A Little Hatred (The Age of Madness, #1)
From New York Times bestselling author Joe Abercrombie comes the first book in a new blockbuster fantasy trilogy where the age of the machine dawns, but the age of magic refuses to die.The chimneys of industry rise over Adua and the world seethes with new opportunities. But old scores run deep as ever.On the blood-soaked borders of Angland, Leo dan Brock struggles to win fame on the battlefield, and defeat the marauding armies of Stour Nightfall. He hopes for help from the crown. But King Jezal's son, the feckless Prince Orso, is a man who specializes in disappointments.Savine dan Glokta - socialite, investor, and daughter of the most feared man in the Union - plans to claw her way to the top of the slag-heap of society by any means necessary. But the slums boil over with a rage that all the money in the world cannot control.The age of the machine dawns, but the age of magic refuses to die. With the help of the mad hillwoman Isern-i-Phail, Rikke struggles to control the blessing, or the curse, of the Long Eye. Glimpsing the future is one thing, but with the guiding hand of the First of the Magi still pulling the strings, changing it will be quite another...For more from Joe Abercrombie, check out:The First Law TrilogyThe Blade ItselfBefore They Are HangedLast Argument of KingsBest Served ColdThe HeroesRed CountryThe Shattered Sea TrilogyHalf a KingHalf a WorldHalf a War

A Little Hatred (The Age of Madness, #1) Details

TitleA Little Hatred (The Age of Madness, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 17th, 2019
PublisherOrbit
ISBN-139780316187169
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fiction

A Little Hatred (The Age of Madness, #1) Review

  • Robin Hobb
    January 1, 1970
    First, the usual caveats. I received an advance copy of this book, free, from the publishers. And I consider Joe Abercrombie a friend. I do not think that affects my review of this book.Joe Abercrombie continues to do what he does best. He sets up a very large chess board, with multiple pieces. Often several pieces are in motion at the same time, and as always, the pieces are all the same color. It is truly up to the reader to decide which faction they will cheer for, as the characters continue First, the usual caveats. I received an advance copy of this book, free, from the publishers. And I consider Joe Abercrombie a friend. I do not think that affects my review of this book.Joe Abercrombie continues to do what he does best. He sets up a very large chess board, with multiple pieces. Often several pieces are in motion at the same time, and as always, the pieces are all the same color. It is truly up to the reader to decide which faction they will cheer for, as the characters continue to defy the 'good' or 'bad' labels. This is a tale of brute force and subtle magic set in a world on the cusp of an industrial revolution. Buckle your seat belts for this one.A few things I will tell you up front. If you've never read any of Abercrombie's books, you can still jump right into his world with this one. There is just enough back story for each setting to make it real; never a mind-numbing re-chewing of events from a previous book. There are numerous characters. Some get a chance to reveal their point of view. Others keep their thoughts to themselves and let us judge for ourselves what they are pondering. Now, if you have read Joe's other books set in this world, you are in for a richer experience as familiar names, rivalries, hatreds and alliances are renewed, evolve and dissolve in this volume. The characters are memorable. Even with a large cast, I never had to fumble back to recall who was who, and what was going on. A Little Hatred is not a gentle book. Characters are shown at their best and their worst, and the full spectrum of what some are capable of can be appalling. This is a vivid and jolting tale. The fantasy elements of the book are subtle, the magic scarce and yet utterly essential to the plot.
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  • Petrik
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisher—Gollancz—in exchange for an honest review.Grim, dark, fun, and glorious; A Little Hatred is irrefutably worth the wait. Let me begin by saying that although this is a new series in the First Law World and you can technically start your journey into this world here, it’s quite mandatory to read at least The First Law trilogy in order to fully appreciate the intricacies of this book; even better if you’ve also read Best Served Cold and The Heroes. Reading A Little Hat ARC provided by the publisher—Gollancz—in exchange for an honest review.Grim, dark, fun, and glorious; A Little Hatred is irrefutably worth the wait. Let me begin by saying that although this is a new series in the First Law World and you can technically start your journey into this world here, it’s quite mandatory to read at least The First Law trilogy in order to fully appreciate the intricacies of this book; even better if you’ve also read Best Served Cold and The Heroes. Reading A Little Hatred without knowledge of the previous books would be a similar experience to reading Pierce Brown’s Iron Gold without reading his previous three books or reading Robin Hobb’s Tawny Man trilogy without reading Farseer trilogy first. Do yourself a favor and make sure you read The First Law trilogy first before you start A Little Hatred, I even binge reread the entire trilogy to make sure that I can start this book with refreshed information. Make some time for it, not only it’s a brilliant trilogy, but you’ll also be doing a huge disservice to the book and most of all your reading experience if you don’t do it. On to the actual review now. “Nothing like being wanted, is there? Wanted by someone you want. Always seems like magic, that something can feel so good but cost nothing.” Red Country was first published on October 2012; it’s been seven years since Abercrombie released a novel within his First Law World series. A Little Hatred is the first book in The Age of Madness trilogy by Joe Abercrombie; chronologically this is the eight—seventh if you exclude Sharp Ends anthology—installment in his First Law World series. Honestly, A Little Hatred and Dark Age by Pierce Brown—which I’ll read after I post this review—are two of my most anticipated books of the year; to say that I’m excited about reading these books are a huge understatement. It gladdens me wholeheartedly to say that A Little Hatred successfully exceeded my high expectations, to say the least. The story in A Little Hatred takes place roughly 30 years after the end of Last Argument of Kings, that’s 15 years after the end of Red Country. Many years have passed and with it, the world has entered a new age: the industrial revolution, it’s a time of innovations, progress, technologies, and commerce. Despite the arrival of a new age, fans of the series have nothing to be scared of, everything that’s familiar and awesome about First Law World was evidently easy to find in this book. Times have changed, but money, politics, power, and bloody war remained as the central driving themes of the story; told in his trademarked gritty, at times humorous, and dark storytelling style, Abercrombie once again tells a compelling story that shows how good or bad are most of the times decided merely by different perspectives and which side you stand on. “Believe it or not, we all want what’s best. The root o’ the world’s ills is that no one can agree on what it is.” Abercrombie is pretty well known for his well-realized and memorable characters, there’s no shortage of them in the series so far: Logen Ninefingers, Sand dan Glokta, Jezal dan Luthar, Bayaz, Collem West, Nicomo Cosca, Caul Shivers, Dogman, Black Dow, The Feared, Bremer dan Gorst, and Monza Murcatto to name a few. In A Little Hatred, we follow the perspectives of a new cast of memorable characters. One way or another, almost all of the perspective characters were related to characters that have appeared before in the series. Familiar faces and names do appear quite a lot; there are so much depth and complexity in the background of the characters and world-building that’s impossible to appreciate if you jump into this immediately. For example, even after three decades have passed in the world, the legend of the Bloody-Nine’s glory still triumphed in the North; many warriors admire his deeds and try their best to follow his footsteps. Also, without entering spoiler territory, for those of you who’ve read the first trilogy, you should know by now who the main despicable villain of this series is. He’s back again, and rest assured he brings havoc, treachery, and maximum manipulations with his arrival. “Now all a man’s worth is how much work can be squeezed from him. We’re husks to be scraped out and tossed away. We’re cogs in the big machine.” The new cast of characters was fantastic to read. In A Little Hatred, we mostly follow the perspectives of seven characters: Rikke, Leo, Savine, Orso, Vic, Broad, and Clover. Every single POV was imbued with a distinctive voice that captivated me. I honestly have a hard time deciding which new perspective I loved most within this book. Almost halfway through the book, I became addicted to reading every storyline, and I think I have to settle with saying that I love reading every new perspective equally. Each character’s internal struggles, different motivations, and their characterizations were extremely well-written; seeing how their paths connect with one another was truly delightful. "She had long ago learned that at least half of everything is presentation. Seem a victim, soon become one. Seem in charge, people fall over themselves to obey." Superbly written and incredibly vivid battle scenes are one of Abercrombie’s strongest strength as an author, and A Little Hatred doesn’t disappoint. The two big action sequences in A Little Hatred were simply jaw-dropping. Abercrombie used the same storytelling style he implemented previously in one or two chapters in Last Argument of Kings and The Heroes to create a chain of events with a seamless perspective’s transition that portrayed mayhem, destruction, and madness towards every participant in a conflict. The poor tend to pay the biggest price of war, and this was showed magnificently. Say one thing for Abercrombie, say he writes some of the best duel scenes in fantasy. The monstrous rage, the noise of clashing steels, the crushing impacts, and the bloody deathblows delivered; everything about the pulse-pounding duel featured in A Little Hatred reached a super palpable quality that made my reading experience totally engaging and immersive. “Why folk insisted on singing about great warriors all the time, Rikke couldn’t have said. Why not sing about really good fishermen, or bakers, or roofers, or some other folk who actually left the world a better place, rather than heaping up corpses and setting fire to things? Was that behavior to encourage?” I can vouch with temerity that Abercrombie has crafted another amazing book; expect great things from him and he shall deliver. Fans of grimdark fantasy and The First Law trilogy will have an utterly terrific time reading this must-read book, I’m sure of it. Abercrombie has created a ground-breaking impact with The First Law trilogy; a lot of modern grimdark fantasy series have been inspired by it. Based on the experience from the reading the first book of this trilogy alone, I don’t think it’s a stretch to claim that The Age of Madness will strengthen that notion. Fueled by furious action sequences, profound passages, compelling narratives, and characters that get under your skin; A Little Hatred is a bloody brilliant and breathtaking book. This absolutely stunning return to Abercrombie’s beloved First Law World once again established himself as the reigning lord of grimdark fantasy. A new age for grimdark is here, and it is called The Age of Madness. Read it.Official release date: 17th September 2019You can pre-order the book from: Amazon UK | Amazon US | Book Depository (Free shipping)The quotes in this review were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.You can find this and the rest of my reviews at Novel Notions
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    ***SPOILER FREE REVIEW***‘War? It’s a fight so big almost no one comes out of it well’First of all, this is not fantasy as we know it. In fact, this is barely fantasy at all. Undoubtedly epic, with more than a hint of magic, this is a high fantasy world with a low fantasy feel. It's a sign of the times- even the big hitters are pursing influence though finance and banking instead of sorcery… The First Law world is, for all intents and purposes, our world. As a result, the book reads a bit more l ***SPOILER FREE REVIEW***‘War? It’s a fight so big almost no one comes out of it well’First of all, this is not fantasy as we know it. In fact, this is barely fantasy at all. Undoubtedly epic, with more than a hint of magic, this is a high fantasy world with a low fantasy feel. It's a sign of the times- even the big hitters are pursing influence though finance and banking instead of sorcery… The First Law world is, for all intents and purposes, our world. As a result, the book reads a bit more like historical fiction. A lot more like history. If nothing else, the author must have done some serious research into the Industrial and French revolutions to so evocatively and effectively depict this kind of terror, these sorts of turbulent times. It’s nothing less than a deconstruction of humanity. And because of that, it’s the very best kind of story telling. This is history in action, bloody and indifferent. It’s a clear eyed look at who people really are and what they really do, in wealth or poverty, in revolution, in war. Revealed here are the dangers of idealised Progress, especially when it’s really just about Profit, and action for and by the People, especially when it’s just about Power. Look around, fellow readers, at the world we live in now; this isn’t just a book about the past. Fear not though, if this all sounds a bit serious, this is pure Abercrombie. Plots within plots, brutal violence, death and destruction, surprises, and a gold thread of humour to balance the grim.The author isn’t the only one who has been looking at the past for inspiration, the narrative is steeped in the supposed glory days of what came before. The events detailed in the First Law Trilogy form more than just the backdrop for this book, they inform the actions and attitudes of all the players. Perhaps you could begin your reading journey here but I highly recommend you don’t. Not only are there characters from past books playing significant roles (no, I’m not telling who), many of the issues in play come directly from the other books in the series. Or at least, the memory of them or their legend. Everyone’s favourite psychopath, Logen Ninefingers, figures heavily in the hero worship of this new age of young warriors, exerting the kind of influence that changes the course of the future. If this is a book about what the past has to teach us, it’s clear to me that many of the characters have learned all the wrong lessons.And what characters they are. Since there’s only limited information in the blurb, I’m not going to spoil any surprises, but at least one of the new introductions is heading towards my favourites list already. Maybe even two. Every flaw, every bit of self-delusion, every failed attempt at virtue is on show, the good in people repeatedly shoved aside by circumstance or self-interest. It’s the kind of real that has you chuckling darkly to yourself in recognition. And if you’re not? Well, perhaps you should take another look… It’s not all gritty inhumanity. Mostly, but not all. Even Abercrombie leaves some room for hope. Except now I’m remembering the overarching pattern of the first trilogy and wondering whether he’s playing on my innate optimism? I wouldn’t put it past him. Anyway, this book is exceptional. Indisputably, spectacularly, criminally good. Clever, funny, and packed with cutting commentary, it’s well worth the wait.ARC via publisher
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  • Nicholas Eames
    January 1, 1970
    Yep, this was as awesome as I'd hoped it would be. Witty, bloody, and fun. Phenomenal characters abound, and it sets the stage for even grander things to come.
  • Holly (Holly Hearts Books)
    January 1, 1970
    “Wars may be won by the clever, but battles have to be fought by the brave.”I’m confident in saying this is Joe Abercrombie’s best work.
  • Myke Cole
    January 1, 1970
    A Little Hatred would be a remarkable book in ANY genre. Fantasy fans are beyond fortunate that Joe chose this one.Abercrombie returns to the world of The First Law without missing a beat, displaying the same incredible empathy, evocative prose, and intensely relatable characters, all navigating one of the most intricate and well-constructed plot mazes I’ve ever had the pleasure to navigate.Seriously. This book is so good, it makes me want to give up writing. That is the highest compliment I can A Little Hatred would be a remarkable book in ANY genre. Fantasy fans are beyond fortunate that Joe chose this one.Abercrombie returns to the world of The First Law without missing a beat, displaying the same incredible empathy, evocative prose, and intensely relatable characters, all navigating one of the most intricate and well-constructed plot mazes I’ve ever had the pleasure to navigate.Seriously. This book is so good, it makes me want to give up writing. That is the highest compliment I can pay a work, and I reserve it for writers operating at the level of a James Clavell. Joe has earned his place among the masters who transcend genre, and I sincerely hope the wider literary community honors him in the same manner as it has fantasy novelists like Tolkien, Lewis, or Martin.
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  • Ed McDonald
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes you get sent a book written by one of the people whose work you do your best not to rip off. I was sent an advanced reader copy by Gollancz. Here’s what I thought.Zero spoilers.For an author, the problem with reading the books of another author whom you kind of grew up on, is that (a) you’re really worried about whether their work will stand up, like when you try and watch The Princess Bride with someone who has never seen it before and really hope they’ll like it, and (b) if you’re wr Sometimes you get sent a book written by one of the people whose work you do your best not to rip off. I was sent an advanced reader copy by Gollancz. Here’s what I thought.Zero spoilers.For an author, the problem with reading the books of another author whom you kind of grew up on, is that (a) you’re really worried about whether their work will stand up, like when you try and watch The Princess Bride with someone who has never seen it before and really hope they’ll like it, and (b) if you’re writing anything of your own at the time, you have to be really careful that your characters don’t mysteriously start sounding like Abercrombie’s. As a writer one can’t help but absorb what you’re taking in. You have to be realistic about these things.The strength of Abercrombie’s writing has always been in the depth and realisation of the characters. Those who’ve followed The First Law since its beginnings will be well aware that every key view point character is immediately recognisable. This is a really deep part of the storytelling, but when you think back on these memorable players, you know what they look like physically, how they would react to any given stimuli, even how they talk. These characters live and breathe on the page. Sometimes it’s hard to imagine that they aren’t actually memoirs.A Little Hatred serves up quite a lot of new characters, and every character in this book stands out as clearly as a blade in the neck. Abercrombie pulls his familiar trick, of showing us the characters in their proto-form – which one could be mistaken for thinking of as one dimensional – before slowly fleshing them out. The denial, the self-loathing, the lack of self awareness, all those awful, negative, and frighteningly real feelings we all have in our moments of self-doubt come creeping in and twist your understanding of who these people are, and what they do. What’s particularly surprising is the way that you can start off enjoying the characters, while rather hoping that they get what they deserve, to really feeling for them – even a character as corrupted and morally bankrupt as Savine.I don’t want to spoil the reveals of the familiar faces as they pop up through the book, but it’s a credit to this novel that while we get to say “Hi” to some of the old favourites, they are not running the show. A Little Hatred is a book about a new generation and they get to show their own lives, their own troubles, and yes of course all that good stuff sending people to the mud, torture, bad sex and what not.There is a lot of shagging in this one, and since I’m pretty much sure you’ve read Abercrombie before, you’re likely also familiar with bad morning breath, trousers getting tangled up and so on. I like a good dose of romance in my reading, but I’m not exactly sure that this is dates and flowers. But then, what does one expect?I particularly also enjoy how we’re constantly reminded and informed by all of the jaded, world-weary characters about how stabbing people in the back is the best option, and how violence never solves anything, and that nothing was ever achieved with a sword blah blah and we readers nod along feeling all smug because yeah, tell it like it is man! And then we get into the Circle and we’re baying for blood just like every Northerner and secretly hoping that someone’s going to earn their Name.One of the curiosities about this novel however is that this is the kind of novel that you can only write when you’re already a megastar in the fantasy literature world. There’s not really an actual single plot running through the narrative. We see a lot of characters, and they all have their adventures, and while towards the end of the book they get tied together, when I turned the last page I still wasn’t entirely sure what the book is about. The stability of the Union, maybe? Although we’re never really asked to care about it. It’s more like a waltz through the First Law world, taking in a little here, a little there, and watching glorious characters make a huge mess of everything.Of course, I’m pretty sure that there’s a current of narrative that runs beneath it all, especially as Abercrombie has finished all three installments before releasing the first. It’s testament to the depth and strength of the characters in this story that I’m already pretty keen to get my hands on the next one, even if I couldn’t actually tell you what the story is actually about. And maybe that’s kind of the point. Life rarely has squared off endings. Maybe not all stories need them too.There are some really interesting themes running through A Little Hatred. I was at times reminded of the Levellers and other reformation groups in the 17th century (not the indie folk band). Questions about division of wealth remain suitably muddy throughout. Perhaps one of my highlights was when Rikke picks up what is essentially a copy of The Daily Mail, or the reflection of Brexiteer attitudes from the mouth of one of the principal cast. There’s some interesting feelings for the reader as they see some of the rich made poor, some of the poor made rich, and how we feel about it in each case.Overall, A Little Hatred shows Abercrombie at his blood-and-dirt best. Characters that come to life on the page, bloody showdowns in the Circle, backstabbing, intrigue, loving and hating and dying all rolled into one infinitely digestible package. You will love to hate and then hate to love these people, characters who are once flawed and perfect. With A Little Hatred, Abercrombie proves that he’s still the one to beat.
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  • Nick T. Borrelli
    January 1, 1970
    10/10For those who hold Joe Abercrombie's First Law trilogy in the utmost esteem like I do, you will be very pleased to know that this book is the start of a new series set in that same world. In fact, some of the main characters in A LITTLE HATRED are the children or other family members of characters from First Law. The setting is also a very familiar one, with the action taking place some years after the turbulent events of the first series. All of this makes for a wonderful transition and ex 10/10For those who hold Joe Abercrombie's First Law trilogy in the utmost esteem like I do, you will be very pleased to know that this book is the start of a new series set in that same world. In fact, some of the main characters in A LITTLE HATRED are the children or other family members of characters from First Law. The setting is also a very familiar one, with the action taking place some years after the turbulent events of the first series. All of this makes for a wonderful transition and extension of that particular story arc while giving us something very new to chew on.Welcome back to Angland, where much has changed in the past 30 or so years, and yet in some cases much has not changed. The Union still struggles to maintain stability in a land where marauders and enemy armies continually nip at its heels and test its tenuous rule. There's also quite a bit of back-biting and double-dealing from within which doesn't help matters. This is a land where power speaks and the best way to gain power is by eliminating your enemies (possibly using underhanded methods if necessary). As with the previous series, there are threats to The Union from outside its borders, the only thing different is the leaders who have now taken up the mantle. The population is growing increasingly bitter and discontented as refugees fleeing from other lands flood into Union territory seeking a reprieve from the corruption and brutality of their own feckless rulers.Ultimately the refugee infusion causes an untenable situation as extreme resentment creeps in and very disparate cultures are forced into a situation where they are competing for the already limited resources provided by an uncaring government only concerned with its own greed and power. The Union faces potential invasion as a growing army masses to the north and is preparing for war. Can The Union prevail when forces from both outside and inside its ranks are slowly eating away at it like a parasite? Or will the past few decades of relative peace result in it being too soft and ill-prepared for the onslaught that may be about to be unleashed from the north?A LITTLE HATRED has all of the violence, brutality, world-building and witty humor that we have come to expect from the Lord of Grimdark himself, Joe Abercrombie. I'm avoiding spoilers here for those who haven't read the First Law trilogy, but if you haven't read those yet, what is wrong with you? What I will say is that for those who may have been afraid that Abercrombie was getting a little soft after releasing a YA series a few years ago, rest assured that the master is back and better than ever!What I found especially gratifying in this book is the way that we were allowed to be connected again to some very familiar characters through their children. For instance there's Savine dan Glokta, daughter of my favorite character in any Fantasy series, hated torturer and inquisitor Sand dan Glokta. Savine has all of the guile and wit of her father but with a tenacity and cunning of her own that makes her a very worthy adversary to those who would cross her. Then there's Rikke, daughter of the battle-tested friend of Logen Ninefingers, Dogman. Rikke has the ability to see the future through a gift called The Long Eye. What she sees in her latest visions are truly horrifying indeed, and could have implications beyond imagining.These characters plus a multitude of others really make up the strength of this phenomenal story. Abercrombie has always been my favorite author when it comes to writing incredible dialogue, and A LITTLE HATRED shows him in top form once again where that is concerned. I mean the guy can flat-out write brilliant dialogue and his characters are always fleshed out to an amazing degree. I'm so glad that I was able to revisit this world again and get immersed in such a wonderful book that doesn't rehash any old ground, but rather expands on the past history to give us an entirely new and engaging story to enjoy. A LITTLE HATRED is a can't miss book filled with violence, treachery, suspense, humor, adventure, and that special storytelling knack that can only come from one of the best writers in the genre. If you want an amazing read that won't disappoint, pick this one up and read it cover to cover. The more I read Joe Abercrombie's books, the higher he moves up in the pantheon of the best of the best in Fantasy. Well done Lord Grimdark! If this first book is any indication of what is to come, then I eagerly anticipate the next installment with much enthusiasm indeed. Just a quick note, if you are wondering whether you can jump right into this book without reading his First Law trilogy I would say yes and no. Yes it is a totally self-contained story and you can absolutely read this book and enjoy it on its own merits. However, if you truly want to get the best reading experience from A LITTLE HATRED, I highly recommend reading the First Law trilogy. It will give you a much deeper understanding of events and circumstances while also providing valuable insight into the characters.
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  • Fares
    January 1, 1970
    Savine dan Glokta?!!!!!!!Wait, what? Is that? YES! WOW. Okay. Yeah... Wow!This is something.
  • Liviu
    January 1, 1970
    One of my highly expected novels of 2019, The First Law: The Next Generation Volume 1, aka A Little Hatred, was even better than expected; clearly a first volume so the big picture is still unclear, but lots of things happen and there is a great ending that makes it a complete volume independent of sequels, though of course much is promised.There are 6 main characters, all children of the original first law books (most of the original characters still are around at least to start with). The 3 le One of my highly expected novels of 2019, The First Law: The Next Generation Volume 1, aka A Little Hatred, was even better than expected; clearly a first volume so the big picture is still unclear, but lots of things happen and there is a great ending that makes it a complete volume independent of sequels, though of course much is promised.There are 6 main characters, all children of the original first law books (most of the original characters still are around at least to start with). The 3 leaders to be, the lion, Leo dan Brock, whose mother Finree is currently the acting governor of Angland, the wolf, Stour Nightfall, son of Black Calder and nephew and heir of Scale Ironhand king of the North, who has decided that time has come to take back the protectorate still led by an old weary Dogman, and the lamb, prince Orso, son and heir of Jezal the first (Jezal having a few great cameos) who has an unmatched reputation for laziness, cowardice, uselessness and immorality. On the girl side, we have the tough Rikke, daughter of the Dogman, epileptic but with visions that may turn out to be quite true and important, the even tougher Vick (dan Teufel), daughter of the iron mine camps and revolutionary to be and of course ruthless Savine, financier, businesswoman, socialite, founder of the new scientific Solar society, patroness of science, technology and inventions (only for profit of course) and daughter of the most feared man in the Union, inquisition chief Arch Lector Glotka. They all have memorable parts to play, wars to fight, revolutions to foment or escape, and no less dangerous balls and feasts at the courts of the North and of the Union to attend. With a superb cast including Yoru Sulfur, Bayaz, Calder, Finree dan Brock, Jezal and Terez, various other new (most notably Zuri, Savine's Gurkish personal "secretary", former Sergeant Gunnar Broad), and old characters from the First Law original books (Superior Pike, Wonderful and many, many others), the novel is even darker and more cynical than the first series, the body count keeps rising and overall it is Abercrombie at his best; top fantasy of the year to date
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  • Peter McLean
    January 1, 1970
    Welcome back to The Union, some twenty years later. Welcome to the industrial revolution, to a new world of belching smokestacks and Dickensian deprivation, of child labour and urchin chimney sweeps, cotton lung and the workhouse. Welcome to the dark Satanic mills of progress. I've always been impressed by Abercrombie's ability to switch from laugh-out-loud hilarity to utter horror and back again in the space of a few pages, but in this book it's stronger than ever. Never knowing which you're go Welcome back to The Union, some twenty years later. Welcome to the industrial revolution, to a new world of belching smokestacks and Dickensian deprivation, of child labour and urchin chimney sweeps, cotton lung and the workhouse. Welcome to the dark Satanic mills of progress. I've always been impressed by Abercrombie's ability to switch from laugh-out-loud hilarity to utter horror and back again in the space of a few pages, but in this book it's stronger than ever. Never knowing which you're going to get next makes for an emotional rollercoaster ride that I can only liken to channel-flipping between Blackadder III and something by the Marquis de Sade.For me, Abercrombie's real strength has always been in his characters, and again here he doesn't disappoint. Twenty and more years have passed since the last books, and although old friends like Glokta and the Dogman make an appearance we're more focused on their sons and daughters now, on Rikke the Dogman's daughter, on Crown Prince Orso and Leo dan Brock and Savine dan Glokta.Savine is a special favourite of mine, a socialite and investor with a cutting tongue to defeat the strongest steel, but her father Sand dan Glokta still holds the reins of power in his withered claws. Neither of them are the sort of people to be deterred by a little hatred, but behind the scenes the strings are still very much being pulled by the Magi. This is a splendid opening salvo in the new trilogy, and I'm eagerly looking forward to the next one.
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  • david y biblioflick
    January 1, 1970
    What we know so far. . . and that's [still] not the cover btw, hoping we see it soon - perhaps on the next update.Cover Copy:The chimneys of industry rise over Adua and the world seethes with new opportunities. But old scores run deep as ever.On the blood-soaked borders of Angland, Leo dan Brock struggles to win fame on the battlefield, and defeat the marauding armies of Stour Nightfall. He hopes for help from the crown. But King Jezal’s son, the feckless Prince Orso, is a man who specialises in What we know so far. . . and that's [still] not the cover btw, hoping we see it soon - perhaps on the next update.Cover Copy:The chimneys of industry rise over Adua and the world seethes with new opportunities. But old scores run deep as ever.On the blood-soaked borders of Angland, Leo dan Brock struggles to win fame on the battlefield, and defeat the marauding armies of Stour Nightfall. He hopes for help from the crown. But King Jezal’s son, the feckless Prince Orso, is a man who specialises in disappointments.Savine dan Glokta – socialite, investor, and daughter of the most feared man in the Union – plans to claw her way to the top of the slag-heap of society by any means necessary. But the slums boil over with a rage that all the money in the world cannot control.The age of the machine dawns, but the age of magic refuses to die. With the help of the mad hillwoman Isern-i-Phail, Rikke struggles to control the blessing, or the curse, of the Long Eye. Glimpsing the future is one thing, but with the guiding hand of the First of the Magi still pulling the strings, changing it will be quite another. . .Publication Date: 19 September 2019 (UK and possibly US)The first book in the new trilogy, set in the First Law World.(Second book: The Trouble with Peace, Third book: The Beautiful Machine)7 POVs - 4 males, 3 females, split into 3 parts (maybe)Takes place (mostly) in the Union and the North and 30 years (or so) after the first trilogy - industrial phasePolitics, war, danger, hangings, BLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOD!!!
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  • Hiu Gregg
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come. Oh fuck yes is there a review to come.
  • Adrian Collins
    January 1, 1970
    The North is invading under a new vicious leader. The Union is under threat both on its northern border and from within, as the Breakers try to destroy the progress large scale machine manufacturing is bringing. Refugees from the lands beyond the Union’s borders stream in looking for a better life and cities swell with people. Mayhem is building–diminishing jobs for diminishing pay; an invasion of cultures clashing with the locals; an unhappy populace frothing under an inept, uncaring, and bruta The North is invading under a new vicious leader. The Union is under threat both on its northern border and from within, as the Breakers try to destroy the progress large scale machine manufacturing is bringing. Refugees from the lands beyond the Union’s borders stream in looking for a better life and cities swell with people. Mayhem is building–diminishing jobs for diminishing pay; an invasion of cultures clashing with the locals; an unhappy populace frothing under an inept, uncaring, and brutal leadership; mountains of money to be made by the few and privileged; a protectorate begging for help–and in the gritty guts of it all are a new generation of characters grown a little soft in the last couple decades of peace and about to get a very rough awakening in Joe Abercrombie’s A Little Hatred.As we’ve come to expect from Abercrombie, the story of this next age in the Union’s development (or destruction?) in A Little Hatred is magnificently driven by its characters. Drawn from all walks of life in the Union and beyond, this new generation are brilliantly written, deeply engaging, and as individually unique as their predecessors. Rikke is the Dogman’s daughter, dealing with either impending madness or The Long Eye and guided by mountainwoman Isern-i-Phail. Leo dan Brock, the Young Lion, is in the thick of it, revelling in glorious combat one moment and then having strips torn off him by his mother for putting himself and the battle at risk the next. Savine dan Glotka is a ruthless business woman in the midst of building her own empire using her father’s infamous name as a baton. Crown Prince Orso is next in line for the throne, and he’s cut from much the same vain and generally useless cloth as his father. Gunnar is back from the loss in Styria, back home to his wife and daughter—only he didn’t leave the war behind. It stayed in his fists and his head, and he’s straining to hold it at bay. Vick comes from the brutal work camps and is a new member of the worker’s movement railing against the losing of jobs to the progress machines are bringing to manufacturing. Clover is cut from the old cloth of the North, and really just wants to sit on his arse under a tree, but bends to the whims of more vicious men. These characters drive the plot through a rollercoaster of twists, fights, laughs, cringes, and epic moments as the Union tries to save itself from the North, as well as from itself.Now, if you’re new to Abercrombie’s world and you haven’t read one of the seven previous novels he’s released, fear not. This books stands on its own two feet as a reading experience. However, if you are like me and you have loved every moment with all the characters since The Blade Itself was published in 2006, A Little Hatred has an extra layer of goodness to it–like that surprise layer of dulce de leche you find in a cake when you cut it open.One of the things Abercrombie does so well is create these characters that just stick with you. He drops a well known name (or surname) here and there and all I want to do is grab somebody near me by the shoulders and share just how fucking wide-eyed-awesome it is that these characters are still in the mix, still trying to save the Union or destroy it, or just bloody retire in peace. With this new generation of characters at the fore, and the old characters in the background as secondary and tertiary characters, there is just so much reward for your years of investment in Abercrombie’s work. Within the Circle of the World, Abercrombie has created one of the most magnificent, unforgettable casts of characters to ever grace the pages of a fantasy book.Grimdark crowd, this book is your jam. We’ve been waiting for this, and Abercrombie has delivered one helluva ride. Get you pre-order in below, you’re not going to want to miss this one. And by that last chapter at the end, you just know book 2 in this new trilogy is going an absolute barnstormer.Orignally posted on Grimdark Magazine.
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so excited to have this ARC. I wanted to read some Joe Abercrombie finally (haven't read any of his books yet) but now I'm concerned because I see people saying you have to have read all his other books to read this one?
  • Lynn Williams
    January 1, 1970
    5 of 5 starshttps://lynns-books.com/2019/08/29/a-...What can I say about A Little Hatred – read it. Goodbye.Okay, I suppose that isn’t really a review is it?This is a series that is very appropriately named – The Age of Madness. Here is a world on the brink of industrial revolution with all the resultant chaos that comes in it’s wake. Still a time of myth and magic but a time when people are turning instead to science and industry and relying less and less on mages. Tumultuous times, bloody time 5 of 5 starshttps://lynns-books.com/2019/08/29/a-...What can I say about A Little Hatred – read it. Goodbye.Okay, I suppose that isn’t really a review is it?This is a series that is very appropriately named – The Age of Madness. Here is a world on the brink of industrial revolution with all the resultant chaos that comes in it’s wake. Still a time of myth and magic but a time when people are turning instead to science and industry and relying less and less on mages. Tumultuous times, bloody times and times that reflect the course of history in many respects. This was a bloody good read that I thoroughly enjoyed. The writing is just so easy. Easy to digest, easy on the eye, easy to keep reading into the early hours. It’s got great characters, it’s amusing, it’s grimy and sweaty and brutal and it’s exactly what I hoped for and then some.To be clear, I haven’t read The First Law Trilogy – I know, you can break out the pitchforks about now (there is a story behind it which involves me owning the set at least three times but I’m not going to go into that here) – the point I’m getting at is that I have no idea how this compares (and perhaps that is a good thing) and also I have no way of knowing whether or not the characters I may mention are old friends – so beware that this review may unwittingly contain spoilers.The heroes of yesterday still remain strong for some who long for derring do and songs written about their exploits, the Lion and the Wolf stand on opposing sides. The North is once again trying its strength against the Union, determined to rule the whole of the North. At the same time as the battles break out unrest is also on the rise in the capital. The poor and downtrodden have had their fill of poverty, dirt and starvation, maybe they want a little cake, they’re about to revolt and it’s going to get messy. In fact this book shows us more of the down and dirty fighting in the capital rather than focusing on the battlefield, although there is one particular fight scene – which I won’t elaborate on – other than to say it’s so well written that I was practically holding my breath for the entire thing – and it was just spectacular, the tension, the fear, the blood, the sweat and the absolutely convincing exhaustion. That’s what I want when I’m reading a fight scene – is that wrong?Funnily enough, this is a difficult story to pin down a plot, and in fact kudos to the great writing in that respect because I was so swept up with the characters and the trials they were facing that I didn’t really think about the bigger picture until I sat down to write this review. There is no shortage of action here plus great pace, witty dialogue and a wonderful balancing act that takes you through the depths of death and drudgery but then lifts you back out with some amazing human interactions and laugh out loud banter. It really is an emotional roller coaster. I think on the whole this is going to be just one piece of a much bigger picture and I confess that at the moment I’m a bit clueless as to what that will be – but it certainly makes me anxious and excited to keep on reading.For me, the characters are the real winners here. There are no shortage of people for you to get behind and I’m sure everyone will have their own particular favourites. Savine dan Glokta – a ruthless business woman. It takes four people to simply get her ready to face the day each morning – she has a ‘face maid’ no less. What can I say – she’s a brilliant character and I loved her and couldn’t get enough of her page time. She’s one tough cookie but she has a soft inner just waiting to be exposed and her vulnerability and fear help to make her that much more relatable. Leo dan Brock and Stour Nightfall – two young men with an apparent deathwish who can’t wait to meet on the battlefield. Rikke – daughter of the Dogman. Rikke has the long eye, the gift (or curse) of foreseeing the future – of course, the real trick is being able to decipher the clues in a meaningful way. Look, there are a lot of characters here and to be frank I never had a dull moment with any of them but I’m trying to be careful because surely the majority of these are the next generation and if I go too much into detail about how they interact readers who are already familiar with this world might just figure out some of the teasers. Although, I simply have to give a shout out to Prince Orso. Brilliantly foppish and droll – he could be straight out of the Scarlet Pimpernell and he certainly made me smile.A Little Hatred is probably one of the most highly anticipated fantasy books of 2019 and whether you’re already acquainted with this world of not there’s a good reason for that. Strong writing, characters that jump off the page, great pace and an ending that leaves you wanting more. What more can I say. Well, I opened with – read it. You could have stopped right there and taken my advice I suppose. I hope I’ve convinced you. If you love fantasy, grimdark, history, battles, death, twists and turns then do yourself a favour and pick this up soon and be part of the conversation. If you’re already familiar with the world then you’ll have the advantage of reading some familiar characters, if you’re like me, and new to the world, you can rest assured that this is a great starting point to jump on board.I received a copy through Netgalley, courtesy of the publisher, for which my thanks. The above is my own opinion.Rating 5 of 5 stars
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  • Spencer
    January 1, 1970
    A Little Hatred exceeded all my expectations and I loved every moment of this perfectly crafted return to the First Law series. The story is set 30 years after the previous books and includes a (mostly) new cast of characters, it's ruthless, funny, exciting and even poignant.I have literally nothing bad to say about this book, If you're a fan of the series you'll absolutely love it. Even if you're new to Joe Abercrombie's work this book has been written in such a way that you don't need to have A Little Hatred exceeded all my expectations and I loved every moment of this perfectly crafted return to the First Law series. The story is set 30 years after the previous books and includes a (mostly) new cast of characters, it's ruthless, funny, exciting and even poignant.I have literally nothing bad to say about this book, If you're a fan of the series you'll absolutely love it. Even if you're new to Joe Abercrombie's work this book has been written in such a way that you don't need to have read the previous books... although if you have you'll get a a whole ’nother level of enjoyment out of it.A Little Hated gets my highest recommendation!Cheers to Orion Publishing Group Gollancz and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in return for an impartial review
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  • Patrick St-Denis
    January 1, 1970
    Say one thing about Joe Abercrombie, say it's been a while since he last wrote an adult fantasy novel.It's been seven years since Red Country was released and in publishing that's a mighty long time. Of course, in the meantime there has been a YA trilogy and a collection of short fiction. These were compelling enough reads in their own right, yet not as satisfying as the works that preceded them. The Shattered Sea series proved to be brutal, engaging, and entertaining, but these books showcased Say one thing about Joe Abercrombie, say it's been a while since he last wrote an adult fantasy novel.It's been seven years since Red Country was released and in publishing that's a mighty long time. Of course, in the meantime there has been a YA trilogy and a collection of short fiction. These were compelling enough reads in their own right, yet not as satisfying as the works that preceded them. The Shattered Sea series proved to be brutal, engaging, and entertaining, but these books showcased a more self-restrained Joe Abercrombie, one that pulled some of his punches and didn't go all out the way he did in his grimdark titles. And the stories featured in Sharp Ends just made you want to beg for the author's next novel-length project.That was back in 2016. Then came the author's decision to write the next trilogy in its entirety before releasing the first installment. Like most of you, I was eagerly awaiting Abercrombie's monthly progress reports. Hoping that progress was indeed being made and that the new novels were truly on their way. Then came the news that A Little Hatred was done and would be published in the fall of 2019. Then came the UK cover art, the blurb, the American cover art, and a confirmed release date. Then came the authors' blurbs and they were raving about this new book.And finally, a galley of A Little Hatred showed up in my mailbox! Other than my tax return, there is nothing more pleasing I've received in the mail this year! Went through the novel in no time. So was it worth the wait? The answer is a resounding yes! And then some!Here's the blurb:The chimneys of industry rise over Adua and the world seethes with new opportunities. But old scores run deep as ever.On the blood-soaked borders of Angland, Leo dan Brock struggles to win fame on the battlefield, and defeat the marauding armies of Stour Nightfall. He hopes for help from the crown. But King Jezal’s son, the feckless Prince Orso, is a man who specializes in disappointments.Savine dan Glokta – socialite, investor, and daughter of the most feared man in the Union – plans to claw her way to the top of the slag-heap of society by any means necessary. But the slums boil over with a rage that all the money in the world cannot control.The age of the machine dawns, but the age of magic refuses to die. With the help of the mad hillwoman Isern-i-Phail, Rikke struggles to control the blessing, or the curse, of the Long Eye. Glimpsing the future is one thing, but with the guiding hand of the First of the Magi still pulling the strings, changing it will be quite another…Should you reread the previous novels to fully enjoy this new series? Not necessarily. I did not and I thoroughly liked A Little Hatred. My memory was a bit hazy regarding certain details, but other than that it was smooth sailing throughout. However, a reread of the first trilogy, as well as Best Served Cold, The Heroes, and Red Country will definitely make you pick up on various details and catch some nuances that I probably did not get immediately. So it's up to you. There can never be too much Joe Abercrombie in your life, after all.A Little Hatred takes place nearly three decades following the end of the First Law trilogy and about fourteen years after the events recounted in Red Country. Evolution and industrialisation have changed the landscape of Midderland, especially in Adua. Neighborhoods and villages have disappeared to give way to great factories. And because you can't stop progress, peasants, skilled artisans, and farmers have lost their lands, their shops, and their homes, and must move into urban areas to look for work in dismal manufactories in order to survive in this new world. Amid the turmoil caused by this industrialisation, three disastrous military campaigns in Styria have beggared the Union and left it with a shortage of experienced troops. Which means that when Uffrith is put to the torch and its people butchered by Stour Nightfall's army, Adua cannot afford to send reinforcements, even if that means that the whole of Angland could be lost. Add to that a refugee crisis caused by the collapse of the Gurkish Empire, with masses of migrants leaving the continent to escape the chaos, as well as workers living in abject poverty demanding reasonable wages and better working conditions resorting to violence and vandalism to get their voices heard, and you realize that Arch Lector Sand dan Glokta and the rest of the Closed Council rather have their hands full in such a political backdrop. All the while, there are Bayaz and Yoru Sulfur pulling strings from behind the scenes. Both claim to want peace and stability, but with these two one never knows. . .As everything goes down the crapper, we witness events through the eyes of seven disparate protagonists. Joe Abercrombie always had a knack for creating compelling characters and A Little Hatred is no exception. Yet again, the author came up with a great bunch of flawed men and women. Savine dan Glokta is a hardcore socialite bitch and a ruthless investor. She is feared as much as she is admired, yet regardless of her business acumen and her take-no-prisoner attitude she's not smart enough to see that given her name and her father's position and reputation the game has always been rigged in her favor. But when the proverbial shit hits the fan and she realizes how much of a spoiled and powerless brat she truly is, the helplessness will make her experience blood-curdling despair for the first time in her life. And that will change her forever. Since the acorn never falls far from the tree, it's no wonder that King Jezal’s son takes after his father. Hard to believe, I know, but Prince Orso turns out to be an even worse wastrel. I mean, the heir to the throne makes Mark Lawrence's Prince Jalan look like Aragorn. And when circumstances conspire against him and he is forced to try to do the right thing for once in his life, he'll discover things seldom go according to plan. Blessed or cursed with the Long Eye, the ability to see the future, Rikke, the Dogman's daughter, is on the run, desperate to evade the army that destroyed her city and those she loved. After living for so long in the shadow of his parents, Leo dan Brock is a talented but reckless warrior. And when Union troops fail to show up to help turn the tide of the battle, his mother has no choice but to let him fight against Stour Nightfall's forces if the Protectorate is to continue to exist. Victarine dan Teufel survived the harsh life of the camps and mines in the North. She now wants to become part of the Breakers and strike a blow for the common man by destroying factories and creating social unrest. Gunnar Broad returns home from the military campaigns in Styria a broken man. After fighting a losing war on a foreign shore, he finds out that his country doesn't really want him back. Things have changed and not for the better. Forced to move in the city with his family where they hope to find work, it will dawn upon him that he may have left the war but the war remains in him. Finally, there is Jonas Clover. Getting his ass handed to him in the Circle and somehow surviving to tell the tale has given the man a new appreciation for life. Once reckoned a famous warrior in the North, these days he wants nothing more than to take it easy and watch the world go by. Alas, even though he's been avoiding fighting as much as humanly possible, when he is chosen to become one of Stour Nightfall's advisors, his life is turned upside down. And though he's now considered a good-for-nothing lazy ass, if pushed enough he can still be the merciless hard as nails man he used to be. The supporting cast is comprised of a panoply of familiar faces such as Bremer dan Gorst, King Jezal, Superior Pike, Queen Terez, Tunny and Yolk, Ardee, Black Calder, the Dogman, Isern-i-Phail, Caul Shivers, Finree dan Brock, Bayaz, Yoru Sulfur, and many more. Add to that interesting newcomers like Zuri, Savine's "secretary," Stour Nightfall, May Broad, among many others, and you have yourself a characterization that is head and shoulders above most of what you can find in the fantasy genre these days. These flawed protagonists are everything you want them to be, which bodes well for this new generation in the First Law universe.As the author mentioned in his progress reports, each new installment will be split into three parts. And though each volume tells its own story, like The Blade Itself, A Little Hatred remains a vast introduction meant to establish the political backdrop, the events, and the characters. As such, it doesn't stand as well on its own as Abercrombie's stand-alone novels. Understandably, these needed to be self-contained stories, while A Little Hatred is the first book in a new trilogy. Having said that, there is nevertheless a lot to love about it and it sets the stage for plenty of fireworks to come in its two forthcoming sequels, The Trouble With Peace, and The Beautiful Machine. Once more, the wit, cynicism, and dark humor that characterize Abercrombie's backlist are all present, and he probably cranks it up another notch. I guess Joe is getting older. Maybe even wiser? Jury's still out on that one. . .For the most part, the author keeps the plot moving at a very good clip. There are no pacing issues or dull moments between the covers. After so long a wait, like me fans will doubtless go through A Little Hatred in no time. The body count may not be as impressive as that of Abercrombie's last First Law offerings, but there is enough blood and gore to satisfy grimdark aficionados. Those hoping for a happy ending will have to look elsewhere, it goes without saying.So how does A Little Hatred stack up against its predecessors? Second only to Best Served Cold in terms of quality and originality, in this house at least. And as good as Red Country, The Heroes, and Last Argument of Kings. As mentioned, it leaves the door open for countless possibilities and the ending throws a monkey wrench into everything. Chaos, as they say, will ensue. Lots of it, if the plot of this book is any indication. Should be awesome!Darker, smarter, more ambitious, and even more cynical. That's A Little Hatred in a nutshell. Say one thing about Joe Abercrombie, say he's back. Kicking some serious ass!For more reviews, check out www.fantasyhotlist.blogpsot.com
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  • Anita Wu
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 *Abercrombie is incredible as always with A Little Hatred and it definitely sets the stage for another incredible journey into the First Law World. With old faces and new and believable (yet not difficult to follow) political to-and-fro it's a definite must for existing First Law fans; but also able to be read on its own without necessarily having read Abercrombie's other works first (bit I definitely recommend doing so!)
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  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    I've ended up reading Joe Abercrombie in a bloody funny order, having so far managed none of the original trilogy which made his name; one stand-alone novel off to one side of it; the short story collection; and now this, set a generation after the First Law books, with what had been a fairly typical mediaeval-ish fantasy-historical world in the early stages of an industrial revolution. Abercrombie being Abercrombie, the emphasis is inevitably on the pollution, child labour and enclosures, the o I've ended up reading Joe Abercrombie in a bloody funny order, having so far managed none of the original trilogy which made his name; one stand-alone novel off to one side of it; the short story collection; and now this, set a generation after the First Law books, with what had been a fairly typical mediaeval-ish fantasy-historical world in the early stages of an industrial revolution. Abercrombie being Abercrombie, the emphasis is inevitably on the pollution, child labour and enclosures, the old inequalities giving way to the new but equally unequal ones; I suppose it only makes sense, because looking at the horror of early capitalism is a better way to appreciate the horror of late capitalism than considering the bearable bit which happened in the middle, after checks and balances were created and before they were subverted. Still, it was with this industrialisation of a fantasy world the writer had established in previous books that I twigged how much Abercrombie has in common with Terry Pratchett, a quote from whom opens the second section of A Little Hatred. There's that same suspicion of grand ideals and noble pretensions, that same weary understanding of what's good and bad in people, not to mention plenty of humour. It's just that the tone of the humour is considerably blacker, the understanding of the balance tilted a little more towards the bad, and the happy resolutions harder to come by. All the same, I feel as if Vimes in particular, dropped into the Circle of the World, wouldn't take long to find his feet. Thin shoes, life being more expensive for the poor than the rich, stinking streets – those are all very Abercrombie details. The stink in particular; it's a rare novel which opens on one of the leads having recently shat themselves, and there's an ever-present awareness of discomfort, imperfection and dirt here, applied as much to the elegant, impractical costumes of the rich as the sorry rags of the poor. On this front, there's one effort which seemed particularly bold. Of late, there has been much justified mockery of male authors writing really weirdly about the experience of life in a female body – the 'she breasted, boobily' school of literature. But here, while there are a few sex scenes scattered around, there's rather more on the ordeal of period pains. It seemed broadly to accord with first-hand accounts I've heard, but I'd still be very interested to hear the verdict of a reader with direct experience on how well he's pulled it off.What stops proceedings from being merely dismal, as ever in Abercrombie's work, is the scabrous verve of his characters. The point of view is shared widely from chapter to chapter, taking in the listless heir to a throne tenuously held; his ruthless and rich, but socially not quite the thing, lover; a woman who may be a seer, or just not right in the head; a revolutionary; a farmer back from the wars, forced from his land and trying to stay out of trouble; and of course the would-be hero, too young to see his time has passed, if it ever existed at all. That last, Leo, has the most mirrors in the other storylines; there are a lot of angry young men who find it difficult listening to the hard-won wisdom of their elders, and doubly so if said elders should happen to be female. Some of them are more forgiveable than others; none of them approach that close to being conventionally likeable, at least at first, and precious few of the other characters do either. But they're all alive enough on the page that it doesn't matter, all as recognisable in their failings as their occasional moments of being impressive. The villain in one strand of the story is the loving (if vexing) father in another, and all of them, however mighty or feared they might be, are painfully aware – if they have any sense at all – that "There's nothing can't be ruined in a moment...It all hangs by a thread, all the time". As much as anything, it's a book about trying to find where the power lies, and how no matter how high you might climb, your available range of action is always far less than you might have thought. Destroying is easy, albeit only attractive to absolute pricks, or in the heat of the moment. Changing things, building them? That's a lot harder, and trying to do so without making things worse along the way is next to impossible. Needless to say, because that's how the genre works, things do get worse along the way. A lot worse. Death, destruction, all that stuff the songs make sound so beautiful and real life always renders so very ugly. But all the while, Abercrombie is working his socks off to keep the reading fun enough to get you through the horror of the contents. Having established that chapter by chapter relay of narration, he goes one further in some of the setpiece chapters, having the perspective switch from major to minor to minor to major character like some absolute show-off director's tracking shot. And it works every time, the bastard. Indeed, there was only one small incident in the whole book on which I wasn't entirely sold (a tattoo, which has been noticed very readily on prior occasions, suddenly goes conveniently unmentioned). The rest of it? Unpleasant, to be sure, but alive, and true. What more than that can one ask of fiction?(Netgalley ARC)
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  • Sean Guy
    January 1, 1970
    I was very lucky to get an advance copy of this book. All I can say is I'm thrilled to see that Lord GrimDark is living up to his title. I've been a fan of his since the beginning, and recently re-read all the books in the Third Law world to prepare myself. Well worth the time, and just as enjoyable as ever. It's safe. No spoilers ahead.A Little Hatred is an excellent book. Like most of Abercrombie's so far it introduces a number of characters, and shows us a series of events through their colli I was very lucky to get an advance copy of this book. All I can say is I'm thrilled to see that Lord GrimDark is living up to his title. I've been a fan of his since the beginning, and recently re-read all the books in the Third Law world to prepare myself. Well worth the time, and just as enjoyable as ever. It's safe. No spoilers ahead.A Little Hatred is an excellent book. Like most of Abercrombie's so far it introduces a number of characters, and shows us a series of events through their colliding and conflicting viewpoints. In this novel most of the characters have some ties - whether by blood or association - with characters from the previous novels. Half the fun is experiencing the chill down your spine when someone mentions Logan Ninefingers, or when the Dogman makes an appearance in the scene. We enter a tense world, where characters and society at large are still feeling the consequences of the original trilogy, as well as - even more sharply - the events of the following books, particularly The Heroes and Best Served Cold. Adding to the rivalry between Adua and the North is the fast acceleration of the technical world, the introduction of machinery and engine. The main action is felt on two fronts. An uprising in a small city near the Capital, and a hasty retreat in the North by what remains of the alliance made in the Heroes. The Dogman is still there, as are many other familiar faces. These stories are connected by politics, but remain mostly separate throughout the novel, told through a variety of viewpoints. The bloodthirsty, the heroic, the tragic, the noble, the common, the cowardly... as an honest writer myself it's incredible to conceive how well Abercrombie crafts each viewpoint so that the characters are completely and utterly real the moment we meet them. As the climaxes reach their unimaginable and explosive conclusions we are treated to seeing the storylines converge, victors and the defeated meeting in a variety of locations, crossing paths, philosophies, and sex lives, so that we are left with a very satisfying end while still on the edge of our seat waiting to find out what on earth Abercrombie has in store for us next.Sorry if that got a bit wordy. It's action packed, gritty, and overflowing with wildly fun characters. If you haven't read him before I highly recommend following the universe from start to finish.And then, like me, doing the whole thing again for the sheer reckless joy of it.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Bloody hell. Yes, go get this immediately. It’s ace.(More soon, but that’s the salient thrust)
  • Unseen Library
    January 1, 1970
    For this week’s edition of Waiting on Wednesday, I check out what has to be one of the most anticipated upcoming fantasy novels of 2019, A Little Hatred by Joe Abercrombie. A Little Hatred will be the first book in the new The Age of Madness trilogy, which will follow up Abercrombie’s iconic grimdark fantasy trilogy, The First Law trilogy.The First Law trilogy, released between 2006 and 2008, was an epic trilogy that has long been considered the gold standard of the grimdark fantasy genre. Featu For this week’s edition of Waiting on Wednesday, I check out what has to be one of the most anticipated upcoming fantasy novels of 2019, A Little Hatred by Joe Abercrombie. A Little Hatred will be the first book in the new The Age of Madness trilogy, which will follow up Abercrombie’s iconic grimdark fantasy trilogy, The First Law trilogy.The First Law trilogy, released between 2006 and 2008, was an epic trilogy that has long been considered the gold standard of the grimdark fantasy genre. Featuring several memorable but incredibly flawed main characters, this trilogy was an outstanding piece of fantasy fiction that featured some truly dark moments, including brutal deaths, numerous torture sequences, berserk rages and magical cannibals. Since the original trilogy’s end, Abercrombie has expanded out his fantasy universe with three standalone novels, Best Served Cold, The Heroes and Red Country, all of which were set after the events of The First Law trilogy and featured a number of characters from the original books.I only got into The First Law trilogy a few years ago, but I found myself quite enjoying this outstanding grimdark adventure and the excellent characters that Abercrombie created. The First Law trilogy is very unique, and I am quite intrigued to see how the author will continue his work. The Age of Madness trilogy will be set nearly 30 years after the events of The First Law trilogy, and will apparently follow several new characters, including the children of some of the characters from the previous books.I like the sound of some of the plot points being explored in this book. The idea of the world advancing into a more industrial age could have some interesting potential, and it will be interesting to see how this world’s devastating magic will play a part in it. I also like the sound of the characters involved in this book. While some of the characters sound new and unattached to other books in the series, several have connections to the original trilogy and some of the other books in the series. I most like the sound of Savine dan Glokta, the daughter of one of the best characters from the original series, Inquisitor Glokta, and I will love to see how someone raised by the ruthless inquisitor will handle the business world. I also like that Bayaz, the First of the Magi, is returning once again. He was a fantastic, if morally challenged, character, as well as an ace manipulator, so it will be good to see him pull the strings again in this book, and maybe he will get some just deserts in this series. It will also be interesting to see where some of the original characters from The First Law series ended up, and whether they are still alive. The original series left some storylines for these characters open and I am curious to see if they will be resolved in this new trilogy.Overall, A Little Hatred sounds like it will be an amazing start to this new storyline in Abercrombie’s dark fantasy universe, and I will be interested to see how it goes. This book currently has a release date of 17 September 2019, with the following two books in the trilogy being released in September 2020 and 2021. I am planning to review The First Law trilogy as part of my Throwback Thursday series in the next couple of weeks, and I will have to check out the three standalone books in the universe to see how the story progresses in the years between The First Law trilogy and A Little Hatred. Hopefully I will able to get through all three of them before September, and I look forward to experiencing more of this first-rate grimdark fantasy tale.For other interesting reviews, check out my blog at:https://unseenlibrary.com/
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  • Sarah (A French Girl)
    January 1, 1970
    Excited for this one. But I hope it will break from the usual Abercrombie fare of every character being an awful person for the sake of being awful and phony grimness. It was fun when I read the First Law trilogy, but I got very bored of it when I delved into the Shattered Sea. I also hope that some of the old characters would have finally grown up.
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  • Paul Allard
    January 1, 1970
    Fantasy follow-up and first of a new series - very interesting Following on from The First Law trilogy, this new series, the Age of Madness, begins with this novel, introducing several main interesting characters such as Savine, an investing capitalist and noble, and Riike, “blessed” with predicting ability. Both women get heavily involved in the struggles and conflicts of a world echoing the Industrial Revolution, the Terror of the French Revolution and Viking invasion. The plot is complicated Fantasy follow-up and first of a new series - very interesting Following on from The First Law trilogy, this new series, the Age of Madness, begins with this novel, introducing several main interesting characters such as Savine, an investing capitalist and noble, and Riike, “blessed” with predicting ability. Both women get heavily involved in the struggles and conflicts of a world echoing the Industrial Revolution, the Terror of the French Revolution and Viking invasion. The plot is complicated and full of moral issues to stimulate the reader. Characters are interesting and developed, complex and ever-changing. There’s betrayal, battle, conspiracies, combat and death to spice up the diplomatic wranglings. Certainly enjoyable and provocative and therefore recommended. I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Mike Shackle
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars doesn’t do this book justice. It’s a masterclass in writing, full of tension, hope, violence, desperation and all that good stuff. But it’s the characters that Joe excels at. And the motley crew gathered here are some of his best. Highly, highly recommended. A Great Change is coming
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    Haven’t even read it yet but I already know what I’m going to rate it
  • mylogicisfuzzy
    January 1, 1970
    Over the years, Joe Abercrombie’s books have been most enjoyable reads, pure escapism. Great world building and fantastic characters in hundreds of shades of grey, I don’t think any contemporary authors do better moral ambiguity and antiheroes. A Little Hatred – such an Abercrombie title, is set in the world of First Law, about three decades after the first trilogy. So, some familiar old characters are still around but the world itself, The Union and its capital Adua, are perhaps a little less f Over the years, Joe Abercrombie’s books have been most enjoyable reads, pure escapism. Great world building and fantastic characters in hundreds of shades of grey, I don’t think any contemporary authors do better moral ambiguity and antiheroes. A Little Hatred – such an Abercrombie title, is set in the world of First Law, about three decades after the first trilogy. So, some familiar old characters are still around but the world itself, The Union and its capital Adua, are perhaps a little less familiar. Progress has happened, in the form of industrial revolution and land enclosures. Poor folk who’d lost their grazing lands pour into fast growing cities alongside immigrants from the Gurkhish empire and the South. Many seek work in the new manufacturies for pittance and unrest is brewing. Sound familiar? I thought this set up was brilliant. Over the course of one excellent, long, cinematic chapter I found myself imagining in awe a what if Joe Abercrombie wrote a novel of the French Revolution, like Hilary Mantel’s A Place of Greater Safety, which I loved. Meanwhile, on the borders of Angland, young heir to the King of Northmen wages war on the Union. Following several unsuccessful wars with Styria, the Union’s forces are overstretched, its coffers empty and it is left to the young heir to the duchy to stop him. So, some things are still the same, Northmen are still ferocious warriors and young men will be heroes. And overall, there is greed, naked ambition, exploitation, hidden motives and twisty plots, some very intriguing new characters and very little magic so far. I’m very much looking forward to seeing how it all develops. Highly recommended but even though this is a standalone series, I would also recommend newcomers to Joe Abercrombie start with The Blade Itself. My thanks to Orion Publishing Groupl Gollancz and Netgalley for the opportunity to read A Little Hatred.
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  • deep
    January 1, 1970
    PW Starred: Abercrombie expands the First Law fantasy universe with a new epic saga of war and power set in a world where the industrial age is rising. Rikke’s Long Eye, a somewhat reliable prophet, foresees a battle in the North, but she doesn’t expect Northern warrior Stour Nightfall and his men to come looking for her. Luckily, she escapes, reuniting with her father, the Dogman; a friend, hotheaded Leo dan Brock; and Leo’s mother, Lady Governor. Together they fight for glory against superior PW Starred: Abercrombie expands the First Law fantasy universe with a new epic saga of war and power set in a world where the industrial age is rising. Rikke’s Long Eye, a somewhat reliable prophet, foresees a battle in the North, but she doesn’t expect Northern warrior Stour Nightfall and his men to come looking for her. Luckily, she escapes, reuniting with her father, the Dogman; a friend, hotheaded Leo dan Brock; and Leo’s mother, Lady Governor. Together they fight for glory against superior Northern forces. Far away, Prince Orso is hungering for a cause, and when the Northern attacks worsen, he finds it. Without the funds for an expedition, he persuades Savine dan Glokta, his lover, to invest in his army so he can support the Dogman and the others. Meanwhile, rumblings of rebellion emerge as workers suffer. Business-savvy Savine sees an opportunity in the unrest—but when she travels to the industrial city Valbeck, revolutionaries seize control of the city, destroying factories and taking hostages. Orso and his new army are ordered to Valbeck to put down the insurrection, leaving the Dogman, Leo, and Lady Governor stranded and forced to make difficult choices. This isn’t a bad starting point for new readers, but returning fans will get the most out of it, as these characters are the heirs and descendants of the previous books’ protagonists. With expert craft, Abercrombie lays the groundwork for another thrilling trilogy. Agent: Robert Kirby, United Agents (U.K.). (Sept.)
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  • Melissa Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    I recieved this arc from Hachette in exchange for an honest review.I cannot believe that I now have to wait for the next installment of this story, because wow.A Little Hatred is described as a fantasy novel, but it is so much more than that. It reads like an epic, with a touch of magic and fantasy elements. The world building is incredible. At first the sheer number of characters threw me off. I struggled to wrap my head around the who's who's, but that didn't last long. I found myself wrapped I recieved this arc from Hachette in exchange for an honest review.I cannot believe that I now have to wait for the next installment of this story, because wow.A Little Hatred is described as a fantasy novel, but it is so much more than that. It reads like an epic, with a touch of magic and fantasy elements. The world building is incredible. At first the sheer number of characters threw me off. I struggled to wrap my head around the who's who's, but that didn't last long. I found myself wrapped up into every story and struggled to put it down. Rikke, I think, is my favourite. Her story fascinates me and I need to know where it's going. She possesses the 'long eye', meaning she can see the future and I find her so fascinating. This story is set in a world just entering the industrial era. Things are changing quickly. The common people are losing jobs to machines and are beginning to group and riot for fair wages and working conditions. In the North, a war is forming threatening the Union. I cannot wait to see how this epic unfolds!
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