How I Resist
An all-star collection of essays about activism and hope, edited by bestselling YA authors Tim Federle and Maureen Johnson.Now, more than ever, young people are motivated to make a difference in a world they're bound to inherit. They're ready to stand up and be heard - but with much to shout about, where they do they begin? What can I do? How can I help? How I Resist is the response, and a way to start the conversation. To show readers that they are not helpless, and that anyone can be the change. A collection of essays, songs, illustrations, and interviews about activism and hope, How I Resist features an all-star group of contributors, including, John Paul Brammer, Libba Bray, Lauren Duca, Modern Family's Jesse Tyler Ferguson and his husband Justin Mikita, Alex Gino, Hebh Jamal, Malinda Lo, Dylan Marron, Hamilton star Javier Muñoz, Rosie O'Donnell, Junauda Petrus, Jodi Picoult, Jason Reynolds, Karuna Riazi, Maya Rupert, Dana Schwartz, Dan Sinker, Ali Stroker, Jonny Sun (aka @jonnysun), Sabaa Tahir, Daniel Watts, Jennifer Weiner, Jacqueline Woodson, and more, all edited and compiled by New York Times bestselling author Maureen Johnson and Lambda-winning novelist Tim Federle. In How I Resist, readers will find hope and support through voices that are at turns personal, funny, irreverent, and instructive. Not just for a young adult audience, this incredibly impactful collection will appeal to readers of all ages who are feeling adrift and looking for guidance. How I Resist is the kind of book people will be discussing for years to come and a staple on bookshelves for generations.

How I Resist Details

TitleHow I Resist
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 1st, 2018
PublisherWednesday Books
ISBN-139781250168368
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Anthologies, Short Stories, Writing, Essays, Politics, Social Issues, Activism

How I Resist Review

  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    **I received this book as part of a Goodreads First Reads Giveaway.**Even though this book was geared toward Young Adult readers, I learned a lot from it. And it was entertaining. The essays and interviews were extremely relatable. And I highly recommend it for readers and resisters of all ages.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    "Libraries: serving the resistance since forever." You SAID it, Libba Bray!! #MakeAmericaSmartAgainSo this is a neat book targeted towards teenagers (but entertaining and inspiring for all of us) with essays, poems, songs and more creative work from all kinds of people, explaining why and how they "resist." Sometimes "resist" means protesting, or making art, or just being yourself in an unfriendly world - but in all cases, it means finding the truth, having compassion, and standing up for what's "Libraries: serving the resistance since forever." You SAID it, Libba Bray!! #MakeAmericaSmartAgainSo this is a neat book targeted towards teenagers (but entertaining and inspiring for all of us) with essays, poems, songs and more creative work from all kinds of people, explaining why and how they "resist." Sometimes "resist" means protesting, or making art, or just being yourself in an unfriendly world - but in all cases, it means finding the truth, having compassion, and standing up for what's right. Three things this world could surely use a lot more of lately, and in the long run.I do wish the book had more visuals - art, photographs, more comics, etc. - as well as links to things like a recording of the song (shown in the book via sheet music), or but I love that it has a "reading list" of resistance books suggested by librarians from around the country!*Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Hailey S. { The Book Muse }
    January 1, 1970
    ARC Review: How I ResistAn Anthology edited by Maureen Johnson and Tim Federle Release date: May 1, 2018Regardless of whether you are an American citizen, you're going to want to get your hands on a copy of How I Resist. This incredibly important anthology includes stories, interviews, comics, instructional articles and so much more that are geared towards young people who want to make a difference. With names like Libba Bray, Hamilton star Javier Muñoz, and Jodi Picoult, this anthology really i ARC Review: How I ResistAn Anthology edited by Maureen Johnson and Tim Federle Release date: May 1, 2018Regardless of whether you are an American citizen, you're going to want to get your hands on a copy of How I Resist. This incredibly important anthology includes stories, interviews, comics, instructional articles and so much more that are geared towards young people who want to make a difference. With names like Libba Bray, Hamilton star Javier Muñoz, and Jodi Picoult, this anthology really is star-studded and full of voices ready to help you, the reader, make a difference.In the wake of the 2016 election, the United States (and the world!) has been caught up in turmoil. How I Resist encourages its readers to take action. And let me tell you--it works. After reading this anthology, I was angry. Angry at the injustices done to people for no reason other than their place of birth, their skin colour, their orientation. But I also felt empowered. How I Resist gives readers the tools they need to take action, and fuels the fire for them to do so--particularly in a world that is driven by social media.We as humans need to be better at communicating. At taking action. At pointing out injustices when we see them. So next time I encounter whitewashing in a fancast for a book series, or I come across someone claiming that 'representation in books doesn't matter'--I will speak out.That's how I resist.
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  • Shawnta Dodson
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advance Uncorrected Proof copy in a GR Giveaway. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and look forward to the finished copy. I loved getting to see so may different perspectives on resisting. It gave me hope.
  • Erikka
    January 1, 1970
    This is going to be a ready recommendation for my students. I can't think of a single one of my kids who wouldn't love this. Jason Reynolds made a strong case for how difficult it is to be hopeless when you work with kids and teens because they don't understand our generation's hatred for others based on characteristics they can't help (racism, homophobia, sexism, etc). I find my kids to be endlessly inspiring in how little they care about the appearance of others. They are far from perfect, min This is going to be a ready recommendation for my students. I can't think of a single one of my kids who wouldn't love this. Jason Reynolds made a strong case for how difficult it is to be hopeless when you work with kids and teens because they don't understand our generation's hatred for others based on characteristics they can't help (racism, homophobia, sexism, etc). I find my kids to be endlessly inspiring in how little they care about the appearance of others. They are far from perfect, mind you, but I have so much faith in them and I truly believe the future is better in their hands. that's why I want them to read this book, to learn ways to resist and have a voice while they're still young and idealistic. I thoroughly enjoyed all of the submissions to this anthology, but there is something here for everyone and, even if you don't like all of it, there's something you will like. I was most touched by what Javier Munoz and Daniel Watts had to say, as well as Jason Reynolds` touching words I previously mentioned. Please pick this book up and realize you aren't alone: resistance is everywhere and you have a role to play in it.
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  • Faith 09
    January 1, 1970
    A really inspiring book that made me really want to go out and make a difference.
  • Skjam!
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this advance uncorrected proof through a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of writing this review. No other compensation was offered or requested. As an uncorrected proof, there will be significant changes between this and the final product.As I write these words, yet another school shooting has sparked an upsurge in student activism. Thus the appearance in my mailbox of this collection of essays and interviews on activism and hope aimed at the young adult market was time Disclaimer: I received this advance uncorrected proof through a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of writing this review. No other compensation was offered or requested. As an uncorrected proof, there will be significant changes between this and the final product.As I write these words, yet another school shooting has sparked an upsurge in student activism. Thus the appearance in my mailbox of this collection of essays and interviews on activism and hope aimed at the young adult market was timely. The selection of authors and artists includes such popular figures as Jodi Picoult and Javier Muñoz, plus a wide variety of folks I have never heard of but younger Americans may be more conversant with.The first essay in the book is “Could We Please Give the Police Departments to the Grandmothers?” by Junauda Petrus which waxes lyrical about solving crime problems with stern looks and good food. Very Afrofuturism. Last is Karuna Riazi with “Refilling the Well”, which is about her emotional self-care while trying to change the world for the better.One of the hazards of reading such an early proof of the book is that none of the interior illustrations are present, including the ones that are a contributor’s entire entry. Also, there’s a comics trivia error in Maya Rupert’s essay about imagining a black Wonder Woman that I can’t tell if it’s the author’s or a typesetter glitch. (Have I mentioned that I’m an annoying nerd about comics trivia?)I do, however, like the cover with all the author bio pictures. It does a good job of giving faces to the people writing and drawing these pieces.This is a collection curated through a strong political lens for a particular type of young person. If you are the sort of young adult who thinks the right person won in 2016 (Hillary’s loss hit several of the contributors hard); that America’s problems are caused by uppity women, dark-skinned people and “weirdos” being allowed to have a say; and that protests are only acceptable when you don’t have to see them, hear about them or be influenced by them in any way…this book will not go well with you.Most of the contributions are interesting or thought-provoking–I’m a bit disappointed by Rosie O’Donnell going with a glorified tweet. The editors have an introduction, mid-word and afterword, which is a bit much, and they come off as trying too hard to be “woke” and “down with the young people.”There’s a list of suggested reading in the back, ranging from 1984 to We Should All Be Feminists.Consider this one as a gift for a teenager or college student who’s into political or social activism. Older readers might want to pick it up if you are a fan of one of the contributors
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  • Lanette Rodgers
    January 1, 1970
    This book is not just a great book for teens but for all people who are wondering what they can do to be more active and involved.I loved the art in this book of the individual people but I wish there was more of it (I am thinking of how Notorious RBG had great art and diagrams!)I thought this had a wide variety of essays and works for lots of different types of people so that it was easy to find someone to relate to.I also really appreciated the suggested reading list in the back!For anyone who This book is not just a great book for teens but for all people who are wondering what they can do to be more active and involved.I loved the art in this book of the individual people but I wish there was more of it (I am thinking of how Notorious RBG had great art and diagrams!)I thought this had a wide variety of essays and works for lots of different types of people so that it was easy to find someone to relate to.I also really appreciated the suggested reading list in the back!For anyone who felt lost, confused, and impassionated after the last presidential election will find this book passionate, exciting, and empowering.Find more of my reviews at novelsandhops.com and on my YouTube channel Novels and hops
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  • Ashlynn
    January 1, 1970
    "How I Resist" is brimming with passion and insight. I enjoyed the multi-genre approach. It felt appropriate given the collage of different voices and identities represented across the text. One of the stand-outs was the poetry of Daniel J. Watts-- absolutely stunning. Also, the recognizable reading list of authors will generate interest with young people. I, too, found myself fangirling over names I that recognize and respect -- Jacqueline Woodson, Dylan Marron, and Javier Munoz, to name a few.
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  • Rhiannon
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an ARC in exchange for my honest review*5 StarsThis book was great! It did a good job of showing what resistance looks like in many forms, that merely existing can be resistance. It showed me I am not alone, and gave me a sense of solidarity and empowerment. There were parts that I heavily identified with, parts that made me cry, parts that made me laugh. It shows a path forward and that the despair we may all feel right now is not the end.While geared toward teens I would recommend *I received an ARC in exchange for my honest review*5 StarsThis book was great! It did a good job of showing what resistance looks like in many forms, that merely existing can be resistance. It showed me I am not alone, and gave me a sense of solidarity and empowerment. There were parts that I heavily identified with, parts that made me cry, parts that made me laugh. It shows a path forward and that the despair we may all feel right now is not the end.While geared toward teens I would recommend it for people of all ages. It had enough information and insight to be helpful and relateable for just about anyone.
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  • Olivia G
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as a part of a Goodreads Giveaway and loved every second.Filled with varying pieces that explore activism and how we can fight back without losing our selves, our energy, and our drive this book really dug deep into the hard issues and didn't let go.I think this book would be great in any curriculum, on your shelf, or for a gift to any activist you know. Enjoy, inhale, and spread the love and knowledge it contains.
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  • Mariejkt
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting book on resistance but do know it is heavy on one side only.
  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book via Good Reads First Reads. I am an ECE administrator and I look forward to adding this book to our lending library for staff and parents at my school.
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