seems to be entertaining himself with random hobbies, she relaxes into her new routine of grabbing coffee from the local cafe and joining a divorce support group. Maggie meets new men, dipping her toes into the dating scene, and falling for them timidly. But then Adam comes back into her life. After all, being married for so long doesn't leave too much room in social circles. And she's far too nice to say no when Adam needs help with his mother who has dementia and then Adam suffers his own health issues that leave the broken family distressed. I found this novel not too dark for what the book is about. I actually found it uplifting in some ways and peaceful to read. I liked how Maggie had character development and grew stronger mentally. She no longer depended on others for happiness and from her bottle of wine. She also stood up for herself. People hurt her. People took advantage of her. And she wasn't going to just accept an apology and forget about it. Nope, Maggie made people grovel. If that doesn't make you stand up and clap, then I don't know what will.MY RECOMMENDATION Do not be afraid to read this book if you haven't read women's fiction before. I really recommend this story to help you ease into the genre. It's a raw and realistic tale that makes you crave more. I'm also going to be reading the author's work from now on!
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Middle aged woman (Maggie) finds herself after husband (Adam) leaves her for younger woman. OK, that simple description makes this book sound mundane and predictable, but please believe me when I tell you that it was not! It started out light and humorous, so I was not at all expecting the depth of emotion sprinkled throughout and especially at the end. #BawlingSince my mom passed away less than 3 months ago, and her outlook on life was so very similar to Maggie's mom's, portions of this book re Middle aged woman (Maggie) finds herself after husband (Adam) leaves her for younger woman. OK, that simple description makes this book sound mundane and predictable, but please believe me when I tell you that it was not! It started out light and humorous, so I was not at all expecting the depth of emotion sprinkled throughout and especially at the end. #BawlingSince my mom passed away less than 3 months ago, and her outlook on life was so very similar to Maggie's mom's, portions of this book really struck a chord with me and definitely contributed to my extreme emotional reaction to the story. Even if you haven't lost a parent, there are so many other themes in this book (divorce, midlife crisis, career change, mothering grown children, forgiveness, trying new things, etc), I think almost everyone will enjoy it. I would highly recommend it!Thank you to the author, the publisher, and NetGalley for a free advance copy of this book! All opinions are my own.Location: Chicago IL, Rome Italy, and Ann Arbor MI"My mother's death taught me that when you think you are bypassing heartache, all you are really doing is borrowing happiness from another day," - Maggie#WomanLastSeenInHerThirties #NetGalley
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  • Emily Cavanagh
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Camille Pagan’s latest, Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties, is at turns honest, hilarious, and full of heart. In Maggie Halfmoon, Pagan has created a nuanced and relatable character whose life is unexpectedly turned upside down when her husband suddenly leaves her after thirty-plus years of marriage. Pagan’s writing is sharp and quick-witted, both laugh-out-loud funny and deeply caring toward her characters. Maggie’s response to I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Camille Pagan’s latest, Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties, is at turns honest, hilarious, and full of heart. In Maggie Halfmoon, Pagan has created a nuanced and relatable character whose life is unexpectedly turned upside down when her husband suddenly leaves her after thirty-plus years of marriage. Pagan’s writing is sharp and quick-witted, both laugh-out-loud funny and deeply caring toward her characters. Maggie’s response to being discarded like a used dinner napkin is both believable and brave. As she navigates finding herself anew, the reader is drawn into Maggie’s story, her marriage, and the subtle choices that have led her to where she is today. Particularly relatable to anyone who has been married for more than two minutes, Pagan’s latest is uplifting, full of hope, and bright with the possibility of a new tomorrow.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Even though this is a plot I've seen before -- Husband leaves, Woman Has to Start Over -- it was still enjoyable because the writing is so engaging. I also liked that most of it was set in Ann Arbor, a great town (and where I lived for over three years). A cautionary tale about not losing yourself in a relationship, whether it's a new one or decades old.I found this quote to be quite profound:"My mother's death taught me that when you think you are bypassing heartache, all you are really doing i Even though this is a plot I've seen before -- Husband leaves, Woman Has to Start Over -- it was still enjoyable because the writing is so engaging. I also liked that most of it was set in Ann Arbor, a great town (and where I lived for over three years). A cautionary tale about not losing yourself in a relationship, whether it's a new one or decades old.I found this quote to be quite profound:"My mother's death taught me that when you think you are bypassing heartache, all you are really doing is borrowing happiness from another day."Thank you to Lake Union Publishing and Netgalley for the ARC.
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  • Hridi
    January 1, 1970
    This is a novel about a woman who is finding herself after a divorce. The writing itself is at times heartbreaking and funny at the same time. But it is truly amazing to see how a woman emerges as an individual after spending so many years in “hiding” as she devoted her own self in order to become a perfect wife. This story is full of love, heartbreak and most of all- inspiration. A must read !
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  • Diane Perry
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Maggie has her life turned upside down by her husband. So, she goes to Rome. She begins to figure herself out, and the new life ahead. Very witty and relatable. Maggie was a wonderful character, and she displayed true love, forgiveness and strength. Very enjoyable.
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  • Cindy Roesel
    January 1, 1970
    In Camille Pagan's new novel, WOMAN LAST SEEN IN HER THIRTIES (LakeUnionPublishing), fifty-three, Maggie Harris has a good marriage and two mostly happy children, until she doesn't. Her husband Adam, decides he's not in love with Maggie anymore and walks out. Maggie proceeds to implode, and realize she's basically become invisible taking care of others for the past thirty years.Then she learns she and Adam had an upcoming anniversary trip planned to Italy, and she's not going to cancel just beca In Camille Pagan's new novel, WOMAN LAST SEEN IN HER THIRTIES (LakeUnionPublishing), fifty-three, Maggie Harris has a good marriage and two mostly happy children, until she doesn't. Her husband Adam, decides he's not in love with Maggie anymore and walks out. Maggie proceeds to implode, and realize she's basically become invisible taking care of others for the past thirty years.Then she learns she and Adam had an upcoming anniversary trip planned to Italy, and she's not going to cancel just because her soon to be ex-loser husband doesn't want to go, because he has some young hottie.When she returns, she relocates with the help of a woman she met on the trip and proceeds to peel away all the negative thoughts and fears she's accumulated over the last three decades - falling air conditioners, the IRS, identity theft, skydiving, and airbag recalls.She slowly begins to rebuild her life, a new career, even a romance. But when a new crisis hits, she must decide how much of the new woman she's become she's willing to keep.I loved WOMAN LAST SEEN IN HER THIRTIES. I appreciated Camille writing about a woman in her fifties showing that life doesn't stop after one's thirties, including traumatic events. Women today are aging gracefully and living full lives with careers and romances until they can't. And no one is going to stop us.I fell in love with Maggie. She had just the right amount of neurosis and joie de vivre to come out on top. I believe readers will connect with Maggie, too.Camille's words:I’ve been telling stories as long as I’ve been able to hold a pen, but I didn’t write a novel until about ten years ago. I had just given birth to my first child and a dear friend was battling terminal cancer; I guess you could say life’s big questions were on my mind. I began writing at night after my daughter went to bed, and after many tough but exhilarating months, completed the draft that would become my debut, The Art of Forgetting. The experience changed me—even before I typed “The End,” I knew I wanted to do it again (and again and again).Still, it took me several years to write another novel that made it to print. A cross-country move, the birth of my second child, and a heavy dose of second book self doubt had me ready to throw in the towel. Then I sat down and began working on a story just for myself, which put the joy back in my writing. Less than a year after handing that book, Life and Other Near-Death Experiences, to my agent, it became the #1 all-category Kindle bestseller and remained there for more than three of the first four weeks after its publication. Life was recently optioned for film by Jessica Chastain’s Freckle Films.Not long after Life was published, I was plodding along on a new draft when I suddenly had the idea for my third novel, Forever is the Worst Long Time. I knew it was supposed to be my next book—and luckily my publisher, Lake Union, agreed. Forever was published at the beginning of 2017, and was an RT Reviews top pick and named a best book of the month by Amazon, InStyle, and RealSimple. This year, I’m thrilled to introduce you to Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties and its protagonist, Maggie Halfmoon, who was a delight to write. I just finished my fifth novel (and hope to be able to share more news about it with you soon!).When I’m not at my computer, you’ll find me with my nose in a book, running after my two kids and our nutty dog, or planning my next trip (most likely to Puerto Rico, where my husband was born and raised). After nearly a decade in Brooklyn and a stint in Chicago, my family and I live in Ann Arbor, Michigan.Drop me a line or connect with me on Facebook; I’d love to hear from you.www.camillepagan.comThanks to Lake Union Publishing, we have one copy of WOMAN LAST SEEN IN HER THIRTIES to giveaway. Tell us what trauma happened in your life that made you stronger. We'll pick a winner soon. Good luck.
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