A Lady's Guide to Selling Out
A brilliant young woman navigates a tricky twenty-first-century career—and the trickier question of who she wants to be—in this savagely wise debut novel in the tradition of The Devil Wears Prada. Casey Pendergast is losing her way. Once a book-loving English major, Casey lands a job at a top ad agency that highly values her ability to tell a good story. Her best friend thinks she’s a sellout, but Casey tells herself that she’s just paying the bills—and she can’t help that she has champagne taste.When her hard-to-please boss assigns her to a top-secret campaign that pairs literary authors with corporations hungry for upmarket cachet, Casey is both excited and skeptical. But as she crisscrosses America, wooing her former idols, she’s shocked at how quickly they compromise their integrity: A short-story writer leaves academia to craft campaigns for a plus-size clothing chain, a reclusive nature writer signs away her life’s work to a manufacturer of granola bars.When she falls in love with one of her authors, Casey can no longer ignore her own nagging doubts about the human cost of her success. By the time the year’s biggest book festival rolls around in Las Vegas, it will take every ounce of Casey’s moxie to undo the damage—and, hopefully, save her own soul.Told in an unforgettable voice, with razor-sharp observations about everything from feminism to pop culture to social media, A Lady’s Guide to Selling Out is the story of a young woman untangling the contradictions of our era and trying to escape the rat race—by any means necessary.

A Lady's Guide to Selling Out Details

TitleA Lady's Guide to Selling Out
Author
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherDial Press
ISBN-139780399592034
Rating
GenreFiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

A Lady's Guide to Selling Out Review

  • Nikki (Saturday Nite Reader)
    January 1, 1970
    Casey Pendergast works for the man, but its not her true passion. At 28, she makes a very good living and as all the material things she wants. She finds herself in a few moral dilemma's as her PR company aims to use artists to promote products they wouldn't normally use: in essence selling out. She herself selling out as she is essentially doing the same thing. There is a strong lesson here on the power of social media. I really wanted to like this book as there were some really good messages o Casey Pendergast works for the man, but its not her true passion. At 28, she makes a very good living and as all the material things she wants. She finds herself in a few moral dilemma's as her PR company aims to use artists to promote products they wouldn't normally use: in essence selling out. She herself selling out as she is essentially doing the same thing. There is a strong lesson here on the power of social media. I really wanted to like this book as there were some really good messages outlined throughout the story; it just wasn't cohesive. After reading the first few chapters I almost shelved it as a DNF, but in came Ben Dickinson and I was like "hey, this chemistry is well written just keep going." Parts of this book are good, some are not.I will say I did not like the Devil Wears Prada book, but loved the movie (when does anyone ever say that - that the movie is better than the book - right?!) I think this story may be a better fit for a screenplay. It has potential.I do need to note: great cover design. It is certainly eye catching.
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  • ChallengeGReads
    January 1, 1970
    Be warned that what you are about to read is a very negative review of A Lady's Guide to Selling Out.Maybe my 29 years of age makes me too old to appreciate this or maybe I'm just too like Susan ... but alas I'm getting ahead of myself.Let me tell you a little story of my own (be warned I am no great writer either)I excitedly received an ARC of A Lady's Guide to Selling Out from Random House. It was beautiful and called to me to read it immediately despite a stack of books that were also demandi Be warned that what you are about to read is a very negative review of A Lady's Guide to Selling Out.Maybe my 29 years of age makes me too old to appreciate this or maybe I'm just too like Susan ... but alas I'm getting ahead of myself.Let me tell you a little story of my own (be warned I am no great writer either)I excitedly received an ARC of A Lady's Guide to Selling Out from Random House. It was beautiful and called to me to read it immediately despite a stack of books that were also demanding my attention. The giveaway had sold it as a cross between Mad Men and The Devil Wears Prada, and although I never cared for The Devil Wears Prada, this "chick-lit" still piqued my interest. I thought it would be a fun light read with a hopeful message tacked in for all of us career women out there. By page 50 though I had a growing dislike for the main character (Casey). She is a caricature of the millennial woman: vapid, shallow, self-obsessed, social media driven, and obsessed with money. Basically like an updated version of Carrie from Sex and the City, but more annoying in that you are stuck inside her head listening to her ever increasing psychosis. I pushed on though, determined to finish, and hopefully be won over to Casey's side. I took it a chapter a day. Treating it as if I was reading an acquaintance's Facebook post that you knew would be part bragging and part pity party. By the end of Chapter 6, I threw the book across the room as I cursed at it, and decided I simply didn't care how it all ended for Casey. Why you may ask... well there is a scene in Chapter 6 that I simply could not stomach. A scene straight out of today's headlines which reinforces all that is wrong with our patriarchal society. The author through Casey isn't telling woman to change the system, but how to accept it quietly so that you live with ease at the expense of your own morals and conscience. To the author I simply say no. You may have been able to write something like this ten years ago, but now it is unacceptable.
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  • Patricia
    January 1, 1970
    A LADY'S GUIDE TO SELLING OUT is about 28 year old Casey who works at a top notch PR firm. Casey get a big pay raise when she heads a new branch of her firm which hires famous writers to promote different products for various companies. Casey had been a literature major in college and loves books and authors. At some point Casey begins to believe she is helping writers sell out.I thought I would love this novel. However, the first half was so slow for me that I almost quit reading the book twice A LADY'S GUIDE TO SELLING OUT is about 28 year old Casey who works at a top notch PR firm. Casey get a big pay raise when she heads a new branch of her firm which hires famous writers to promote different products for various companies. Casey had been a literature major in college and loves books and authors. At some point Casey begins to believe she is helping writers sell out.I thought I would love this novel. However, the first half was so slow for me that I almost quit reading the book twice. Fortunately the second half was great. Because of the beginning I would only rate A LADY'S GUIDE TO SELLING OUT with 3.5 stars. I received this book for an honest review.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book through the Goodreads giveaway program. I just couldn't with this book. I felt no empathy for any of the characters; they were all horrible, and I could not finish this book.
  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from the publisher via a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review.A possible contender to the Worst Book of 2018 (it will be published in April 2018). Ms. Franson doesn't seem to understand her own characters, as she repeatedly emphasizes how likeable and attractive they are and then characterizes them in the least attractive and most unlikeable ways. Casey, when she isn't insipidly describing herself as a midwest girl who has no concept of life in the m I received a copy of this book from the publisher via a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review.A possible contender to the Worst Book of 2018 (it will be published in April 2018). Ms. Franson doesn't seem to understand her own characters, as she repeatedly emphasizes how likeable and attractive they are and then characterizes them in the least attractive and most unlikeable ways. Casey, when she isn't insipidly describing herself as a midwest girl who has no concept of life in the midwest, is manipulative, petty, and thoughtless at best, with seemingly no character arc.This story is one inane situation after another as this supposed 28 year old, wealthy in NYC ad exec engages in casual sex with an innumerable amount of strangers, skyrockets her career with the most unimaginative PR speech I've ever read, and generally relies on the reader believing what we're told that she creates chemistry with everyone around her to believe anyone is drawn to her at all.While this was an ARC copy and I do expect to see errors every now and again, there were at least 3 instances of the author using a word incorrectly. Generally the writing is in a comedic tone, so I let much of the bad writing slide, but ultimately the author sounds as if she is new to writing and does not read much of other's writing that she wishes to emulate.Unless this was written by a teenager dreaming of a Kim Kardashian style womanhood, I don't see why a publishing company signed off on it. For more reviews, including Book v. Movie reviews, visit my blog at http://bookroomreviews.weebly.com/
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  • Samantha Plotkin
    January 1, 1970
    I was very conflicted about this book. It drew me in and kept me reading but at the same time I was annoyed with the selfishness of the main character, Casey, (and not in the way I think Fransen intended) and the plot could use some shoring up. It's supposed to be a classic deep-down good person gets caught up in bad things, has crisis, redeems herself. The biggest problem was there was just not enough for the reader to care if Casey's life gets better - it didn't seem like she was a good person I was very conflicted about this book. It drew me in and kept me reading but at the same time I was annoyed with the selfishness of the main character, Casey, (and not in the way I think Fransen intended) and the plot could use some shoring up. It's supposed to be a classic deep-down good person gets caught up in bad things, has crisis, redeems herself. The biggest problem was there was just not enough for the reader to care if Casey's life gets better - it didn't seem like she was a good person underneath. I found the ending overly simplistic and convenient. Also, Fransen is prone to random high level analogies and overly long descriptions that just don't fit in this Devil Wears Prada type of story. The farcical reliance on negative millennial stereotypes was a huge turn off for me. A more heavy handed editor could go a long way.I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Emily Mishler
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book in a goodreads giveway. None of the characters were really well fleshed out and the main character was a pretty terrible person it seemed for most of the book and it took a sexual assault and a huge social media shaming episode to get her to be a decent human being with better adjusted emotions? I'm not sure of any story where the subject of widespread internet humiliation just bounces back within a year of the incident with a local tv show and wins back her ex (who broke up with I won this book in a goodreads giveway. None of the characters were really well fleshed out and the main character was a pretty terrible person it seemed for most of the book and it took a sexual assault and a huge social media shaming episode to get her to be a decent human being with better adjusted emotions? I'm not sure of any story where the subject of widespread internet humiliation just bounces back within a year of the incident with a local tv show and wins back her ex (who broke up with her because she was so possessive and also emotionally unavailable). Also books about all of these "typical millenials" confuse me because none of my friends are like any of these characters. Also the metaphors in this book were getting to me. You don't need to use a weird metaphor every few paragraphs when the rest of the text can stand just fine on its own.
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  • Gaele
    January 1, 1970
    Promoted in the blurb as a sharp and satirical look at one woman’s life as she navigates dreams and reality in the world of advertising, I was hoping for more sharpness and satire as Casey’s story unfolded. Perhaps I’m not the ‘target’ for this book – a 28 year old, navel-gazing, often shallow and superficial woman, alternating her rants between the need and futility of ‘keeping up’ on social media, interspersed with moments about the mother-daughter conflicts she endured and her overwhelming ne Promoted in the blurb as a sharp and satirical look at one woman’s life as she navigates dreams and reality in the world of advertising, I was hoping for more sharpness and satire as Casey’s story unfolded. Perhaps I’m not the ‘target’ for this book – a 28 year old, navel-gazing, often shallow and superficial woman, alternating her rants between the need and futility of ‘keeping up’ on social media, interspersed with moments about the mother-daughter conflicts she endured and her overwhelming need to please. But, were I to choose, Casey would not be someone in my circle, and the inability for me to form any sort of empathy for her nearly had me putting this book aside. Unfortunately, as Franson does have some wonderful moments when books and the only real relationship that Casey has, that with her friend and former college roommate Susan. But, this is often buried behind the lack of any real morality play for Casey – sure what she does (and she sees this) is ultimately sell to create a buzz, and there are few (if any) who really deserve all of the attention and hoopla that she helps to create, but it is more a function of her disengagement and inability to find an actual stance on anything. Sure she snarks and scoffs – but those real moments, where a decision to make a choice that will change the norm, rather than gloss over it with a pretty picture and soft lighting are wholly missed, and Casey seems like a set-dresser working for an Oscar, rather than someone truly bothered by, or willing to change, the way she is operating in the world. From her awareness of the disconnects to a consistent and concerted effort to ignore any way to make a difference, even a small one, the only hope for her appears with Ben, but this is soon buried, again, beneath the desperate attempts to appear ‘clever’ and ‘in tune’ while actually ignoring and fluffing over any way to improve or change her situation, her life or the lives around her. I was hoping for sharp wit and some clever insights, more in line with a satirical approach to the tale of the times we live in – instead it was sadly soft focus without any real conviction on Casey’s part to move on or forward, content in her self-absorption and stasis. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via Edelweiss for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed
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  • Susie Williams
    January 1, 1970
    (I received an advanced copy of this book via Amazon in exchange for my honest review.)I can see why A Lady's Guide to Selling Out is a book with some mixed reactions, but I'm happy to say that I really enjoyed it, though there were some parts that were a bit tough to read. Not everything went how I wanted it to and Casey isn't the most likable girl in the world, but that's life and I'm glad this book reflected it. I'm actually really surprised by how many people hate the main character, Casey P (I received an advanced copy of this book via Amazon in exchange for my honest review.)I can see why A Lady's Guide to Selling Out is a book with some mixed reactions, but I'm happy to say that I really enjoyed it, though there were some parts that were a bit tough to read. Not everything went how I wanted it to and Casey isn't the most likable girl in the world, but that's life and I'm glad this book reflected it. I'm actually really surprised by how many people hate the main character, Casey Pendergast. I didn't think she was a horrible person at all... She went into marketing (like millions of people) and worked for an agency where yes, she was forced to sell her soul in some ways. Maybe it's because I spent years working for an agency myself, but I didn't see this as making Casey a bad person. Especially since she actually felt conflicted about some of the things she had to do in her position... Something many people in the industry never feel. And, after all, this book is called A Lady's Guide to Selling Out, so, I kind of expected there would be some selling out.I also appreciated how this book is so current, touching on many aspects of the Me Too movement. It isn't pretty and many events that happened in this novel made me very upset, but it was sadly realistic. Though I do assume Franson was finished with her book before the Me Too movement really took off and I wonder if Casey were to have the same experience now, would reactions be a bit different?Overall, I recommend this book, especially for anyone who has worked in marketing or has had a job that they felt didn't truly reflect their values. Just go into it knowing you may not want Casey to be your bff and some of the things she does and decisions she makes may make you cringe.
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  • Gail F.
    January 1, 1970
    It takes two or three chapters to get past what appears to be a chick-lit book, but STAY WITH IT as it is SO worth it, because it's actually a novel which explores friendship, love, and what it means to be a woman navigating the sticky paths between self identity through career vs. "a true and meaningful" life--whatever that is!--, the human problem of always wondering if one's perceptions are clouded by false ego and past trauma. Franson's voice is so clear, so strong, so true; the pacing is fa It takes two or three chapters to get past what appears to be a chick-lit book, but STAY WITH IT as it is SO worth it, because it's actually a novel which explores friendship, love, and what it means to be a woman navigating the sticky paths between self identity through career vs. "a true and meaningful" life--whatever that is!--, the human problem of always wondering if one's perceptions are clouded by false ego and past trauma. Franson's voice is so clear, so strong, so true; the pacing is fast but not at all superficial, and as the book goes along, it just gets more and more intelligent. The narrator's voice feels ultimately like the reader's own thoughts which is Franson's real strength as a writer. This is one of my favorite books, ever, and her treatment of female friendship especially is both delicate and truthful. It seems, at first, to be a light read, but it gains weight and heft as one goes along--the writing is clever, quirky, but finally, thoughtful, honest and supremely well crafted. Highly recommended!!
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I won this novel as part of a Goodreads Giveaway. A Lady's Guide to Selling Out was an easy read, a quick book to fly through in an evening. However, there were several times I had to put the book down because it was either uncomfortable to read or made no sense to me. I regularly found myself cringing at the implausible circumstances the main character, Casey Pendergast, found herself in or otherwise created for herself. I spent the first half of the novel looking for a solid reason Franson had I won this novel as part of a Goodreads Giveaway. A Lady's Guide to Selling Out was an easy read, a quick book to fly through in an evening. However, there were several times I had to put the book down because it was either uncomfortable to read or made no sense to me. I regularly found myself cringing at the implausible circumstances the main character, Casey Pendergast, found herself in or otherwise created for herself. I spent the first half of the novel looking for a solid reason Franson had set the novel in the mid-west. Nothing about Pendergast or any of the other characters differentiated them from PR firms in NYC. Was it just for novelty? There were several other frustrating plot points like this throughout the novel. It felt like Pendergast learned a lot from what happened, but in the end everything was tied up with a nice bow thanks to a few convenient plot devices.It's a shame too, because Franson has an ability to write beautiful sentences on their own. There were numerous examples of poetic prose throughout the novel; touching pieces of writing that stood out on their own. As a novel however, A Lady's Guide to Selling Out just isn't a cohesive piece of writing.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    A book that took nearly 2 weeks to read? Meh.Did not care for the self-indulgent, whiny main character.
  • AH
    January 1, 1970
    Won this in a Goodreads giveaway and was excited to read it, based on the description. Unfortunately I found the main character really unlikable, and her self-absorbed commentary seemed like an exaggerated version of a stereotype, rather than a believable character. DNF
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    Casey, formally an English major, has now joined the big leagues working for an ad agency. She has given up dreams of perfectly formed sentences to go after authors and match them up with corporate accounts that they will sponsor. She is blown away by the perks - travel, a huge expense account and the joy of meeting (and recruiting) some of her author crushes. It all seems too good to be true because it is. She seems very naive about the way the advertising business is so cut throat and expects Casey, formally an English major, has now joined the big leagues working for an ad agency. She has given up dreams of perfectly formed sentences to go after authors and match them up with corporate accounts that they will sponsor. She is blown away by the perks - travel, a huge expense account and the joy of meeting (and recruiting) some of her author crushes. It all seems too good to be true because it is. She seems very naive about the way the advertising business is so cut throat and expects everyone to play fair. Some of the advice that she is given from friends, co workers or authors seems to set up the next disaster to befall her. She doesn't know what she expects or wants from this life but it begins to alienate her from her boyfriend & best friend. Casey begins to understand that she might not be able to handle this kind of success, this kind of life. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Goodreads and Dial Press for this ARC.I'm usually not into 20-something chick lit books. The plot was about a woman working in advertising and how her life gets all mucked up and how she gets her life together. By the end of the book, I was a big fan of hers and how she started her own tv show about books.
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  • Marne Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book way more than I expected to. When I found out I’d won advance uncorrected proofs in a Goodreads giveaway and reread the description here, I was sure I’d made a mistake and it wasn’t the right book for me. And Franson does such a good job in the early chapters of setting up our main character, Casey Pendergast, as a somewhat shallow status-obsessed person that I was still convinced I wouldn't like her or the novel. But despite my reservations, one thing was immediately clear to I liked this book way more than I expected to. When I found out I’d won advance uncorrected proofs in a Goodreads giveaway and reread the description here, I was sure I’d made a mistake and it wasn’t the right book for me. And Franson does such a good job in the early chapters of setting up our main character, Casey Pendergast, as a somewhat shallow status-obsessed person that I was still convinced I wouldn't like her or the novel. But despite my reservations, one thing was immediately clear to me: Sally Franson can write! And after establishing Casey as a flawed character, she spends the rest of the novel putting Casey into situations that force her to confront her flaws and work on them. I don’t want to say much more about the specifics of the plot, since this book won’t even come out for another four months. Suffice it to say that this novel is way more timely now than the author could have known when she wrote it. If you think this novel sounds too shallow or too girly for you, you may very well be mistaken, just as I was.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    #NetgalleyThank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an E-ARC copy of this novel.First, I think that it is a solid novel, but does have room for improvement. The character, Casey, was just missing something for me. I think that for fans of certain chick-lit novels this would be a good fit. Sally Franson has talent and I hope to have the chance to read another novel from her.
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  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    When I read the synopsis of A Lady's Guide to Selling Out, an ARC I received through Goodreads.com, it sounded a lot like Laura Weisberger's The Devil Wears Prada so I was definitely expecting a fairly light chick-lit. In many respects, the two novels have plenty in common. Like the earlier novel, Sally Franson's work centers around a twenty-something woman who gets what job she can after earning her degree in English - in this case working at a marketing firm - then loses her way and her moral When I read the synopsis of A Lady's Guide to Selling Out, an ARC I received through Goodreads.com, it sounded a lot like Laura Weisberger's The Devil Wears Prada so I was definitely expecting a fairly light chick-lit. In many respects, the two novels have plenty in common. Like the earlier novel, Sally Franson's work centers around a twenty-something woman who gets what job she can after earning her degree in English - in this case working at a marketing firm - then loses her way and her moral compass with the help of an accomplished, powerful yet ultimately corrupt female boss before finding her way back, her true calling, and (potentially) love with the help of some truly good friends. A Lady's Guide to Selling Out is much more than Casey Pendergast's story of navigating the sometimes morally questionable world of advertising though. The novel explores how a well-meaning (most of the time) but sheltered young woman could lose her way, how this intelligent (but not always smart) woman can end up in any number of compromising situations, how the world - especially in today's world of social media, memes and YouTube videos - can judge so harshly with no evidence and the double standard by which they judge men versus women, the power of friendship, and why our past determines the decisions - good or bad - that we make. Casey, though not always likable, represents all women as she makes mistakes, comes to terms with them with the help of those who love her, starts to be true to herself, and learns that she will continue to make mistakes. This book held so many important truths about women, work, relationships, society, and most of becoming the best person we can be. Reading A Lady's Guide to Selling Out was often exhausting like having a needy, selfish friend (like Casey). It wasn't the characters and their endless drama that sap my reading energy but rather the mirror the book held up to my life and society as a whole and the lessons it taught me.A Lady's Guide to Selling Out can at times ramble as Casey's inner monologue gives voice to her fears and rationalizations and the lessons she's learned. And Casey is often really not likable. But I think that there are so many important passages and the story truly is a good one that I highly recommend this novel.
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    What a wonderful book. I ended up with an advanced reader copy, and honestly couldn't put it down. IThere aren't too many books that actually make me laugh out loud, but this one had me in stitches. The satire is just so on point--it really nails so much about our image-obsessed culture, but in a way that feels knowing and self-aware rather than mean or self-righteous. It has a lot of doesn't take anything too seriously, including itself.Which is not to say it's all wit and jokes--far from it. I What a wonderful book. I ended up with an advanced reader copy, and honestly couldn't put it down. IThere aren't too many books that actually make me laugh out loud, but this one had me in stitches. The satire is just so on point--it really nails so much about our image-obsessed culture, but in a way that feels knowing and self-aware rather than mean or self-righteous. It has a lot of doesn't take anything too seriously, including itself.Which is not to say it's all wit and jokes--far from it. It's got a lot of heart, too, a clever, surprising plot, and really strong characters. The protagonist, Casey, is so richly drawn--she's brassy, confident, and smart, but also vulnerable and really relatable. The book's brave enough to let her be human--to make mistakes, have some edge, and get into things over her head. But that humanity doesn't make Casey any less charming, just more real. Especially by the end of her journey through the glitzy and garish world of advertising, I was really rooting for her. What else can I say? The love story is especially well-done and satisfying. And I won't spoil anything, but the major plot blow-up feels ripped from the headlines. Franson's take on the #MeToo moment and social media shaming is both contemporary and wise. I don't even know how she does it--it's somehow sharp and sweet, fun and thought-provoking. A little bit, in other words, for everyone. Don't miss it.
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  • Hanna Kjeldbjerg
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the audiobook narrated by Chelsea Morgan (bless you, Libro.fm!). First of all, big, swirly top hat tips to Chelsea, because she GOT the book. This was a book about a 28-year-old advertising big shot--so someone kicking ass at "adulting," but still very much a millennial. The "whatever" attitude and accentuation on some of the words was absolutely necessary to the character, and it felt great that, again, she GOT it.And then a big, skirts-a-swirlin' curtsy to the author, Sally Frans I listened to the audiobook narrated by Chelsea Morgan (bless you, Libro.fm!). First of all, big, swirly top hat tips to Chelsea, because she GOT the book. This was a book about a 28-year-old advertising big shot--so someone kicking ass at "adulting," but still very much a millennial. The "whatever" attitude and accentuation on some of the words was absolutely necessary to the character, and it felt great that, again, she GOT it.And then a big, skirts-a-swirlin' curtsy to the author, Sally Franson. First let me say that I finished the audiobook in less than a week . . . I think that speaks for itself. At first I didn't like Casey, which made her development through the character arc all the more enjoyable. I believed her love story (hard to do), I believed the concept of Nanu (not sure how to spell it, because audiobook), and this suspension of disbelief carried me through the course of the novel. I loved the emphasis on female friendship (that resolution was even more important than the romance!) and the attention given to how often twentysomthings wrestle with their career choices (is it "the one" or just where my life path led me?). And hey, I loved that the story was written by a Minneapolis-based author and set in the Twin Cities. It makes me proud, and I hope I can fangirl Sally Franson in person one day.I'll recommend this book to all my ladies. Cheers!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This started out with the perfect amount of lighthearted semi-snark, but quickly lost that and became more about an out-of-control life starring a rather unlikable main character. Casey just seems to be completely blank and not terribly interesting, when with a few slight changes, she could have been a character readers root for and feel for. The life she thought she'd be leading isn't the life she is leading - less doing something with her English degree or being on tv and more trying to persua This started out with the perfect amount of lighthearted semi-snark, but quickly lost that and became more about an out-of-control life starring a rather unlikable main character. Casey just seems to be completely blank and not terribly interesting, when with a few slight changes, she could have been a character readers root for and feel for. The life she thought she'd be leading isn't the life she is leading - less doing something with her English degree or being on tv and more trying to persuade others to do something slightly distasteful (no spoilers). Then things go terribly wrong, with not one but two incidents of what I can only call "ripped from the headlines" incidents and her life goes completely downhill. Yet none of that inspired me to feel sorry for her or hope things would work out (and some things, like her relationship with her mother, never do get resolved).It was also interesting that at times the author played coy with brands and popular culture (the "curly haired girl staring at the New York skyline" poster from a tv series, for example) and then Real Housewives is not only namechecked but give a pivotal role. Still, as vacation brain candy goes, you could do worse. ARC provided by publisher.
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  • Adriana
    January 1, 1970
    I must admit that it took me a bit to warm up to leading lady Casey's personality, but the more I read about her the more she developed as a character and pulled me in. She's complex and Franson does a great job of slowly peeling back her layers to reveal a very human individual. The fact that the plot deals with both advertising and publishing was practically tailor-made for me and I could easily see how Casey ends up where she is both at the beginning of the book and at the end. It starts out I must admit that it took me a bit to warm up to leading lady Casey's personality, but the more I read about her the more she developed as a character and pulled me in. She's complex and Franson does a great job of slowly peeling back her layers to reveal a very human individual. The fact that the plot deals with both advertising and publishing was practically tailor-made for me and I could easily see how Casey ends up where she is both at the beginning of the book and at the end. It starts out somewhat slowly, but it definitely hits it's stride around half-way thru. There's no topic it doesn't seem to touch: romance, current topics, mental health, literature, business, finance, interpersonal relationships, finding your own way, and even sexual abuse. So much packed into such a slim volume. This is definitely a book I'd recommend.Mandatory note: I got my copy thru GoodReads' First Reads.
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  • Jada
    January 1, 1970
    (Please be advised that 90% if not more, of my personality is salt. I am so salty I could give the the Dead Sea a run for its money! I'm about to write horribly salty DNF review(s), one that I've been sitting on for weeks, trying to see if it was just a mood, that I was being too hard on the author.Unfortunately, the salt is still there, and so ... (This is not the way I wanted to get ahead on my 2018 reading challenge.)) ******************************************************************"Dial ed (Please be advised that 90% if not more, of my personality is salt. I am so salty I could give the the Dead Sea a run for its money! I'm about to write horribly salty DNF review(s), one that I've been sitting on for weeks, trying to see if it was just a mood, that I was being too hard on the author.Unfortunately, the salt is still there, and so ... (This is not the way I wanted to get ahead on my 2018 reading challenge.)) ******************************************************************"Dial editors take note! Slow pacing, self-aggrandizing while simultaneously self-pitying first person narrative DOES NOT(!) work!Constant over-analysis and self-awareness and extended analogies bog the reader down and does nothing but slap the reader in the face by telling them all they need to know. Show, don't tell! Stop laying cement where there should be breadcrumbs!" This is my first DNF of 2018. The above came from my last status update of this ARC. As of today, I am putting it down because while I'm normally all in favor of giving an author a chance to build their world, to create characters and situations for a reader to love, constantly stuck in a "It'll get better," sort of mentality, because its a book! With this one I can't. (And since I can't, it will have a review but no stars.)I dislike feeling that I'm being told a story and not shown it. To use an analogy, it feels as if I'm being slapped in the face with a fish (by information). Writing isn't about telling your readers upfront absolutely everything they need to know. Readers are more better than that, they can infer, make leaps and judgements; they're perfectly capable of such things.Telling the reader (me), outright exactly the motivation behind themselves and the people around them, exactly how they're going to react, why they do what they do--what's the point? Why bother reading any more about them?Off-the-wall, too long metaphors to showcase that point, especially right upfront, screw with the flow and prevent a reader from really connecting with any of the characters (especially the protagonist since its being written in first person).There were a few moments, brief thought they were, where I was willing to put my reservations aside and get into the story, then dashed against the rocks went my hopes, scattered to the winds before I could even unfurl the sails.Its only February! THERE IS TIME TO EDIT AND MAKE IT BETTER! Right? Because if there isn't, I can't see too many readers putting up with the beginning to get to what I understand is a better ending. I know I wasn't.
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  • E
    January 1, 1970
    This book made me laugh out loud so often that my roommates kept asking what on earth I was giggling about over there. The narrator's voice is both breezy and brilliant, and oftentimes my laughter would morph mid-sentence, as a clever line would suddenly twist and become not just clever but truly insightful. It is extremely fun to read, but describing it as "chick lit" is a disservice -- that is, if you think of chick lit as nice easy read that'll placate but not challenge you. However if chick- This book made me laugh out loud so often that my roommates kept asking what on earth I was giggling about over there. The narrator's voice is both breezy and brilliant, and oftentimes my laughter would morph mid-sentence, as a clever line would suddenly twist and become not just clever but truly insightful. It is extremely fun to read, but describing it as "chick lit" is a disservice -- that is, if you think of chick lit as nice easy read that'll placate but not challenge you. However if chick-lit these days means a badass anti-capitalist love story with one-liners that just won't quit, then yes, this is an excellent example of the genre! Below the capers and the lolz, there's some real darkness here, which I assume is what people mean when they say it's "timely." Time to SMASH THE PATRIARCHY am I right ladies?! ... Right? Anyway, this book is the bomb.
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  • Shayna Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Considering my books usually fall in the genres of a little more important topics than Casey's life, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the novel. It was a sassy, true, and relevant book for today's world. The people whom give this book a bad rating must be crazy! I bought this book at Sally's launch party, so maybe I am a bit biased since I met the hilarious author, but I truly love the book. It was so different than anything I had ever read while still pulling in a lot of the same themes th Considering my books usually fall in the genres of a little more important topics than Casey's life, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the novel. It was a sassy, true, and relevant book for today's world. The people whom give this book a bad rating must be crazy! I bought this book at Sally's launch party, so maybe I am a bit biased since I met the hilarious author, but I truly love the book. It was so different than anything I had ever read while still pulling in a lot of the same themes that I love. It was funny, sad, romantic, embarrassing, and totally relatable at parts. I would really recommend giving this book a shot, even if you wouldn't usually pick it off the shelf. Trust me, the cover did not appeal to my interests, but I am so happy I read it. I will definitely keep an eye out for Sally's next novel.
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  • Jenee Rager
    January 1, 1970
    This is a nice little fluff novel that falls somewhere in the chick-lit genre. It is the literary equivalent of a Kate Hudson movie. Some people love them, some people hate them, and I fall somewhere in between.Casey is a spoiled marketing exec. She is tasked with a new project where authors start shilling consumer goods via social media apps. It goes well for her at first, and then it absolutely doesn't. The fall from grace and the obligatory happy ending all happen in the last 30 pages or so, This is a nice little fluff novel that falls somewhere in the chick-lit genre. It is the literary equivalent of a Kate Hudson movie. Some people love them, some people hate them, and I fall somewhere in between.Casey is a spoiled marketing exec. She is tasked with a new project where authors start shilling consumer goods via social media apps. It goes well for her at first, and then it absolutely doesn't. The fall from grace and the obligatory happy ending all happen in the last 30 pages or so, so there isn't a lot of build up or reward, and you never really feel like Casey learns her lesson as much as she just lucks out.Thank you goodreads giveaways for the chance to read this book.
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  • Jeanne Grace
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advanced Reader Copy from NetGalley for my unbiased opinion of the book. The book is about Casey Pendergast who is an executive is selling her soul to sign authors for a new social media ad campaign. I think this book would have been great as long as it had an overhaul first. It just droned on for several pages all over the place if there were more interactions with all the players would have helped the book. No spoilers, but the last chapter was good still finding it lacking. The I received an Advanced Reader Copy from NetGalley for my unbiased opinion of the book. The book is about Casey Pendergast who is an executive is selling her soul to sign authors for a new social media ad campaign. I think this book would have been great as long as it had an overhaul first. It just droned on for several pages all over the place if there were more interactions with all the players would have helped the book. No spoilers, but the last chapter was good still finding it lacking. The ending was a let down due to I think the author would like to redeem herself with a sequel. I think the story has possibilities but it just missed the mark.
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  • Sarah Wagner
    January 1, 1970
    *I received this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.*Rarely have I picked up a book this timely. Casey, the main character, is an early career professional who's had some success - she's turned her English major into a successful advertising career with a six-figure salary and her latest project involves pairing famous authors with endorsement deals to help both parties profit. However, a overly friendly author or two begins to cause problems - resulting in plagiarism, sexual assault, and a socia *I received this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.*Rarely have I picked up a book this timely. Casey, the main character, is an early career professional who's had some success - she's turned her English major into a successful advertising career with a six-figure salary and her latest project involves pairing famous authors with endorsement deals to help both parties profit. However, a overly friendly author or two begins to cause problems - resulting in plagiarism, sexual assault, and a social media storm. This is a very contemporary story, one that doesn't take itself too seriously, but still speaks to the relevant truths of living today.
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  • Julie Garagliano
    January 1, 1970
    Two stars is generous but I like to encourage new writers. Having said that, don't hold out great hopes for this novel. The main character, Casey, is a whining, self-absorbed, materialistic 28 year old woman working for a PR firm. Any shred of integrity she might have once had is tossed aside so she can make more money and get a better position in the firm. She disses her friends, screws up relationships and is someone you would never really want to know. But then! Something bad happens to her a Two stars is generous but I like to encourage new writers. Having said that, don't hold out great hopes for this novel. The main character, Casey, is a whining, self-absorbed, materialistic 28 year old woman working for a PR firm. Any shred of integrity she might have once had is tossed aside so she can make more money and get a better position in the firm. She disses her friends, screws up relationships and is someone you would never really want to know. But then! Something bad happens to her and she becomes a good person! And successful! After 20 pages a discerning reader can easily predict where this weak plot will lead. It's an easy read but don't expect much.
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  • Bellasong
    January 1, 1970
    I received this novel in a giveaway on Goodreads in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This novel is always on the defensive. Oh so funny, oh so descriptive, it is both creative and spiteful. While some parts of the story are extremely laughable, there are others that are so unbelievable. As the reader, it is easy to root for Casey, the protagonist, but when it goes downhill for her, it goes fast. She has great parts, and is likeable, outlandish, and quirky. Howe I received this novel in a giveaway on Goodreads in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This novel is always on the defensive. Oh so funny, oh so descriptive, it is both creative and spiteful. While some parts of the story are extremely laughable, there are others that are so unbelievable. As the reader, it is easy to root for Casey, the protagonist, but when it goes downhill for her, it goes fast. She has great parts, and is likeable, outlandish, and quirky. However, others are not so accepting, so how does that affect Casey and this love affair with life and literature that she has? Casey is an outstanding example of attitude once out of place set right, and severely makes you think of how you appear to others, appearance or otherwise. I loved Franson's novel! While it may appear to be made up of last-minute thoughts, I enjoyed Casey's character and the "thoughts of a standard modern woman."
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