The Prophet Calls
Born into a polygamous community in the foothills of New Mexico, Gentry Forrester feels lucky to live among God’s chosen. Here, she lives apart from the outside world and its “evils.”On her thirteenth birthday, Gentry receives a new violin from her father and, more than anything, she wants to play at the Santa Fe Music Festival with her brother, Tanner. But then the Prophet calls from prison and announces he has outlawed music in their community and now forbids women to leave.Determined to play, Gentry and Tanner sneak out. But once they return, the Prophet exercises control from prison, and it has devastating consequences for Gentry and her family. Soon, everything Gentry has known is turned upside down. She begins to question the Prophet’s teachings and his revelations, especially when his latest orders put Gentry’s family in danger. Can Gentry find a way to protect herself and her family from the Prophet and escape the only life she’s ever known?This realistic, powerful story of family, bravery, and following your dreams is a can't-miss debut novel from Melanie Sumrow.

The Prophet Calls Details

TitleThe Prophet Calls
Author
ReleaseNov 6th, 2018
PublisherYellow Jacket
ISBN-139781499807554
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Young Adult, Contemporary

The Prophet Calls Review

  • Hema Penmetsa
    January 1, 1970
    I have been lucky enough to get my hands on an ARC (Advanced Reader Copy) of THE PROPHET CALLS before its publication, which is set for November 6th of 2018. The very second sentence of the book, which says, “In the shade of the general store, my three mothers shake their heads in unison,” makes the reader sit up and take notice: this is no run-of-the-mill middle grade novel. Those words hint at the fact that this is an involved and thought-provoking story. What the reader has surmised from that I have been lucky enough to get my hands on an ARC (Advanced Reader Copy) of THE PROPHET CALLS before its publication, which is set for November 6th of 2018. The very second sentence of the book, which says, “In the shade of the general store, my three mothers shake their heads in unison,” makes the reader sit up and take notice: this is no run-of-the-mill middle grade novel. Those words hint at the fact that this is an involved and thought-provoking story. What the reader has surmised from that one sentence isn’t wrong; only, the story has much more to it: this is the story of a girl with a big heart and mighty courage. This is the story of a girl who is trying to find her place within her own family and rises above restrictions that not many thirteen-year-olds would ever have to face. The subject of polygamous communities is complex in its own right; when you have to explore it in a middle grade book, the conversation becomes almost insurmountably complicated. However, the author--in her debut novel, no less!—does a commendable job of it. She is gentle, compassionate and non-judgmental in her portrayal of the society and the many perspectives we come across within the story. She leaves it up to the reader to form their own opinion of each circumstance they face. Additionally, none of the characters in the book is black-and-white. Each of them has strengths along with deep-rooted flaws, and this makes the book more relatable. More life-like.Sumrow uses deceptively simple language and sentences throughout the book, which only add to the poignancy of the gripping themes explored in the book. Each seemingly simple sentence tugs at your heart and makes it race for what danger is lurking around the next corner, ready to pounce at the protagonist Gentry. And the cover art (both front and back) has been rendered so beautifully that it totally sets the mood for the book.It’s been a few days since I finished reading the book (in one sitting, btw), but I still catch myself unconsciously wondering how Gentry, Tanner, Amy and Meryl are faring, as though they’re real people. And that is one of the signs of a book done well. I cannot wait to see how high this book will soar once it hits the stands, because soar it will!
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  • Jen Petro-Roy
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic debut, this book kept me gripped to the pages.
  • Polly Holyoke
    January 1, 1970
    Melanie Sumrow’s powerful debut novel, The Prophet Calls, is a coming of age story with a fascinating setting. Raised in an isolated polygamous community in New Mexico, Gentry Forrester adores her family and her music. More than anything, Gentry longs to play her violin at the Sante Fe Music Festival with her big brother Tanner. But the community’s Prophet, who controls every aspect of their lives, calls from prison and forbids all forms of music and decrees that females can no longer leave the Melanie Sumrow’s powerful debut novel, The Prophet Calls, is a coming of age story with a fascinating setting. Raised in an isolated polygamous community in New Mexico, Gentry Forrester adores her family and her music. More than anything, Gentry longs to play her violin at the Sante Fe Music Festival with her big brother Tanner. But the community’s Prophet, who controls every aspect of their lives, calls from prison and forbids all forms of music and decrees that females can no longer leave the compound. When Gentry and Tanner defy these decrees to play at the festival, their family is torn apart, and Gentry must cope with the consequences. I will never forget an opening scene in the novel where the community’s children play one of their favorite games, Apocalypse. As they run up and down a hillside squealing and hiding from imaginary government helicopters, soldiers and grenades, the reader realizes these kids live in a starkly different reality from our own. Throughout the novel Sumrow deftly depicts this alternate world and the believable, complex people who choose to raise their families in such a community.Gentry Forrester is a courageous and thoughtful protagonist, determined to look out for her younger sister. The reader feels for spirited, intelligent Gentry as she struggles to make sense of her community’s oppressive rules. This fundamental aspect of adolescence, developing one’s own moral compass, is made so much wrenching because Gentry’s compass, in the end, drives her to escape her community and the only world she’s ever known. The themes in this novel are certainly topical as people with different world views in our society continue to clash, and women continue to fight for basic freedoms. This well-written and haunting debut is well worth your time.
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  • Texan Holly Reads
    January 1, 1970
    You know when you start a book just right at bedtime thinking that you would only read a couple of chapters that would turn into the book fully read in two hours, it's then you know that you have a book that is destined for greatness! The Prophet Calls grabs you from that first page and won't let go until that last word is read and even then, I wanted more of this story on what happens after for this family. Having been born into a polygamous family, Gentry and her very large family is all she k You know when you start a book just right at bedtime thinking that you would only read a couple of chapters that would turn into the book fully read in two hours, it's then you know that you have a book that is destined for greatness! The Prophet Calls grabs you from that first page and won't let go until that last word is read and even then, I wanted more of this story on what happens after for this family. Having been born into a polygamous family, Gentry and her very large family is all she knows until her thirteenth birthday when her father gives her a violin. It's then when the Prophet who is in jail, declares that music is off limits because of the evilness it brings. But Gentry doesn't see it like that and it starts this rocky journey that will force Gentry to realize the person she is and who she is destined to be. I don't want to give anything away but like I said in the beginning, I wasn't planning on finishing the book that night I started it but I had to see what happens to Gentry and her family. There will come a point in this book toward the end that will have you wonder what if that was to come true for Gentry and it will have your heart breaking for the simple fact that it does happen on a regular basis in a extremist polygamous community like the one that the famous Warren Jeffs was running. Thank You to Melanie Sumrow for writing this heartbreaking tale that captures the beauty of New Mexico while writing a story that is hard to turn away from!I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book from RockStar Book Tours!
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  • Hallie
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book- all opinions are my own. The Prophet Calls is an excellent debut middle grade novel that provides a glimpse into a world that many readers are unfamiliar with. Gentry is a 13 year old girl who lives in a polygamist community in New Mexico and is now facing the challenge of being considered a woman and no longer a little girl. Melanie Sumrow has written a powerful book about a girl at a crossroads. She carefully documents Gen Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book- all opinions are my own. The Prophet Calls is an excellent debut middle grade novel that provides a glimpse into a world that many readers are unfamiliar with. Gentry is a 13 year old girl who lives in a polygamist community in New Mexico and is now facing the challenge of being considered a woman and no longer a little girl. Melanie Sumrow has written a powerful book about a girl at a crossroads. She carefully documents Gentry's eyes opening and her world getting bigger. The book sensitively portrays the polygamist lifestyle and makes it approachable for middle grade readers. Sumrow writes the book in a way that allows the reader to make their own decisions about Gentry's upbringing and strict community she lives in. Gentry faces many monsters such as the Prophet, powerful men in her community, and even her own family. There are difficult scenes where Gentry is scared and abused. The book also features a scene of animal abuse that is used to show the expectations that are placed on the boys in the community. Even if readers can't relate to the way Gentry has grown up, they'll be able to relate to her love for her family and playing music. Gentry is equally devoted to protecting and teaching her sister Amy, who has Down Syndrome, as she is to playing her violin. In the face of opposition Gentry always stands up for what is right and she will inspire middle school readers to do the same. Perfect for readers of Jennifer Mathieu's Devoted and Aisha Saeed's Amal Unbound. This book will interest upper middle school and high school students who like contemporary stories about standing up for yourself. Publishes on November 6, 2018.
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  • Anne O'Brien Carelli
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC in exchange for a review and I'm glad I had a long ride so I could read it right through. I kept reading parts of it out loud to the driver. This book is compelling on many levels - not only because it's based on reality, but because it's beautifully written and moves along swiftly. I was with Gentry, the MC, from the very beginning and was always anxious to see what was on the next page. It should be made clear that no there's no judgement in this book - just the story about G I received an ARC in exchange for a review and I'm glad I had a long ride so I could read it right through. I kept reading parts of it out loud to the driver. This book is compelling on many levels - not only because it's based on reality, but because it's beautifully written and moves along swiftly. I was with Gentry, the MC, from the very beginning and was always anxious to see what was on the next page. It should be made clear that no there's no judgement in this book - just the story about Gentry's life in a religious cult (yes, a cult) and her confusion and frustration as she navigates her environment and feels in her gut that something isn't right. The inner conflict is handled very nicely, and it's clear that there isn't an obvious solution to Gentry's plight. She's tough and determined, but also understandably scared and worried about her fate. I believe that middle grade and YA kids, boys and girls, will find this a fascinating story, full of risks and mystery, but also informative about how some kids are forced to live their lives. Share this with kids who want a fast read that will make them look at the world in a very different way. 5 stars for sure.
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  • Lauren- The Smile Lines
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partnerThanks to #kidlitexchange for sharing a review copy of this #mglit book. .LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this book! The Prophet Calls is @melaniesumrow debut novel coming out on 11/6..The story is about a polygamous community and all of the challenges the members go through. The main character, Gentry, uses her love for music to get her through the darkest of days! Her family is being torn apart, and she needs to make her way out of this community!.Gentry is such a strong female charac @kidlitexchange #partnerThanks to #kidlitexchange for sharing a review copy of this #mglit book. .LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this book! The Prophet Calls is @melaniesumrow debut novel coming out on 11/6..The story is about a polygamous community and all of the challenges the members go through. The main character, Gentry, uses her love for music to get her through the darkest of days! Her family is being torn apart, and she needs to make her way out of this community!.Gentry is such a strong female character who goes through very relatable teenage things. Questioning her parents, speaking her mind, standing up for what she believes... except it is in a polygamous world where she myst obey The Prophet. The love and bond she has with her special needs sister is beautiful..I absolutely recommend this book and look forward to more books by #melaniesumrow ..
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  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    I have never read anything like The Prophet Calls, but that's not to say I didn't enjoy the story. Think student level Handmaid's Tale. I found myself feeling completely emotional in wanting to help children in circumstances such as Gentry's that are beyond their control. I felt disgusted reading, but I couldn't stop. Everything Melanie wrote is accurate on so many levels, but also written in a way that students will be able to comprehend, question, and then inquire about. Yes, they live in a po I have never read anything like The Prophet Calls, but that's not to say I didn't enjoy the story. Think student level Handmaid's Tale. I found myself feeling completely emotional in wanting to help children in circumstances such as Gentry's that are beyond their control. I felt disgusted reading, but I couldn't stop. Everything Melanie wrote is accurate on so many levels, but also written in a way that students will be able to comprehend, question, and then inquire about. Yes, they live in a polygamous community, yes their mother is the third wife to their father, yes they have 21 siblings and are told how to live by a Prophet in prison - but, this has happened, is happening, still today. The story was crafted beautifully and full of power. Your readers will be rooting for Gentry 100%.
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  • Laney Nielson
    January 1, 1970
    Set in a polygamous community in New Mexico, this upper middle grade story is beautifully written and compellingly told. At its center is Gentry, a thirteen year old girl whose love of music (she plays the violin) stirs her feelings and gives her a glimpse of the outside world. As the leader of her community (The Prophet) grows increasingly harsh in his pronouncements, Gentry struggles to obey. What follows is a page-turning, high stakes story that is hard to put down. The southwestern setting a Set in a polygamous community in New Mexico, this upper middle grade story is beautifully written and compellingly told. At its center is Gentry, a thirteen year old girl whose love of music (she plays the violin) stirs her feelings and gives her a glimpse of the outside world. As the leader of her community (The Prophet) grows increasingly harsh in his pronouncements, Gentry struggles to obey. What follows is a page-turning, high stakes story that is hard to put down. The southwestern setting and the secondary characters are all well drawn. I was especially moved by the depiction of Gentry's relationship with her younger sister. Readers will be rooting for Gentry from page one. A great addition to any library, classroom or summer reading list!
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  • R.L.
    January 1, 1970
    An emotionally adventurous tale, this story features life in a religious compound, under the thumb of a Prophet and the stifling expectations of a polygamous community. This is life as "God's chosen people." The problem, however, is that Gentry Forrester is not only a strong-willed 13-year-old girl, but she also (1) loves music and (2) adores her family. As the Prophet exercises his control over the community from the confines of prison, Gentry is faced with a decision: obey his orders, or liber An emotionally adventurous tale, this story features life in a religious compound, under the thumb of a Prophet and the stifling expectations of a polygamous community. This is life as "God's chosen people." The problem, however, is that Gentry Forrester is not only a strong-willed 13-year-old girl, but she also (1) loves music and (2) adores her family. As the Prophet exercises his control over the community from the confines of prison, Gentry is faced with a decision: obey his orders, or liberate her family? A sweet tale of love, hope, and devotion, THE PROPHET CALLS is an important contribution to middle grade literature and young female empowerment.
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  • Elise
    January 1, 1970
    Received this as an ARC because I'm a bookseller. Amazing! Also quite a quick read. Made me want to know more about polygamous communities. Hopefully this book helps others who have an interest in or experience living in these types of communities speak out (for better or worse--but let me tell you--this book is most definitely for worse). It is a timely, important book for the world we live in no matter what community you are a part of--the violence and bigotry towards women is intense in here Received this as an ARC because I'm a bookseller. Amazing! Also quite a quick read. Made me want to know more about polygamous communities. Hopefully this book helps others who have an interest in or experience living in these types of communities speak out (for better or worse--but let me tell you--this book is most definitely for worse). It is a timely, important book for the world we live in no matter what community you are a part of--the violence and bigotry towards women is intense in here and maybe even triggering. I wouldn't give to a child younger than 13 honestly--but the age range on here is interesting. Otherwise--I will be recommending this book for sure!
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  • Brad McLelland
    January 1, 1970
    One word: HAUNTING. Gentry's story won't just tug at your heart, it'll stick in your mind and make you think for days. I'm definitely placing this one on my "To Read Again" list, if only to analyze a little more deeply how Sumrow captured such a complex idea -- the notion of a polygamous community -- and yet distilled it for young readers in a way that makes it palatable, relatable, and real. I imagine this one's gonna get studied at great lengths for many years to come. I read an Advanced Reade One word: HAUNTING. Gentry's story won't just tug at your heart, it'll stick in your mind and make you think for days. I'm definitely placing this one on my "To Read Again" list, if only to analyze a little more deeply how Sumrow captured such a complex idea -- the notion of a polygamous community -- and yet distilled it for young readers in a way that makes it palatable, relatable, and real. I imagine this one's gonna get studied at great lengths for many years to come. I read an Advanced Reader's Copy of this book.
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  • Ginger
    January 1, 1970
    This book will leave you aching for girls caught in circumstances beyond their control. This book will leave you cheering for Gentry. So well-written. Such a page-turner. A fantastic debut.
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by publisherGentry lives with her very extended family in a small community in New Mexico. They are led by the Prophet, and her father is one of the elders in the community. He has three wives, and many children who attend school in the Prophets house, since he has been in prison for a few years. The boys learn survival skills, and the girls learn homemaking and other skills that will make them good wives and mothers. Gentry isn't happy that she has to stop playing games when she tu ARC provided by publisherGentry lives with her very extended family in a small community in New Mexico. They are led by the Prophet, and her father is one of the elders in the community. He has three wives, and many children who attend school in the Prophets house, since he has been in prison for a few years. The boys learn survival skills, and the girls learn homemaking and other skills that will make them good wives and mothers. Gentry isn't happy that she has to stop playing games when she turns 13, but she's even more upset when a new pronouncement from the Prophet (who calls the community weekly with his revelations) forbids women from leaving the community at all. It's too dangerous, but Gentry and her brother Tanner are set to compete in a musical competition, since they both play violin very well. Gentry's father even gives her a new violin, so she is okay with Tanner's plans to sneak out. The outside world is a little scary, but there are some nice people, and the bluegrass song the siblings play is well received. However, there father shows up at the competition to take them home, and things do not go well when they get there. Tanner is sent away from the community as an apostate, and Gentry is punished. She is very angry, especially when her older sister Meryl is pressed into a hasty marriage with one of the older men, and her sister Amy's record player is taken away as being a tool of the devil. When the Prophet decides that Gentry's father can no longer control his wives and children, he is sent away, and his wives are reassigned to other men. Gentry and her family end up being sent far away from their community to another one, and when Gentry finds that she is going to be forced to marry a boy she dislikes, she finally decides to strike out on her own, with the help of some relatives.Strengths: This is a timely novel about religious oppression of young women, and about one young woman who is brave enough to confront her oppressors. It was well written and descriptive, and Gentry's relationship with her young relatives is warm and supportive, especially since the adults are all too wrapped up in their religion to do the right thing. The lengths to which Gentry and her siblings and cousins go to escape are intriguing and exciting, and readers who like books where children are abused will find this to be a new topic that is not much discussed.Weaknesses: Is this offensive to religious people? I am not in a position to judge. To me, ALL religions are the dictates of men thinly disguised as "the will of God". While this is a fictitious religion, will people in religions that severely limit the rights and experiences of women fell that this is a strike against them as well? Or would they stay far enough from this sort of book that they would never know about it. While most people would agree that marrying off girls at the age of 13 is a bad, bad idea, I just had a weird feeling that religious people might feel this book is also denigrating their own beliefs.What I really think: This was very much like The Child Bride of Short Creek, a 1981 movie with Diane Lane and Christopher Atkins. It was certainly a page turner, but I'm not sure how big a demand there is among my students for books about polygamist sects.
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  • Sandy O'Brien
    January 1, 1970
    “But I feel so torn. I know what’s right, so why doesn’t it feel right?”Gentry lives in a polygamy community where she lives apart from the outside world and it’s “evils”. There are rules upon rules that the Prophet has professed and are strictly enforced by the God Squad. Gentry has always followed them, but resisted within her mind.•Gentry and her brother, Tanner, are invited to perform at a local art festival. The night before the event the Prophet calls to outlaw music and says that women ar “But I feel so torn. I know what’s right, so why doesn’t it feel right?”Gentry lives in a polygamy community where she lives apart from the outside world and it’s “evils”. There are rules upon rules that the Prophet has professed and are strictly enforced by the God Squad. Gentry has always followed them, but resisted within her mind.•Gentry and her brother, Tanner, are invited to perform at a local art festival. The night before the event the Prophet calls to outlaw music and says that women are forbidden to leave the compound. Gentry and her brother decide to sneak out and perform at the festival, but are caught causing their entire family to be in danger.•Will Gentry fall in line and follow the rules that are laid out or will she keep pushing even though it could cause her to lose her family?#teacherswhoread#MGlit#polygamy #teachersfollowteachers
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    The Prophet Calls is a story about a polygamist cult in New Mexico. It is a middle grade book and approaches all that you can imagine would be involved in that lifestyle with a middle grade lens. It is a page turner, the action never stops and several times I got pretty worried for the MC. The adults in the story don’t do anything to help the kids and so thirteen year old Gentry and her siblings have to rescue themselves from the life they were born into. For awhile its unclear if Gentry will ac The Prophet Calls is a story about a polygamist cult in New Mexico. It is a middle grade book and approaches all that you can imagine would be involved in that lifestyle with a middle grade lens. It is a page turner, the action never stops and several times I got pretty worried for the MC. The adults in the story don’t do anything to help the kids and so thirteen year old Gentry and her siblings have to rescue themselves from the life they were born into. For awhile its unclear if Gentry will actually find a way to escape this life, but after her arranged marriage is announced she realizes that she has to leave while she still has the chance.I don’t know that I would hand it universally to the younger end of the age range, but certainly kids in junior high would enjoy the adventure and look into a very different lifestyle.
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  • Meg Williams- Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    I was able to read this book before publication, thanks to an ARC provided by the author to #BookPosse. Stunning debut from Melanie Sumrow! This book was fast-paced and dramatic and I had a hard time putting it down! This book will be published on November 6th, and I suggest pre-ordering so you get it immediately. Set in New Mexico in a polygamous community, The Prophet Calls" tells the story of Gentry Forrester. A little bit of a rebel, Gentry and her brother Tanner sneak out of the community-a I was able to read this book before publication, thanks to an ARC provided by the author to #BookPosse. Stunning debut from Melanie Sumrow! This book was fast-paced and dramatic and I had a hard time putting it down! This book will be published on November 6th, and I suggest pre-ordering so you get it immediately. Set in New Mexico in a polygamous community, The Prophet Calls" tells the story of Gentry Forrester. A little bit of a rebel, Gentry and her brother Tanner sneak out of the community-and defy the ruling of the Prophet- to play violin at a music festival. Little do they know, their lives are about to change more than anyone can imagine. I loved Gentry as a protagonist. I thought she was witty and courageous and exactly the kind of character kids need to read about. She was fiercely protective of her siblings and brave in the face of adversity. This book was phenomenal and different and I would recommend to upper Middle Grade readers and adults alike.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Polygamy is definitely not a subject you see in middle grade fiction. This book was fascinating. I couldn't put it down!My only disappointment was the end! I loved the escape and Channing being there to help them. But... I didn't like how the story picks up a month later. I mean... HOW did they make it from Canada to New Mexico? I needed some details fleshed out in the last chapter for closure. Also, it was a little too tidy for my taste. There still is the question of where the dad is. I was su Polygamy is definitely not a subject you see in middle grade fiction. This book was fascinating. I couldn't put it down!My only disappointment was the end! I loved the escape and Channing being there to help them. But... I didn't like how the story picks up a month later. I mean... HOW did they make it from Canada to New Mexico? I needed some details fleshed out in the last chapter for closure. Also, it was a little too tidy for my taste. There still is the question of where the dad is. I was surprised there wasn't an author's note at the end explaining all of this to kids. Like I said, polygamy is not something kids know about since it is not prevalent (thank goodness). None the less, I really liked the book
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  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    This story was disturbing, haunting and too real. Gentry is a member of a polygamist community in New Mexico. It is ran by the Prophet from his prison cell. Gentry begins to question the Prophet when his latest orders put her family in danger. Watching people blindly follow corrupt leaders under the guise of religion made my heart ache. I think readers are going to love this book and the discussions it generates. It is a story of family, bravery and the dreams of a young girl. Thank you #BookPos This story was disturbing, haunting and too real. Gentry is a member of a polygamist community in New Mexico. It is ran by the Prophet from his prison cell. Gentry begins to question the Prophet when his latest orders put her family in danger. Watching people blindly follow corrupt leaders under the guise of religion made my heart ache. I think readers are going to love this book and the discussions it generates. It is a story of family, bravery and the dreams of a young girl. Thank you #BookPosse for the opportunity to read this book.
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  • Susan Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    Gentry and her brother and sister live in a compound controlled by The Prophet who is in prison. She is part of a polygamous family (her mother is the second of three wives) with 21 children. She and her brother have entered a contest to play violin at a Festival but when she turns 13 the community tells her that since she is now a woman she can’t go. Will she? This riveting book explores the world of the cult, the fear of outsiders and the power wielded by the men in control. I was spellbound.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    You can't help but root for Gentry as her family and her world falls apart. Seeing Gentry's community through her eyes, you feel compassion but also horror at this dystopian setting turned real. Packed with a surprising amount of plot twists and turns, this book is sure to entice even the more reluctant reader to keep going. While handling the topic of polygamy delicately, it teaches a valuable lesson about standing up and speaking out. This is a book I could not put down. I am excited for this You can't help but root for Gentry as her family and her world falls apart. Seeing Gentry's community through her eyes, you feel compassion but also horror at this dystopian setting turned real. Packed with a surprising amount of plot twists and turns, this book is sure to entice even the more reluctant reader to keep going. While handling the topic of polygamy delicately, it teaches a valuable lesson about standing up and speaking out. This is a book I could not put down. I am excited for this one to be in my middle school class library. #LitReviewCrew
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  • Brandy
    January 1, 1970
    Melanie Sumrow's debut novel is a stand out!! Her story of Gentry, a young girl raised in a polygamous community, is one I've not seen for middle grade readers. I knew as soon as I saw the cover on Twitter that I needed to get my hands on a copy and read it! I was fortunate to receive an ARC, and cannot say enough good about this book. It has opened the eyes of several of my students to other lifestyles and challenges that are out there. Melanie hits on important themes of family, growing up, an Melanie Sumrow's debut novel is a stand out!! Her story of Gentry, a young girl raised in a polygamous community, is one I've not seen for middle grade readers. I knew as soon as I saw the cover on Twitter that I needed to get my hands on a copy and read it! I was fortunate to receive an ARC, and cannot say enough good about this book. It has opened the eyes of several of my students to other lifestyles and challenges that are out there. Melanie hits on important themes of family, growing up, and courage. I am very happy to add this to my classroom library!
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  • Cherie
    January 1, 1970
    I finished this book when I was in early labor, and when I was in those psychedelic moments between contractions, this book was on my mind. Sooo messed up. In another dystopian world where men have more than one wife, where The Prophet controls everything (from prison, where he lives), one girl's dreams of playing violin are dashed. When her family is punished and she is told she must marry a man she hates, she has to figure out how to make life work for her. Great read! Def need to buy this one I finished this book when I was in early labor, and when I was in those psychedelic moments between contractions, this book was on my mind. Sooo messed up. In another dystopian world where men have more than one wife, where The Prophet controls everything (from prison, where he lives), one girl's dreams of playing violin are dashed. When her family is punished and she is told she must marry a man she hates, she has to figure out how to make life work for her. Great read! Def need to buy this one for my school's collection.
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  • Julie Overpeck aka Mrs. O's Library
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free advanced copy from the publisher and author.Melanie Sumrow has studied world religions, and it shows. The story is so compelling that I hardly wanted to put it down. I like that Gentry learns to think critically and question what she has been taught, even when the adults around her don’t. Sumrow’s description of a polygamous family is believable, and the book is really intense at times. Know that the book includes descriptions of emotional and physical abuse.
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  • Erik Miller
    January 1, 1970
    This book has such an incredible weight to it. The topic, the life these characters are experiencing... but the author handles everything with such a deft touch. I have family and friends who've been in situations similar to this, and for those kids this would be a very meaningful, very impactful book. There's such an undeniable beauty to the way the author presents Gentry's story, but at the same time an importance that'll root it very deeply in many kids' hearts.
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  • Huang Chu
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fascinating, harrowing look at faith gone very wrong. Despite the austere and oppressive setting, the book is not grim and bleak. We care about the characters even as we recoil at the world they are forced to live in. We cheer them as they question the foundations of that world when their conscience tells them that everything they have been taught is wrong. A relevant fable filled with hope.
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  • Sean
    January 1, 1970
    This book has such an incredible weight to it. The topic, the life these characters are experiencing... but the author handles everything with such a deft touch. I have family and friends who've been in situations similar to this, and for those kids this would be a very meaningful, very impactful book. There's such an undeniable beauty to the way the author presents Gentry's story, but at the same time an importance that'll root it very deeply in many kids' hearts.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    WoW - I loved this story! So well done. Very richly told, and being from a child's point of view, helped me understand how groups of people can fall into (and remain in) cult-like environments. This is a page-turner, and the story will stay with me a long time. I laughed, cried, cringed, and cheered!
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  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    A WinnerGentry lives with her father, her mothers, and siblings in a religious sect in New Mexico. When she and her brother, Tanner sneak out to play music and get caught, their lives change forever. This novel is filled with well-developed characters such as Dirk, Amy, and The Prophet. There is pain and sadness, but also hope in Gentry’s story.
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  • Mandy Stallard
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing and so different from anything I’ve read. You will be rooting for Gentry from the very beginning of the novel. She is strong-willed and brave and willing to question authority. I’m so grateful I was given the chance to read an ARC through #BookPosse. The Profit Calls is a must read for MG students, as well as adults. Pre-order as soon as possible!
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