Bitch Planet (Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #1)
DECONNICK & DE LANDRO PRESENT: The Triple Feature! Ripped directly from the world of BITCH PLANET, a crack team of creators spin fifteen teeth-clenching tales of rage, revolution and ridicule. Patriarchy beware...this scifi kidney punch can't be stopped...! 100% Grade A satire. Accept no substitutes.Featuring writers CHERYL LYNN EATON, ANDREW AYDIN, CONLEY LYONS, CHE GRAYSON, DANIELLE HENDERSON, JORDAN CLARK, ALISSA SALLAH, DYLAN MECONIS, KIT COX, MARC DESCHAMPS, SARA WOOLLEY, VITA AYALA, JON TSUEI & MORE!With art by creators MARIA FROHLICH, JOANNA ESTEP, CRAIG YEUNG, SHARON DE LA CRUZ, TED BRANDT, RO STEIN, NAOMI FRANQUIZ, ALEC VALERIUS, DYLAN MECONIS, VANESA R. DEL REY, MINDY LEE, SARA WOOLLEY, ROSSI GIFFORD & MORE!Collects issues 1-5.

Bitch Planet (Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #1) Details

TitleBitch Planet (Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 13th, 2017
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534305298
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Feminism, Science Fiction, Fiction

Bitch Planet (Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #1) Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Random stories of women from the world of Bitch Planet. I'm interested in where the story of the main book is headed. These random depressing stories set in the same world not so much. How many stories can you read of stupid, aggro men putting down women before you want to go slit your wrists? I'm getting depressed just reading this review. Plus, it's mostly by sub-par indie artists. Who thought this was a good idea? Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest revie Random stories of women from the world of Bitch Planet. I'm interested in where the story of the main book is headed. These random depressing stories set in the same world not so much. How many stories can you read of stupid, aggro men putting down women before you want to go slit your wrists? I'm getting depressed just reading this review. Plus, it's mostly by sub-par indie artists. Who thought this was a good idea? Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • 47Time
    January 1, 1970
    All these stories are one big 'meh.' At least the members of the 'crack team' were consistent. The fifteen 'teeth-clenching' tales don't have a chance to shine in under three minutes of reading. I suppose the intention was to expand this dystopia and to some degree they manage it. Still, I prefer named characters that I can follow for at least a full story arc. I'm starting to hate anthologies. While the completely independent stories were sometimes fun, they didn't get me hooked, in part becaus All these stories are one big 'meh.' At least the members of the 'crack team' were consistent. The fifteen 'teeth-clenching' tales don't have a chance to shine in under three minutes of reading. I suppose the intention was to expand this dystopia and to some degree they manage it. Still, I prefer named characters that I can follow for at least a full story arc. I'm starting to hate anthologies. While the completely independent stories were sometimes fun, they didn't get me hooked, in part because of all the in-your-face misogyny. Why some writers went with 'wa wa wa waaaa' comedy is beyond me. The artwork changes along with the writing and it can go from sexy to cartoony in an instant.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like punching something now.
  • Jerrie (redwritinghood)
    January 1, 1970
    These short vignettes are filled with the satirical social commentary you expect from Bitch Planet. Of course, I liked some more than others, but overall this was great fun.
  • Cat (cat-thecatlady)
    January 1, 1970
    although there's some good stuff in here, I felt like most stories were too short to really get some point across. only can say I enjoyed a couple of them but I do appreciate the work and ideas put in this.full review soon
  • Hilary Martin
    January 1, 1970
    I'm thinking of going to my next Comic Con as Non Compliant. :)
  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    (read as single issues)I feel likeeeeeeeee the thing about these being set in the world of Bitch Planet but not moving forward the main plot is that it just really depressed me, like for the same reasons I haven't watched Handmaid's Tale show yet...like I feel like I'm not ready for satire about extreme patriarchy right now, maybe in a few years or something. Also I appreciate the concept of having all these short stories with great authors/artists but they are all so short I never got that inve (read as single issues)I feel likeeeeeeeee the thing about these being set in the world of Bitch Planet but not moving forward the main plot is that it just really depressed me, like for the same reasons I haven't watched Handmaid's Tale show yet...like I feel like I'm not ready for satire about extreme patriarchy right now, maybe in a few years or something. Also I appreciate the concept of having all these short stories with great authors/artists but they are all so short I never got that invested in any of them.Just not really my cup of tea. As ever the single issues include great interviews and other back matter though.
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  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    Shocking to realise that Bitch Planet launched in 2014, yet has only managed ten issues since - and those are years during which its nightmare patriarchal future seems to have come distinctly closer. Obviously one can't hold deConnick and de Landro's workrate entirely responsible for the rise of Trump, but that unkind line of Peter Cook's about the wonderful Weimar cabarets does spring to mind, and it would have been nice if they could have kept up a little more momentum. So, tiding us over, an Shocking to realise that Bitch Planet launched in 2014, yet has only managed ten issues since - and those are years during which its nightmare patriarchal future seems to have come distinctly closer. Obviously one can't hold deConnick and de Landro's workrate entirely responsible for the rise of Trump, but that unkind line of Peter Cook's about the wonderful Weimar cabarets does spring to mind, and it would have been nice if they could have kept up a little more momentum. So, tiding us over, an anthology title set in the same world - five issues, each with (as the title suggests) three stories, from a world where old gender rules have been reasserted with a vengeance, and women who don't like them get labelled Non-Compliant and shipped off to space gaol.Most of the creators are new to me - the exceptions being Elsa Charretier, Vanesa del Rey, deConnick's husband, and one of John Lewis' collaborators on March. But I think I'm right in saying that there are few, if any, Brits, which is a shame, because whatever else may have gone horribly wrong with this country, in 2000AD's Future Shocks and the like, Britain does have the world's finest academy for short SF comics. Not that they're all winners, by any means - but even at their worst they at least offer some pointers on what to avoid. Whereas here, with everything being set in the same world, the first three issues in particular are prone to story after story where the Surprise! Twist Ending! is 'Aaaah, patriarchy.' Well, yes, we knew that - it is pretty much the premise of the setting, after all. There are exceptions, of course, stories which rather than going for a gotcha use their scant space to weave a claustrophobic vignette; 'Without and Within' and 'Love, Honor & Obey' both sculpt horribly compelling examples of the double bind whereby women are damned if they do and damned if they don't (though the latter then feels the need to add a twist anyway). The hit rate picks up in the fourth issue; 'Life of a Sportsman' encapsulates the way that sport celebrates and accentuates everything that's most toxic in masculinity, though it's debatable whether it even needs a science fiction setting; the grotesque 'Bodymods', on the other hand, takes full advantage both of that and the comics form. But for me the highlight is the final issue's 'Everyone's Grandma is a Little Bit Feminist', which flips the stereotypical scene of the awkwardly unreconstructed grandparent at Christmas dinner for an era when progress has been thrown into reverse. An excellent piece of satirical science fiction, and here's hoping it stays that way.(I had this from Edelweiss as an ARC but, as with volume 2 of the parent series, the file simply wouldn't work - I think that, ironically, the deliberately retro and pulp look Bitch Planet uses for the art is very intensive to render digitally. So in the end I read this from the library, but I'm going to do the declaration of interest anyway to be on the safe side)
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  • Jenny Clark
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the covers, they had the vibes of the 50's pulp novels/movies down pretty well. The stories were alright, it was kinda interesting to see how this whole world started, with first the schools separating boys and girls, and the ad campaigns to get women to beautify themselves intensely, to the point where they had to quit work to keep up with it, the protests ect. I did like the one story about the grandmother talking about how it was in her day, our current day.Some of the art was just to I liked the covers, they had the vibes of the 50's pulp novels/movies down pretty well. The stories were alright, it was kinda interesting to see how this whole world started, with first the schools separating boys and girls, and the ad campaigns to get women to beautify themselves intensely, to the point where they had to quit work to keep up with it, the protests ect. I did like the one story about the grandmother talking about how it was in her day, our current day.Some of the art was just too strange for me to really enjoy the stories, and some of them were just eh. The beauty pageant one was creepy as all get out though.The cosplay pictures were a nice touch too. Overall, I would say this is not necessarily a must read for Bitch Planet fans, since the stories just take place in that universe, but it may be a good way to see if you would like the series from a story point.
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  • Ma'Belle
    January 1, 1970
    This collection of short stories set within the world of Bitch Planet, each written by a different insightful author, is a fantastic way to give Kelly Sue DeConnick a break (presumably). The art styles vary quite a bit, which might not jive with some readers, but I found this mini-series to be generally as good as the main series. I'd love to keep seeing the Triple Feature issues alongside or alternating with the ones by DeConnick.Fav story was probably the one called "It's Good For You!"
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this collection! I like seeing the expanded universe and how some of these stories emphasize the negatives of such extreme gender dichotomy and inequality on people who identify as male, as well.The modification story really creeped me out. Just wow.
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  • Verity W
    January 1, 1970
    I find Bitch Planet fascinating, scary and a little off the wall and these short features are no different. There's humour here, but it's very, very black, and I some times feel like I'm not comic-literate enough and am missing things. But I like that they challenge me and put me out of my comfort zone.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    Like most collections, the quality is uneven amongst the contributors. But, it was a fascinating view into the scary (hopefully not a portent to come) world of Bitch Planet, from the ground. An origin story would be welcome.
  • Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    Dang, this feels timely coming at the end of 2017. But I suppose that's the whole point, that Men in power have been doing this shit the whole time and we're just now acknowledging it. I gave the volumes 1 & 2 of the main series silly winking "The Patriarchy recommends" ratings of 3/5 and 5/5 respectively, but this anthology is detached from the main story and takes place within that world. It's depressing and heavy-handed, but doesn't lose much steam for all that. While I enjoyed this read, Dang, this feels timely coming at the end of 2017. But I suppose that's the whole point, that Men in power have been doing this shit the whole time and we're just now acknowledging it. I gave the volumes 1 & 2 of the main series silly winking "The Patriarchy recommends" ratings of 3/5 and 5/5 respectively, but this anthology is detached from the main story and takes place within that world. It's depressing and heavy-handed, but doesn't lose much steam for all that. While I enjoyed this read, I think I'll stick with the main series and pass on future anthologies unless they come highly rated.
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  • Marcela
    January 1, 1970
    Shudder.
  • Sierra Dean
    January 1, 1970
    Really excellent side stories. A great collection to introduce people to the world of Bitch Planet, with some biting social commentary on gender, race, and the state of the world we live in.
  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    A couple of these fell flat for me, but overall this collection is a good expansion of the Bitch Planet universe. Pure dystopian horror.
  • Rick
    January 1, 1970
    Good stuff, but not quite as good as the regular story line. I liked the different perspectives and the art styles. Very enjoyable. This stuff should be required reading.
  • Amanda Hanson
    January 1, 1970
    This was beautiful and disturbing and made me want to read the rest of the Bitch Planet graphic novels immediately. Some of the stories felt too short and some resonated immensely. I'm glad I read this.Thank you to the publisher and to Edelweiss for the advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Stories from random women who inhabit the Bitch Planet world (none of the characters you know and love from the main series). “Everyone’s Grandma Is A Little Bit Feminist” stole the show for me, as I have personally experienced some of those ridiculous comments about Jewish stereotypes in person. Like any anthology, some stories and artwork were better than others.
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  • Meepelous
    January 1, 1970
    And today we are hitting up a Bitch Planet Graphic Novel Anthology entitled Bitch Planet Triple Threat Book One. Which is the cumulative effort of Andrew Aydin, Alec Valerius, Alissa Sallah, Bassey Nyambi, Clayton Cowles, Cheryl Lynn Eaton, Che Grayson, Clayton Cowles, Conley Lyons, Craig Yeung, Chris Visions. Dylan Meconis, Danielle Henderson, Elsa Charretier, Kit Cox, Joanna Estep, Jordan Clark, Jonathan Tsuei, Lauren Sankovitch, Leurenn McCubbin, Matt Fraction, Marco D'Alfonso, Maria Frohlich And today we are hitting up a Bitch Planet Graphic Novel Anthology entitled Bitch Planet Triple Threat Book One. Which is the cumulative effort of Andrew Aydin, Alec Valerius, Alissa Sallah, Bassey Nyambi, Clayton Cowles, Cheryl Lynn Eaton, Che Grayson, Clayton Cowles, Conley Lyons, Craig Yeung, Chris Visions. Dylan Meconis, Danielle Henderson, Elsa Charretier, Kit Cox, Joanna Estep, Jordan Clark, Jonathan Tsuei, Lauren Sankovitch, Leurenn McCubbin, Matt Fraction, Marco D'Alfonso, Maria Frohlich, Naomi Franquiz, Nick Filardi, Rian Hughes, Ro Stein, Saskia Gutekunst, Sharon De La Cruz, Ted Brandt, Tricia Ramos, Vanesa R. Del Rey and Valentine De Landro.A slightly more diverse group of people than I initially suspected, but I am a bit suspicious of how many men were involved. Not that I ever say that men cannot write female characters, but it does seem a bit odd considering the general feminist gist of the comic. It's already a bit of a tightrope situation with such aggressive female characters and something that could tip into men overcompensating out in left field and creating something that isn't actually feminist. This doesn't seem to be the case, however, so an A+.Overall, focusing in on execution, I personally felt like this was a pretty excellent anthology with everything generally on the same level of quality. The stories were short enough that they never got super deep, but at the same time the variety did hold my interest extremely well. Each story was different, but the art styles and focus on the themes of Bitch Planet were similar enough to bring everything together.Revisiting the premise and themes of Bitch Planet I am also pretty struck by how much my life (in relation to the USA) has really changed since Bitch Planet originally came out. Not just because of King Cheeto, but also related to most people's revived interest in A Handmaid's Tale. Certainly no slouch of a novel, but Bitch Planet is feeling a bit more current. I don't even know what to think most of the time....And while I do feel like Bitch Planet's attempt and failure to be all feminism to all women is somewhat better accomplished through this shared world anthology of very short stories this collection still felt like it lacked a very strong critique of racial biases. Choosing instead to mostly focus on what could be seen as white feminist issues. All the characters also appear to be CIS gender, which is actually a step backward compared to the main series. I feel like I'm perhaps being a bit too critical but just something to keep in mind. This could possibly be a four star book, and I'm a bit surprised that more people on goodreads have not rated it as such, but I think this last point does push it down from 3.5 to just a 3 rather then up to a 4.
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  • Artemis
    January 1, 1970
    Political anthology tales from the world of Kelly Sue DeConnick's B-movie, sci-fi, dystopian nightmare about the patriarchy, 'Bitch Planet.'Each story certainly sticks with you. Some artwork is better than in the others, though I suspect a lot of the graininess, the distortions, and the ugliness all have a point; to add to the atmospheric horror of women being completely stripped of their rights and choices, and this is seen as normal. Progressive, even. "This is good for you," they say."It's fo Political anthology tales from the world of Kelly Sue DeConnick's B-movie, sci-fi, dystopian nightmare about the patriarchy, 'Bitch Planet.'Each story certainly sticks with you. Some artwork is better than in the others, though I suspect a lot of the graininess, the distortions, and the ugliness all have a point; to add to the atmospheric horror of women being completely stripped of their rights and choices, and this is seen as normal. Progressive, even. "This is good for you," they say."It's for your own good," they say."You'll be happier and healthier this way. We know better than you," they say.These terrifying tales of the misogynistic crypt deal with various feminist issues, plus issues that might not seem to have anything to do with feminism at first, but most definitely, assuredly do; such as fear-mongering, whitewashing, cultural approbation, and police brutality and senseless death targeted towards black people. With the news people placing sympathy on white men, on every case, all the time. Everyone else, no matter the circumstances, is either ignored or demonized.These are mirrors. Highlights of our society right now, obsessed with consumerism, commercialism, appearances, objectifying women, harassing women, catering to men, catering to white people, spotlighting famous men as the victims of the crimes they themselves have committed and are rarely punished for, the army, violence, toxic masculinity violence, nuclear family values, dismissing women's experiences, dismissing older women's experiences and views, and controlling women's health and reproductive rights and body parts - so they are no longer people, but things to be bought and masturbated over. While the women are expected to just take men's abuse and mistreatment, and lie, roll over and fawn over them like the sexy puppies the patriarchy prefers them to be. Not so extreme the more we think about it.The whole of 'Bitch Planet' is like 'The Handmaiden's Tale' on crack, and it is no less horrifying in how one can easily imagine something like it happening in the future. If we let it.Because yes, this is political as hell, and we, women, won't take it anymore.Now I hope the next anthology contains issues that concern transgender rights. Also Third World concerns and immigration.Final Score: 3.5/5
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  • All Things Urban Fantasy
    January 1, 1970
    Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy.BITCH PLANET is a thought-provoking and important series, but it can also be a difficult one to read. Kelly Sue DeConnick has the ability to turn a spotlight on a harsh truth and inspect it. BITCH PLANET: TRIPLE FEATURE VOLUME 1 introduces us to different artists and writers, each with their own spin on DeConnick's universe.However, the universe that Kelly Sue DeConnick created is too immense for the short story format. There's not enough time to devel Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy.BITCH PLANET is a thought-provoking and important series, but it can also be a difficult one to read. Kelly Sue DeConnick has the ability to turn a spotlight on a harsh truth and inspect it. BITCH PLANET: TRIPLE FEATURE VOLUME 1 introduces us to different artists and writers, each with their own spin on DeConnick's universe.However, the universe that Kelly Sue DeConnick created is too immense for the short story format. There's not enough time to develop full out rebellions and story arcs. It's difficult to get attached to the characters in such a short amount of time. What stuck with me the most was the difficult experiences the women went through, rather than the women themselves. And these are depressing, harsh stories that capture a reality that many women face, despite not living in a dystopian future.Each story is well-written and thought-provoking, with easy to follow art and good line work. Big fans of BITCH PLANET will enjoy this deep dive into the universe, but may be disappointed it does not feature characters from the main story line. Being a fan myself, I wish I could say I enjoyed it more than I did. I'm glad BITCH PLANET: TRIPLE FEATURE VOLUME 1 exists, but I often had to take a breather because it struck too close to home or became too depressing.Sexual Content: References to sexual assault, sexual harassment
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  • TammyJo Eckhart
    January 1, 1970
    If you are not familiar with the graphic novel series, "Bitch Planet," this is not a collection to start with. This is 15 stories that were collected in 5 special issues where graphic artists and writers dived dystopian hyper patriarchal white world of "Birth Planet". Yeah, I did just use all of those words to describe the universe that DeConnick & De Landro created.The layout was the biggests issue for this collection because it was a challenge to figure out when one story began if you don' If you are not familiar with the graphic novel series, "Bitch Planet," this is not a collection to start with. This is 15 stories that were collected in 5 special issues where graphic artists and writers dived dystopian hyper patriarchal white world of "Birth Planet". Yeah, I did just use all of those words to describe the universe that DeConnick & De Landro created.The layout was the biggests issue for this collection because it was a challenge to figure out when one story began if you don't pay close attention to the style of the art. Some of the stories have their titles right away, others start on page two, and some don't give us a title or the names of writer and artist until the very end.While most of the stories are about the horror of being a woman in that "Bitch Planet" dystopia, some show us resisters and some show us men also being targeted because of sexuality or race/ethnicity. That dystopia is a lot like today in 2018, just cranked up a little bit. That may be very scary for some to read.Some people may see "Bitch Planet" as good jack off material or even a model for the world they want to live in but that isn't the intent. Much like Hulu's "Handmaiden's Tale" this is a warning of just how close we may be to a future far worse than the past some people do not want you to learn about.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Bitch Planet continues to speak to my heart. My angry, angry heart. It's raw, honest and occasionally really funny. In a scene of women protesting against the patriarchy one carries a sign that says "Mansplain my Boot Up Your Ass" which still makes me laugh whenever I think about it. I was very pleased to have finally found the character I would be in this world in "Everybody's Grandma is a Little Bit Feminist." I couldn't relate more to the nut-cracking Nanna. I react exactly the same way whene Bitch Planet continues to speak to my heart. My angry, angry heart. It's raw, honest and occasionally really funny. In a scene of women protesting against the patriarchy one carries a sign that says "Mansplain my Boot Up Your Ass" which still makes me laugh whenever I think about it. I was very pleased to have finally found the character I would be in this world in "Everybody's Grandma is a Little Bit Feminist." I couldn't relate more to the nut-cracking Nanna. I react exactly the same way whenever women say that they aren't feminists. As Nanna says "What a goddamned disappointment you turned out to be." From workplace sexual harassment to plastic surgery this volume tackled it all with heart and guts. This collection wasn't focused solely on feminism. Two of my favorites dealt with other issues. "Mirror Mirror" focused on whitewashing in the movie industry and "Basic Bitch" with unprovoked police violence towards the Black community. Heavy topics for a cartoon and I think it handles them with cleverness and thoughtfulness. Can I just say how happy the pictures of the real life Bitch Planet cosplayers made me? You women are my heroes! I'm ready for my red overalls because you know I'm Non-Compliant.
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  • Cara Wagner
    January 1, 1970
    It seems to me that a lot of the sub-par reviews that this volume received had to do with the fact that it isn't Volume 3 in the main plotline and/or that the readers are frustrated with the speed at which the main plotline is being written. Don't get me wrong, I think the main series is solid and I'm looking forward to the next volume, but I LOVED this collection on its own merit. The 15 short comics in the volume expand the Bitch Planet universe and give us a look into what life in that societ It seems to me that a lot of the sub-par reviews that this volume received had to do with the fact that it isn't Volume 3 in the main plotline and/or that the readers are frustrated with the speed at which the main plotline is being written. Don't get me wrong, I think the main series is solid and I'm looking forward to the next volume, but I LOVED this collection on its own merit. The 15 short comics in the volume expand the Bitch Planet universe and give us a look into what life in that society looks like on a daily basis. They tackle beauty standards, body modification, gender roles, policing (and racialized police violence), masculinity in sports, societal values (and what happens when the older generation remembers how society used to function), and many other topics with the sharp, satirical style we expect from Bitch Planet. It shows us what that world looks like, and makes us question how close we are to that world already.Bonus points: I loved the pictures of Bitch Planet cosplayers between the issues, and I'm adding this to my list of cosplay ideas!
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  • Jarrah
    January 1, 1970
    It always feels like too long between issues of Bitch Planet, so I was thrilled that Kelly Sue DeConnick had a plan to fill the main storyline's hiatus with short comic stories with writing and art by diverse contributors. Now the various issues - each containing three stories - are collected in a new trade paperback that rounds out the BP world for all of us curious, non-compliants. The collection takes a look at how queer and racialized identities, toxic masculinity, and aging fit into the dys It always feels like too long between issues of Bitch Planet, so I was thrilled that Kelly Sue DeConnick had a plan to fill the main storyline's hiatus with short comic stories with writing and art by diverse contributors. Now the various issues - each containing three stories - are collected in a new trade paperback that rounds out the BP world for all of us curious, non-compliants. The collection takes a look at how queer and racialized identities, toxic masculinity, and aging fit into the dystopian yet all-too-familiar universe of Bitch Planet. More than one story also looks at how "compliant" women keep themselves within strict societal norms, at significant cost.The quality of each story's writing and art varied, with some stories feeling a little hackneyed, but several were as poignant, surprising and biting as the main series. A good filler read for fans of BP.
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  • Sean Kottke
    January 1, 1970
    Read in single issue format, but in one burst of catching up on back issues, this is a great project to showcase a diverse slate of comics authors and artists and unpack the world of Bitch Planet. I miss the main storyline, but this set of stories does a great job of maintaining the darkly satiric vision of the comic and demonstrating the sincerity of Kelly Sue DeConnick's open invitation to readers to explore myriad pathways through the world that surrounds the narrative. Some stories are bette Read in single issue format, but in one burst of catching up on back issues, this is a great project to showcase a diverse slate of comics authors and artists and unpack the world of Bitch Planet. I miss the main storyline, but this set of stories does a great job of maintaining the darkly satiric vision of the comic and demonstrating the sincerity of Kelly Sue DeConnick's open invitation to readers to explore myriad pathways through the world that surrounds the narrative. Some stories are better developed than others, but the whole exceeds the sum of its parts admirably (and the back matter of the single issues is great). As new story arcs for the main narrative launch, I hope this bonus continues.
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  • Downward
    January 1, 1970
    This collection is a number of short narratives (three per issue, so fifteen total) that add shadow and color to the world that caused and exists outside of the titular “bitch Planet” — because the format of the stories requires them to be incredibly pithy, they serve specifically this purpose and not much else. There’s nothing of the main narrative in this thread, so it functions as a sort of intermezzo between story arcs, and is functional for that. As we ditch the mainline we can also read th This collection is a number of short narratives (three per issue, so fifteen total) that add shadow and color to the world that caused and exists outside of the titular “bitch Planet” — because the format of the stories requires them to be incredibly pithy, they serve specifically this purpose and not much else. There’s nothing of the main narrative in this thread, so it functions as a sort of intermezzo between story arcs, and is functional for that. As we ditch the mainline we can also read these as incredibly brief and satirical commentary on the times we live in, some funny, some brutal, some funny and brutal. It’s nice that it’s pulling double duty, but it doesn’t really have the thrust of the main volumes.
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  • David Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    A collection of one-off short stories set in the Bitch Planet universe. I actually liked this a good bit more than the main plot volumes. Some were great, including "Everybody's Grandma is a Little Bit Feminist" which is about a grandmother who is openly feminist, to the chagrin of her family, and "Basic Bitch" which is about police brutality against a woman who dyes her skin brown for the sake of fashion.There were some problematic stories, though. One portrayed body-mods as something women wou A collection of one-off short stories set in the Bitch Planet universe. I actually liked this a good bit more than the main plot volumes. Some were great, including "Everybody's Grandma is a Little Bit Feminist" which is about a grandmother who is openly feminist, to the chagrin of her family, and "Basic Bitch" which is about police brutality against a woman who dyes her skin brown for the sake of fashion.There were some problematic stories, though. One portrayed body-mods as something women would only do to land a man. If you told someone with a bifurcated tongue or tattooed scleras or gauged ears that they did it just to land a man, they'd probably get pretty angry at you.
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