Season of Blood (Crispin Guest Medieval Noir #10)
A missing Holy Relic. A mysterious and beautiful woman. Two murdered monks: Crispin Guest tackles his most intriguing investigation to date. 1390. Hailes Abbey, Gloucestershire, England. Two monks lie murdered, their Holy Blood relic stolen: a relic that is said to run liquid for the sinless and remain stubbornly dry for the sinner. Unwilling to become involved in a bitter dispute between a country monastery and Westminster Abbey, the disgraced former knight Crispin Guest attempts to return the relic to Hailes where it belongs, but somehow it keeps returning to his hands no matter what.As he tries to shield a former nemesis from a charge of murder while becoming entangled with a mysterious and beautiful woman caught between Church politics and the dangerous intrigues of King Richard's court, Crispin begins to suspect that someone at Westminster is conspiring with the assassins. Can the Blood of Christ point to the killer?

Season of Blood (Crispin Guest Medieval Noir #10) Details

TitleSeason of Blood (Crispin Guest Medieval Noir #10)
Author
ReleaseDec 24th, 2017
PublisherSevern House Publishers
ISBN-139780727887474
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Medieval, Historical Mystery

Season of Blood (Crispin Guest Medieval Noir #10) Review

  • Kirsty 📚📖❤️
    January 1, 1970
    Continuing my run of authors new to me. I enjoyed this one. There are lots of twists and turns and it's nice to read crime novels where the detective (or rather Trapper as in here) relies on brain and wit rather than technology. As much as I did like it and it's an easy enough to read, it didn't grab my attention enough to read all in one go. I did leave it halfway through to read 2 other books. And there were maybe one or two many twists. I lost track at the end of all the people who had ended Continuing my run of authors new to me. I enjoyed this one. There are lots of twists and turns and it's nice to read crime novels where the detective (or rather Trapper as in here) relies on brain and wit rather than technology. As much as I did like it and it's an easy enough to read, it didn't grab my attention enough to read all in one go. I did leave it halfway through to read 2 other books. And there were maybe one or two many twists. I lost track at the end of all the people who had ended up doing something wrong.But I liked the relationship between Crispin and his apprentice Jack. I was intrigued by John and his alter ego Eleanor - not something you tend to see in more medieval books. When I did pick the book back up again I found it easy to get back into. It works well as a stand alone book having not read the others in the series. Overall a enjoyable bookFree arc from netgalley
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  • Yvonne
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first visit with this author and I read this book as a stand alone. It is set in 1390 and we are introduced to Crispin Guest and his apprentice and side kick Jack Tucker. They have been approached by a mysterious lady for their help in finding her niece. But along with that a monk dies on Crispin’s door step and in his possession is a religious Blood Relic artefact.This is the 10th instalment in the Crispin Guest mystery series. As this is the first I had read by this author, I was in This is my first visit with this author and I read this book as a stand alone. It is set in 1390 and we are introduced to Crispin Guest and his apprentice and side kick Jack Tucker. They have been approached by a mysterious lady for their help in finding her niece. But along with that a monk dies on Crispin’s door step and in his possession is a religious Blood Relic artefact.This is the 10th instalment in the Crispin Guest mystery series. As this is the first I had read by this author, I was intrigued as to how well I would get on with an established series. For me, I am pleased to say, it worked very well, there are hints and mentions of past stories but not enough to detract from this one. This book has a very good “well researched” feel to it. It is one of those books that feel right for the time it is set in and Jeri has some great description to back that feel up. It is a well paced story that has some very unexpected twists, it is one of those books that you are never quite sure who is telling the truth, creating a good edginess to it. The characters are quick to remember and identify as they are introduced gradually.Overall this was a very enjoyable read, and I think a good introduction for me to this author, even though I have started at the wrong end of the series. I would recommend this to readers who like a good medieval murder, mystery read. Some good twists, plots and characters. It has been well researched and written.
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  • Pamela Priest
    January 1, 1970
    Whenever one of Ms. Westerson's Crispin books hits my Kindle or my hands, all other books go to the 'hold' list until I finish it. Her books are well researched. They are set in medieval times, which I find to be a fascinating period, and they are intelligent. Her descriptions make me feel like I am right there in the story. There are some interesting twists presented to Crispin and Jack in this 10th Crispin book. The female character is also quite interesting. You won't want to miss this one! O Whenever one of Ms. Westerson's Crispin books hits my Kindle or my hands, all other books go to the 'hold' list until I finish it. Her books are well researched. They are set in medieval times, which I find to be a fascinating period, and they are intelligent. Her descriptions make me feel like I am right there in the story. There are some interesting twists presented to Crispin and Jack in this 10th Crispin book. The female character is also quite interesting. You won't want to miss this one! Or any of the others, for that matter.
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  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published at Reading RealitySeason of Blood follows last year’s A Maiden Weeping, and Crispin seems to have learned very little from all the trouble he got into during that case.A man dies on his doorstep with a knife in his back. In Crispin’s down-at-heels section of London, that actually might not be all that uncommon an occurrence. But the dead man in this particular case is a monk. And in addition to his corpse, he leaves Crispin with two big problems.That knife in the monk’s back Originally published at Reading RealitySeason of Blood follows last year’s A Maiden Weeping, and Crispin seems to have learned very little from all the trouble he got into during that case.A man dies on his doorstep with a knife in his back. In Crispin’s down-at-heels section of London, that actually might not be all that uncommon an occurrence. But the dead man in this particular case is a monk. And in addition to his corpse, he leaves Crispin with two big problems.That knife in the monk’s back clearly bears the seal of Simon Wynchecombe, former Sheriff, current Alderman, and always a thorn in Crispin’s side. Simon hated Crispin while he was Sheriff, and beat and belittled him at every turn, including when he needed Crispin to resolve a case.The second problem presented by the corpse is that he has a religious relic in his possession. Crispin has been involved with relics before. He doesn’t trust them or the people who traffic in them. But the damnable things keep invading his life, and that never ends well for him.On the heels of the corpse, a woman hires Crispin to find her errant niece, who seems to have run off with a married man – that married man being the same Simon Wynchecombe whose knife was in the dead man’s back.This all should scream “unlikely coincidence” to Crispin the expert tracker, but something about this woman has Crispin doing most of his thinking with his little head instead of his big one. Not that that hasn’t happened before, too. Crispin can never resist a pretty face, especially when there’s a clever brain behind it.So Crispin, as usual, finds himself investigating a case where he trusts that no one is telling the truth. He is forced to rely on his own wits to determine who killed the first monk (and eventually the second and the third) without having anything like 21st century forensic science. Only his own knowledge of how things work and how people behave – even if his wits are a bit addled by the beautiful woman who seems to be at the center of this spider’s web of a case.And just because he doesn’t believe in the truth of the relic, doesn’t mean that others are not willing to kill for them. Or that just because so many of the people involved with this case are celibate monks, does not mean that there are not men under those robes, just as fascinated by a pretty face as he himself is. Possibly even the same pretty face.The chance to solve this conundrum tests Crispin at every turn. But the unexpected chance to score against an enemy – PRICELESS.Escape Rating B+: A part of me wants to say that this was fun, in spite of the dead bodies falling at every turn. This case is interesting because it is so foreign. The past is definitely another country in this one.Crispin is skeptical about the truth and the efficacy of those much venerated relics. His attitude is in some ways almost modern, and in others fits within his time. He’s not sure they are real, but if they are, we don’t deserve them. And it’s not for him to judge their religiosity, only to follow the trail of death and end it – no matter the cost.But this is a case where trying to follow “who benefits?” is difficult because the benefits don’t seem based in our reality – even though they are in theirs.As always, Crispin is a fascinating character. Once upon a time, he was a nobleman, who lost his station and his fortune by backing the wrong claimant in one of the early skirmishes of what became later known as the “Wars of the Roses”. He should have been killed for his treason, but instead he was reduced severely in station.He should have died of his ignorance, but instead was helped and taught until he could manage to make his own living as the infamous “Tracker” who solves problems for a fee and shows up the Sheriffs at every turn. He has seen life from both the heights and the depths, but is a stranger in both and at home in neither.He’s also in his mid-30s and starting to feel that he is no longer young. At the same time he has no idea of if or how to “settle down”. He does have a knack for gathering interesting people around him who both help and support him. A group that gets more interesting all the time, particularly in this outing.If you like historical mysteries where you really feel (and occasionally taste and smell) just how different the past is from our own present, Crispin Guest is a master at bringing his world to life – and solving its suspicious deaths.
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  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    It was fabulous to receive Jeri Westerson’s Season of Blood, a Crispin Guest medieval mystery,#10. I could not open the box fast enough & I began reading it immediately & read it right through to the end. The author describes medieval London so thoroughly. I loved reading about Crispin and his apprentice, Jack Tucker again. Jack is now 18 and has been educated by Crispin as well as taught by Crispin how to become The Tracker someday. Jack also watches out for Crispin and is Crispin’s clo It was fabulous to receive Jeri Westerson’s Season of Blood, a Crispin Guest medieval mystery,#10. I could not open the box fast enough & I began reading it immediately & read it right through to the end. The author describes medieval London so thoroughly. I loved reading about Crispin and his apprentice, Jack Tucker again. Jack is now 18 and has been educated by Crispin as well as taught by Crispin how to become The Tracker someday. Jack also watches out for Crispin and is Crispin’s closest friend. Another religious relic has entered Crispin’s new digs, but so has a dead monk. It begins again, but Crispin and Jack seem more like partners in this tale. They also ride to Hailes Abbey which is a few days outside of London. Jack cannot see enough as he travels with Crispin to the Abbey. Another previous character shows up which adds more difficulties & then there is that woman! 41/4 stars. So enjoyable! Cannot get the next book, The Deepest Grave #11, quickly enough!
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first historical fiction novel I've read in a while. I previously read and really enjoyed Simon Scarrow's books set in the times of the Roman empire, and also enjoy fantasy novels, so was keen to see how this stacked up. In short, I'll be reading the other books featuring Crispin Guest.Jeri Westerson leads you around medieval (1390) London on a thrilling murder mystery romp. She paints an incredibly vivid picture of the city (or rather cities) of the time, including a short glossary This is the first historical fiction novel I've read in a while. I previously read and really enjoyed Simon Scarrow's books set in the times of the Roman empire, and also enjoy fantasy novels, so was keen to see how this stacked up. In short, I'll be reading the other books featuring Crispin Guest.Jeri Westerson leads you around medieval (1390) London on a thrilling murder mystery romp. She paints an incredibly vivid picture of the city (or rather cities) of the time, including a short glossary at the start, and some historical notes at the end. A mysterious woman hires Crispin (a former knight, falled on hard times as a detective) to track down her niece. What should have been a straightforward missing person case turns into an increasing number of murders, and the theft of a priceless holy relic.This was a really engaging book, and well worth the time spent reading it.
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    5 starsIt is 1390 in London. Crispin Guest is being followed. He hides in a doorway only to find his stalker is a woman. She wants to hire him to locate her apparently abducted young neice who she believes has been taken by the former Lord Sheriff Simon Wynchecombe. He is a powerful figure indeed. A knock on the door proves to be a dying monk with a very distinctive dagger in his back. He drops a crystal as he falls. The dagger belongs to Wynchecombe. Crispin rises to discover that the woman is 5 starsIt is 1390 in London. Crispin Guest is being followed. He hides in a doorway only to find his stalker is a woman. She wants to hire him to locate her apparently abducted young neice who she believes has been taken by the former Lord Sheriff Simon Wynchecombe. He is a powerful figure indeed. A knock on the door proves to be a dying monk with a very distinctive dagger in his back. He drops a crystal as he falls. The dagger belongs to Wynchecombe. Crispin rises to discover that the woman is gone and she has taken the crystal with her. What follows is a remarkable romp through London and Hailes to monasteries, slums, cathedrals and sheriff’s offices. Crispin falls for the lady, and then he learns a great deal about her – or does he? We meet some delightful and unusual friends of Crispin’s. They will also play a part in uncovering the conspiracy and catch the killers. They recover a relic artifact, and then lose it. Do they get it back safely? And what of the mysterious woman? Who is she and what does she really want? This book is very well written and plotted. The descriptions of the 1390’s London were brilliant. I felt like I was there, seeing the people and smelling the smells. I truly enjoyed it. The suspense starts out immediately and continues throughout the book until it reaches its denouement in an exciting and surprising ending. This is my first Jeri Westerson novel, but it won’t be my last. I immediately went to Amazon to look at her other books. I want to thank NetGalley and Severn House for forwarding to me a copy of this most wonderful book to read and enjoy.
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  • Maggies Daisy
    January 1, 1970
    Crispin Guest an honored knight who has fallen from grace by an act of treason against the King has been hired as a "Tracker" to find a young women's niece from a former Sheriff whom Crispin is quite familiar with from past experiences. Cistercian monks, murderers, thieves, politicians, coppers, a damsel in distress plus some of London's colorful street dwellers act as faithful friends and consultants to Mr. Guests in his quest to solve the mystery of the Holy relic of Hailes and the death of se Crispin Guest an honored knight who has fallen from grace by an act of treason against the King has been hired as a "Tracker" to find a young women's niece from a former Sheriff whom Crispin is quite familiar with from past experiences. Cistercian monks, murderers, thieves, politicians, coppers, a damsel in distress plus some of London's colorful street dwellers act as faithful friends and consultants to Mr. Guests in his quest to solve the mystery of the Holy relic of Hailes and the death of several monks. The characters were fun, but I would have liked to read more on some of their past adventures that were hinted at but never enlighted upon within the pages of this book.
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  • eyes.2c
    January 1, 1970
    Crispin at his best!Once again, The Tracker, Crispin Guest is dogged by a mysterious holy relic. This time 'the Holy Blood of Hailes.' A Ciscurcian monk arrives at Crispin's door with a dagger in his back, and a holy relic in his hand! And that's not all, Crispin recognizes the dagger. And so it begins.Why is it that these mysteries gravitate towards him? At one stage Crispin grimly ponders that, 'Nothing good ever came from association with relics, at least not for him. It was damnable how they Crispin at his best!Once again, The Tracker, Crispin Guest is dogged by a mysterious holy relic. This time 'the Holy Blood of Hailes.' A Ciscurcian monk arrives at Crispin's door with a dagger in his back, and a holy relic in his hand! And that's not all, Crispin recognizes the dagger. And so it begins.Why is it that these mysteries gravitate towards him? At one stage Crispin grimly ponders that, 'Nothing good ever came from association with relics, at least not for him. It was damnable how they kept turning up at his door.' As does a dead White monk of the Cistercian order just to add spice and intrigue. There seems to be a veritable plague of monks imbedded in this Tracker episode.And let's not forget the last words of Crispin's friend Abbot Nicholas, ' ‘Forget what you think you know … Beware of what you find …’ ' words that haunt Crispin more than the relics. What will Crispin find and what is he really searching for? This is our ongoing exploration of Crispin, his strengths and failings, his personhood.Jack Tucker is back, now a betrothed young man whose words of wisdom have occasion to bring Crispin up short. John Rykener appears (one of my favorite characters) and, most unexpectedly, the ex sheriff of London, no friend to Crispin, Simon Wynchecombe turns to the Tracker for help.On top of this a rather mysterious woman enters Crispin's life and turns it upside down.Another enthralling read. I continue to enjoy the interplay between Crispin and Jack Tucker. I love their verbal sparring, spiced with references to Aristotle and much grumbling from Jack. As always, Westerson's prose brings the streets of 1390's London vividly to life.A NetGalley ARC
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Season of Blood takes the reader on another adventure with Crispin Guest as he investigates murdered monks and stolen relics. I've enjoyed several of these Crispin Guest novels and enjoy the setting during Richard II's reign. Crispin is a disgraced knight who has earned a reputation as an investigator and finder of lost objects. He has become known as the Tracker.A beautiful and mysterious woman sets this mystery in motion. She approaches Crispin, asking for his aid in finding her niece. Things Season of Blood takes the reader on another adventure with Crispin Guest as he investigates murdered monks and stolen relics. I've enjoyed several of these Crispin Guest novels and enjoy the setting during Richard II's reign. Crispin is a disgraced knight who has earned a reputation as an investigator and finder of lost objects. He has become known as the Tracker.A beautiful and mysterious woman sets this mystery in motion. She approaches Crispin, asking for his aid in finding her niece. Things are not what they seem, however, and when a monk falls into his door with Crispin's old rival Simon Wynchecombe's dagger in his back and a blood relic in his hand, events take a perilous direction.Crispin has a skeptical approach to relics, but this one seems unlike the usual fakes. Religious institutions were often competitive about relics because relics were a source of pilgrims and income, but blood relics containing the blood of Christ were particularly desirable.Crispin's attempts to return the relic are thwarted because the relic keeps returning to him. Read in September; review scheduled for Dec. 21.Goodreads/Severn HouseHistorical Mystery. Jan. 1, 2017. Print length: 224 pages.
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  • Laura Ruetz
    January 1, 1970
    I eagerly await each new book in this series and this newest book did not disappoint. I love a good mystery, and I love a good flawed anti-hero. Crispin is a disgraced knight, turned tracker. He finds things, people, and information. His apprentice is a former thief named Jack. Crispin may be a disgraced knight but he certainly is the heart of these stories, and he is very good at what he does. This story, like the rest, revolves around a religious relic. In this case, a blood relic. The story i I eagerly await each new book in this series and this newest book did not disappoint. I love a good mystery, and I love a good flawed anti-hero. Crispin is a disgraced knight, turned tracker. He finds things, people, and information. His apprentice is a former thief named Jack. Crispin may be a disgraced knight but he certainly is the heart of these stories, and he is very good at what he does. This story, like the rest, revolves around a religious relic. In this case, a blood relic. The story is always well written and paced. There is plenty of action and the characters all merge well. One of the things I love about the author's writing is how well she brings them alive on the page. Rather than rely on too much dialogue, she mixes dialogue with actions, and little things like how they interact with each other, and their actions, tell us as much about them as what they say. The characters continue to evolve and grow, and not just Crispin and Jack. Each books brings more growth, which keeps the characters from feeling too familiar and static, and we see a little more of some of the other characters, like the lawyer and John (who I absolutely love in the books). These are mysteries that are engaging, fun and full of action.
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    Another fun read in the Crispin Guest series. I have been following this series from the beginning -- this is the 10th book. The books are not long -- this one ran 200 pages and I read it over a couple of days. Its the type of book that commands the readers attention - at least this one. It was fun to see some of the secondary characters from the prior books brought into the story. I did find the plot a little too predictable -- a few more suprises would have been a plus.The series combines myst Another fun read in the Crispin Guest series. I have been following this series from the beginning -- this is the 10th book. The books are not long -- this one ran 200 pages and I read it over a couple of days. Its the type of book that commands the readers attention - at least this one. It was fun to see some of the secondary characters from the prior books brought into the story. I did find the plot a little too predictable -- a few more suprises would have been a plus.The series combines mystery/detective genre with historical fiction in a most enjoyable fashion. If that is your cup of tea you will not be disappointed.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    I had not read the first 9 books in this series but I don't think that hampered my enjoyment a bit of this medieval mystery starring (no other word) Crispin Guest. How fun that a knight has turned detective in 1390 London and that he's trained a young man Jack Tucker to follow in his footsteps (no pun intended!). Lovely well rounded characters, a villain, a missing woman, a relic, and atmospheric details made this a very good read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. I suspect there's a fan club of I had not read the first 9 books in this series but I don't think that hampered my enjoyment a bit of this medieval mystery starring (no other word) Crispin Guest. How fun that a knight has turned detective in 1390 London and that he's trained a young man Jack Tucker to follow in his footsteps (no pun intended!). Lovely well rounded characters, a villain, a missing woman, a relic, and atmospheric details made this a very good read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. I suspect there's a fan club of the medieval mystery genre and if so, this should definitely on your list. If you haven't delved into this area, try Crispin for lively entertainment.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    1390 London and Crispon Guest is followed home by an unknown female who wishes to employ himto find her niece. Their meeting is disturbed by a monk with a dagger in his back. Holy relics, monks, ex-sheriffs abound but its Guest who must find the guilty parties.An enjoyable mystery, which I liked but did not love. Not too sure I cared much for some of the characters but I might go back to the start of the series. This can certainly be read as a standalone novel.A NetGalley Book
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  • Ana Brazil
    January 1, 1970
    Crispin is just as noble, clever, and wary of relics as ever! Crispin, Jack, and assorted love interests and religious fellows take readers on an emotional and entertaining ride through London and the countryside. Loved every minute of this story and thoroughly enjoyed the historical afterword.
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  • Tessa in Mid-Michigan
    January 1, 1970
    Better than usual, even! Enjoyed this one, shows growth and change of characters. Be aware that there is some sex in this one, as well as one of the characters being a gay male prostitute and transvestite. He has been in other books, but he has a slightly larger part in this book.
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  • Diane Peters
    January 1, 1970
    The best of an excellent series.
  • Puzzle Doctor
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyable historical mystery, but felt that something was lacking from not reading the earlier books. Full review at classicmystery.wordpress.com
  • William
    January 1, 1970
    I found that the first half of the book dragged, but then it picked up to a stronger finish. I'd give the first half two stars and the second half four stars.
  • Kristen McQuinn
    January 1, 1970
    Pending HNS review posting.
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