Hey, Kiddo
Hey, Kiddo is the graphic memoir of author-illustrator Jarrett J. Krosoczka. Raised by his colorful grandparents, who adopted him because his mother was an incarcerated heroin addict, Krosoczka didn't know his father's name until he saw his birth certificate when registering for a school ski trip. Hey, Kiddo traces Krosoczka's search for his father, his difficult interactions with his mother, his day-to-day life with his grandparents, and his path to becoming an artist. To date, nearly one million people have viewed Krosoczka's TED Talk about his experience. Artwork from his childhood and teen years will be incorporated into the original illustrations for the book.

Hey, Kiddo Details

TitleHey, Kiddo
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 25th, 2018
PublisherGraphix
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Autobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Family

Hey, Kiddo Review

  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    I only realized I have read this author before (five times, actually) when I read the author’s note and realized that he’s the creator of Lunch Lady.No wonder I didn’t figure it out. This is not humorous, or light, or action-packed like Lunch Lady is.Because this is a memoir—the author’s. And a very honest one at that. It’s never easy to share your truth with the world, because what if your words are not well-received, what if you’re judged, what if you didn’t carry your message across?But it’s I only realized I have read this author before (five times, actually) when I read the author’s note and realized that he’s the creator of Lunch Lady.No wonder I didn’t figure it out. This is not humorous, or light, or action-packed like Lunch Lady is.Because this is a memoir—the author’s. And a very honest one at that. It’s never easy to share your truth with the world, because what if your words are not well-received, what if you’re judged, what if you didn’t carry your message across?But it’s still important you try. I’m glad this author tried, despite his initial reluctance. He mentioned becoming motivated to create this graphic novel after giving a TED talk and receiving an overwhelmingly positive response, and I’m so glad he did. In this book, we follow Jarrett from childhood to adolescence to graduating high school. We see him interact with his mother, who was a heroin addict, his grandparents, who raised him after witnesses their daughter’s decline into darkness, and later on his father.It’s not an easy story to read, definitely darker than most YA graphic memoirs that get published. Actually, graphic memoirs to begin with aren’t very popular, but those that I have read were nothing like this. I’m not trying to say it’s a depressive story. On the contrary, it is hopeful, family-focused, and will motivate you to do everything possible to accomplish your own dreams. But the child neglect, of course, affected me. The author wrote this book in hope that readers will be able to understand and perhaps connect. I say he has achieved his goal. I can’t wait for this book to come out and see it skyrocket to NYT bestselling status. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Jen Petro-Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Utterly phenomenal. Krosoczka takes his talent to a whole new and utterly personal level.
  • Jamie-leigh Haughn
    January 1, 1970
    *4.5This was such an amazing way to tell a life story, the drawings were fantastic and fit so perfectly with the feel of the story. This book reminded me of a draw my life video and sucked me in totally. I don't typically read memoirs of people I don't know but I'm so glad I read this one. Definitely recommend you pick it up, but be warned this isn't a warm and fuzzy family story! It's real and it's harsh and heartbreaking, but also has silver linings and moments of warmth!
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusIn this graphic novel style memoir, Krosoczka describes the difficulties he faced growing up in the 1980s and 90s. His mother was not married and did not even list his father on his birth certificate, and struggled with addiction, mainly to heroin. After the age of three, Krosoczka was cared for by his grandparents and learned not to rely on seeing his mother, who was in and out of residential programs. His two aunts were still at home, and his basic needs were met, but E ARC from Edelweiss PlusIn this graphic novel style memoir, Krosoczka describes the difficulties he faced growing up in the 1980s and 90s. His mother was not married and did not even list his father on his birth certificate, and struggled with addiction, mainly to heroin. After the age of three, Krosoczka was cared for by his grandparents and learned not to rely on seeing his mother, who was in and out of residential programs. His two aunts were still at home, and his basic needs were met, but his grandparents had problems of their own. Both alcoholics, they bordered on verbally abusive on occasion. Still, they were generally supportive and encouraged Krosoczka to pursue his art, which was something that helped him cope throughout his school career. In notes at the end, we learn a little about the way the book was written, and also that Krosoczka lost his mother in 2017 to a final heroin overdose.Strengths: In the current climate where openness and frank discussion of issues is encouraged, this will be popular. Krosoczka tells his story in a compelling way and rolls up his sleeves rather than wrings his hands, and the artwork is excellent as always. I particularly liked the way he worked in some wallpaper from his childhood home. Weaknesses: This is very frank, covering issues such as unmarried parents and drug and alcohol abuse, and has some vulgar language. The digital ARC was hard to read at spots, and the grandmother usually uses "fecking", but there was at least one full octane version of that word.What I really think: I really don't want to buy this, because I think it will be hard for the book to find the right audience. Fans of graphic novels who pick this up expecting a light, fun read will be surprised. That being said, I do have students who are being raised by their grandparents because their parents are unfit, imprisoned, or deceased. Not that I'm going to push this book on those students, but other students might be more understanding if they read this, and all students should be able to see their experiences reflected in literature.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    A heartfelt reflection on his own life, author/illustrator Krosoczka decided after a TED talk gone viral to share his life's story in a graphic novel biography because the story makes anyone feel like their life could be understood when oftentimes there was tragic, scary, uncomfortable, or unfortunate events to happen in their life. For Krosoczka, his mother had him very young and was addicted at a very young age to drugs, notably, heroin which eventually took her life as he was writing Hey, Kid A heartfelt reflection on his own life, author/illustrator Krosoczka decided after a TED talk gone viral to share his life's story in a graphic novel biography because the story makes anyone feel like their life could be understood when oftentimes there was tragic, scary, uncomfortable, or unfortunate events to happen in their life. For Krosoczka, his mother had him very young and was addicted at a very young age to drugs, notably, heroin which eventually took her life as he was writing Hey, Kiddo. He was raised by his grandparents who were as loving as they were sometimes aggressive with words (his grandmother) or alcohol (both of them). There was always family around. But the situations he experienced are those that kids are growing up in. He did have his art to work toward and was encouraged, eventually making a living at it and settling with his own family, but this is the snapshot of that time growing up that will connect him with a different set of readers and shares the pain but hopefulness that existed in his life, notably around addiction. In addition, I liked the messages in the back as he ends the story but shares a bit more that can only really be accomplished with a few letters to readers in the back that complete the portrait. Thank you, Jarrett Krosoczka for allowing readers into this world and encouraging a whole new set of conversations with students.
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  • Kelli Gleiner
    January 1, 1970
    Incredibly moving graphic novel memoir. The artwork does, as intended, look like a memory or dream sequence, and JJK’s style has evolved deeply much from his earlier graphic novels. I can see this book being very helpful for teens struggling with addicted parents or family members through its honest voice.
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  • Stacy Fetters
    January 1, 1970
    Hey, Kiddo is a deeply moving and intimate look at how addiction can affect families. Usually you see how the addiction affects the abuser but this gives you a closer look at how it tears apart a family. Jarrett digs deep and holds nothing back. Every little devastating and disappointing moment is shared through these pages and it’s heartbreaking. He also shares the goodness that has happened in his life. You don’t need biological parents to survive life, you just need a really good support syst Hey, Kiddo is a deeply moving and intimate look at how addiction can affect families. Usually you see how the addiction affects the abuser but this gives you a closer look at how it tears apart a family. Jarrett digs deep and holds nothing back. Every little devastating and disappointing moment is shared through these pages and it’s heartbreaking. He also shares the goodness that has happened in his life. You don’t need biological parents to survive life, you just need a really good support system. I really wish more people would tell their stories with graphic novels. It lets you get a better understanding of certain situations that could be tough to describe with words. But it also may get reluctant non-fiction readers interested. This book is going to change the way people look at graphic novels. And I hope this leads others to follow in this direction.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This book will hit you right in the feels. There was so much attention put forth into this book, every single detail. A profound, raw, important book that must be read.
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC for free from the publisher. Hey Kiddo is a graphic memoir following Jarrett, or "Ja", through his teen years being raised by his maternal grandparents because he never knew his father and, as he eventually finds out, his mother has been addicted to heroin since before he was born when she was a teen herself. Jarrett discovered art at a young age and basically used it as his lifeline. In one "panel" he tells the reader he used art as a child to get attention from his parents, i I received an ARC for free from the publisher. Hey Kiddo is a graphic memoir following Jarrett, or "Ja", through his teen years being raised by his maternal grandparents because he never knew his father and, as he eventually finds out, his mother has been addicted to heroin since before he was born when she was a teen herself. Jarrett discovered art at a young age and basically used it as his lifeline. In one "panel" he tells the reader he used art as a child to get attention from his parents, in middle school as a way to impress his friends, but as a teen used it to survive. One aspect that makes this story really special is all of the art (with the exception of two pieces he discusses in the back) are copies of his real art he's made through his life. When he's depicting himself as a child making art for school the picture we see him working on is an actual picture he made as a kid copied into the book. He wrote letters back and forth to his mom as grew older and he includes those real letters from her. The chapter openers feature pineapples and it's literally the wallpaper from the house he grew up in: he found a roll of the wallpaper as they were cleaning it out one day and held on to it. These additions make it feel like the reader is having an even more personal interaction with the author and an authentic experience. It's like we've gone into the Pensieve in Harry Potter and are literally walking around in Jarrett's world. Many teens will be able to relate to Jarrett's story and while it's depressing, there are many moments of hope. His overarching theme is "you have the power to make your family" whether it's your grandparents as your parents, your best friends as your siblings, etc. Its strength is his willingness to show the flaws in his family's behavior, including his own, and his choice in many cases to let his art speak for itself. There are no page numbers, but some artistic moments that stick out to me are: 1. A scene taking place after the grandmother found out she'd had a miscarriage: it's all black with the glow of a TV screen as the source of lighting.2. A scene where he discovers a letter from his father.3. A scene as a child where he thinks he's visiting his mother at Christmastime to take her home with them but he's torn away from her when he finds out she isn't come home. (My goodness, the crying face he gives himself as a kid RIPS ME APART) 4. The scenes where he recreates his recurring nightmares.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Jarrett, for writing an honest portrayal of your upbringing. Your honesty about having an addict for a mother. About being raided by your grandparents. I’m sending this to my nephew.
  • Scott Fillner
    January 1, 1970
    It’s really hard to put into words how amazing this book is...for now all I can say is you’re just going to have to read it for yourself. The story, the back matter...all of it is just phenomenal.
  • Scott Robins
    January 1, 1970
    Emotionally raw and honest. I admire the courage of Krosoczka in sharing his story and Graphix for publishing such a daring book.
  • Laura Petrie
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book- All opinions are my own.--- When I saw that this ARC was available for review, I couldn’t have been more excited. As a teacher, I have noticed my students picking up graphic novels more and more, so I never turn down the chance to find new titles for my library. I finished this graphic novel in one sitting, and I couldn’t wait to share my thoughts on it.Hey, Kiddo is a memoir written and illustrated by Jarrett J. Krosoczka i Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book- All opinions are my own.--- When I saw that this ARC was available for review, I couldn’t have been more excited. As a teacher, I have noticed my students picking up graphic novels more and more, so I never turn down the chance to find new titles for my library. I finished this graphic novel in one sitting, and I couldn’t wait to share my thoughts on it.Hey, Kiddo is a memoir written and illustrated by Jarrett J. Krosoczka in which he tells the story of his childhood dealing with the effects addiction had on his family. Because of heroin addiction, Jarrett’s mother was unable to care for him, and his grandparents became his caretakers. This novel takes the reader on Jarrett’s journey all the way from his earliest memories up until his high school graduation. I loved this graphic novel for so many reasons. First, the art is phenomenal. Everything from the color schemes to the layout is well thought out. The emotion and message that is conveyed through picture is incredible. In some scenes, words simply weren’t needed. Second, at each stage this story, the perceptions and observations of what is happening in Jarrett’s life are so age appropriate. The narration provided for each memory has the perfect balance of being seen through eyes of whatever age the author was and hindsight commentary. Ultimately, I loved this book for its message. I believe that many kids can identify with the concept of family being more than biological. Jarrett Krosoczka instills in his readers that although there are so many things in that are not in their control, they are indeed in control of their dreams and destiny. I urge anyone who works with young adults to add this to their libraries!
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  • Matthew Noe
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this at ALA 2018.Hey, Kiddo is an incredibly timely comic about a addiction, family, and resilience. Drawn in an almost hazy style with purposeful use of burnt colors, the artwork makes you FEEL the story rather than reading-from-above. Jarrett is honest - at times unflatteringly so - and that honesty gives weight to the story, even if in the moment it might feel too much. If no one else takes it up, I may write a more in-depth review for graphic medicine. But for n I received an advance copy of this at ALA 2018.Hey, Kiddo is an incredibly timely comic about a addiction, family, and resilience. Drawn in an almost hazy style with purposeful use of burnt colors, the artwork makes you FEEL the story rather than reading-from-above. Jarrett is honest - at times unflatteringly so - and that honesty gives weight to the story, even if in the moment it might feel too much. If no one else takes it up, I may write a more in-depth review for graphic medicine. But for now, I have two claims to make. First, this is going to be one of my picks of the year for the field. Few comics targeted to young adults are this honest and open about addiction. And as the "opioid crisis" and long overdue national attention kn addiction ramps up, we need honest stories. There's already enough fearmongering, misinformstion, and downright ill-will toward addiction. Maybe stories like Hey, Kiddo can bring some humanity back into the conversation. I hope.Second, because the comic doesn't shy away from drug use, teenage misadventures, and includes cursing, I'm expecting this book will face serious challenges from parents who think kids should be sheltered. I hope I'm wrong but given how much more appealing a banned book becomes maybe I want to be right - then it's sure to be read. Full disclosure: I live in Worcester and seeing the place depicted in comics positively is certainly making me enjoy this even more.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I'm only aware of Krosoczka's comics -- never have read them but know how popular they were in the library -- but this memoir was a total gut punch and will be for readers who aren't familiar with his work at all. This is a book about growing up with a mother who is addicted to heroin, who is in and out of jail and treatment, and it's about having a father who isn't in the picture at all. Jarrett grew up with his grandparents, in a situation that is all too familiar to so many young people today I'm only aware of Krosoczka's comics -- never have read them but know how popular they were in the library -- but this memoir was a total gut punch and will be for readers who aren't familiar with his work at all. This is a book about growing up with a mother who is addicted to heroin, who is in and out of jail and treatment, and it's about having a father who isn't in the picture at all. Jarrett grew up with his grandparents, in a situation that is all too familiar to so many young people today. I could not help thinking about the opioid crisis and how this will resonate with those kids living with grandparents and how those grandparents raising their grandchildren will find so much here. And more, this is the kind of book that will build tremendous empathy for those who aren't in those situations.I especially connected with the end of this book, where Jarrett meets the half-siblings from his father. I have never reconnected with mine -- my father, too, was absent from my life but for different reasons than this -- but I do think about what it'd be like to know my half-sisters sometimes. I don't think it's the right thing in my life, but I love the outcome it had in Jarrett's. The art here is wonderful, as is the author's note about his life and the choices he made for the art in this memoir.
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    I met the author and received an ARC at BEA 2018. While I haven’t read his works for young readers, I’m a huge fan of graphic novel memoirs, which is why I had to have this book. I wish I could go back and tell Jarrett how amazing this story was. It is sad and inspiring, honest and beautiful. It starts with him as a young boy and goes through to college. It’s clear when he is very young and his grandfather becomes his primary caregiver that his mom has addiction issues she is struggling with. Ja I met the author and received an ARC at BEA 2018. While I haven’t read his works for young readers, I’m a huge fan of graphic novel memoirs, which is why I had to have this book. I wish I could go back and tell Jarrett how amazing this story was. It is sad and inspiring, honest and beautiful. It starts with him as a young boy and goes through to college. It’s clear when he is very young and his grandfather becomes his primary caregiver that his mom has addiction issues she is struggling with. Jarrett always had art to calm and distract him and he had loving grandparents that supported him through grade school, high school and life. He doesn’t know who his father is until he is in high school. A tremendously personal story that I’m glad he has shared now that he is a successful artist and author.The art in this graphic novel memoir is phenomenal. The eyes of each character really project their emotions. I liked that he interweaves real art him and his mom created and hand written letters that they sent each other. There is a note about the art in the back of the book. I didn’t cry until the Author’s Note in the back of the book, and I was glad to have the full story because I was so invested in Jarrett’s life. A moving read for adults and teens.
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  • Laura Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to @scholasticinc for the free book, which comes out 10/9/18.~*~*~*~*~*⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 for this powerful #graphicnovel by @studiojjk about his mother’s heroin addiction, being raised by his loving, but *interesting* and *complicated* grandparents and finding an escape through art. ~*~*~*~*~*WOW. This is one of those books I powered through to finish because it was so intense. The feelings and emotions presented here are SO RAW. This is an excellent #windowsandmirrors book for understanding addict Thanks to @scholasticinc for the free book, which comes out 10/9/18.~*~*~*~*~*⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this powerful #graphicnovel by @studiojjk about his mother’s heroin addiction, being raised by his loving, but *interesting* and *complicated* grandparents and finding an escape through art. ~*~*~*~*~*WOW. This is one of those books I powered through to finish because it was so intense. The feelings and emotions presented here are SO RAW. This is an excellent #windowsandmirrors book for understanding addiction and how it affects the whole family. @studiojjk’s illustrations are done in tones that evoke memories and the past. There is some pretty explicit language (mostly from Grandma); that combined with the subject matter make this most appropriate for grades 7/8+. Every middle school and high school needs this book in their library this fall. I can’t wait to put this in the nonfiction #graphicnovel section of my library. ~*~*~*~*~*#bookstagram #book #reading #bibliophile #bookworm #bookaholic #booknerd #bookgram #librarian #librariansfollowlibrarians #librariansofinstagram #booklove #booktography #bookstagramfeature #bookish #bookaddict #booknerdigans #booknerd #ilovereading #instabook #futurereadylibs #ISTElibs #TLChat #kidlitexchange~*~*~*~*~*Book 14 for #30booksummer
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a Jarrett J. Kroscozka fangirl who knew about this graphic memoir's upcoming release from his social media over the past year. The images and stories shared have been intriguing, gorgeous, and heartfelt and I desperately wanted to get my hands on an ARC. Thanks to my awesome friends at the Massachusetts Library System, I had the chance to read it today.Addiction leaves huge holes in families. Having a sibling who was an addict (he died from mixed substances two years ago this month) colored I'm a Jarrett J. Kroscozka fangirl who knew about this graphic memoir's upcoming release from his social media over the past year. The images and stories shared have been intriguing, gorgeous, and heartfelt and I desperately wanted to get my hands on an ARC. Thanks to my awesome friends at the Massachusetts Library System, I had the chance to read it today.Addiction leaves huge holes in families. Having a sibling who was an addict (he died from mixed substances two years ago this month) colored my entire life differently than those of my friends and peers. Jarrett's account of his mother's troubles and how his grandparents did their best to fill her role wrenched my heart in so many ways. I felt like I understood his experience while simultaneously being unable to imagine it.This work is exceptional. Thank you for publishing this.
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  • Rita
    January 1, 1970
    I am having a hard time describing my thoughts after reading this book. It hits so close to home for me as I was also raised mostly by grandparents and had a mother who was mostly out of my life because of her drug addiction (kudos to my dad for being awesome). I could relate to watching the "stories" and the Price is Right with my grandmother who would yell at the television and swear like a sailor (and was also Catholic). There are so many kids that are being raised in homes similar to his sto I am having a hard time describing my thoughts after reading this book. It hits so close to home for me as I was also raised mostly by grandparents and had a mother who was mostly out of my life because of her drug addiction (kudos to my dad for being awesome). I could relate to watching the "stories" and the Price is Right with my grandmother who would yell at the television and swear like a sailor (and was also Catholic). There are so many kids that are being raised in homes similar to his story today and I am so thankful that Jarrett Krosoczka wrote this book so that they can see that their world is not that different from so many others. Thank you Mr. Krosoczka. I was your number one fan of Punk Farm and now I feel like you should be my new fake author brother from another mother. I read some comments about the fear of sharing this with students. Let me know how you feel about that after watching his Ted Talk. https://www.ted.com/talks/jarrett_j_k...
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    I know so many people, now adults, to whom I would have given this book when they were teens (or even younger). Because, let's be honest, there is nothing in here that the child of an addict has not seen, heard, or experienced at a young age. This is not an easy book, nor a comfortable one, but it is an important book. This is a book that screams "You are not alone" to kids who desperately need to hear it. It shows that circumstances do not define you, that it is possible to overcome, to live th I know so many people, now adults, to whom I would have given this book when they were teens (or even younger). Because, let's be honest, there is nothing in here that the child of an addict has not seen, heard, or experienced at a young age. This is not an easy book, nor a comfortable one, but it is an important book. This is a book that screams "You are not alone" to kids who desperately need to hear it. It shows that circumstances do not define you, that it is possible to overcome, to live through it, to become and be something and someone amazing.Hey, Kiddo deserves to find its place alongside such books David Small's Stitches and Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis in the pantheon of graphic memoir.
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  • Ireadkidsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    With his mother in and out of rehab and his father a mystery, Jarrett's headstrong grandparents raise him and nurture the love of art that ultimately saves him. Notable comics creator Jarrett J. Krosoczka's graphic memoir reflects on his family and complicated upbringing with raw frankness and impressive attention to historical detail.
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  • Amanda [Novel Addiction]
    January 1, 1970
    As I work in a library, we occasionally (read: rarely) get advance copies of some books. I decided to give this one a shot, mostly because it was a graphic novel, and we don't get those too often. This was great. Well written, well illustrated, overall fantastic. The author's story of living with addiction in the family, and therefore being raised by his grandparents is moving, and emotional. Totally recommended for teen readers.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    I think Kristin compared this to Stitches.. although not a graphic novel it made me think of Jack Gantos autobiography Hole in My Life... as both are realistically alive with details of situations not familiar to most... A heroin addict mother.. an absent father.. but two loving grandparents and a love for art...I think I have read some of his kid books but need to find another one or two..
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  • Mandyhello
    January 1, 1970
    I received this as an ARC, I think the actual book isn't out until October. The evolution of the graphic autobiography but for both adults and men. Very touching memory of grandparents, addiction, and finding your place. More like this please.
  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    I read this in one sitting. It is one of the best graphic novels I have ever read and so very relevant for teens. I love the message and how real this was. I look forward to reading this author’s work in the future - it is candid and beautiful and gritty, just like life.
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  • Paul Hankins
    January 1, 1970
    Review closer to release date. This was the title for which I was most excited when the fall galleys from Scholastic arrived. Read in one sitting. Lots of TED talk weaves that will be recognizable to those who have seen and considered this.
  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    This story absolutely slayed me.
  • Brenda Kahn
    January 1, 1970
    Moving, powerful, raw and unflinching. Hey, Kiddo is an outstanding addition to any YA collection.
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    😭😭😭 The book was beautiful, but that author's note, note on the art and acknowledgments killed me.
  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    [I received an Advanced Reader Copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.]A powerful and moving memoir. My family has loved everything Jarrett J. Krosoczka has written - Jedi Academy, Lunch Lady graphic novels, Platypus Police Squad, picture books - and this is equally fantastic. But it's definitely for an older audience. It's a mature story of family struggle and the fall out from addiction. The language and subject matter make it a good fit [I received an Advanced Reader Copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.]A powerful and moving memoir. My family has loved everything Jarrett J. Krosoczka has written - Jedi Academy, Lunch Lady graphic novels, Platypus Police Squad, picture books - and this is equally fantastic. But it's definitely for an older audience. It's a mature story of family struggle and the fall out from addiction. The language and subject matter make it a good fit for teens and older readers. Kids who see their own lives reflected in the book will feel seen. Kids who don't see themselves can develop empathy and understanding for others. There's also an inspiring message of "follow your dreams" when it comes to Krosoczka's art. Loved the author notes in the back of the book, too. They're almost more emotional than the story. Highly recommend.
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