Little Shoes
In the summer of 1937, with the Depression deep and World War II looming, a California crime stunned an already grim nation. Three little girls were lured away from a neighborhood park to unthinkable deaths. After a frantic week-long manhunt for the killer, a suspect emerged, and his sensational trial captivated audiences from coast to coast. Justice was swift, and the condemned man was buried away with the horrifying story.But decades later, Pamela Everett, a lawyer and former journalist, starts digging, following up a cryptic comment her father once made about losing two of his sisters. Her journey is uniquely personal as she uncovers her family's secret history, but the investigation quickly takes unexpected turns into her professional wheelhouse.Everett unearths a truly historic legal case that included one of the earliest criminal profiles in the United States, the genesis of modern sex offender laws, and the last man sentenced to hang in California. Digging deeper and drawing on her experience with wrongful convictions, Everett then raises detailed and haunting questions about whether the authorities got the right man. Having revived the case to its rightful place in history, she leaves us with enduring concerns about the death penalty then and now.A journey chronicled through the mind of a lawyer and from the heart of a daughter, Little Shoes is both a captivating true crime story and a profoundly personal account of one family's struggle to cope with tragedy through the generations.

Little Shoes Details

TitleLittle Shoes
Author
ReleaseMay 29th, 2018
PublisherSkyhorse Publishing
ISBN-139781510731301
Rating
GenreCrime, True Crime, Nonfiction, Mystery, History, Menage, M F M

Little Shoes Review

  • Marialyce
    January 1, 1970
    I found this book hard to place a star value upon.Reading about this horrific crime was heart wrenching. The wanton murder of three little innocent girls, Madeline and Melba Everett and Jeanette Stephens was a crime that heralded in the age of the sex crime unit and provided the country in 1937 the news of these young girls murders. They were only seven eight and nine and their young lives were tragically and mercilessly cut short by their killer.Many years later, the author of this book, a niec I found this book hard to place a star value upon.Reading about this horrific crime was heart wrenching. The wanton murder of three little innocent girls, Madeline and Melba Everett and Jeanette Stephens was a crime that heralded in the age of the sex crime unit and provided the country in 1937 the news of these young girls murders. They were only seven eight and nine and their young lives were tragically and mercilessly cut short by their killer.Many years later, the author of this book, a niece to these girls, stumbled upon the fact that her dad was a brother to the Everett girls. She often wondered, although he never spoke of it, why he was so overprotective. Pamela Everett, being both a lawyer and a former journalist sought out information regarding her aunts she never knew of and the man who eventually was hanged for their murders, Albert Dyer.Investigating the trial, Ms Everett discovers vast inconsistencies in the trial as well as the investigation into Albert Dyer. Dyer was a functional illiterate, a man with the IQ of about a ten year old who was a crossing guard and was accused and later convicted by a unanimous decision of the jury. He had confessed to the crime numerous times but then recanted and presented in each of his various confessions a different scenario. Was he capable of this crime, or was he so easily led that he would do anything people suggested to him? Did Albert commit this crime or was he just the person whom it was most convenient to convict? This story is also in its own way a cautionary tale about the death penalty with the what if always being asked of whether a convicted person is truly the guilty person. It was for this reader a thought provoking book.Thank you to Pamela Everett, Skyhorse Publishing, and Edelweiss for an advanced copy of this book.You can also see my reviews on my blog https://yayareadslotsofbooks.wordpres...Publishing May 29, 2018
    more
  • Marilyn Shea
    January 1, 1970
    This is a true crime book told by a person related to two of the child murder victims. As she had only sketchy newspaper articles and court documents to work from, I wondered how she was able to write the courtroom scenes complete with "he looked down at his shoes," and similar touches. So it has elements that were probably invented to help the flow of the story. And it was one of those awful, doomed stories of an accused man so cognitively impaired that he would smile when he thought he was "he This is a true crime book told by a person related to two of the child murder victims. As she had only sketchy newspaper articles and court documents to work from, I wondered how she was able to write the courtroom scenes complete with "he looked down at his shoes," and similar touches. So it has elements that were probably invented to help the flow of the story. And it was one of those awful, doomed stories of an accused man so cognitively impaired that he would smile when he thought he was "helping," happy to be the center of attention and little understanding that he was incriminating himself. It seems obvious, from the conflicting evidence and omissions, that he was not the person who committed the murders, and the man who probably did commit them was absent from all but the very first inquiries. These murders and the trial took place in the 1930s but I don't think we as a society have progressed much from that time in terms of assuming a suspect innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. It still is too common for someone who is a convenient target, often poor, uneducated and unsophisticated, to be railroaded into a guilty verdict. It is a terrifying prospect, to prove one's innocence, when the public and the media have found one guilty.
    more
  • Karen & Gerard
    January 1, 1970
    This book is hard to read because of what it describes, but it is gripping too which makes it hard to put down! The pacing of this book is well done. The writing really made me feel like I was right there. I always enjoy reading about true events that I am not up to speed on, but I can't say I enjoyed this. However, it is very good and am glad I read it! (Gerard's review)This is a very sad and disturbing book! The author wrote this to memorialize the three girls who were murdered, two of which h This book is hard to read because of what it describes, but it is gripping too which makes it hard to put down! The pacing of this book is well done. The writing really made me feel like I was right there. I always enjoy reading about true events that I am not up to speed on, but I can't say I enjoyed this. However, it is very good and am glad I read it! (Gerard's review)This is a very sad and disturbing book! The author wrote this to memorialize the three girls who were murdered, two of which her family never spoke of much. I really didn’t enjoy this one because not only was the murder of the three little girls horrible, but then it seemed to me that justice was not even served. I felt the guy who was convicted was really innocent! This book points out pitfalls in our criminal justice system when it comes to wrongful convictions. I found the research extremely interesting about eyewitnesses. The emotions I felt while reading this were sadness and anger. Much of the book moved very slowly for me, but things picked up once the trial got underway. Overall, this book is very unsettling. (Karen's review)
    more
  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    To read this book about a family secret explored shortly after reading "Mindhunter" proved to be intriguing. The author, the niece of two of the little girls killed, uncovers the back story of this tragedy, including the likely news that the one convicted was not the killer. Rather the real killer could have been the guy who got away and committed more crimes across the country.Pamela Everett describes the way that the police invited a psychiatrist to put together a profile of the killer. What t To read this book about a family secret explored shortly after reading "Mindhunter" proved to be intriguing. The author, the niece of two of the little girls killed, uncovers the back story of this tragedy, including the likely news that the one convicted was not the killer. Rather the real killer could have been the guy who got away and committed more crimes across the country.Pamela Everett describes the way that the police invited a psychiatrist to put together a profile of the killer. What that doctor described in 1937 fits with the profiles described in "Mindhunter."The likely miscarriage of justice and the profound sadness at the loss of the three young lives makes for a painful story to read.
    more
  • J
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed is the wrong word to use in describing my reaction to this book. It does, after all, describe a sensational murder. I did find the book very interesting. As a lawyer--though not one who practices criminal law--and an amateur genealogist, I found the search to find out how a sensational murder affected the family of two victims to be a compelling read.
    more
  • Ronna
    January 1, 1970
    Sad and interesting tale, with a reminder that even now in 2018, people still get found 'guilty' of crimes they didn't commit just because it's 'easier' than finding out the truth.
  • Mary Mattis
    January 1, 1970
    so tragic!
  • Enigmaticblue
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fast, easy read that raised some really interesting questions.
  • Sarah - All The Book Blog Names Are Taken
    January 1, 1970
    It's very difficult to rate this book at all, given the horrific nature of the crimes - which I am glad are not given in detail. The generalities were bad enough. The books is full of heartbreak and tragedy, and justice not served. I wanted to know more about Godsey, and what else might have been known about him from after the girls' murders, to when he died within a decade later. I do not believe Dyer killed them. Full review to come.++++My full review is now posted, you can check it out here:h It's very difficult to rate this book at all, given the horrific nature of the crimes - which I am glad are not given in detail. The generalities were bad enough. The books is full of heartbreak and tragedy, and justice not served. I wanted to know more about Godsey, and what else might have been known about him from after the girls' murders, to when he died within a decade later. I do not believe Dyer killed them. Full review to come.++++My full review is now posted, you can check it out here:https://allthebookblognamesaretaken.b...
    more
Write a review