Ask Me About My Uterus
For any woman who has experienced illness, chronic pain, or endometriosis comes an inspiring memoir advocating for recognition of women's health issuesIn the fall of 2010, Abby Norman's strong dancer's body dropped forty pounds and gray hairs began to sprout from her temples. She was repeatedly hospitalized in excruciating pain, but the doctors insisted it was a urinary tract infection and sent her home with antibiotics. Unable to get out of bed, much less attend class, Norman dropped out of college and embarked on what would become a years-long journey to discover what was wrong with her. It wasn't until she took matters into her own hands--securing a job in a hospital and educating herself over lunchtime reading in the medical library--that she found an accurate diagnosis of endometriosis.In Ask Me About My Uterus, Norman describes what it was like to have her pain dismissed, to be told it was all in her head, only to be taken seriously when she was accompanied by a boyfriend who confirmed that her sexual performance was, indeed, compromised. Putting her own trials into a broader historical, sociocultural, and political context, Norman shows that women's bodies have long been the battleground of a never-ending war for power, control, medical knowledge, and truth. It's time to refute the belief that being a woman is a preexisting condition.

Ask Me About My Uterus Details

TitleAsk Me About My Uterus
Author
ReleaseMar 6th, 2018
PublisherNation Books
ISBN-139781568585819
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Autobiography, Memoir, Health, Science

Ask Me About My Uterus Review

  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for an advanced ebook in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Abby Norman for your courageous voice in advocating women's health. Ironically as I write this review, Nelly Furtado's version of Maneater is playing. A song that I feel my fellow Canuck turned into a powerful anthem for women. In this non fiction/memoir Abby Norman launches the microscope and takes look at women's health and the author's own personal struggle with endometriosis, Abby Norman explores just ho Thanks to NetGalley for an advanced ebook in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Abby Norman for your courageous voice in advocating women's health. Ironically as I write this review, Nelly Furtado's version of Maneater is playing. A song that I feel my fellow Canuck turned into a powerful anthem for women. In this non fiction/memoir Abby Norman launches the microscope and takes look at women's health and the author's own personal struggle with endometriosis, Abby Norman explores just how difficult it still remains to have doctors listen to the intuition women possess when it comes to their own bodies. I do take a star away because there were a few times that my mind wandered during Abby's extensive family problems that sometimes were a bit repetitive in nature. Overall, I appreciated the message and do believe that this is a must read book for March!
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    I was really looking forward to reading this, and now that I'm done with it, I can tell you my excitement was not displaced. I very much enjoyed certain aspects of it, but also experienced feelings of indifference to it.At certain times, my attention strayed. I would read several paragraphs before realizing I was not absorbing any of what I had just read. It was quite tedious and repetitive at times, but I believe, in a way, that is a small testament to how the author must have felt (and probabl I was really looking forward to reading this, and now that I'm done with it, I can tell you my excitement was not displaced. I very much enjoyed certain aspects of it, but also experienced feelings of indifference to it.At certain times, my attention strayed. I would read several paragraphs before realizing I was not absorbing any of what I had just read. It was quite tedious and repetitive at times, but I believe, in a way, that is a small testament to how the author must have felt (and probably still feels) when she repeatedly told her doctors there was a problem, only to be met with disbelieving exasperation. Aside from that, I found this book to be a mix of memoir and non-fiction, both that [obviously] pertained to the synopsis. It was more of a memoir than I had originally anticipated, but I believe all of the back story was very necessary to convey her message. It helped me understand and empathize with the author. This book taught me a lot not just about endometriosis, but self-advocating for physical and mental health symptoms and treatments. The medical jargon was a tad confusing at times, but also very informative. I like when books teach me things, especially things I know nothing about. This book definitely did that, and that is the largest reason why I appreciate it so much.The writing style was very easy to read and made me feel like the author was having a laid back conversation with me, face-to-face. It felt personal, inviting and informative.Over all, I'd absolutely recommend this book, if only for the simple fact that I think it's important to know how and when to pay extra attention to the signs your body and mind are giving you, but also how to take a stand against ignorance. To know that when you need help, or simply information, from doctors who don't advocate for you, you need to learn how to advocate for yourself, because no one knows how you feel inside better than you do. Thank you to NetGalley, Perseus Books, PublicAffairs, Nation Books, and Abby Norman for a digital ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. Publication intended for March 6, 2018.
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  • Janday
    January 1, 1970
    "Even now, it's been so many years since I've lived in a pain-free body that I don't really remember what it feels like."I'd accuse Abby Norman of plagiarizing me if I didn't wholeheartedly, bone-achingly, gut-wrenchingly, atom-pulsingly believe her. Even though this is a book about endometriosis, everyone should read this book. Norman recounts her own experience with endometriosis and the (seemingly innumerable) complexities related to endometriosis (spoiler: it is not a "menstrual" disease, it "Even now, it's been so many years since I've lived in a pain-free body that I don't really remember what it feels like."I'd accuse Abby Norman of plagiarizing me if I didn't wholeheartedly, bone-achingly, gut-wrenchingly, atom-pulsingly believe her. Even though this is a book about endometriosis, everyone should read this book. Norman recounts her own experience with endometriosis and the (seemingly innumerable) complexities related to endometriosis (spoiler: it is not a "menstrual" disease, it is not a "female" disease). Just as pain from endometriosis can lead to pain in other systems, disbelief and dismissal of women's pain leads to a lifetime of silent suffering...even when we're screaming.
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  • Hanna
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, I was absolutely enthralled by Abby Norman's journey. Part memoir, part history of women's pain, this book was everything I was looking for & more. Norman is a skilled researcher, in large part, because her life has greatly depended on it, but also because she's truly an academic at heart. Norman artfully wove her story into the fabric of shared experience regarding women's turbulent history navigating our health in a medical world that is set up to dismiss us. This read is both extreme Wow, I was absolutely enthralled by Abby Norman's journey. Part memoir, part history of women's pain, this book was everything I was looking for & more. Norman is a skilled researcher, in large part, because her life has greatly depended on it, but also because she's truly an academic at heart. Norman artfully wove her story into the fabric of shared experience regarding women's turbulent history navigating our health in a medical world that is set up to dismiss us. This read is both extremely frustrating but also immensely inspiring. Norman not only is a voice for the voiceless, but a voice for the exhausted, the pained, the misunderstood, the lost, the alone, and the ones who are just now beginning what will become an arduous journey to the truth. This is absolutely an important non-fiction read of 2018.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher - For any woman who has experienced illness, chronic pain, or endometriosis comes an inspiring memoir advocating for recognition of women's health issuesIn the fall of 2010, Abby Norman's strong dancer's body dropped forty pounds and gray hairs began to sprout from her temples. She was repeatedly hospitalized in excruciating pain, but the doctors insisted it was a urinary tr I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher - For any woman who has experienced illness, chronic pain, or endometriosis comes an inspiring memoir advocating for recognition of women's health issuesIn the fall of 2010, Abby Norman's strong dancer's body dropped forty pounds and gray hairs began to sprout from her temples. She was repeatedly hospitalized in excruciating pain, but the doctors insisted it was a urinary tract infection and sent her home with antibiotics. Unable to get out of bed, much less attend class, Norman dropped out of college and embarked on what would become a years-long journey to discover what was wrong with her. It wasn't until she took matters into her own hands--securing a job in a hospital and educating herself over lunchtime reading in the medical library--that she found an accurate diagnosis of endometriosis.In Ask Me About My Uterus, Norman describes what it was like to have her pain dismissed, to be told it was all in her head, only to be taken seriously when she was accompanied by a boyfriend who confirmed that her sexual performance was, indeed, compromised. Putting her own trials into a broader historical, sociocultural, and political context, Norman shows that women's bodies have long been the battleground of a never-ending war for power, control, medical knowledge, and truth. It's time to refute the belief that being a woman is a preexisting conditionWhere was this book when I was suffering from endometriosis and being accused of looking for narcotics?Or being admonished that it could not be THAT bad. Or that the pain was only in my head? This is a BRILLIANT resource for anyone who is going through "paint under the belt"! Five huge, honking stars for not being afraid to write it as it is ... thank you!!! p.s. LOVE the cover image.!!!
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  • Amy Kreydin
    January 1, 1970
    Ms Norman weaves her personal experiences living with the diagnosis of endometriosis, and the history of women being ignored by medicine. It's a painfully brutal look at the ways women's health is misunderstood, insufficiently researched, poorly managed, and frequently misdiagnosed as being all in our heads. I'm reminded of the sobering statistics around adverse childhood events, or ACEs, and that it is typical of a woman with a chronic health issue to spend a minimum of three years seeking a di Ms Norman weaves her personal experiences living with the diagnosis of endometriosis, and the history of women being ignored by medicine. It's a painfully brutal look at the ways women's health is misunderstood, insufficiently researched, poorly managed, and frequently misdiagnosed as being all in our heads. I'm reminded of the sobering statistics around adverse childhood events, or ACEs, and that it is typical of a woman with a chronic health issue to spend a minimum of three years seeking a diagnosis.
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  • Noorilhuda
    January 1, 1970
    Norman details her life story, her medical crisis and her attempts to understand and handle it better: the grueling symptoms of endometriosis, the lack of proper care and cure, the fixation with 'being one's own doctor', the paranoia at the unknown and the (seemingly bizarre and desperately morbid) attempts to 'get to know the uterus' (attending cadaver openings!) and trying to find a doctor who'd take her seriously. Though many may not get the extreme forms of pain and lackadaisical doctors, I Norman details her life story, her medical crisis and her attempts to understand and handle it better: the grueling symptoms of endometriosis, the lack of proper care and cure, the fixation with 'being one's own doctor', the paranoia at the unknown and the (seemingly bizarre and desperately morbid) attempts to 'get to know the uterus' (attending cadaver openings!) and trying to find a doctor who'd take her seriously. Though many may not get the extreme forms of pain and lackadaisical doctors, I think we can all relate to the fact that when you are ill, know you are ill, and medicines are not working, and doctors are not paying attention the way you want them to, then you go off on a road of understanding your own body, whether the tendency to have cysts is due to inflammation, or autoimmune disorder or something else, you get blood tests of anything and everything (hormones, thyroid, vitamins), ultrasounds of organs/ areas, read books and net researches, that can show what's wrong with you so that the doctor believes you! I do not agree with Norman's peculiar obsession with endometriosis - but it is incredibly shocking that she could not find a single doctor who examined her properly as per her recurring debilitating symptoms, a drug / pool of drugs that could handle her horrible symptoms better and increase her quality of life without crippling her with a constant sense of fear and disappointment - and she is presenting her authentic journey and there's a lesson in it for all of us, women and practitioners. It's a very important book, at the end of it, you will feel as exhausted as Norman is by the cycle of futility - trying to make people believe she is not a hypochondriac, not suffering from a neurological disease, not uninterested in sex, not being difficult, not okay with repetitive intrusive examinations, doesn't care about fertility as much as about excruciating pain! - a doctor at the end of the book even says to her 'let me know what's wrong with you, when you find out' (!) So there it is - Norman still doesn't know what is the source of the pain and how to fix it. She's just living with it. I hope she remains vigilant about her health and happiness, never giving up.It's also a well-written book, complete with minute details of other women's histories / battles with their bodies.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I'm going to be honest and say that I was expecting more from this. I thought it would be more about Norman's health struggles and fights with her doctors. Instead, the constant focus on Norman's horrific childhood were a distraction from that. While her background was important to the story, it felt like there was more focus on it than necessary, turning it into a general memoir by Norman, rather than a medical-focu I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I'm going to be honest and say that I was expecting more from this. I thought it would be more about Norman's health struggles and fights with her doctors. Instead, the constant focus on Norman's horrific childhood were a distraction from that. While her background was important to the story, it felt like there was more focus on it than necessary, turning it into a general memoir by Norman, rather than a medical-focused one. I think the book would have been better served by shortening the stories of Norman's childhood into one chapter with occasional brief anecdotes, and then using more time to focus on her work with other women. But despite these issues I will still happily recommend this to people because the medical aspects are so important and should be shared.
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  • Mars
    January 1, 1970
    When I saw this book, the first thing that immediately intrigued me was the cover and the title. I love reading nonfiction books about things that impact me or my life in a more direct or specific way, and I've heard about endometriosis, but I didn't know the specific details and symptoms. Norman is a talented writer, and has a knack for telling her life story in such a way that you could see the similarities in the people in your life that may be going through various chronic illnesses.Througho When I saw this book, the first thing that immediately intrigued me was the cover and the title. I love reading nonfiction books about things that impact me or my life in a more direct or specific way, and I've heard about endometriosis, but I didn't know the specific details and symptoms. Norman is a talented writer, and has a knack for telling her life story in such a way that you could see the similarities in the people in your life that may be going through various chronic illnesses.Throughout this book, we get lots of backstory about Norman's childhood, which gives us insight into the cycle of abuse and mental illnesses/eating disorders that can potentially ruin someone's life if untreated. We get lots of passages of frustrating doctor's visit, or weekly therapy sessions. All of these things combined make the author more relatable, or approachable as one might say.I learned so much medical language and various symptoms throughout this book, and so because of those passages where the author explains in a teachable way that I appreciated and gained knowledge from.
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  • Vnunez-Ms_luv2read
    January 1, 1970
    I was so looking foward to this book, but was disappointed. I was expecting more about how hard it is to convince some medical doctor's that female pain is real. To me this was more about the author and her experiences with medial professionals. Yes the book was about female pain but it was about the author's pain not female pain in general. Thanks to NetGalley, the author and the publisher for the ARC of this book in return for my honest review.
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come.
  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    Disclosure: ARC received from Netgalley & publisher in exchange for an honest review. (They may regret this.) Any and all quotes were taken from an advanced edition subject to change in the final edition.
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