Superman
SUPERMAN: YEAR ONE from Frank Miller (THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT: MASTER RACE) and John Romita Jr. (ALL-STAR BATMAN, SUPERMAN) A groundbreaking, definitive treatment of Superman’s classic origin story in honor of his 80th anniversary. This story details new revelations that reframe the Man of Steel’s most famous milestones—from Kal-El’s frantic exile from Krypton, to Clark Kent’s childhood in Kansas, to his inevitable rise to become the most powerful and inspiring superhero of all time.

Superman Details

TitleSuperman
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 12th, 2019
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401291372
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Dc Comics, Superman, Superheroes, Comic Book

Superman Review

  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Ha! No.1.5 starsThis wasn't completely awful, but Clark's inner monologue was just weird. How can someone sound so fucking awkward inside their own head? He sounded so goddamn creepy that I was honestly waiting for the moment when Miller popped up with a Gotcha! This is Evil Superman! twist.No, seriously. I was shocked when it didn't happen.I'm not sure what exactly happened to make anyone think it would be a good idea to have Clark turn into a playboy, either. The whole thing is littered with Ha! No.1.5 starsThis wasn't completely awful, but Clark's inner monologue was just weird. How can someone sound so fucking awkward inside their own head? He sounded so goddamn creepy that I was honestly waiting for the moment when Miller popped up with a Gotcha! This is Evil Superman! twist.No, seriously. I was shocked when it didn't happen.I'm not sure what exactly happened to make anyone think it would be a good idea to have Clark turn into a playboy, either. The whole thing is littered with the women in his life who are falling all over themselves to be with him. And...ok?But then he just up and leaves several of them without a backward glance after having these You Are My Forever Love moments with them. And in the case of Posiodon's daughter, Lori, it seems as though they may have been on their way to getting married when he just sort of trotted off on to another adventure.WEIRD.And speaking of weird, that whole incestuous storyline was a lot of fun, wasn't it?I gotta say, Wonder Woman giving him that weepy-eyed look as he flies out the window made me throw up in my mouth a little.Getthefuckoutofherewiththat.Oh, and apparently Batman not only has a gun (pew, pew!) but now acts like a douchey frat boy after a kegger.AWESOME.It's also worth noting that it looks like this version of Baby Clark mind controlled the Kents into adopting him.Because that's not scary as all fuck, is it?Just so you think I'm not a big whiner baby, there were parts of it that were interesting. The stuff with him in the military caught my attention as a what if - then it just went off the rails and into mermaid land. Add to that the fact that he never seemed to visit Smallville, or mention Lana & the Kents again, and you can see why I was convinced I was reading a comic about Ultraman.Normally, I'm not a fan of John Romita Jr.'s art, but I actually thought this was the best work I've ever personally seen from him. That's not to say I loved it, but I didn't (for once) hate it.And look, I know it had to be incredibly hard to try and retell the Superman origin story...again. I get that, really. But maybe that's a sign that it doesn't need to be retold.On the whole, though?
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  • Paul E. Morph
    January 1, 1970
    This is a tricky one to rate. One’s first thought can’t help but be ‘Do we really need yet another re-telling of Superman’s origin story?’ and, to be honest, I don’t think we really did.That being said, the first two issues (and each issue is a giant-sized 67 pager) are undeniably engaging and entertaining, doing a decent job of capturing what makes Clark who he is, despite a couple of questionable decisions (view spoiler)[(namely having the infant Supes mind-control the Kents into raising him, This is a tricky one to rate. One’s first thought can’t help but be ‘Do we really need yet another re-telling of Superman’s origin story?’ and, to be honest, I don’t think we really did.That being said, the first two issues (and each issue is a giant-sized 67 pager) are undeniably engaging and entertaining, doing a decent job of capturing what makes Clark who he is, despite a couple of questionable decisions (view spoiler)[(namely having the infant Supes mind-control the Kents into raising him, which is extremely creepy, and having young Clark join the Navy, which is odd but kind of works) (hide spoiler)].Issue three is where it starts to feel very rushed; the plotting falls to pieces once Lex Luthor, Batman and Wonder Woman are introduced (in rapid succession); and it fails to have any kind of satisfying ending. Rather than another character-defining epic like The Dark Knight Returns, Miller’s take on Superman seems destined to be remembered rather as something of an odd duck.
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  • Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.How many times have we heard about the story of a space ship holding a special baby that crash-landed in the middle of Smallville, Kansas? The one where that very baby grows up to don a symbol of hope for the city of Metropolis? The one where he learns to fit in with humans although he possesses powers worthy of a God? In the same vein as Batman: Year One, legendary writer Frank Miller returns with the help of artist John Romita Jr. to write a You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.How many times have we heard about the story of a space ship holding a special baby that crash-landed in the middle of Smallville, Kansas? The one where that very baby grows up to don a symbol of hope for the city of Metropolis? The one where he learns to fit in with humans although he possesses powers worthy of a God? In the same vein as Batman: Year One, legendary writer Frank Miller returns with the help of artist John Romita Jr. to write a reimagined origin story for Superman in honor of his 80th anniversary. As part of the DC Black Label imprint, this tale focuses on some of the most crucial turning points throughout the hero’s formative days, including his teenage, young adult, and his career-defining early-adult days.What is Superman: Year One about? This three-issue story invites readers to revisit Superman’s origins from the destruction of Krypton and exile of Kal-El to his introduction in Metropolis as the Man of Steel. As a stranger to Earth, he learns to stand up to those who are in need and to control his powers before inviting any form of alienation from those who do not see eye to eye with him. It’s through personal experiences of love and danger, that he understands what he is capable of doing, what he believes in and what he wants to give the world, but he will never forget his roots and what his adoptive parents have allowed him to become.There he goes again. While writer Frank Miller might have had a hand in revolutionizing the comic book industry with some of the most impressive stories out there, he has failed to prove the world that he is still relevant as he continues to repeatedly write some of the most painful and cringy stories in the market. This time around, he wished to tackle one of DC’s most iconic heroes while having complete control of the Big Blue Boy Scout’s lore and an oversized format to explore it all on. Oddly enough, the graphic novel starts off intriguing and resolutely promising as the dialogue doesn’t scream pretentious or absurd for once. He ties together various iconic characters that have often been associated with Clark Kent’s growth, from his parents to his love interest, and allows us to see the innocent yet virtuous hero acknowledge his place on Earth while restraining himself to avoid breaking everything he touches, objects and people alike.It is as you progress through the story and Clark Kent grows old that you start getting the idea that Frank Miller plans on adding some unnecessary lore elements to the hero’s journey, as the transition seems off more often than not. In fact, when Clark Kent reaches his young adult days, he is put in a world that is not common of him to be in, especially when he is often reluctant to be a pawn to a higher authority. It can maybe be argued that he has always been a man who will do anything for his nation but to insert it so early in his life almost makes it seem like he was always inclined to join forces with the government in the long run. The story also ventures in an underwater tale where Superman showcases unprecedented signs of cockiness, as he discovers more of his powers while proving his love for an unusual love interest. This chapter simply appeared out of the blue and quickly made me think that Frank Miller simply wanted to fuse Aquaman’s playground to Superman’s adventures.The final chapter is where it completely derailed in my books as the story lost its focus and expanded its cast to include other heroes and villains that shouldn’t have been in this story in the first place—amongst them all, he unsurprisingly decided to ruin the Dark Knight with some of the worse dialogues of all time. This whole chapter almost felt like it that was designed to prove the people at Warner Bros and DC Comics that he had a “better” idea—the premise of it could’ve been good but the execution here was horrible—than director Zach Snyder as to what Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016) should’ve been.And the artwork? Thankfully, Frank Miller didn’t do that too. He does do the inside cover art of this edition and I’m glad that the dusk jacket is there to hide it. However, John Romita Jr. does a decent job illustrating this story from start to finish but since I’m not much of a fan of his visual style, especially his character designs, I can’t say that I loved it too much. It’s mostly the inking by Danny Miki and colouring by Alex Sinclair that allowed this volume to keep me hooked. Vibrant, clearly-defined, and with a touch of mysticism, the artwork was decent enough to not contribute to Frank Miller’s yet-again unnecessary and mediocre project.Superman: Year One is a superfluous origin story that skips through his evolution and delivers a hectic, unfocused and precipitous finale that completely lost sight of its intended direction.Yours truly,Lashaan | Blogger and Book ReviewerOfficial blog: https://bookidote.com/_______________________It's not surprising for Frank Miller to go down that route in the end...Yours truly,Lashaan | Blogger and Book ReviewerOfficial blog: https://bookidote.com/
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  • Saravanan Mani
    January 1, 1970
    This is a quick review of the first issue and I will update the review when the next issues come out. I do not get the hate for this book. Comic Book website had given this a one star review. It might not be revolutionary like some of the all-time greats but it is a fantastic and grounded version of Superman, which is not overly cynical and dark like the Zack Snyder version. It shows good reasons why the Alien chooses to be human. This is very important to me, because that's what Superman is--an This is a quick review of the first issue and I will update the review when the next issues come out. I do not get the hate for this book. Comic Book website had given this a one star review. It might not be revolutionary like some of the all-time greats but it is a fantastic and grounded version of Superman, which is not overly cynical and dark like the Zack Snyder version. It shows good reasons why the Alien chooses to be human. This is very important to me, because that's what Superman is--an alien being who comes from a technocratic and advanced society which does not tolerate weakness. If we are buying into the Superman/Clark Kent duality, we must accept that he is neither and both - he likes being both and he sees the importance of bearing the sign of house of El as well as a guest on earth. He is naturally drawn to vulnerable people and he wants to help them but he realizes that all his power does not allow him to help people all the time. The truth of the matter is, Superman lives in the world where murders, rapes and genocide happens. He gets to decide which crimes he will stop and which ones he will allow to happen. Every time he switches off his world-tuner, he bears the weight of responsibility of what he has sanctioned. That weight of responsibility shines through in this book. While it is a different father figure, Uncle Ben, who says that with great power must also comes great responsibility - Superman lives it. And the art is gorgeous and color use is brilliant. Pa and Ma Kent come across as earnest and caring. They don't have to be oversmart or woke. As much as I love the woke Aunt May in the recent Spider-Man books (that is the best character reinvention in comics in years imo), 1940s Kansas-bound Martha and Jonathan Kent don't have the same world-exposure that a 2010s New-Yorker Aunt May has. Of course, they are conservative. But they represent the simplest kind of binary values to Superman. One criticism that I can't abide by is that Lana Lang is passive, waiting to be rescued. No, she is smarter than Superman and proves to be as courageous as him. She teaches him the importance of using a scalpel instead of a sledge-hammer. She understands him more instinctively than he does on his own. She does not get as much air time, because this is not Lana Lang year one. But she is not a one-note girlfriend character. Overall, I am excited for the next issue.
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  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    Just so bafflingly, bizarrely, badly written. Two fantastic creators at the bottom of their game. Every page made me a little sadder.
  • Preston Stell
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent origin story. I’ve not read a Frank Miller comic I didn’t find original. He is a great writer and I think this deserves all the glory behind the Frank Miller name. I’m actually shocked by the reviews for this.
  • Jamie Connolly
    January 1, 1970
    Different. Enjoyable. Not necessarily what I would call good. I'm trying to think of the last comic by Frank Miller that was good. 3 stars.
  • Chris Greensmith
    January 1, 1970
    "The air is as crisp and clean as on the first day. The Kansas wind sweeps across the wheat field like the cleansing hand of God. The Son of Krypton has arrived. His journey has ended. His adventure begins." Not usually a Superman fan, really enjoyed this.
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  • Blindzider
    January 1, 1970
    I used to be a very devoted fan of Miller's, decades ago, but that has decreased quite a bit these last few years. Not only because of his reduced output but the few things he has done just didn't have the edge it used to. In other words, I wasn't that excited to begin with about reading this and the bar wasn't set very high.Having read many variations of Superman's origin and upbringing, I was curious what new could possibly be added. Now that I've finished it: not much. First of all, any I used to be a very devoted fan of Miller's, decades ago, but that has decreased quite a bit these last few years. Not only because of his reduced output but the few things he has done just didn't have the edge it used to. In other words, I wasn't that excited to begin with about reading this and the bar wasn't set very high.Having read many variations of Superman's origin and upbringing, I was curious what new could possibly be added. Now that I've finished it: not much. First of all, any "dangerous" situations that a young Clark is but through has zero drama. We all know he's going to be fine. Keeping to very minor spoilers, Clark spends a brief stint in the military. This is new, a modernization, but frankly it was boring, much like the rest of this. Yes, we know Clark has to hide his powers, yes we know he won't kill, blah blah blah. Towards the end, we get to see and hear Batman, but his dialogue was so oft-putting and cringe-worthy. Even more polarizing than Miller's version in All-Star Batman and Robin. It simply doesn't sound like Bruce. More of an angry thug.Miller's staccato captions, while giving an insight to what Kal El is thinking, just don't have the impact they used to. They previously were well placed, with specific phrases invoking specific feelings, but now it almost seems too much and not as effective and developing the right mood.The writing only deserves two stars, but I'm giving one extra for John Romita Jr.'s art. His last few years at Marvel resulted in less than stellar work from him. I think you could tell that he was dissatisfied working there. Even though he started on Superman after first coming to DC, this work seems much better: his anatomy has improved, eliminating those long and thin body limbs as well as reducing the number of "scratches/hashmarks", resulting in a much cleaner style. This may simply be to Miki's inking.To summarize, the book isn't terrible, it just simply isn't interesting. It doesn't engage you, you don't feel for Kal El the way you do in Superman for All Seasons for example. It is a more modern take, and a few moments that are probably a little more realistic, but inherently, nothing stands out here to make this worthwhile.
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  • Logan
    January 1, 1970
    This book really made no sense what's so ever! Although cautious, I was intrigued to see how Frank Miller was going to tackle Superman's origin and honestly I was disappointed. While DK 3: The Master Race had a logical sense to it because Brian Azzarello wrote it with Miller, this book is just full-on Miller with all his craziness from All-Star Batman and Dark Knight Strikes Again! To start off with the good, I did enjoy the first issue, where we see Clark growing up in Smallville. It had a lot This book really made no sense what's so ever! Although cautious, I was intrigued to see how Frank Miller was going to tackle Superman's origin and honestly I was disappointed. While DK 3: The Master Race had a logical sense to it because Brian Azzarello wrote it with Miller, this book is just full-on Miller with all his craziness from All-Star Batman and Dark Knight Strikes Again! To start off with the good, I did enjoy the first issue, where we see Clark growing up in Smallville. It had a lot of great moments and really felt like Miller understood Superman's humble beginnings. I also enjoyed John Romita Jr's art as well as Frank Miller's variant covers which were very cool looking.The positives kind of derailed with issue 2 where Superman has sex with a mermaid, (I'm not kidding), despite Clark having a relationship with Lana in the first issue. But Superman going to Atlantis means he'll meet Aquaman right? Wrong! Instead Superman becomes the new king of Atlantis until the next issue where they abandon that angle completely like it never happened. This was one of my main gripes with the book is that they introduce plotlines in one issue that literally get abandoned in the next issue! Issue 3, Superman goes to Metropolis and becomes a reporter, (I guess because Miller remembered he was writing a Superman book and not Aquaman), completely abandoning his "wife"(?) in Atlantis. The third issue has multiple contradictions to Miller's own books since he has his own universe in the DC multiverse. Even though this is supposed to be Superman's origin, Batman appears, and apparently uses guns to catch criminals and blows up a ship because he's a now a terrorist? Of course, this has to lead to Batman and Superman fighting and then Wonder Woman shows up and tells them to stop fighting and team up, despite her and Batman not having met yet in All-Star Batman, and her just wanting to slice every man's head off. Also, I seem to recall Superman not being able to fly yet in All-Star Batman? I guess that's out of the window.The book didn't even end with a satisfying conclusion but rather with a cliff hanger for I suppose will be a Year Two series? In the end, this series was just a mess honestly. The plot holes, continuity inconsistencies and abandoned plotlines just made for a book that made me scratch my head and wondering what I just read?
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  • Peter Looles
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the start of this comic. I liked the destruction of Krypton from baby Superman's point of view. I think it was really interesting. But after that there was not a lot to like in the first two issues. The John Romita jr's artwork was good but not as good as it can be and Alex Sinclair's colors were nice but too digital for my taste. Now, as far as the writing goes, it wasn't great. As a matter of fact it wasn't even close to great. They were some point where the plot was going way faster I liked the start of this comic. I liked the destruction of Krypton from baby Superman's point of view. I think it was really interesting. But after that there was not a lot to like in the first two issues. The John Romita jr's artwork was good but not as good as it can be and Alex Sinclair's colors were nice but too digital for my taste. Now, as far as the writing goes, it wasn't great. As a matter of fact it wasn't even close to great. They were some point where the plot was going way faster than it should and they were some points where it was going really, REALLY, slow. Also the characters evolution was unrealistically fast, like the relationships between them. For example, Jonathan Kent finds Superman he acts like it's the most normal thing in the world and when he tells Martha she reacts like nothing is happening. I don't know if it's just me, but I think that it would take more time to accept something like that. Maybe I'm the crazy one, I don't know. Oh! There was also an other good in those two issue, way that Frank Miller wrote Superman trying to control his powers was really interesting and very good. But then, after two mediocre (at best) issues, comes the third issue. In the third issue we see how Superman met Lois Lane, we see Superman fighting some marines (basically it was more like Superman was flexing his strength than fighting, but it still worked), we see Superman deciding to become a reporter and moving to Metropolis for a job at the daily planet, we see Superman capturing a lot of bad guys and stopping a hostage situation at Luthor's company, we see the passion of a true reporter through Lois, we see Luthor trying to take Superman to his side, we see Batman, Joker, Wonder Woman, a lot of great things happen and all those things where perfectly written by Frank Miller. The only thing that I disliked in the third issue was when Wonder Woman stops Superman and Batman from fighting and she kinda created justice league. It wasn't bad as an idea but it happened so fast the it didn't make any sense. So to sum up, after all I liked it. 7/10 from me.
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  • Albert
    January 1, 1970
    Superman: Year One by Frank Miller gave me some pretty high expectations and with artwork by John Romita Jr., I will admit to a pretty big amount of fanboy hopes with this one. But as it has been with the majority of DC's Black Label comics, this one was pretty weak from the get go. A battle with the Kraken and a very rough beginning with Batman and Wonder Woman did nothing to save this book. The early take on Clark Kent in Smallville was good and we could all do with more Lana Lang and less Superman: Year One by Frank Miller gave me some pretty high expectations and with artwork by John Romita Jr., I will admit to a pretty big amount of fanboy hopes with this one. But as it has been with the majority of DC's Black Label comics, this one was pretty weak from the get go. A battle with the Kraken and a very rough beginning with Batman and Wonder Woman did nothing to save this book. The early take on Clark Kent in Smallville was good and we could all do with more Lana Lang and less Lois Lane, but once Clark moved away this one lost its way for me.
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  • Marco
    January 1, 1970
    There's bad. And then there's Superman: Year One. Terribly written, the art is waaaaay below JRJr's standards, the story is an absolutely unneccessary retelling of Supes's origins. Do yourself a favor and skip this one.
  • Jackie Skotnik
    January 1, 1970
    I thought the artwork and the writing were both great. It was definitely engaging. My only issue was how his romantic relationships were handled. I realize the focus of the story was elsewhere, but I felt like having no closure for these relationships turns Superman into a womanizer. I get "forgetting" about Lana because of distance, but Lois enters the story, and he just abandons the merpeople? That didn't sit right. Otherwise I really liked it, especially Wonder Woman's entrance.
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  • Lynda
    January 1, 1970
    OK, I must be missing something. I liked it.
  • Ryan Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    At one point you see a panel where a copy of the Daily Planet is sitting on a desk with a headline that reads, simply, "WTF?" Yeah, exactly. To all of this. But if you've ever wanted to see Clark do military basic training or bang a mermaid, this is your chance.
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  • Clay Brown
    January 1, 1970
    SUPERMAN YEAR ONEFRANK MILLERREVIEWMiller begins this new looksie at The Superman with, what else Krypton. Romita’s art is of course the visuals of this book, he’s the director of this basically, and it’s all subjective like all art and it’s viewers. I found his art to be bleeding good, I’d say... This is probably a good chance for Romita to ‘get back on the horse’ with Batman legend Miller, who, let’s face it hasn’t come near to his Dark Knight Returns fame, more like Frank Miller Returns if he SUPERMAN YEAR ONEFRANK MILLERREVIEWMiller begins this new looksie at The Superman with, what else Krypton. Romita’s art is of course the visuals of this book, he’s the director of this basically, and it’s all subjective like all art and it’s viewers. I found his art to be bleeding good, I’d say... This is probably a good chance for Romita to ‘get back on the horse’ with Batman legend Miller, who, let’s face it hasn’t come near to his Dark Knight Returns fame, more like Frank Miller Returns if he can pull this off. Everyone knows that Superman isn’t being renewed with the current crop of writers at DC. I mean sure Bendis, but his work is starting to feel like he’s a paid employee of DC! Who else, Tom King? Nah... I’ll stick to “Burger King!”Miller describes Krypton exploding as a CELEBRATION! Well, at least he’s positive! Hope when man and woman explode off of Earth, Miller is as excited!“Look at mom and dad, they’re running! They’re jumping! Save the boy! Save Kal.”Nice! The sequence is well done I thought, Kal’s father is much younger than Brando, and the sequence is done quick without too much verbiage. Well done so far, I’d say.Unfortunately Miller goes into Superman to ‘save’ the world he means people in general, and they need no ‘saving’, that’s a joke, they are just people, they matter about as much as a fly or an orangutang. Besides an alien like Superman isn’t exactly the one to ‘save’. Best move on from this nonsense this little fable about Superman being a good man. Superman is no man and should have a larger understanding of things, he should be say against #metoo and shit like that!The meeting of Kal and his adopted father is colorful with Jon Kent younger and Superman looks to be about two years old, not a newborn. Miller makes the meeting a rather friendly one. No ‘Brightburn’ moments here! Martha is described as some sort of ‘angel’, Miller is really trying for a christian thing in the book. You know make sure you touch bases with your creator, dude. What’s his name again? Oh yeah, he’s sure to ‘pop it in!’ Miller ‘joining up’ is how I’m looking at this. Martha is pretty hokey, she takes to the kid quickly and boy, you’d be wondering where the police are, or the government, didn’t they track this kids spaceship? Even an idiot like Elon Musk would know something’s up!Miller doesn’t have any interest in Superman being known by anyone but Martha and Jon Kent, he has no ulterior motives, when surely this child is unique... Maybe next time the kids ship could just land in Beverly Hills, that way Bill Gates or Jeff Bezos could adopt him! Too damn cutsie pie! Miller ages Superman quickly and keeps describing a corn field as Heaven itself... hate to break it to Miller, earth ain’t Heaven, kiddo! Not like Frank Miller’s ever been there... He’s about as close to being a christian as is Clive Barker! I’m kinda wishing Clive had written this...Things are finally better when Clark becomes older he’s a teenager. Miller though is still gee shucks, he’s not adding much to this new origin story, where’s the conflict I’m wondering. Not like the “Superkid” will have some sex before he’s 25, right? “Watch your step, kid, don’t go thinking you’re BETTER than everyone else!” Says his dad Jon Kent as teen Superman gets onto high school. Pretty weak as usual, telling the kid don’t excel be a loser in other words. No Pride, that’s #1 is what his little pop is telling him here! Well, he’s a Christian, ain’t he, is what dad’s saying, about the kid, but do make sure to be a chump while your at it!“I’m not better than anybody!” Spouts the Superkid suddenly! Wow! What an idiot! Loser! Hopefully a bully will knock this stupid kid around some! Is what I was thinking. Superkid’s first teacher is a woman spouting things about when a man and a woman were monkey’s and climbing the trees, she says we all were ‘teddy bears’ back then! Looks like the ‘adults’ are going to do the ‘revisionist’ thing... in the book here...Clark has some friends and they are pretty neat, one is a ‘goth’ sort Jeremy and the other a ‘large’ boy that he helps in school. Lana is attractive as well. I like what Miller is doing in this part. I’ve never known Clark to have actual school friends, that part is never significant in DC hallways and ‘think-tanks’. Miller calls Clarks friends ‘the weirdos’, interesting. Clark is upset about the so called ‘bullies’ in school. Martha is weak, sure she’s a woman, she thinks it’s about talking it out like Hillary, or Pelosi, but take a look at the score there! Martha is certainly one of those chimps! Democrat! Weakling! Miller is surely keeping women in it’s place by way of Martha! Good boy! Would say Donald!Clark confronts the bullies and is mindful to not hurt them... in Brightburn that ‘saucer’ kid he broke this little girl’s hand, so Clark is certainly being ‘good’ so far! I doubt Miller will make him a ‘bad guy’ in this series of books. At home Martha says ‘Nobodies really, Bad,” to Clark... Hmmm... guess not dearie, remember Newtown and Columbine, guess they were ‘misunderstood’ as well, right, dearie? Jon her husband is a pure hypocrite, he’s stuck with a democrat in Kansas! He says flatten the guy, but then, not really. Thanks pop! I’m not liking the weakness here, Miller!Clark then realizes he’s a Stranger in a Strange land, this would mean quite a lot if Heinlein were the writer. Still Clark considering that he’s not born on earth is important. The rest of the book gets to Clark who wants to join the military. Neat. Overall this book is keeping with the old line on the boy Superman. I’m rather ‘mixed’ about the approach, after all this is just one persons thoughts on this. I felt that Miller kept too closely with the usual origin story. I’d have preferred a more existential journey for the Kryptonian. Still one wonders who or what is up ahead in Miller’s Superman.
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  • Krista Omstead
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it. A great origin story and wonderful illustrations. Love the magazine size and pages. Frank Miller is one of the best.
  • Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    Basically the exact same usual origin story, nothing to warrant being considered a part of DC’s mature ‘black label’, and ultimately a boring romp through the same backstory that’s been done a dozen times in the past few decades. And also it’s not even ‘year one’, it’s “Book one: years 0-18” and who knows how much ground the others will cover. Not worth the price or time sadly.
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  • Quentin Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsA lot of Frank Miller's more recent work is polarizing and I see this one was no exception. First off, I suppose I misunderstood what DC's Black Label imprint was all about. I thought it was for more mature storytelling, but really, Miller's All Star Batman had more adult content than this series did, which had very little really. Now, let me start by saying I thought the art was really good, some of Romita's best. The story was..harder to rate.I would say this is more of an 3.5 StarsA lot of Frank Miller's more recent work is polarizing and I see this one was no exception. First off, I suppose I misunderstood what DC's Black Label imprint was all about. I thought it was for more mature storytelling, but really, Miller's All Star Batman had more adult content than this series did, which had very little really. Now, let me start by saying I thought the art was really good, some of Romita's best. The story was..harder to rate.I would say this is more of an "Elseworlds" story than canon as there are too many weird things going on.For one thing, this shouldn't be called "Year One" but rather "The Early Years" as there are several years covered here. The first issue deals with Superman as a child and teen, and was the best issue of the three. A really humanizing first issue as Clark deals with bullies and teen angst in general. I did not like the idea of baby Clark using mind control powers to have the Kents raise him (this idea was basically covered in one panel) because for one thing, mind control isn't known to be one of his abilities and for another it just doesn't work for Superman's origin. Lana Lang is the love interest here.The second issue has Superman in the Navy, which worked okay. He journeys to Atlantis, or at least part of Atlantis, to meet Lori Lemaris and Poseidon (no Aquaman.) Creepy part here is when Poseidon tells his daughter Lori she'll need to replace her mother and be his companion in "every way." And later he even explains further, which was really unnecessary. This was out of place.Finally the third issue, where we start to enter nonsensical "Dark Knight Strikes Again" territory. The plot is rushed with very little transition. Batman and Wonder Woman are introduced too quickly, and at times we're left guessing as it seems major plot points are taking place off panel. Batman is somewhat out of character, the Joker just seems to pop up out of nowhere for little reason, and Wonder Woman...I don't know where to start with her. Did Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman have prior relationships I missed? It seems like something was going on we weren't let in on, but who knows. Of course for this issue, we get Lois Lane.The first issue really impressed me and the second wasn't bad either, but the third one sort of went off the rails. If you're a Superman fan this is still worth a read, as I didn't think it was horrible, but I was expecting a lot more.
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  • Kaleb
    January 1, 1970
    The way I see it is, and for me, the only real reason to buy this comic is that it is Frank Miller. Anything else, and you're setting yourself up for disappointment. It is not a Superman comic that is meant to displace Birthright, Byrne, etc, etc, or anything else. Not 'The Definitive Statement On' Superman. The reason to buy is Frank Miller's sensibilities (disappointment, otherwise).Some stuff on Miller's content, then (only read #1 myself, so far). You can appreciate Miller in an ongoing The way I see it is, and for me, the only real reason to buy this comic is that it is Frank Miller. Anything else, and you're setting yourself up for disappointment. It is not a Superman comic that is meant to displace Birthright, Byrne, etc, etc, or anything else. Not 'The Definitive Statement On' Superman. The reason to buy is Frank Miller's sensibilities (disappointment, otherwise).Some stuff on Miller's content, then (only read #1 myself, so far). You can appreciate Miller in an ongoing spectrum. He always plays with and has paid attention to the ecosystem of the panel and layout - with DD, it was thin and vertical, to get the Manhattan cityscape; with 300, horizontal, for that ancient Grecian environ. When you see format change with Miller, some consideration has gone into the ecosystem, and that's the case here with Y1. At least that's what I think, and particularly with his focus on descriptions of nature within his prose (done very well, and reminiscent of Steinbeck, I found), and with an allusion to Forrest Gump (that mode of rural life). Kansas.Miller also pays attention to original creator rights and character hallmarks close to those original works, historically. Expect Lori Lemaris, and things like the original black and red 'S' shield, in Miller's tour of creators' history. But this is Miller, and he is going to reference those things but with his stamp on it (you buy this because this is Miller, not for another reason).Personally, I liked Miller's depiction of high school, and I recognised it as written well that had been felt in experience (I could recognise it in my own). The military, and how Clark develops his morals, viewpoints, etc., it's all fair game and to be explored; and this is Miller. I think he brings enough Art to it all (enough for me, at least).I appreciate perspectives and interesting takes and readings on texts, and I like reading others perspectives and viewpoints. It's half the fun.[first published on a Facebook post of mine, on CBR]
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    I hardly know where to start. I am in late middle age and have been reading Superman my entire life. Starting off in the 60s I have watched the Man of Steel transform with the times and always enjoyed new interpretations of the character. Seeing Frank Miller attempt to do with the Last Son of Krypton what he did with Batman is like a dream come true. I purchased the standalone issues, but waited until the hardcover collection came out so I could experience his story telling in one fell swoop. It I hardly know where to start. I am in late middle age and have been reading Superman my entire life. Starting off in the 60s I have watched the Man of Steel transform with the times and always enjoyed new interpretations of the character. Seeing Frank Miller attempt to do with the Last Son of Krypton what he did with Batman is like a dream come true. I purchased the standalone issues, but waited until the hardcover collection came out so I could experience his story telling in one fell swoop. It was worth the wait.There is a lot to enjoy in this volume. There are Easter Eggs a plenty, including some dialogue lifted straight from Superman the Motion Picture. (That made me smile). There is even a sound bubble that I have never seen before, (This coming from a Navy Seal who is not having a good day), that made me laugh out loud. However, that is just window dressing. What makes this story shine is the new perspective on Clark Kent's youth and how he decides upon his direction in life. It is easy to forget what childhood is like, but Mr. miller captures it well. Especially in a youth who can throw hay wagons around with the flick of a wrist. The perspective from an adolescent who also has to contend with an alien heritage is spot on. His friends, his choices, and his failures all give an aura of verisimilitude to the tale.Once he sets out on his own, Clark makes life choices that also assist in defining his personal philosophy. Some of these are harsh, but help us understand why he does what he does. As he progresses into adulthood we meet some characters from the past as well as some we are much more familiar with. Oh, and Batman. And Wonder Woman. And Lex. In fact, everything you need to make a Superman story complete is here and so much more. I really enjoyed this book and if you have a long history with our favorite hero, you will to.
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  • James Lawner
    January 1, 1970
    *0.5/5*It's high time Frank Miller retires already! This is the best that he could do?!I don't know why we live in a world that has so many Superman origin retellings, WE JUST HAD ONE LIKE TWO YEARS AGO, WHY MAKE ANOTHER??!?! The dialogue was dull, boring, awful and repetitive as fuck! I don't remember Frank Miller being this repetitive with his dialogue, is he trying to be like Tom King? Or is this some bullshit gimmick that comic book writers like to use nowadays? The story is different from *0.5/5*It's high time Frank Miller retires already! This is the best that he could do?!I don't know why we live in a world that has so many Superman origin retellings, WE JUST HAD ONE LIKE TWO YEARS AGO, WHY MAKE ANOTHER??!?! The dialogue was dull, boring, awful and repetitive as fuck! I don't remember Frank Miller being this repetitive with his dialogue, is he trying to be like Tom King? Or is this some bullshit gimmick that comic book writers like to use nowadays? The story is different from other retellings, but it is so long-winded and boring, and because of the hokey dialogue, it really doesn't help things (Here's an excerpt literally from the third panel of the third issue: "Planet Earth farts"). One of the biggest issues with the dialogue is that most of it is done in narration boxes, and in the first issue you can't tell who's narrating the story; Clark or some random narrator, THERE IS NO DISTINCTION!!! The second issue was the worst because the dialogue went to Wisconsin! (Because it was cheesy) and it involved Atlantis, BUT THERE WAS NO AQUAMAN! The third issue was better, and it even went so far as to do a slightly better version of Batman V. Superman! (But still not very good) But get this, WONDER WOMAN SHOWS UP TO BREAK UP THE FIGHT! She literally appears out of nowhere for no reason, no setup, NOTHING! And they all team-up to stop Lex Luthor, and of course, the issue, and thus this series ends on an open-ended ending that there could possibly be a sequel down the road (I hope not).Overall, the artwork was the only redeeming quality of this miniseries, but it's not saying much. This story practically made The Dark Knight Returns look like a masterpiece, and I really hated that book too. Also, the characterizations were stiff and wooden and I absolutely did not care about them at all. On the plus side, at least Batman wasn't as douchey as he was in "ASSBAR". Also, for a DC Black Label title, it was surprisingly tame and not nearly as graphic as it could’ve been.
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  • Trey
    January 1, 1970
    So, so bad. The worst Superman book I can think of off the top of my head. In general, I'm not a fan of John Romita, Jr.'s art, so not even the pictures could save Frank Miller's overwrought, ridiculous script. He managed to entirely miss the heart and tone of the character. As soon as Clark Kent joined the Navy (??), I wondered if Miller truly thought he had turned in a good script, or if that was even his goal. (Sample caption: "Then. Targeting systems lock. Torpedo strike. Volcanic gas So, so bad. The worst Superman book I can think of off the top of my head. In general, I'm not a fan of John Romita, Jr.'s art, so not even the pictures could save Frank Miller's overwrought, ridiculous script. He managed to entirely miss the heart and tone of the character. As soon as Clark Kent joined the Navy (??), I wondered if Miller truly thought he had turned in a good script, or if that was even his goal. (Sample caption: "Then. Targeting systems lock. Torpedo strike. Volcanic gas explodes. Planet Earth farts.")In addition to being completely off-key, the book is more a collection of nods to Superman's history, especially in the third chapter, than a true story. By trying to put his own spin on every little reference, to write the definitive "Miller take," he gives each moment short shrift and makes it feel less important. (Let's have the S be red and black instead of red and yellow because that's how it originally was in the 1930s, and here's how Superman met Lois Lane, and here's how I would write the line, "It tickles," and here's the first time Superman meets Batman, and here's the origin of the Justice League....) It's referential, but not reverential. There are plenty of good Superman stories out there; this is most certainly not one of them.
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  • Jacob Kraus
    January 1, 1970
    ...What the hell did Miller do to Superman?!This comic looked promising when I saw it on sale on Amazon, and I'm a sucker for a good Superman story, but once I got it and read through it, I just remember wanting my money back several times.This isn't Superman. The first part of three, yes, I can see how this could be a young Superman, but I cannot, in good conscience or passionate love that I have for this character call this story a good Superman story or the character presented as Clark Kent. ...What the hell did Miller do to Superman?!This comic looked promising when I saw it on sale on Amazon, and I'm a sucker for a good Superman story, but once I got it and read through it, I just remember wanting my money back several times.This isn't Superman. The first part of three, yes, I can see how this could be a young Superman, but I cannot, in good conscience or passionate love that I have for this character call this story a good Superman story or the character presented as Clark Kent. Superman is supposed to be the best of the human race but instead in this story, he is a cheating, lying, easily manipulated buffoon that would rather look good on the front page of the Daily Planet's newest postings than actually being a good person. Every character acts to serve Clark's ego more so than in the Man of Steel movie, and it has no payoff in the end except that he's friends with half the Justice League suddenly at the end including a gunslinging Batman. The ending was rushed, the story was full of contrivances, and it was mostly a waste of my time. I recommend reading a better story than this. Superman Birthright or Superman Earth One is a better origin story about how Clark Kent becomes Superman than this garbage. 2 out of 5 because the first part was somewhat entertaining and had the beginnings of a good story, but not enough to save this pile of super-crap.
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  • Stratospherus
    January 1, 1970
    Sorry, but I think I will skip it this further. Miller wrote this and it can't be good. I idealize his work before Sin City, but after few SC books and atrocious TDKSA, that man lost his mind. Here, Miller is in his game, given this is Black Label product, but Miller never pushed it further to it, and at the same time, he remained shy as possible. Like as is he was holding his darker side onto the hero who was anything but dark. But I blame DC editorial for this. As for the story, this, as title Sorry, but I think I will skip it this further. Miller wrote this and it can't be good. I idealize his work before Sin City, but after few SC books and atrocious TDKSA, that man lost his mind. Here, Miller is in his game, given this is Black Label product, but Miller never pushed it further to it, and at the same time, he remained shy as possible. Like as is he was holding his darker side onto the hero who was anything but dark. But I blame DC editorial for this. As for the story, this, as title suggests is origin story, with the exception that Clark actually witness the destruction of Krypton, lands in Kansas, go to school, save Lois from gang rape in an awkward scene (this is BL after all) and this - joins the NAVY?!! Wtf? Anyway, you won't miss anything if you miss another Superman origin story. Or you are simply tired from Bendis melodrama. Art by John Romita JR was never to my taste, and this looks as if Romita was stepping backward off Kick Ass series, which imo is his best artistic work.All in all, it's worth only for nerds of DC flagship characters who tend to read its every issue and die hard fans of Superman.
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  • Sasha
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't love this book, because I'm not a fan of Superman. If you do like Superman though, you'll probably love this one. The art is absolutely amazing and detailed! The naked cover is stunning and it also has lots of bonus art! It's a good introduction to Superman if you've not read any comics about him before, because it goes back to his origin story and first adventures. One thing that stood out was the writing - in a comic, it's usually simple, but in this one it read like prose, which I I didn't love this book, because I'm not a fan of Superman. If you do like Superman though, you'll probably love this one. The art is absolutely amazing and detailed! The naked cover is stunning and it also has lots of bonus art! It's a good introduction to Superman if you've not read any comics about him before, because it goes back to his origin story and first adventures. One thing that stood out was the writing - in a comic, it's usually simple, but in this one it read like prose, which I really liked. I don't like how Superman has so many love interests that are suddenly forgotten in the next story. Wonderwoman was introduced as a badass character and I was like "yaas" and then suddenly she's asking Clark to kiss her. She has never been and never should be Superman's love interested and I really didn't like that at all. They didn't even give you any reasons to want them together it was just like "here's a hot woman, she must love Superman!!" even though two seconds ago she was being way more cool and badass than him.Overall, this wasn't bad, it just wasn't for me at all.
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this retelling of the Superman origin story. It is not as great as Batman: Year One but I did enjoy parts of it. It is beautiful and I love the different avenues Superman takes. SPOILERS acoming... I thought it was odd how he joined the Navy. It was cool and kind of worked but seemed a little odd. I enjoyed his voyage down to Atlantis but really felt let down since Aquaman doesn’t show up.Superman did seem like a ladies man similar to 007 because he had a few hit-it-and-quit-it moments I enjoyed this retelling of the Superman origin story. It is not as great as Batman: Year One but I did enjoy parts of it. It is beautiful and I love the different avenues Superman takes. SPOILERS acoming... I thought it was odd how he joined the Navy. It was cool and kind of worked but seemed a little odd. I enjoyed his voyage down to Atlantis but really felt let down since Aquaman doesn’t show up.Superman did seem like a ladies man similar to 007 because he had a few hit-it-and-quit-it moments which I felt would lead somewhere and didn’t (Lana Lang, Nora the Mermaid, Lois Lane, and Wonder Woman). Romantically it felt lacking but I wasn’t really looking for that in his book. It did feel rushed at the end with intros to Lex Luthor and Batman, and definitely Wonder Woman. The ending didn’t lead anywhere but I wonder if there are plans for it to be continued in another book or series. Overall I enjoyed it but there are some issues and it doesn’t always click but well worth the read.
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  • Eli
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine if someone wrote the Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman in the absolute worst possible ways. Superman as an arrogant ultra-strong, amazing alien to be looked up to who is motivated almost entirely by a sense of morality that isn't explained even partially, and who is a ladies' man almost to a fault. Batman as an illogical, arrogant vigilante who exists almost exclusively to be a foil for Superman. Wonder Woman as a five-second character who lusts after Superman with the fire of a Imagine if someone wrote the Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman in the absolute worst possible ways. Superman as an arrogant ultra-strong, amazing alien to be looked up to who is motivated almost entirely by a sense of morality that isn't explained even partially, and who is a ladies' man almost to a fault. Batman as an illogical, arrogant vigilante who exists almost exclusively to be a foil for Superman. Wonder Woman as a five-second character who lusts after Superman with the fire of a thousand suns. Literally, that's her whole thing. It's so weird and offended me partly because it was such a long read to be this bad.The dialogue was terrible. The country diction was extremely overdone and not remotely genuine. Lines were repeated, but not in a well-written way. Like he would repeat the same line twice in a row way too many times through the book (Ex. but not from the book: "Too late for it all. Too late for it all.") Art ABSOLUTELY SUCKED.Overall, it started off around 2 stars and went downhill hard.
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  • Jacob
    January 1, 1970
    Public library copy. Hardcover. What started out as an unusual origin story having Clark join the Navy Seals was all good and fine until toward the end when Batman awkwardly gets shoehorned into the story and all thr pizzazz and affection for Superman goes out the window.I'm a long time Frank Miller fan and at one point he was the only interesting comic book creator. There were as many badly written narrative captions as there were fantastic ones. Something seemed really off as to why this Public library copy. Hardcover. What started out as an unusual origin story having Clark join the Navy Seals was all good and fine until toward the end when Batman awkwardly gets shoehorned into the story and all thr pizzazz and affection for Superman goes out the window.I'm a long time Frank Miller fan and at one point he was the only interesting comic book creator. There were as many badly written narrative captions as there were fantastic ones. Something seemed really off as to why this modern retelling had modern day tech and gadgets but the characters would speak as if they existed from 30s pulp novels. Visually, by the the time Batman and Lex Luthor show up even the art its detail and glamour. I've always liked the pairing of Frank and John, this book was no exception. It's too bad tge Smallville setting came to a quick end.
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