The World of Lore
A fascinating, beautifully illustrated guide to the monsters that are part of our collective psyche, from the host of the hit podcast Lore, soon to be an online streaming series.They live in shadows--deep in the forest, late in the night, in the dark recesses of our minds. They're spoken of in stories and superstitions, relics of an unenlightened age, old wives' tales, passed down through generations. Yet no matter how wary and jaded we have become, as individuals or as a society, a part of us remains vulnerable to them: werewolves and wendigos, poltergeists and vampires, angry elves and vengeful spirits.In this beautifully illustrated volume, the host of the hit podcast Lore serves as a guide on a fascinating journey through the history of these terrifying creatures, exploring not only the legends but what they tell us about ourselves. Aaron Mahnke invites us to the desolate Pine Barrens of New Jersey, where the notorious winged, red-eyed Jersey Devil dwells. He delves into harrowing accounts of cannibalism--some officially documented, others the stuff of speculation . . . perhaps. He visits the dimly lit rooms where seances take place, the European villages where gremlins make mischief, even Key West, Florida, home of a haunted doll named Robert.In a world of "emotional vampires" and "zombie malls," the monsters of folklore have become both a part of our language and a part of our collective psyche. Whether these beasts and bogeymen are real or just a reflection of our primal fears, we know, on some level, that not every mystery has been explained and that the unknown still holds the power to strike fear deep in our hearts and souls. As Aaron Mahnke reminds us, sometimes the truth is even scarier than the lore.Praise for the Lore podcast"Truth can often be much scarier than fiction--something Mahnke proves as he dives deep into the world of folklore and the darker side of history in a quest to root out the fragment of truth at the bottom of our fears." --Entertainment Weekly "Unlike so much horror that needs over-the-top viscera to scare you, this podcast leans on history--folklore, myth, the stuff people once thought was true--to tell its tales." --The Atlantic "Narrated by Mahnke in a style that evokes spooky campfire stories, Lore is a history lesson like no other."--Esquire

The World of Lore Details

TitleThe World of Lore
Author
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherDel Rey Books
ISBN-139781524797966
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Horror, History, Fantasy, Mythology, Paranormal, Folklore

The World of Lore Review

  • Amalia Gavea
    January 1, 1970
    ‘’The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.’’ H.P. Lovecraft Starting this book, I had the belief that nothing new was in store for me. That it would possibly prove to be a satisfying read on the Paranormal field but with little new to offer. Well, I was wrong. It was very well-written with some exciting changes from the norms that made it all the more interesting.The title ‘’Monstrous Creatures’’ is a bit misleading. ‘’The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.’’ H.P. Lovecraft Starting this book, I had the belief that nothing new was in store for me. That it would possibly prove to be a satisfying read on the Paranormal field but with little new to offer. Well, I was wrong. It was very well-written with some exciting changes from the norms that made it all the more interesting.The title ‘’Monstrous Creatures’’ is a bit misleading. I suppose the word ‘’monstrous’’ is loosely used to signify something unnatural, threatening and evil. Something that we cannot understand, something that repels us. In this volume, we find a well-balanced array of traditions from all over the world, folklore from the five continents, although the emphasis is on the Anglo-Saxon world since the written testimonies are heavily broader and properly documented. Vampires, werewolves, the living dead, mysterious creatures of the sea, anthropomorphic being lurking in dark woods, dark entities responsible for dark deeds. There are spirits, superstitions and beliefs that go back ages and ages ago and yet, they are very much alive in our time.There are two things that I found refreshing and worthy of praise, in my opinion. For starters, the narration is very vivid, very interesting, thoughtful and sincere. The writer comes across as a level-headed person, witty and respectful of the subject. He doesn’t downgrade it, he doesn’t turn it into a smartarse satire. He walks the thin line between the believer and the sceptic comfortably and I found myself in absolute agreement with his views. What makes this book special, in my opinion, is the fact that it links beliefs and traditions of the past with extremely recent unexplained occurrences. We’re talking about phenomena that were reported in the 60s, the 70s, all the way to our decade. The fact that stories whose roots can be found in the past still seem to concern us certainly gives food for thought. I admit that many of the stories- and quite a few were unknown to me- were eerie and chilling. The experience was enhanced by the simple yet effective black-and-white illustrations and I cannot help but give extra points to Aaron Mahnke for the Hannibal (TV series) reference. Nothing beats Mads and his culinary skills. Or any other of his skills and yes, this was totally inappropriate…So, it takes a lot to impress a reader who has read extensively on the Paranormal subject, but this book managed to do it. I consider myself leaning more towards the believer’s side with a significant dose of doubt (because who knows for sure, right….?) and many of the questions Mahnke poses had me thinking. This is a book that sceptics and believers will enjoy since the writer doesn’t provide answers. He simply states the facts. Speaking for myself, I was a bit influenced and each night I read it (because I obviously such things in the late hours...), I double-checked to make sure the cross I keep on my bedside table was there. It doesn’t hurt to be cautious….My reviews can also be found on https://theopinionatedreaderblog.word...
    more
  • HFK
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars.The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures was an accidental find while surfing around Amazon. I had no previous knowledge of there being a podcast by Aaron Mahnke that tackles through creatures, infamous and lore. This is probably a good thing as it seems the people who do listen the show claim this to be merely a recap of the show's material, which makes me assume this book is written for n00bies and hardcore fans rather than to someone who desires new information to deepen whatever the 3.5 stars.The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures was an accidental find while surfing around Amazon. I had no previous knowledge of there being a podcast by Aaron Mahnke that tackles through creatures, infamous and lore. This is probably a good thing as it seems the people who do listen the show claim this to be merely a recap of the show's material, which makes me assume this book is written for n00bies and hardcore fans rather than to someone who desires new information to deepen whatever the show itself offers.Mahnke's style is to casually walk a reader through history of legends and myths, beliefs and sightings of mystical and mysterious. His tone being neutral while writing of the many incidents and beliefs makes The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures read like a fascinating look at historical events with a shortish introduction of the past and today - how these myths are very similar regardless of the culture or the country, and how popular culture affects how these legends are seen in modern times. History is often so much more interesting and weird than any fiction written. That is what makes life so wonderful in all its tiny nuances. The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures is not an in depth look at all things and beyond, but chooses to focus its short chapters to multiple readers of differing tastes - from vampires to elves. There is a lot of information in a small space, yet it never feels like you are info-dumped to death. Mahnke has what it takes to keep an attention - never too serious nor over-the-top humorous, which balances the handling of a subject that can sometimes be controversial in certain hoods.There is specific words that get an repetitive treatment, but it does not downgrade the experience much at all, but Mahnke most likely works best in a podcast form. If you like them, go with it. If not, go with the book - I do not think you will need both of them unless a die hard fan.If you are looking for an introduction, The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures is a good choice for it. You can choose your favorites and look more literature of the things you find most appealing to you. If you already are a professional in the genre of lore, you might not find much new to ponder.As much as I have gotten fed up with vampire fiction - I do hope to find good vampire stories from the past, though- the lore of vampire has always been my favorite. So gory, so weirdo, so SMFH - so much fun. Our history is rich with blood.
    more
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.A perfect book for Halloween.The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures is a guide to the weird and wonderful bits of folklore and legend that roam our earth surrounding mysterious creatures. Each chapter presents a specific type of 'creature' for examination, before providing a number of local legends that relate to that creature with beautifully illustrated prints throughout.The author does a good job at 'setting the scene' with these I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.A perfect book for Halloween.The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures is a guide to the weird and wonderful bits of folklore and legend that roam our earth surrounding mysterious creatures. Each chapter presents a specific type of 'creature' for examination, before providing a number of local legends that relate to that creature with beautifully illustrated prints throughout.The author does a good job at 'setting the scene' with these creatures. Each chapter is well defined, and categorised well, which makes the writing easy to follow and very engaging. This is certainly one of those books you can pick up and put down with ease, and the author also does a really good job at creating a decent atmosphere. Reading this late at night, I was certainly creeped out by certain chapters (the dolls and ghost in particular).As with most books of this nature, I found some chapters more interesting than others. I was less interested in the 'flying animal' stories than I was with the dolls, ghosts and vampires. I also would have at least liked a mention of Whitby when discussing Dracula and Bram Stoker. I felt at times the writing was definitely geared more towards an American audience in this sense.That said, I thought this was a very thorough introduction into the world of folklore, and it's certainly piqued an interest in this area for future reading material at this time of year.
    more
  • Logan
    January 1, 1970
    As a long time fan of the Lore podcast, this book was a huge let down. It houses maybe 10 illustrations and almost every story in it is a direct transcript of a podcast episode. If someone hasn’t listened to the Lore podcasts, then maybe this could be a great gift. Aside from that, $20 to read something you can listen to for free? No thanks.
    more
  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I am a hug fan of podcasts (heck I even have a book shelf called "Also A Podcast"). They make my work commutes so much more pleasant and there are so many high quality ones to choose from. We are sort of in a new golden age of radio, just radio on demand that you can carry in your pocket. One that I quite enjoy is called Lore by Aaron Mahnke. It explores neat little nooks and crannies of folklore, stories that illuminate greater truths about human nature. Mahnke has a lovely voice and is able to I am a hug fan of podcasts (heck I even have a book shelf called "Also A Podcast"). They make my work commutes so much more pleasant and there are so many high quality ones to choose from. We are sort of in a new golden age of radio, just radio on demand that you can carry in your pocket. One that I quite enjoy is called Lore by Aaron Mahnke. It explores neat little nooks and crannies of folklore, stories that illuminate greater truths about human nature. Mahnke has a lovely voice and is able to weave a compelling narrative around various themes. Themes like the seemingly eternal human fear of the Other or Death that have manifested in multifold ways across just about every human culture. Also, there is apparently a huge tradition of people blaming small magical creatures when things go wrong. Weird, huh? So when I heard he was also coming out with a book I was very excited.But...when reading this I felt like it was just reading a transcript of the podcast. Most of the stories seemed to be taken straight from the podcast (even with Mahnke's dulcet voice echoing in my mind as I read it). I suppose that shouldn't be surprising given the finite amount of folklore out there and the fact he already has more than 75 episodes of a podcast devoted to folklore, but it still felt very repetitive and was not very value added to a steady podcast listener like myself. I was disappointed and I would guess that if you also listen to the podcast you would be as well.Don't get me wrong, this was a still a really well done book and very illustrative of the universal human condition. I would say if you are interested in learning about human folklore and culture either read his books or listen to the podcast, both on their own are well worth your time and attention.
    more
  • Dannii Elle
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating 3.5 stars.This non-fiction divulges the hidden secrets from the supernatural underbelly of our world. Testimonies from both ancient and modern-day, real-world sightings are used as a basis to explore each of the creatures featured in this anthology. The likelihood of their existence is then probed at, using links from literature, science, and religious and spiritual beliefs to prove or disprove the claims. The author provides no definite answer but rather suggests reasons for and a Actual rating 3.5 stars.This non-fiction divulges the hidden secrets from the supernatural underbelly of our world. Testimonies from both ancient and modern-day, real-world sightings are used as a basis to explore each of the creatures featured in this anthology. The likelihood of their existence is then probed at, using links from literature, science, and religious and spiritual beliefs to prove or disprove the claims. The author provides no definite answer but rather suggests reasons for and against the existence of such creatures. He also does not makes his personal beliefs on the discoveries explicitly known. Whilst this didn't hamper my enjoyment I would have appreciated a more personal anecdote to end each of the sections. The writing style, however, was something that could definitely be categorised as personal. The author, Aaron Mahnke, is the host of a hit podcast show that formed the basis of this anthology. I can see how the interior of this book would lend itself well to this spoken format, as much of the writing was of a fantastical and atmospheric vibe and conversational in tone.Whilst this all combined to make this an entertaining read I found I could remember little of what was detailed, once I had completed my reading of it. It was a fun and, on times, creepy read but one that, for some reason, did not allow me to retain any of the factual information. I can remember my enjoyment of the book, however, if not explicit details of the interior. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the author, Aaron Mahnke, and the publisher, Del Ray for this opportunity.
    more
  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    One of the most popular scary story podcast transforms into the written word. Some of my most favorite tales of the unexplained are profiled. Stories of monsters, ghosts, and even a few possessed dolls are featured. I CANNOT wait to read the sequel!
  • [Name Redacted]
    January 1, 1970
    Yes, it is pretty much just transcriptions of the podcast, now arranged topically.Yes, it does include beautiful illustrations.Yes, it is worth buying, but mainly if it's been a while since you listened to an episode of the podcast the transcription of which is featured herein.
    more
  • Lucy Banks
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.A comprehensive guide to some of the world's most intriguing 'monsters'.Firstly, I should state that I'm a massive fan of Lore podcast, and as such, was familiar with nearly all the tales set out in this book. Prospective buyers should be aware that the stories within the book are taken, pretty much word for word, from the podcast. However, I think it's far fairer to judge the book on the presumption that readers wil I received a copy of this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.A comprehensive guide to some of the world's most intriguing 'monsters'.Firstly, I should state that I'm a massive fan of Lore podcast, and as such, was familiar with nearly all the tales set out in this book. Prospective buyers should be aware that the stories within the book are taken, pretty much word for word, from the podcast. However, I think it's far fairer to judge the book on the presumption that readers will not be familiar with the podcast, and that thus, the material will all be fresh! On that note, let's continue...The book covers all manner of strange and monstrous creatures; with fascinating 'real life' stories of supernatural events. It's all accessible, written in the same chatty, down-to-earth tone as the podcast itself; though considerably less frightening (mainly because the music on the podcast is so freaking eerie!). A great book for those who like to read spooky, 'real life' tales, but who don't want to be too badly frightened late at night. However, if you've listened to the podcast, this might not be the book for you, unless you listened to it all ages ago, and want to remind yourself of how good it is!
    more
  • Arnis
    January 1, 1970
    https://poseidons99.wordpress.com/201...
  • TheYALibrarian
    January 1, 1970
    Rating 2.5 StarsI personally have been a lover of all things supernatural for as long as I can remember. While other kids made pictures and cute stories about unicorns and rainbows, I made stories on ghosts and vampires. My parents were horrified but eh they got over it, especially once they realized that love would never go away and as an adult it still has not.But I digress, a lot of my rating has to do with my own personal taste. When I pick up a book on all things creepy I want it to not be Rating 2.5 StarsI personally have been a lover of all things supernatural for as long as I can remember. While other kids made pictures and cute stories about unicorns and rainbows, I made stories on ghosts and vampires. My parents were horrified but eh they got over it, especially once they realized that love would never go away and as an adult it still has not.But I digress, a lot of my rating has to do with my own personal taste. When I pick up a book on all things creepy I want it to not be just full of stories of Bigfoot, Moth Man, Jersey Devil, etc. I'm more interested in the things you can't see, which is what people call ghosts but I like the word spirits it sounds less cliche. Why? Well I have had many terrifying paranormal experiences that has made me have no doubt whatsoever of the possibility of us wandering the earth after death. So, this book was a let down since there was only bits here and there that related to poltergeists, spirits, demonic presence, etc. Most of them I had already heard of as well so it made for another let down but I tried not to get too critical on that part since I have watched every TV show that has to do with the paranormal. I'm bound to know all the well known stories like Robert the Doll. I also watched the first season of Lore as well and those short episodes were also included in this book. I haven't listened to any of the podcasts of Lore but I'm glad I didn't or I probably would have just dropped this audio and moved onto something else since it seems like this book is just a repeat of the podcast episodes.What also knocked off stars was Aaron Mahnke's narration. I like when narrators of audio express emotions and inflect their voices. But Mahnke's just stayed monotone and flat. I don't know if his voice is like that in his podcasts but it really turned me off and had me zoning out several times.But, I still had to give some stars since Mahnke obviously has done a lot of research on the supernatural. He added more details to stories and accounts that I had heard of before but did not know much detail about it. So it added some times of enjoyable listening as my fascination with everything spirit and monster came out to play. I would only recommend this book to reader's who have not listened to his podcasts. I would also recommend reading it in book form since it apparently has illustrations and I think that adds a interesting element and made me regret listening to it on audio. It also probably made it more organized when you can see the breaks in chapters and so on so it doesn't sounds like Mahnke is bouncing all over the place from topic to topic. There is also the fact of terrible narration that I already mentioned so it really is up to the reader. I will pick up the sequel that will be on serial killers and all freaky stuff like that but I will keep in mind to read it in book form next time.
    more
  • Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 22%Basically, this book is for diehard fans or those who can't access the podcast. I tried watching the show and didn't like it. I've tried the book and it was just the scripts for episodes in a book. I was hoping for more than that. I was hoping for added details and information. Not just a repeat of things I had already heard.This would make for a great coffee table book since it catches the eye and is super quick to read. But, just didn't work for me. I'd rather listen to the podcast.
    more
  • Claire (bookscoffeeandrepeat)
    January 1, 1970
    I can't believe I won a copy. *tears of joy*Well, considering the fact that I listen to Lore while I'm in the car, might as well have a copy on my shelf.
  • Amelia's Fantastical Bookends
    January 1, 1970
    I love and have always loved folklore. I especially love folklore when it's told this type of manner: the folk story, the history behind the lore, the science behind why human nature makes us believe certain lore, and again more of the legends themselves.The only issue I had with this book was the way it was written, because it's very obvious that the language in here was originally used for the podcast itself, and a lot of the time what sounds good when we listen to a story vs when we read a st I love and have always loved folklore. I especially love folklore when it's told this type of manner: the folk story, the history behind the lore, the science behind why human nature makes us believe certain lore, and again more of the legends themselves.The only issue I had with this book was the way it was written, because it's very obvious that the language in here was originally used for the podcast itself, and a lot of the time what sounds good when we listen to a story vs when we read a story aren't the same thing. I've never listened to the podcast either, but many of the sentences were just overall kind of cheesy & sounded really weird when reading it. I bet if I listened to the tales, though, it would have sounded much better.But anyways, what a fantastic book full of mystery and intruige and what goes on behind the veil. There were different chapters based on different types of folktales, such as vampires, werewolves, ghosts, curses, haunted houses, haunted shipwrecks, haunted dolls, zombies, The Jersey Devil, goblins, elves.... really, any kind of folk story with a monster/creature that you can imagine, this book has them all.I would sit for hours reading each individual tale, entranced by the mystery of it all. I love how there's stories where you can tell that the cause of the folktale is simply humans not understanding their world, (i.e., vampires,) but there are others that make you question whether or not our world really has more to offer than what meets the eye, (i.e., many of the haunted house tales and woodland monsters.) I'm a firm believer in the supernatural anyways, and I think that there is more going on in this planet than what we can explain away with science. Who am I to say that spirits don't exist? Especially in circumstances that ended in tragedy, where a spirit might be restless if their life ended horribly. This book has numerous tales of such happenings, and each one was entrancing in its own unique way. I've always loved stories of urban legends and folk stories, and this book has re-captured my love for those things once again. The artwork in this book is also to DIE for (hahaha, puns,) each one invoking a spooky atmosphere. I also feel like I learned a lot from this book, and the folk tales span all over the world with different eras of time and cultures. It would go from the ancient Egyptians to the Middle East in the B.C. period to medieval Ireland to present day America. I love being able to see & feel & learn about the legends of so many different peoples. This book was scary & enthralling in all the right ways, and I hope that Aaron Mahnke continues to write more books of folklore because he certainly knows how to craft a wonderful tale.
    more
  • Melora
    January 1, 1970
    A fun late-October book combining stories of uncanny events and encounters with breezy explorations of the folklore related to the various sorts of ghosts, beasties, and peculiar practices covered in each section. Prior to reading this, I was not aware of the “Lore” podcast (potential readers may want to note that some reviewers comment that the stories here are very similar to those presented in episodes of the podcast), and that originally oral presentation is very evident in the book, which i A fun late-October book combining stories of uncanny events and encounters with breezy explorations of the folklore related to the various sorts of ghosts, beasties, and peculiar practices covered in each section. Prior to reading this, I was not aware of the “Lore” podcast (potential readers may want to note that some reviewers comment that the stories here are very similar to those presented in episodes of the podcast), and that originally oral presentation is very evident in the book, which is distinctly casual and conversational in style. The author maintains an attitude of friendly skepticism about the supernatural creatures featured in his tales – sea monsters, evil dolls, vampires, mothmen, etc. – but always with a wink and in the cheerful spirit of “Well, we can see that there is probably a perfectly rational explanation for this, but wouldn't it be delicious fun if it really were true that...” The book is not heavily illustrated, but the full page black and white drawings (I think there are ten of these) are marvelous, and the bibliography is also really nice.
    more
  • Trisha
    January 1, 1970
    "life is one long journey down a road, and we walk until it’s over. Some think they see light at the end of it all, while others hope for darkness. And that’s where the mystery of it all comes in. No one knows what’s on the other side; we just know that the proverbial walk ends at some point.” This was a wonderful but dense book about creatures (especially for being so short!) Some of the stories were about the possible origins of some of our greatest horror stories like Dracula. Others were acc "life is one long journey down a road, and we walk until it’s over. Some think they see light at the end of it all, while others hope for darkness. And that’s where the mystery of it all comes in. No one knows what’s on the other side; we just know that the proverbial walk ends at some point.” This was a wonderful but dense book about creatures (especially for being so short!) Some of the stories were about the possible origins of some of our greatest horror stories like Dracula. Others were accounts of things seen in the night (like the white thing with the big head?) or possible origins of urban legends. All in all the stories were fascinating and frightening. I'd heard some of the podcasts so it was great to actually get to read the stories I'd already heard - I definitely think I got more out of them by reading than by listening - but that's not to say the podcast isn't great - It IS great! I just think I tend to absorb more when I read it. I liked that the stories were broken into sections and each section tended to tell the story of a certain type of creature or event. I loved the drawings and added creativity of each section and the visuals in-between. Whether you've already heard all the podcasts or never even heard of them, I'd recommend both the Podcast AND the book. There's only a little overlap and the add visuals in the book really add to the experience of the Podcast.
    more
  • T. Blake
    January 1, 1970
    As previously stated, these are transcripts of selected episodes from the podcast with added art. The first episode (also the first chapter of the book) states there are transcripts available on its website. I haven't looked into it as I was listening to said episode while skimming through the book. The only benefit I can see of owning this book is if you wanted to get it autographed or are Deaf/HoH and prefer reading it via physical copy.
    more
  • Darnell
    January 1, 1970
    I actually enjoyed parts of this book, but it has a huge mark against it. Skeptical of how credulous the author was being, I looked up one of the stories and discovered that the incident came only from one extremely dubious, tabloid-level source. Thus I needed to laboriously check everything that had been written to be sure I wasn't misinforming myself.Though there are good pieces of the book, nonfiction where you have to constantly check if the author is repeating nonsense isn't acceptable to m I actually enjoyed parts of this book, but it has a huge mark against it. Skeptical of how credulous the author was being, I looked up one of the stories and discovered that the incident came only from one extremely dubious, tabloid-level source. Thus I needed to laboriously check everything that had been written to be sure I wasn't misinforming myself.Though there are good pieces of the book, nonfiction where you have to constantly check if the author is repeating nonsense isn't acceptable to me. Maybe the book is okay if you just want to hear some spooky stories, but if you want to actually learn about those stories (much less study actual cultural lore), this isn't the book.Also, the historicity has been much exaggerated. Large portions are basically just repetition of urban legends.
    more
  • Scott Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    I am giving this 4 stars based on the quality of the writing and how much I have enjoyed the podcasts, but 3 stars for this book. Overall I was not super thrilled that upon receiving this at midnight, the book seemed to just be a majority of copy/pasted material from the episodes. Much of the advertisements during pre-release seemed to give the impression that there would be new material and that the author was working really hard on it. So I was hoping for something to be added to the growing w I am giving this 4 stars based on the quality of the writing and how much I have enjoyed the podcasts, but 3 stars for this book. Overall I was not super thrilled that upon receiving this at midnight, the book seemed to just be a majority of copy/pasted material from the episodes. Much of the advertisements during pre-release seemed to give the impression that there would be new material and that the author was working really hard on it. So I was hoping for something to be added to the growing world of Lore, but I found this lacking.I have great respect for the author and his creative work, but I felt this book was advertised misleadingly.Listen to the podcast or check it out from the library
    more
  • Angie Rhodes
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book, beautiful illustrations to go with the legends and myths. it is one of those books, that you pick up to read "one chapter" and carry on, loosing yourself in the woods, with the creatures that live there, your coffee going cold at the side of you..
    more
  • Jesaca
    January 1, 1970
    Aside from the intriguing topic, the style of writing was extremely engaging. I could not put it down, and I learned so much. Will be eagerly awaiting the next book in the series. This book is for anyone with even a remote interest in the unexplained and the origins of myths and legends.
    more
  • Amy Caudill
    January 1, 1970
    In his Amazon Prime series, Aaron Mahnke offers an overview of the “lore” from numerous cultures created by our ancestors in an attempt to explain the unknown workings of the world around them. For example; how did a deadly disease contribute to a belief in the existence of vampires? What geological features as said to be the home of fairies? Now the writer, producer, and narrator of the series Lore has released an anthology titled The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures, which includes some of t In his Amazon Prime series, Aaron Mahnke offers an overview of the “lore” from numerous cultures created by our ancestors in an attempt to explain the unknown workings of the world around them. For example; how did a deadly disease contribute to a belief in the existence of vampires? What geological features as said to be the home of fairies? Now the writer, producer, and narrator of the series Lore has released an anthology titled The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures, which includes some of the most interesting encounters from the popular show as well as a wealth of additional stories and background information about the evolution of the myths, folklore, and campfire tales of “things that go bump in the night.” The author uses historical accounts and descriptions of known “sites” of supernatural and unexplained phenomena to describe how a lack of scientific knowledge and fear of the unknown culminated in a belief in numerous supernatural creatures and phenomena. Then he shares examples of the tales of happenings in a “story-telling” manner consistent with the scripts of the television series.I found the scholarly portion of the book to be very informative but a little dry, despite attempts by Mahnke to inject humor and current events into his explanations of the supernatural. By comparison, his accounts of the “events” read like very engaging short stories of horror and the paranormal. After reading a large portion of the book, I decided I needed to watch some of the episodes of the show for comparison purposes. I found that the podcast featured some of the same stories in the book, heavily dramatized and enacted, but seemed to focus more on one particular example instead of the multiples given in the manuscript. While both were interesting, the dramatization of the show drew me in much more quickly than the volume, if only because the length of the episode was longer than each encounter narrated in the book.Still, I found the book interesting enough to give it four stars and would recommend it to anyone who wants not only to get a chill out of a story of the paranormal, but also an understanding of why the story could make the reader feel fear in the first place.
    more
  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so interesting and entertaining and sometimes concerning. Basically each chapter is a short exploration into reports made about a possibly supernatural entity, written similarly to a campfire story, but without overdramatising things and whilst acknowledging other possible explanations and areas where evidence is lacking. I really enjoyed reading this book. It was shocking to me the amount of evidence surrounding some of these cases, and even though I don't necessarily believe that This book was so interesting and entertaining and sometimes concerning. Basically each chapter is a short exploration into reports made about a possibly supernatural entity, written similarly to a campfire story, but without overdramatising things and whilst acknowledging other possible explanations and areas where evidence is lacking. I really enjoyed reading this book. It was shocking to me the amount of evidence surrounding some of these cases, and even though I don't necessarily believe that there was a ghost or a goblin or whatever, I think I'm a bit more openminded now having read this book. Flaws mainly centre around the areas where the material struggled to translate from a podcast format (the book is made by the creator of the Lore podcast and many of the chapters are based of podcast episodes), such as when I felt like I was reading a script more than a book. The first few chapters were a little rough at times but it really picked after that and each chapter felt unique and fascinating and well crafted.
    more
  • Chinook
    January 1, 1970
    This was super fun to listen to - makes sense since it started as a podcast - hence the four stars. I probably won’t retain much of it because it throws so much information at you and if you want to retain it I’d think maybe listening to the podcast more slowly than all of it back to back as an audiobook. I saw that it had illustrations so I also got the ebook - I liked the style of them quite a bit but there aren’t so many that you need to seek them out if you listen to the audiobook.
    more
  • Krystal
    January 1, 1970
    Good but it reads exactly like the podcast. Which isn’t the worst because AM has a unique narrative style. it tends to feel repetitive towards the middle, leaving me guessing whether or not I already heard this same story on the podcast.
  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    Recommended to be read by candlelight with tea and blanket to prevent shivers but, be warned, the book is as exciting and haunting as the podcast. Read it if you dare.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    An overall enjoyable book; although, it was a bit confusing as it started with general folklore like vampires and zombies, and then shifted to very specific examples of unexplained, possibly-supernatural phenomena. Also, the author’s occasional personal interjections bordered on the cheesy and distracting most times. However, the general writing style was entertaining.
    more
  • Abby
    January 1, 1970
    I will give this a five star review even though I was actually kind of disappointed. This is a well written and very interesting book that I would recommend to anyone who is interested in folklore and historic tales involving superstitions and mythical creatures. Aaron Mahnke is definitely a good author, and his stories were absolutely fascinating. HOWEVER! If you have already listened to the podcast then you have pretty much already read the book. It's basically the transcribed podcast episodes I will give this a five star review even though I was actually kind of disappointed. This is a well written and very interesting book that I would recommend to anyone who is interested in folklore and historic tales involving superstitions and mythical creatures. Aaron Mahnke is definitely a good author, and his stories were absolutely fascinating. HOWEVER! If you have already listened to the podcast then you have pretty much already read the book. It's basically the transcribed podcast episodes with a few extra short tales thrown in. That is why I was disappointed, because I had already listened to all of the podcast episodes so I had already heard all of this before.Basically do one or the other. Either read the book, or listen to the podcast. Doing both feels very repetitive.
    more
  • twinkle
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect for Halloween! Highly interesting.
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    A fun variety of creepiness, and I loved the zingers at the end of the chapters.
Write a review