A Map of the Dark (The Searchers #1)
A girl, missingA woman, searchingA killer, planning...A thrilling new FBI series for fans of Tess Gerritsen and Karin Slaughter. FBI Agent Elsa Myers finds missing people.She knows how it feels to be lost...Though her father lies dying in a hospital north of New York City, Elsa cannot refuse a call for help. A teenage girl has gone missing from Forest Hills, Queens, and during the critical first hours of the case, a series of false leads hides the fact that she did not go willingly.With each passing hour, as the hunt for Ruby deepens into a search for a man who may have been killing for years, the case starts to get underneath Elsa's skin. Everything she has buried - her fraught relationship with her sister and niece, her self-destructive past, her mother's death - threatens to resurface, with devastating consequences.In order to save the missing girl, she may have to lose herself...and return to the darkness she's been hiding from for years.

A Map of the Dark (The Searchers #1) Details

TitleA Map of the Dark (The Searchers #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 2nd, 2018
PublisherMulholland Books
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller, Fiction, Crime

A Map of the Dark (The Searchers #1) Review

  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    * 3.5 STARS* Thank you to www.shotsmag.co.uk for my paperback copy in exchange for an honest review* A Map of the Dark introduces us to FBI agent Elsa Myers, and to what appears to be the first in a new police procedural series.Elsa is at the bedside of her terminally ill father, when she gets a call to assist NYPD Detective Lex Cole. Cole has specifically requested Elsa's help on a missing teen case, because she has an excellent track record within the Child Abduction rapid response team.Elsa h * 3.5 STARS* Thank you to www.shotsmag.co.uk for my paperback copy in exchange for an honest review* A Map of the Dark introduces us to FBI agent Elsa Myers, and to what appears to be the first in a new police procedural series.Elsa is at the bedside of her terminally ill father, when she gets a call to assist NYPD Detective Lex Cole. Cole has specifically requested Elsa's help on a missing teen case, because she has an excellent track record within the Child Abduction rapid response team.Elsa had a difficult childhood, and this has clearly shaped the way that she deals with these extremely emotional cases - and she's nothing if not dedicated.As investigations get under way, all the clues appear to point to a ‘repeater’: someone responsible for other missing teens. Although Lex is new to child abduction cases, he appears to be quite adept, which comes as something of a relief to Elsa, as she struggles to come to terms with her father’s imminent death, alongside her own personal demons.Elsa is a very complex character, but flashbacks to her childhood provide a comprehensive insight into what defines her personality in the present - in fact I felt rather too much time was dedicated to her background, leaving the investigation itself feeling a little sparse in its construction.After a slow start though, the pace picks up considerably, with a few twists along the way, and although the reveal at the end was something I was expecting, I did enjoy it overall, and I feel that now that we've got Elsa's background out of the way, I believe the series has great potential.
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  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    A new series, the introduction of a new character, Elsa, an FBI agent who had a very difficult and abusive past, and is dealing with an impending sorrow in the present. Young women are going missing, and it is up to Elsa, and the young policemen who asked for her assistance, to find them.So far, so good, Elsa is an interesting character, Lex her police counterpoint on this, grows on one and cements the deal by books end. For me though, the back story of Elsa quite overtook the case of the missin A new series, the introduction of a new character, Elsa, an FBI agent who had a very difficult and abusive past, and is dealing with an impending sorrow in the present. Young women are going missing, and it is up to Elsa, and the young policemen who asked for her assistance, to find them.So far, so good, Elsa is an interesting character, Lex her police counterpoint on this, grows on one and cements the deal by books end. For me though, the back story of Elsa quite overtook the case of the missing. It was an intriguing back story but nonetheless definitely overshadowed everything else going on, very lopsided. The case itself had a plot point that was so predictable one could see it coming from s mile away, cliche I know. What happens next in the case I just couldn't quite swallow as believable. There is also one coincidence of a personal nature that felt to me, contrived. So a mixed read, but an intriguing enough of a character that it may call me back to read book two, which I am suspecting will have less of the past and more of a case.ARC from Netgalley.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsI was lost in the dark shadowy barren coulee with one of my Traveling Sisters reading The Map of the Dark trying to find cover from the demons haunting our main character FBI Agent Elsa Myers. Map of the Dark is a police procedural with a strong well-drawn character here with Elsa who really stood out for us. Karen Ellis does a good job creating an interesting and complex character with Elsa Myers. We settled in with our books and soon were taken on a race against time with Elsa as she 3.5 StarsI was lost in the dark shadowy barren coulee with one of my Traveling Sisters reading The Map of the Dark trying to find cover from the demons haunting our main character FBI Agent Elsa Myers. Map of the Dark is a police procedural with a strong well-drawn character here with Elsa who really stood out for us. Karen Ellis does a good job creating an interesting and complex character with Elsa Myers. We settled in with our books and soon were taken on a race against time with Elsa as she hunts for a missing girl. Her dark past secrets start to surface and we had our guard up for those demons that were lurking in the shadow as Elsa begins to wrestle with them. We were intrigued and wanted to know more about her past however her past began to overshadow the case for us. The race slowed down and the case became a bit too predictable. However, for me, the revelation, in the end, left me shocked and clinched this one as a winner for me. We loved the dynamics between intense, flawed Elsa and her cool easy going partner Lex. We enjoyed their growing friendship and loved the kindness and understanding Lex offered Elsa leaving us wanting more from Lex. We look forward to book two focusing on him. Thank you, to NetGalley, Mulholland Books and Karen Ellis for a copy to read and review. Traveling Sisters Review also can be found on our sister blog:https://twogirlslostinacouleereading....
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    FBI Agent Elsa Myers finds missing people. She knows how it feels to be lost. Though her father lies dying in hospital, Elsa can not refuse a call for help. A teenage girl has gone missing from Forest Hills, Queens. As the hunt for Ruby deepens into a search for a man who may have been killing for years, the case starts to get underneath Elsa's skin.This is another book that features multiple points of view. It also tells about both the past and the present . Although the book is well written. I FBI Agent Elsa Myers finds missing people. She knows how it feels to be lost. Though her father lies dying in hospital, Elsa can not refuse a call for help. A teenage girl has gone missing from Forest Hills, Queens. As the hunt for Ruby deepens into a search for a man who may have been killing for years, the case starts to get underneath Elsa's skin.This is another book that features multiple points of view. It also tells about both the past and the present . Although the book is well written. I just felt there was something missing. I also found the back story to Elsa distracted me a bit from the main storyline. There was many twists in the book to keep you guessing. This is the first book in a new series called The Searchers.I would like to thank NetGalley, Hodder & Stoughton and the author Karen Ellis for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    A damn fine start to a new procedural series featuring an FBI Agent on the Child Abduction rapid response team. Cleverly intriguing main protagonist hiding dark secrets, excellent back up cast. creepy and atmospheric mystery element. One I'll be following along with.Full review as one of my "Ones to Watch in 2018" soon.
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  • Abby Slater- Fairbrother
    January 1, 1970
    A new series and a new feisty female protagonist, perfect to kick off the new year! Introducing FBI agent Elsa Myers, who is part of the child abduction, rapid deployment division. This novel does read like an episode of criminal minds. But as always, the author has cleverly woven a secret into the novel, which slowly unravels. The prologue opens with a kidnapping, so the reader is left in no disillusion about the central plot of this novel. A missing teenage girl and a devastated family!Elsa is A new series and a new feisty female protagonist, perfect to kick off the new year! Introducing FBI agent Elsa Myers, who is part of the child abduction, rapid deployment division. This novel does read like an episode of criminal minds. But as always, the author has cleverly woven a secret into the novel, which slowly unravels. The prologue opens with a kidnapping, so the reader is left in no disillusion about the central plot of this novel. A missing teenage girl and a devastated family!Elsa is at the bed side of her terminally ill father when she is summoned to the case. She is warned by her superior that the detective handling the case is newly transferred from vice. To cut it short, he is out of his depth and desperately needs Elsa’s expertise. The missing teen is Ruby Haverstock, a 17-year-old teenager. Ruby has no apparent motive to have run away and nobody seems to hold a grudge against her. She does have a local ex-boyfriend, maybe he can shed some light onto the disappearance? Detective Alexei ‘Lex’ Cole is the newly transferred detective assigned to the case. Elsa and Lex work incredibly well together as fictional characters, they are polar opposites, yet with so much in common. The tackle the case by following the evidence and interviewing those known to Ruby. When more and more leads don’t pan out. The investigation becomes a slow burner. There is a fascinating back story into Elsa’s past. Elsa’s mother died in a home invasion gone, deadly! When she was just a young girl. Leaving her and her big sister Tara to be brought up by single father Roy. A father now slowly slipping away due to cancer. The depth in the backstory is drip fed to the reader throughout the novel. I found it absolutely fascinating! Elsa’s niece Mel, tries to insinuate herself into the investigation. This frustrates Elsa and causes disagreements within their relationship. Elsa tries to be both Mel’s aunt and best friend. But she is completely oblivious to the perilous world, modern teens live in. The novel has various spin-off themes, mainly surrounding the relationships of the central characters. It works well as a basis to set up a series. Elsa is a strong and capable woman, but at time is broken and vulnerable. I am keen to see where the author takes her next! This novel is perfect for fans of TV series CSI, Criminal Minds or Law & Order SVU. 4*
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  • Kate~Bibliophile Book Club
    January 1, 1970
    A Map of the Dark is a fiercely compulsive read. I sat down to start it, and before I even realised it, I was over halfway through. I just couldn’t put it down. I’m a huge fan of American-based crime thrillers, especially when they have a great cast of characters and an intriguing plot. That is exactly why I loved this one. It had everything I look for, as well as a few surprises.Elsa Myers is a FBI agent, tasked with investigating the disappearance of a teenage girl in Queens. Torn between sitt A Map of the Dark is a fiercely compulsive read. I sat down to start it, and before I even realised it, I was over halfway through. I just couldn’t put it down. I’m a huge fan of American-based crime thrillers, especially when they have a great cast of characters and an intriguing plot. That is exactly why I loved this one. It had everything I look for, as well as a few surprises.Elsa Myers is a FBI agent, tasked with investigating the disappearance of a teenage girl in Queens. Torn between sitting by the bedside of her ailing father and wanting to find the girl, Myers has a struggle on her hands. I really liked Elsa. She is flawed, and nobody loves a dark back story more than me, so when we learn what happened in her past it really changes the way you see her as a character.I loved the pacing of the story too. It moves really quickly, with little nuggets of information scattered through the narrative that you’d miss if you’re not paying attention. It made me question everyone, and their motives, which always wrecks my head but makes me become invested in the outcome!A Map of the Dark is a really clever crime thriller. There is much more to it than meets the eye at first glance. Relationships, family secrets and the past are the main players here and each one is woven seamlessly into the plot. I thoroughly enjoyed this one, and I will definitely be reading more from this author!Highly recommended!
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  • Abby (Crime by the Book)
    January 1, 1970
    **DNF** I just couldn’t get into this book, and I don’t want to force myself. There’s nothing glaringly “wrong” with it, I just found it.... slow. I gave it nearly 75 pages but I wasn’t finding myself invested in the characters or the plot - I had that feeling that I had to force myself to keep reading, which is no fun. So I’m just going to set this one aside.
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  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress...I received a free copy of this book courtesy of the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This review is also part of the blog tour for A map of the Dark.The book’s title A Map of the Dark immediately reminded me of the classic Iron Maiden tune Fear of the Dark:Fear of the dark, fear of the dark, I have a constant fear that something’s always near, Fear of the dark, fear of th As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress...I received a free copy of this book courtesy of the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This review is also part of the blog tour for A map of the Dark.The book’s title A Map of the Dark immediately reminded me of the classic Iron Maiden tune Fear of the Dark:Fear of the dark, fear of the dark, I have a constant fear that something’s always near, Fear of the dark, fear of the dark, I have a phobia that someone’s always there.And so, I give to you:A Map of the Dark, A Map of the Dark,I read a crime thriller that really is quite killer,A Map of the Dark, A Map of the Dark,I have a sweet review for you to all peruseI bet none of you was expecting to start the review that way?!😂Elsa Meyers is an FBI special agent, namely for the CARD (Child Abduction Rapid Deployment) division. Ruby Haverstock, a 17-year-old girl has been abducted at the end of her shift working in a Café on Friday evening. Detective Lex Cole, a new to the department Detective who’s just spent three years undercover with Vice is assigned to the case. It is his first child abduction case and he requests the help of Elsa as her reputation for finding abducted children precedes her.Interspersed with the hunt for Ruby are the occasional chapters that focus on the predicament of the captive. They are only short but add a creepy edge to the book as you get a first-hand account of the captive’s situation. There are also some short chapters that act as interludes from the present day narrative and take us back in time to Elsa’s childhood and her traumatic memories.Set against the backdrop of the abduction case is the story of Elsa’s father, Roy, who has recently been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer and sadly, doesn’t have long left to live. Elsa’s younger sister and her teenage niece are also dealing with this heartbreak making for an interesting family dynamic and relationship between them all.A Map of the Dark isn’t purely an abduction story and the sole focus isn’t just on the kidnapping of Ruby. The book is as much character-driven as it is story-driven with Elsa’s character and her past playing a large part in the story. For me, this is where A Map of the Dark really excelled with the characterisation of the main character adding an extra layer and depth to the book.Elsa is a complex and damaged character suffering from her own familial secrets and personal demons and is haunted by her past. However, it’s also those same demons from her childhood that now drive her and Ellis does a stellar job of showing with Elsa how a person’s past, no matter how long ago can affect their present.The story told in A Map of the Dark is both well-executed and well-written by Ellis who never glorifies the subject matter that she deals with. The hunt for Ruby is a race against the clock and at times it can be harrowing especially as the story progresses and more about the kidnapper is revealed. Then you also have the revelation that Ruby’s abduction might not be the isolated and solitary case that it was thought to be and that it might, in fact, be the latest in a long line of abduction cases perpetrated by the same person dating back years. Add in plenty of twists and turns along the way (one revelation near the end is shocking) and as Ellis builds to the conclusion, ramping up the tension you will find yourself gripped and constantly turning the pages.And now the highly quotable bit:The pacing in A Map of the Dark never lets up and combined with Ellis’s writing creates a dark and compelling read.
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  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    The first in a new series, we get introduced to Elsa Myers. FBI Agent who is put on a child abduction case all while dealing with her dying father which is trudging up memories of her traumatic childhood. As each day passes without finding this young girl, her memories start to infiltrate her mind more and old habits of coping come to the surface again. I'll be honest, I had a little bit of a hard time getting through the first third of the book. I wanted to put it down several times and contemp The first in a new series, we get introduced to Elsa Myers. FBI Agent who is put on a child abduction case all while dealing with her dying father which is trudging up memories of her traumatic childhood. As each day passes without finding this young girl, her memories start to infiltrate her mind more and old habits of coping come to the surface again. I'll be honest, I had a little bit of a hard time getting through the first third of the book. I wanted to put it down several times and contemplated DNF-ing. Why? Because it was a little confusing. The prologue gave you a sense of a girl not quite right in her mind but you're not sure why. Ok, I get it. Then we get into the case and the introduction to Elsa. The problem is with the past and present chapters with Elsa. There was some confusion in one chapter where she just calls her mom, Mom, but in others where she calls her Deb... it took me a minute to realize they were one in the same. Also, at a certain point, her past seemed to be more prominent than the real case at hand - the abductions. Then randomly thrown in there, we would get glimpses of the mind of the girl from the prologue, who I assumed was one of the abductees. It just didn't flow well for me. There were also a couple of inconsistencies that glared at me but that's just me being super picky.So, why did I continue? Because I DID get drawn into the case. I needed to know where the girls were and if and how they were going to get saved. Karen Ellis drew me into Elsa's character but I did find myself mulling through the past chapters antsy to get to the present day. By the last third of the book, I was hooked and powering through the pages. I was engaged and empathetic to Elsa, even her past! And while I did see the twist coming a mile away, the author did it well and by the end, I DID feel satisfied. If only I didn't trudge through the beginning, I would be raving about this book. The author is clearly talented and maybe it took all that trudging to truly appreciate the end... who knows? Maybe it's just me and those little inconsistencies just rattled me a bit. At the end of the day, I'm glad that I did finish the book and felt satisfied by the end. I will definitely pick up some more of the author's work in the future (as this is a pseudonym, I'll be looking for some of her work under Katia Lief as well) - and I would honestly like to see where Elsa goes from here. Thank you so much to Mulholland books for this free copy in return for my honest review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book in a new series featuring FBI Agent Elsa Myers.The story flicks between modern day as well as to Elsa’s past and the troubled relationship that Elsa has with her mother. I have to admit, it does make for some uncomfortable reading and my heart really went out to Elsa as she is quite a troubled soul.I loved the balance of getting to know who Elsa is and about her past as well as the case she finds herself working on. It is very well laid out so that we really get a feel for This is the first book in a new series featuring FBI Agent Elsa Myers.The story flicks between modern day as well as to Elsa’s past and the troubled relationship that Elsa has with her mother. I have to admit, it does make for some uncomfortable reading and my heart really went out to Elsa as she is quite a troubled soul.I loved the balance of getting to know who Elsa is and about her past as well as the case she finds herself working on. It is very well laid out so that we really get a feel for Elsa and exactly who she is as well as how she works. The fact that the story is set over so many days really gives an urgency in reading it. I wanted to know if they were going to find Ruby alive and well and to who was behind taking her. It certainly didn’t disappoint.A Map of the Dark is a great start to a new crime series. It is a compelling read that has left me looking forward to future books in the series. A must read for crime fiction lovers.My thanks to Hodder & Stoughton for an advanced readers copy of this book. All opinions are my own and not biased in anyway.
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  • Joanna Park
    January 1, 1970
    A Map Of The Dark is an unusual psychological thriller as it doesn’t just focus on the kidnapping and the fate of the victim.  Instead there is a lot of character development, particularly in the first half of the book.  We learn more about Eliza’s past in particular her childhood which was quite traumatic at times and the fraught relationship she had with her mother.  This is done in a series of flashback which is interspersed with chapters regarding the ongoing investigation and are quite harr A Map Of The Dark is an unusual psychological thriller as it doesn’t just focus on the kidnapping and the fate of the victim.  Instead there is a lot of character development, particularly in the first half of the book.  We learn more about Eliza’s past in particular her childhood which was quite traumatic at times and the fraught relationship she had with her mother.  This is done in a series of flashback which is interspersed with chapters regarding the ongoing investigation and are quite harrowing to read at times.Eliza is definitely a complex character but one that I found myself warming to more as the story unfolded and I learnt more about her.  It was quite poignant to learn about how her childhood still affects her in her everyday life, even when she is at the top of her game work wise.  Most of the time she comes across as being quite confident and able but she has moments of self doubt due to her experiences which make her seem quite human.  It was heart breaking to read about the coping strategies she had in place for such occasions and how little things could floor this otherwise very confident women.  Her partnership with Lex seems very well suited, particularly when the reader starts learning a bit more about his history too.  I enjoyed reading about their partnership and how they dealt with the case throughout the book.The story is quite dark due to some of the subject matters discussed and is quite chilling in places, particularly when it becomes obvious that not everything is as it first appears regarding Ruby’s disappearance.  Not everyone is telling Eliza and Lex the truth which adds a very intriguing edge to the story as the reader tries to figure out what is happening and why supposed friends and witness are lying.This is the first book by Karen Ellis that I have read and it will be interesting to see where this series goes next.  Her writing reminded me a bit of Sarah Hillary as it was quite character driven and emotional which is similar to her writing I felt.  The focus on the characters made the book more interesting then a normal crime book as I felt I was more invested in what happened to the characters and that I cared more about what happened to them.Thank you to Louise Swanell and Jenni Leech for my copy of this book and for inviting me on the blog tour.
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  • Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.Karen Ellis, pseudonym of author Katia Lief, releases a thriller mystery tale focused on a special agent with a disturbing past and a kidnapping of a teenager. One part police procedural and one part thriller, A Map of the Dark is a fast-paced story that delivers an emotionally-charged and highly personal hunt.Elsa Myers is not your typical FBI agent. While her father is hospitalized with an illness that seeks to steal his life, she is assigned You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.Karen Ellis, pseudonym of author Katia Lief, releases a thriller mystery tale focused on a special agent with a disturbing past and a kidnapping of a teenager. One part police procedural and one part thriller, A Map of the Dark is a fast-paced story that delivers an emotionally-charged and highly personal hunt.Elsa Myers is not your typical FBI agent. While her father is hospitalized with an illness that seeks to steal his life, she is assigned to take on a child abduction case that dusts off all the devastating things she has been through in her own childhood. The story features multiple point of views, as well as both past and present narrative. Chapters that explore the past of Elsa Myers especially highlight the protagonist’s damaged-self through her past relationship with her mother as well as the present residuals of her trauma. Short and extremely concise, they don’t make for an easy read with Karen Ellis’ ability to write convincing and powerful scenes showing us the consequences of abuse.Although these chapters set in the past were interesting in making us further understand our damaged protagonist, they were oddly integrated and never truly felt fluid in the narrative. It didn’t help that there were also a couple of chapters interspersed within the story that offered readers the perspective of the kidnapped. As much as I wanted to truly enjoy this case, I felt like background of the main character overshadowed the main investigation and diluted its thrill. However, Elsa Myers was still a complex character whose baggage isn’t easy to read about. Her flaws are put in the foreground and became the main focus, and that unfortunately took away from the crime story that was being told.Karen Ellis has an excellent writing style that is absolutely captivating. I did see the main twist coming that made the story accelerate considerably a little after the halfway mark, but the author delivers it masterly. In fact, I found that the action towards the end was remarkably developed. I won’t lie that it had me flipping through the pages at an uncontrollable speed. But everything before that twist felt like mud instead of water. It simply wasn’t easy or exciting to swim through. A Map of the Dark is a great new series to check out with its exploration of abuse ambitiously integrated within this child abduction story.Thank you to Hachette Book Group Canada for sending me a copy for review!Yours truly,Lashaan | Blogger and Book ReviewerOfficial blog: https://bookidote.com/
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    A big thank you to Mulholland Books for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review!Not going to lie, this cover is what drew me to this book. I saw that it was a police procedural and a mystery thriller, so that was all I needed to know before diving in! A MAP OF THE DARK by Karen Ellis as an eerie atmosphere about it and I really enjoyed that, plus it's book one of a new crime series!"A girl, missing. A woman, searching. A killer, planning"Elsa Myers is an FBI Agent that specializes in A big thank you to Mulholland Books for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review!Not going to lie, this cover is what drew me to this book. I saw that it was a police procedural and a mystery thriller, so that was all I needed to know before diving in! A MAP OF THE DARK by Karen Ellis as an eerie atmosphere about it and I really enjoyed that, plus it's book one of a new crime series!"A girl, missing. A woman, searching. A killer, planning"Elsa Myers is an FBI Agent that specializes in finding missing people. Her being assigned to a case of a child abduction couldn't come at more inconvenient time. Her father is sick in the hospital and battling for his life. However, she cannot refuse the call to help find a teenage girl that has disappeared - the first few hours are the most critical. Trying to track down a killer and save Ruby will prove to be difficult for her, because she may have to come face-to-face with her dark past that she has tried so hard to repress.I will say that I struggled with the first portion of this book. It was slower and some parts felt all over the place, but I was drawn in by the case. The case of finding Ruby was so intriguing and is what kept me reading! The second portion of the book really started to pick up the pace and pulled me in even more. Ellis created a great female lead - she's a strong character but she has her flaws that make her feel more human. I really enjoyed the ending and felt that everything tied together nicely for the conclusion.Overall, if you want to start a new crime series, then A MAP OF THE DARK would be a good one to pick up! If you don't mind a slower build at the beginning, then you'll enjoy this one - just know that it does begin to pick up towards the end. I definitely want to see more of Elsa Myers, so I'll be keeping my eyes peeled for more.I give this 3.5/5 stars!
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  • Claire Kittridge
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this! A map of the Dark has a super lead character (FBI Special Agent Elsa Elsa Myers) who harnesses her own demons in order to help solve the case of three missing girls. I couldn't get up from my chair until I'd read it all! The writing is more introspcective than most popular thrillers, so be prepared to take a little time for the story to get rolling - but it's well worth the effort. Five stars, all the way.
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  • The Book Review Café
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow
  • Alyssa Marie
    January 1, 1970
    Overall, I wasn't a huge fan of this book. I liked the storyline and the police procedural aspect of the plot. The writing was of good quality, but I just had a hard time with the narration style and didn't understand certain aspects that the author was trying to convey. I found it difficult to focus on the main plot because of the backstory of the main character, Elsa. It was so distracting, and I didn't see a connection between the two that I'm used to reading. I didn't feel that the teenagers Overall, I wasn't a huge fan of this book. I liked the storyline and the police procedural aspect of the plot. The writing was of good quality, but I just had a hard time with the narration style and didn't understand certain aspects that the author was trying to convey. I found it difficult to focus on the main plot because of the backstory of the main character, Elsa. It was so distracting, and I didn't see a connection between the two that I'm used to reading. I didn't feel that the teenagers in the book were well represented or realistic. As for Elsa, the main character, there were times that I found her likable, and then times where I just didn't want to bother with her. I had a lot of trouble picking up the book to read it. I enjoyed the multiple twists and turns that the story offered, but felt that so much time was invested in developing Elsa's character and exploring her past. As much as I understand the reasoning behind this, I was hoping for more focus on the mystery of missing teenager, Ruby. This would be a great read for someone who enjoys more in-depth character development rather than a straight and narrow thriller.
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  • Jannelies
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks Netgalley for this book.Sometimes you find, amidst all the 'new and wonderful series' a book that marks the start of a series you think you will really like. This is such a book. Elsa Meyers is a complex person with a complex background, and the story is sometimes quite complex too. It is very well written in a clear style, and besides the fact that it is a good book, it gives you food for thought.Sometimes it even brought a tear to my eyes. And it is not every day that I read a book that Thanks Netgalley for this book.Sometimes you find, amidst all the 'new and wonderful series' a book that marks the start of a series you think you will really like. This is such a book. Elsa Meyers is a complex person with a complex background, and the story is sometimes quite complex too. It is very well written in a clear style, and besides the fact that it is a good book, it gives you food for thought.Sometimes it even brought a tear to my eyes. And it is not every day that I read a book that has this effect on me.
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    “Her name’s Ruby Haverstock. She’s seventeen, almost eighteen, and her parents haven’t heard from her since Friday night. She went to her job at a local café, left work on time, and that was that.”As the excerpt says this looks as an ordinary missing girl case for this new series featuring a female lead character, an FBI agent, Elsa Myers, but there are other complexities, other darkness indoors waiting to lurk its head out, other truths that wait and you feel the intensity at times of something “Her name’s Ruby Haverstock. She’s seventeen, almost eighteen, and her parents haven’t heard from her since Friday night. She went to her job at a local café, left work on time, and that was that.”As the excerpt says this looks as an ordinary missing girl case for this new series featuring a female lead character, an FBI agent, Elsa Myers, but there are other complexities, other darkness indoors waiting to lurk its head out, other truths that wait and you feel the intensity at times of something coming and this keeps you reeled in and immersed in the tale. The fragility of this agent and her past brought before the reader in unfolding events and a series of flashbacks to her terrible mother daughter relationship. She is captive of the dark past within, a release somehow wanting, and with an ailing father with cancer needing attention she needs to focus on the discovery of the missing girl, battling with past and present some resilience to move in right direction in a map of discovery sought, a map of dark things may just come to fruition. Time is of essence, a sense of things slipping away from her, her own web of permeant reminders must be subdued, as the the chapters that mark the days mount, chances of the missing being alive shorten.This is a psychological tale that has you intertwined in the discovery of Elsa’s troubled past and her dealing and coming to terms with that, with her competent outer but fragile inner self and then also the safety of the missing.There are maybe one or two things in this story that do not feel plausible in reality.The writing, easy flowing, visceral, and the psychology mystery has you reading on in some compelling and accessible thrill.https://more2read.com/review/map-dark-karen-ellis/
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  • Luanne Ollivier
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 A Map of the Dark is the first novel in a new series (The Searchers) from Karen Ellis. (A nom de plume of Katia Lief)FBI Agent Elsa Myers specializes in missing children. She's good at her job. But when she's asked to take on the case of a young woman most likely taken by a serial killer, she hesitates. Her father is dying and this is bringing the past she has tried to bury back to the surface. She does take the case, thinking she can handle both, but her carefully constructed defenses begin 3.5 A Map of the Dark is the first novel in a new series (The Searchers) from Karen Ellis. (A nom de plume of Katia Lief)FBI Agent Elsa Myers specializes in missing children. She's good at her job. But when she's asked to take on the case of a young woman most likely taken by a serial killer, she hesitates. Her father is dying and this is bringing the past she has tried to bury back to the surface. She does take the case, thinking she can handle both, but her carefully constructed defenses begin to crumble. Ellis's prologue opens the book with the crime.Ellis has created a flawed lead character in Elsa. I liked her right away, but was caught off guard by her dark personal secrets. Ellis reveals Elsa's backstory through past and present chapters. (I did have some questions as to how such a wounded psych could end up in such a job). The victim of the crime is also given a voice - and the hope that she might still be found. Elsa is paired up with a new partner named Lex that only adds to her stress. Although he says and does all the right things, I just wasn't sold on him.Ellis seems to be setting the stage for this new series in A Map of the Dark. Establishing Elsa as a character and setting the background seemed to (for me) take more precedence than the crime. The crime itself is somewhat familiar in tone. There are some convenient plot devices that made if perhaps a little too easy for law enforcement. There is a twist at the end, but astute readers will most likely suss it out before the reveal.A Map of the Dark is a solid read and will appeal to those who enjoy characterizations more than the mystery. Me? I like the mystery and the solving of the crimes.
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  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for an advance copy of A Map of the Dark, the first in a series to feature Special Agent Elsa Myers of the FBI's New York Child Abduction Rapid Deployment unit.Elsa is sitting with her dying father when she gets a call to assist detective Lex Cole of NYPD in investigating the disappearance of teenager Ruby Haverstock who never made it home from her part time job in a coffee shop.The investigation is intense and takes Ruby to places she h I would like to thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for an advance copy of A Map of the Dark, the first in a series to feature Special Agent Elsa Myers of the FBI's New York Child Abduction Rapid Deployment unit.Elsa is sitting with her dying father when she gets a call to assist detective Lex Cole of NYPD in investigating the disappearance of teenager Ruby Haverstock who never made it home from her part time job in a coffee shop.The investigation is intense and takes Ruby to places she has no wish to visit.I enjoyed A Map of the Dark which has several interesting twists and turns. It is not, however, a straightforward missing person novel as it spends more time excavating Elsa's past and character than looking for Ruby. It has therefore several points of view and timelines. Mostly it is Elsa's narrative both present and past but there are interjections from the missing teenager. It gets confusing occasionally as it jumps from one to the other.I can't say that majorly damaged investigators are my favourite reading matter and I feel that Elsa's problems are fairly stereotypical so the big twist at the end is fairly well signposted and not much of a surprise. Of course I read a lot so I may be unfair in this assessment. It would be interesting to read about Elsa without all the baggage as she is a smart and dedicated, if emotionally involved, investigator.With the focus on Elsa and her problems the investigation is rather perfunctory - everything falls into place rather easily and in double quick time so there is little of the despondency and frustration detectives normally experience.A Map of the Dark is a solid read.
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  • Eve K
    January 1, 1970
    Things I loved:Standing at the door, she blows him a kiss, but he's sleeping, and it sails right past him.They laugh, and Elsa drives, and soon the city announces itself along a looming corridor of graffitied buildings, impatient traffic, and ill-tended roads....but wonders if outsiders could really comprehend how lost a child can be inside her own house. At some point you're beyond saving; no one can show you how to unswallow all that darkness.In some ways she's still waiting for him in that cl Things I loved:Standing at the door, she blows him a kiss, but he's sleeping, and it sails right past him.They laugh, and Elsa drives, and soon the city announces itself along a looming corridor of graffitied buildings, impatient traffic, and ill-tended roads....but wonders if outsiders could really comprehend how lost a child can be inside her own house. At some point you're beyond saving; no one can show you how to unswallow all that darkness.In some ways she's still waiting for him in that closet, has been waiting all her life, but now that he's dying, how will he save her?I really liked the prose. The poetic elements had meaning and weren't thrown in to make the author sound smart. I felt touched by the interesting, profound and dignified way Elsa mused over her childhood and resulting inner turmoil. There was no filler, which I always love not having to skim through.The pacing was well done up until the end when the book lost a bit of its tension. It was a definite page-turner and every scene was interesting, exciting or insightful. I thought Elsa's backstory was well-paced and brought to a satisfying (if slightly predictable) conclusion.Things I didn't love:They belonged to the Christian Identity Church - white supremacists, basically. - Even in fiction, I can't get away from right wing Christians being labelled racist without evidence.Elsa's skin electrifies with understanding, telling her they're on the right track. This is how it always happens. This is the feeling she gets when the pieces of a case start to fit ... Her skin tells her when a child is within her reach, her unstoppable, unfixable skin. - A woman's skin being given autonomy in an almost magical way was ill-fitting with the style of the rest of the book."...Lives with her parents and two younger brothers. Good student, no boyfriend, no drugs, no problems. Hasn't been seen since Monday morning when she left for school." - The cops discounted all missing girls who had a possible explanation for why they were missing, and zeroed in on all the squeaky clean ones who had no obvious reason for disappearing. This assumed the serial killer picked only girls who would otherwise not disappear. I don't know where this logic came from but to insinuate that a 'problem child' is less likely to be taken by a serial killer, just for the sake of cheaply explaining how the cops narrowed down their search, goes against everything I've read about serial killers.Stragglers, runaways, people who put themselves into dangerous situations because of drugs or escaping domestic violence, people whose families are estranged because they have problems and won't be immediately missed upon disappearance - these are the people most commonly targeted by serial killers. So the cops' logic in this instance was completely wrong. The predator isn't going to be like 'Lives at home with parents, check. Doing well in school, check. No drug problems, check. But damn, she has a boyfriend... Abort!' This was illogical and way too clean-cut for a crime thriller or realistic kidnapping case, but it served the plot so, whatever.It was disappointing to me that Elsa, the highly esteemed FBI agent took so long to cotton on to the fact Mel was likely the serial killer's third victim. It was obvious while it was being set up - Mel inserting herself into Elsa's work by going to the Haverstock's house - that Mel would be used to up the stakes at the end by being kidnapped. The fact that Elsa knew Mel was in a vulnerable situation, being alone and not inclined to answer her phone after Tara hit her, knowing the serial killer was already aware of her existence (from seeing her at the Haverstock's) and knowing there was a third victim that they couldn't yet identify, I'd expect an FBI officer to be straight on it and know her niece was in grave danger. It seems Elsa was dumbed down at this point, just to serve the plot.The serial killer's conclusionElsa reaches into the water and feels for the Glock holstered to her ankle. She slides off the safety strap, grips the handle, tugs out the gun. Frozen in place, hand underwater, she studies him.She focuses on the burl of neck and skull where his hair is skewed in all directions... She will aim exactly there. If she misses, Hope could die, but if she doesn't try, Hope will die.She lifts the gun out of the water. And then, in a moment, the wet steel slicks out of her hand. Her weapon lands in the stream with a heavy plop, ripples orbiting. Nelson turns. Sees her. - I don't think it warrants explanation why this is so stupid.The details of the serial killer's motive, intentions with the girls, history etc were sacrificed for more of a focus on Elsa's backstory. I think this could have been evened out a bit more, especially as things had previously been brought to the forefront, such as the box of tools and the strangeness of the serial killer's choice in tools, each tool described in detail as if their purpose would at some point become clear in the book, but they never did. The serial killer's plan, the fate of his past victims, their burial sites etc, were never even mentioned after his very quick, slightly cheesy and anticlimactic apprehension.That plotline was dropped completely, aside from a bizarre scene at the end where some cops in Oregon emailed over a video of themselves filming the inside of the killer's house, that Elsa stopped watching halfway through. That entire scene was so strange and pointless. It brought up more questions than answers and seemed like a forgotten part of a bigger plotline that had been scrapped before publication.Overall I really enjoyed the book. I would definitely read more from this author as I enjoy her voice, her characters and her adeptness at covering emotional subjects in a wise and compassionate manner, without being overly sentimental or employing purple prose. I think the plot of this book could be tightened up a little but as a first in a series, it's good and I'm excited to read the next instalment. 3.5/5*
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    A Cry in the Dark is the first book I've read by Ms. Ellis and I picked it from the library shelf because it took place in Queens. ** Itsy bitsy spoilers ahead ** FBI Agent Elas Myers finds missing children for a living. When a 17-year-old girl named Ruby goes missing, she is called in to assist a Queens detective named Lex.At the same time, Myers is dealing with her father's impending death from cancer, unresolved memories of abuse she endured at the hands of her mother, and her father's comp A Cry in the Dark is the first book I've read by Ms. Ellis and I picked it from the library shelf because it took place in Queens. ** Itsy bitsy spoilers ahead ** FBI Agent Elas Myers finds missing children for a living. When a 17-year-old girl named Ruby goes missing, she is called in to assist a Queens detective named Lex.At the same time, Myers is dealing with her father's impending death from cancer, unresolved memories of abuse she endured at the hands of her mother, and her father's complicity in not effectively protecting her from his wife.The POVs shifts from Myers' investigation and the perspective of one of the kidnapped girls; also, at we are given glimpses into the abuse Myers suffered decades ago and how the years of suffering ends in a devastating act that forces both father and daughter to conspire in a secret only they know and have kept hidden for decades.First of, the mystery was not much of a mystery. There was no suspense and perhaps contained one of the more boring villains I've read so far this year. But its early. It was as if the case was just background noise and Elsa the focus of the book, which is partly character driven, as we are offered insight into who she is, her damaged psyche and her need to self-harm and her intuitive skills.The thing is, I prefer my mysteries to be mysterious and character driven and to make it worse, I didn't really like Elsa. I'm not begrudging her bad childhood and her issues but it strikes me as that she is mired in the past. She's never found her way out of it. Her mother has won; trapped her in a cycle of abuse in which she replicates by her acts of self-harm. Elsa needs to stop revisiting her old childhood home, which her father has sold. Elsa needs counseling.Also, I guessed what happened to Elsa's mother from the moment the woman's death was mentioned. I think I'm just getting good at making educated guesses since I read so many of these types of books. I guess that makes me an armchair detective.I find it kind of an useful coincidence that Lex is so understanding of Elsa's past and personal issues, since he had a mother with similar issues. And let's not forget to throw in his older bro, David, as a potential love interest. Was that necessary? I'm not opposed to romance and love. Far from it. But could it wait until the next book, maybe?I love well written, strong, female characters but this story was bogged down by a lackluster mystery and a damaged main character I found more irritating than fascinating.
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  • Mike Sumner
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to NetGalley and Hodder & Stoughton, Mulholland Books for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.Is this the first in a new series perhaps? It bears all the hallmarks and the notes do say a thrilling new FBI series…A Map of The Dark introduces FBI agent Elsa Myers. An agent with a troubled past, a past riven by physical abuse from her mother. Elsa specialises in finding people. Detective Lex Cole asks specifically for Elsa to help find a missing seventeen-year-old girl. He knows My thanks to NetGalley and Hodder & Stoughton, Mulholland Books for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.Is this the first in a new series perhaps? It bears all the hallmarks and the notes do say a thrilling new FBI series…A Map of The Dark introduces FBI agent Elsa Myers. An agent with a troubled past, a past riven by physical abuse from her mother. Elsa specialises in finding people. Detective Lex Cole asks specifically for Elsa to help find a missing seventeen-year-old girl. He knows of her reputation. Their investigation indicates the work of a ‘repeater’; other girls are known to have gone missing.This is a slow starter; indeed the first seventeen chapters or so look back on Elsa’s early years and that of her sister - an abusive mother and a hapless father, Roy. The mother is now dead and Roy is dying from cancer. Perhaps rather too much of the story is spent on providing this background. (A protagonist with a similar past to that of DI Helen Grace…) But then, Chapter eighteen onward and suddenly the brakes are off…A Map of The Dark becomes a helter-skelter ride, the chapters shorten, the pace quickens - often no time to catch ones breath. The plot becomes dark and disturbing as the investigating team race to find the missing girls before it’s too late.And there is a twist in the tale that is not entirely unforeseen but completes a darned good thriller.
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  • Alyce Hunt
    January 1, 1970
    Sadly disappointed with this Karen Ellis novel. Full review to follow.EDIT 15/01/2018: I was so close to giving A Map of the Dark one star, because it was the most predictable crime novel I’ve ever read. I expected a lot more. Karen Ellis is the pseudonym of established crime/thriller author Katia Lief, and I’ve heard a lot of good things about her novels. Sadly, I’m no longer feeling inclined to checking her out.The novel opens with the kidnapping of a girl. It then dives into the investigation Sadly disappointed with this Karen Ellis novel. Full review to follow.EDIT 15/01/2018: I was so close to giving A Map of the Dark one star, because it was the most predictable crime novel I’ve ever read. I expected a lot more. Karen Ellis is the pseudonym of established crime/thriller author Katia Lief, and I’ve heard a lot of good things about her novels. Sadly, I’m no longer feeling inclined to checking her out.The novel opens with the kidnapping of a girl. It then dives into the investigation, following FBI Agent Elsa Myers as she looks into the disappearance of a different teenage girl. There are a lot of false starts, Elsa and her partner Lex chasing their tails, but I knew who the perpetrator was the moment they appeared on the page. The lack of subtlety is astounding.There were a few “SHOCK TWISTS” in this book, but I saw all of them coming from a mile away. The atmosphere that Ellis built was absorbing, but sadly the obvious plot destroyed any emotional involvement that I felt. I didn’t help that the flashbacks were told in second person, contrasting uncomfortably with the rest of the novel. I’ve already read a book that did this in 2018 and I didn’t enjoy it: I’m hoping that it’s not going to be a trend throughout the rest of the year.Elsa has a troubled past, which is exposed slowly but surely throughout the novel. Read the rest of my review over on The Bumbling Blogger!
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    I struggled to get hooked on this book and was well over half way before I did. I hadn't realised that the first couple of flashback chapters were exactly that, and didn't see how they fit into the story. Once it did pick up though, I read the last half of the book very quickly. Elsa Myers had a difficult childhood, which seems to be what has shaped her into an excellent FBI agent. She has been requested for a new missing teen case as she has an excellent track record. She's working with Lexi Co I struggled to get hooked on this book and was well over half way before I did. I hadn't realised that the first couple of flashback chapters were exactly that, and didn't see how they fit into the story. Once it did pick up though, I read the last half of the book very quickly. Elsa Myers had a difficult childhood, which seems to be what has shaped her into an excellent FBI agent. She has been requested for a new missing teen case as she has an excellent track record. She's working with Lexi Cole who is new to these types of cases. With what's going on in her personal life, she hopes she doesn't have to hand-hold! Luckily Lexi has good potential and just needs some experienced guidance. Ruby the missing teen doesn't fit the usual criteria in that she seems to be a good, hardworking girl with a caring family. Something about it all makes Elsa uncomfortable, something doesn't feel right. There are a few good twists to the tale that you don't expect and once the story takes hold, you get to the point that you are trying to think ahead of how it's going to unfold, and therefore you can't put it down!
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  • Chaitra
    January 1, 1970
    Unfortunately, what urgency there was to the plot was stifled by the continuous insertion of the main character's back story. Elsa, the FBI Agent who exclusively works missing kid cases, has a tortured background, which I agree is a good way of adding depth to her. But, tragic as it is, it's not very relevant to the case, and just takes away from what is already a rather boring serial killer story. There wasn't too much doubt about who the killer was, the minute they are introduced, because the Unfortunately, what urgency there was to the plot was stifled by the continuous insertion of the main character's back story. Elsa, the FBI Agent who exclusively works missing kid cases, has a tortured background, which I agree is a good way of adding depth to her. But, tragic as it is, it's not very relevant to the case, and just takes away from what is already a rather boring serial killer story. There wasn't too much doubt about who the killer was, the minute they are introduced, because the creepiness is not too subtle. I also thought it shocking that the killer got away with as many kills as they did, because they didn't seem too bright.Maybe I'll read the next in the series, but it's not high on my list.
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  • Kristina Reads - Books. Blogs. Memes.
    January 1, 1970
    How can you make sense of a person who confuses suffering and love, with such devastating results?Trigger warnings: domestic violence, self injuryMy reviews can also be found on my blog Kristina Reads. This mystery-thriller debut from Karen Ellis will be familiar but intriguing territory for fans of police procedural led by a capable woman. Elsa Myers certainly has some dark demons – she was abused by her mother as a child and let down by her father who couldn’t find the courage to remove his da How can you make sense of a person who confuses suffering and love, with such devastating results?Trigger warnings: domestic violence, self injuryMy reviews can also be found on my blog Kristina Reads. This mystery-thriller debut from Karen Ellis will be familiar but intriguing territory for fans of police procedural led by a capable woman. Elsa Myers certainly has some dark demons – she was abused by her mother as a child and let down by her father who couldn’t find the courage to remove his daughters from their home to keep them safe from their own mother. After her mother was killed in a home invasion when Elsa was a teenager, she’s been able to find solace and some level of recovery in her father, who is now dying of cancer.Karen Ellis has great way with words here. Her descriptions and writing style are beautiful, and she can elaborate on any setting without sounding tedious. I also really appreciated finding out that one of the major characters is gay, even though it wasn’t revealed to the end. If this person is in future books I would be happy to know the LGBT community is getting some representation.She has a litany of her own never-found girls and boys, and replaying them is like a helpless dream where you’re caught inside a hall of mirrors in which innocence inverts, those little smiles becoming helpless screams.That being said, the book didn’t really click with me. This story is focused far more on the development of Elsa’s character than the actual mystery, which I think is why I didn’t enjoy it as much as I hoped to. A psychologist is brought in to help track down the kidnapper but there’s not too much development of his motivation. Much more important is a confrontation between Elsa’s sister Tara and Tara’s daughter Mel, after Elsa breaks a promise to keep Mel’s secret. The family dynamics are in full view as Elsa flashes back to her abusive childhood frequently and wonders what parts of her have been irreparably damaged by those years. The most jarring evidence of Elsa’s damaged psyche comes in the form of words and shapes she’s drawn on to her skin over the years, cutting over and over again until permanent scars form. This had a really Sharp Objects feel to it so I didn’t find it as interesting a plot device as I was probably supposed to.Why is it so important to know every detail about your body when it works just fine all on its very own?The narration style also didn’t flow with me. Interspersed with third person present day narration of Elsa’s work, there are also Elsa’s second-person flashbacks and another set of second-person chapters by a kidnapping victim. Compared with telling the main story in present tense vs past (she looks across the street vs. she looked across the street) the format just felt a little gimmicky.I’m nit picking now, but there were other parts of the book that just flat out didn’t make sense. There are two characters with tattoos despite being under 18 years old, although this is somewhat explained away by one character. One girl’s father gives her a realistic-looking fake gun to use as protection against an insistent ex-boyfriend, but apparently doesn’t care enough to ask more about what the hell is going on. The main big twist at the end I saw coming from a mile away. And there’s also kind of a weird part where Elsa’s father tells her to “let it go.”This was a quick read and will be enjoyable for people who prefer a more character-driven story rather than the actual mystery at the heart of the novel.I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    When 17 year old Ruby Haverstock disappears on her way home from her after-school job in Queens, New York, it's a race against the clock to find her before it's too late. The investigation falls to FBI special agent Elsa Myers, who has a successful track record of finding missing children. But Elsa has demons of her own and family matters that are competing for her attention. As she zeroes in on a wily abductor in a case that straddles multiple jurisdictions, circumstances indicate a more comple When 17 year old Ruby Haverstock disappears on her way home from her after-school job in Queens, New York, it's a race against the clock to find her before it's too late. The investigation falls to FBI special agent Elsa Myers, who has a successful track record of finding missing children. But Elsa has demons of her own and family matters that are competing for her attention. As she zeroes in on a wily abductor in a case that straddles multiple jurisdictions, circumstances indicate a more complex criminal and scenario. And as the situation hits closer to home than is comfortable, Elsa struggles to maintain her focus and keep her composure long enough to protect others in her orbit and rescue the missing teen.A Map of the Dark is a fast-paced thriller from Karen Ellis, aka Katia Lief, and the first book in a new series.
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  • Susan Angela Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    A map of the dark by karen ellis.FBI Agent Elsa Myers finds missing people.She knows how it feels to be lost...Though her father lies dying in a hospital north of New York City, Elsa cannot refuse a call for help. A teenage girl has gone missing from Forest Hills, Queens, and during the critical first hours of the case, a series of false leads hides the fact that she did not go willingly.A very good read although I found it slow. 4*. Netgalley and hodder and stoughton.
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