She-Hulk, Volume 2
Let them eat cake! Jennifer Walters is only just getting used to her new Hulk alter ego when an internet-famous cooking show host transforms into a hideous monster - on camera! Now, Jen must come to terms with her own monstrous side in time to help. Can she find an antidote for the host before the drug that caused it hits the streets - and its horrific effects start to spread? Maybe with a little help from Patsy Walker, A.K.A. Hellcat!COLLECTING: HULK 7-11

She-Hulk, Volume 2 Details

TitleShe-Hulk, Volume 2
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302905682
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel

She-Hulk, Volume 2 Review

  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    I am very much a fan of Mariko Tamaki, indie comics artist and fiction writer (and more) who is now working on Supergirl-Being Super, She-Hulk, and so much more in comics. I liked the first volume of this and like the second less well. I like Jen's character and the support group for her PTSD, I like her best friend, Patsy Walker (a.k.a Hell-Cat) as one of the best things about this volume. I don't much love her date scene (ooh, a jerk/monster!) though it is a bit clever to satirize how comics u I am very much a fan of Mariko Tamaki, indie comics artist and fiction writer (and more) who is now working on Supergirl-Being Super, She-Hulk, and so much more in comics. I liked the first volume of this and like the second less well. I like Jen's character and the support group for her PTSD, I like her best friend, Patsy Walker (a.k.a Hell-Cat) as one of the best things about this volume. I don't much love her date scene (ooh, a jerk/monster!) though it is a bit clever to satirize how comics usually look at girls, I guess. I am a bit disappointed by this one, with all the different artists, but I will read the next one.
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  • Julie Ehlers
    January 1, 1970
    Arrrgh! I was so excited to read Let Them Eat Cake and I wish I could give it five stars, but unfortunately there were a couple of problems that made me want to HULK SMASH everything. Don't get me wrong—I'm a major fan of this She-Hulk reboot. As with the first volume, I loved the storyline of this one, loved the setting, loved the whole "battling the monster inside us" theme. I love Jen Walters both as her ordinary self and as her alter ego, love her assistant, love the fact that her best frien Arrrgh! I was so excited to read Let Them Eat Cake and I wish I could give it five stars, but unfortunately there were a couple of problems that made me want to HULK SMASH everything. Don't get me wrong—I'm a major fan of this She-Hulk reboot. As with the first volume, I loved the storyline of this one, loved the setting, loved the whole "battling the monster inside us" theme. I love Jen Walters both as her ordinary self and as her alter ego, love her assistant, love the fact that her best friend is a superhero named Hellcat. I found most of this volume riveting—my train ride home has never gone by so fast. Unfortunately, as is often the case with these collected volumes, several artists were used, and the art in issues 9 and 10 was just awful, weirdly juvenile and inappropriate. Our heroine was engaging in hand-to-hand combat with a bad guy, but the sneer she wore was more like that of a mean girl who'd just spotted a rival cheerleader walking by her locker. Worse still, her body and clothes were the most pornified they've been in the series so far. Artists, Jen Walters is a criminal attorney and she is the Hulk. SHOW SOME RESPECT. The last issue, number 11, had a different artist, and I was hoping to finish the volume on a positive note. Alas, it was not to be. Issue 11 was a goofy standalone wherein our heroine goes out on a blind date. Sure, all of the standard rom-com tropes are subverted (kind of), but they're also shown in all their cliched glory. This kind of thing never works. Comics creators, when will you learn? You can't show dumb tropes and truly subvert them simultaneously. You're better off just not wasting your (and your readers') time.Anyway, I would still recommend the She-Hulk series to anyone who likes superhero comics, but sadly this volume was yet another lesson in how important it is for comics to have artists who really understand the characters. In conclusion, Fiona Staples should just illustrate everything. The end.
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    Damn. What happened? The first volume of Tamaki’s She-Hulk was one of my favorite comics of the last year. It was smart, moody, understated, a thoughtful depiction of a person going through trauma. This? This was like when Gail Simone’s Batgirl got suddenly replaced by that Batgirl of Burnside bullshit all over again. In this volume we get a dumb storyline involving some youtuber who accidentally turned into a monster and was hulking out for four issues, and then an even stupider issue about Jen Damn. What happened? The first volume of Tamaki’s She-Hulk was one of my favorite comics of the last year. It was smart, moody, understated, a thoughtful depiction of a person going through trauma. This? This was like when Gail Simone’s Batgirl got suddenly replaced by that Batgirl of Burnside bullshit all over again. In this volume we get a dumb storyline involving some youtuber who accidentally turned into a monster and was hulking out for four issues, and then an even stupider issue about Jen on a date with a guy who turned out to be an evil robot. Ughhhhhh... Did the editors think that the first volume was too much for the general audience and decided they should dumb it down? The sudden change of tone is absolutely baffling. Argh, who cares. This was the last ongoing Marvel comic I was interested in, and now that’s gone, too. Good job, Marvel. Good job.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Boy, this book quickly turned into a clunker. The first arc was great, well thought out story, fantastic pacing. This reminded me of all those other run of the mill Marvel books with poor art that don't make it past issue 12. There were 4 artists on 5 issues ranging from "meh" to give it to the intern to draw because we missed our deadline. The difference in artists midbook in issues 9 and 10 was jarring. I was really looking forward to reading this. It was a real disappointment.
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  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    The most compelling part of this series for me is Jen's recovery story. Tamaki does a wonderful job of portraying Jen's life after CW II without making it seem like there's a "miracle cure". She attends support groups, she has her coping techniques to manage anxiety and this series shows her finding a way to function while helping people around her. Overall, I didn't enjoy this one as much as the previous volume because of the last, sort of hammy issue and it just didn't seem to flow as well as The most compelling part of this series for me is Jen's recovery story. Tamaki does a wonderful job of portraying Jen's life after CW II without making it seem like there's a "miracle cure". She attends support groups, she has her coping techniques to manage anxiety and this series shows her finding a way to function while helping people around her. Overall, I didn't enjoy this one as much as the previous volume because of the last, sort of hammy issue and it just didn't seem to flow as well as the first one. It's still wonderful but it didn't resonate with me the same way the first one did.That being said, there is still a LOT to love here:- the couple, Oliver and Warren, were written well enough that I got attached and cared about their plight. They're actually people with their own goals and lives so I really cared what happened to them. They truly care about them and I was so angry on their behalf during this book.- Jen is wonderful as always. Tamaki has a great handle on the character and I root for her everytime. I'm enjoying this book a lot more than Slott's run which is saying something. Sorry, but a part of me will always think women write female characters better than 99% of male writers. It's all in how you choose to portray our motivations. Which brings me to:- Patsy Walker and her friendship with Jen. I really love this! They're really supportive of each other and Patsy is never scared of Jen or the Hulk. It's a great female friendship. - the plot is actually interesting. Sometimes, it's hard for authors to accomplish great characterization and development and still give us a decent plot. Tamaki doesn't struggle with that at all. - the metaphor and Jen wondering about what Bruce would think if he read Mary Shelley's Frankenstein really resonated with me. Bruce didn't read a lot of fiction but I'd be interested to see his thoughts on who was the more sympathetic character: Victor or his monster?
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  • Craig
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not a big fan of this rebooted Jennifer Walters character; it's not bad, just not nearly as good as it once was. The book is well-written, but the situation is unappealing. This second book gets a bit overly silly with a plot centered around cake-baking-videos, which is an unfortunate side-track when a happy, competent, confident character is in the process of being re-booted as grey, grim, unhappy, and unconfident. The five issues are illustrated by four different artists, so there's a big I'm not a big fan of this rebooted Jennifer Walters character; it's not bad, just not nearly as good as it once was. The book is well-written, but the situation is unappealing. This second book gets a bit overly silly with a plot centered around cake-baking-videos, which is an unfortunate side-track when a happy, competent, confident character is in the process of being re-booted as grey, grim, unhappy, and unconfident. The five issues are illustrated by four different artists, so there's a big lack of consistency in the style and look.
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  • Ken Moten
    January 1, 1970
    This volume continues the best comics about post-traumatic stress disorder being published right now. Probably the only one being published right now. After the events of the last volume, Jennifer Walters is no longer ignoring her ptsd, though she is not back to being a superhero full-time either. She is being eased back into her life by her best friend, Patsy Walker (a.k.a Hell-Cat) and they are solving another situation involving someone who gets into a situation that is similar to (She-)Hulk' This volume continues the best comics about post-traumatic stress disorder being published right now. Probably the only one being published right now. After the events of the last volume, Jennifer Walters is no longer ignoring her ptsd, though she is not back to being a superhero full-time either. She is being eased back into her life by her best friend, Patsy Walker (a.k.a Hell-Cat) and they are solving another situation involving someone who gets into a situation that is similar to (She-)Hulk's. She is regaining more control over her Hulk-mode, but still a far ways from her pre-CWII self. This is a story helps get as much into head of Jen as it does the people she is trying to help. It also does an interesting call-back/tribute to the John Byrne-era of She-Hulk which I have read of, but not yet read. I will be doing that soon, since I now have an interest in the characters history.
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  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I'm still low-key enjoying this series, though this volume is a little too much a retread of the first. Once again, the center of Jennifer's attention is a person who is going through problems that reflect her own. Last time it was physical trauma, this time it is involuntarily becoming a big green monster. A bunch of threads slowly come together as the story once again builds toward a big anticlimactic fight scene. I like exploring different facets of Jennifer's character in a dramatic way, but I'm still low-key enjoying this series, though this volume is a little too much a retread of the first. Once again, the center of Jennifer's attention is a person who is going through problems that reflect her own. Last time it was physical trauma, this time it is involuntarily becoming a big green monster. A bunch of threads slowly come together as the story once again builds toward a big anticlimactic fight scene. I like exploring different facets of Jennifer's character in a dramatic way, but the final issue with it's meta fourth-wall breaking throwback to old She-Hulk antics made me miss the energy that made She-Hulk series of the past so much fun.
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  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    I'm definitely happy as new Marvel comics can move further out from Civil War II and get back to like, other things. (Although I do appreciate seeing Jen's ongoing journey with PTSD and trauma recovery! But I'm also glad for a return to the She-Hulk blend of sass/shenanigans [feat Hellcat] and legal expertise.) Plus I LOVE that the arc revolved around a queer couple who have a baking YouTube channel.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    I would like Mariko to write all the comics pls
  • Drown Hollum
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, this was terrible! I don't know what happened here. The first volume was incredible thoughtful, and a creative exploration of depression and trauma. This volume, was almost unreadably banal and filled with leaps of logic in a superhero story that failed in just about every way a superhero story can fail. There was no growth for the main character, there was no satisfying resolution, and there wasn't even really a villain. It wasn't subversive and exploratory, it was just goofy and atonal, w Wow, this was terrible! I don't know what happened here. The first volume was incredible thoughtful, and a creative exploration of depression and trauma. This volume, was almost unreadably banal and filled with leaps of logic in a superhero story that failed in just about every way a superhero story can fail. There was no growth for the main character, there was no satisfying resolution, and there wasn't even really a villain. It wasn't subversive and exploratory, it was just goofy and atonal, with a bunch of hot-button stuff tossed in trying to pass for substance. I don't even understand why Patsy was here besides the fact that sometimes, Patsy hangs out with Jen. Also, the art in the back half of this book gets pretty bad, not to mention the abysmal "Tinder(???) issue" which caps the whole thing off. She-Hulk is my favorite Marvel hero. I loved Slott's run, I loved Soule's run, and I loved the first arc of Tamaki's run. But now I'm bouncing out, until there's a change in creative.Bummer.
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  • Mitchell
    January 1, 1970
    The backup story was annoying. Well actually the breaking the wall and talking to the reader and the romance channel announcer was annoying - the actual story wasn't horrible. But the main story. It's like the hint of who Jen Walters is, is inescapable. And makes for an interesting story whether she's lawyering or trying to save a gay cake cooking youtube star. It just came across off as interesting and heartfelt and real plus monster juice.
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  • Louie
    January 1, 1970
    As an obsessive GBBO watcher, this arc was very relatable. #scrummy
  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Still not totally sold on Grey She-Hulk, but I do like that Hellcat keeps coming around.
  • Adam Fisher
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Walters is still coming to grips with her gray Hulk form, but support groups can only help so much. When a aspiring chef livestreams his most recent attempt at a cake, he is poisoned by "monster juice" as a prank from two of his crew, changing him into something close to Abomination. Jen, being a fan of the show, rushes to his aid. What follows (other than a team up with Hellcat and quite a few battles) is She-Hulk getting a lesson in what it means to be a "monster". Lots of internal di Jennifer Walters is still coming to grips with her gray Hulk form, but support groups can only help so much. When a aspiring chef livestreams his most recent attempt at a cake, he is poisoned by "monster juice" as a prank from two of his crew, changing him into something close to Abomination. Jen, being a fan of the show, rushes to his aid. What follows (other than a team up with Hellcat and quite a few battles) is She-Hulk getting a lesson in what it means to be a "monster". Lots of internal dialogue and exposition, Jen is coming to terms more and more with her rage-filled ways. The chef ends this Volume in the hospital, trying to heal.As a second tale, we see a 4th wall breaking issue about Jen going on a date. Starting off as a horrible, self-absorbed wine snob, her date becomes a destructive robot and Hulk must throw down. Is it a setup by "Robyn", the self-proclaimed biggest fan of Jen Walters who we see in the shadows near the end of the Volume? Perhaps.... but we'll find out soon enough. This title is the right amount of Hulking out and internal drama. :) Recommend.
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  • Ronald
    January 1, 1970
    While this volume threats She-Hulk Jennifer Walters somewhat better, she is still a victim unable to cope with anger (or was it fear or hormones or some woman body issues?) It is just another guy writing a woman he does not understand and treats the character like a caricature and not a real person. But unlike the previous volume there is an actual story and mystery to solve. That part of the book was well written and executed even if the "villains" were dumber than rocks. Now if only the writer While this volume threats She-Hulk Jennifer Walters somewhat better, she is still a victim unable to cope with anger (or was it fear or hormones or some woman body issues?) It is just another guy writing a woman he does not understand and treats the character like a caricature and not a real person. But unlike the previous volume there is an actual story and mystery to solve. That part of the book was well written and executed even if the "villains" were dumber than rocks. Now if only the writers and editors at Marvel actually wrote She-Hulk as real as the male character, you know like a person.
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  • Garrett
    January 1, 1970
    Tonally, I feel like we've a had a major lift from the first volume to this one; the first one was explicitly dark for our heroine, in this one, we've got more of a "how do use this situation" vibe going on, and actual bad guys to confront. Still present is rumination on what it means to be monstrous, so this is a good read, cleanly illustrated, but not complicated. Together with the first one, could either be a jumping on point for a younger reader OR an archive for longtime She-Hulk fans - a r Tonally, I feel like we've a had a major lift from the first volume to this one; the first one was explicitly dark for our heroine, in this one, we've got more of a "how do use this situation" vibe going on, and actual bad guys to confront. Still present is rumination on what it means to be monstrous, so this is a good read, cleanly illustrated, but not complicated. Together with the first one, could either be a jumping on point for a younger reader OR an archive for longtime She-Hulk fans - a reference to the infamous Byrne GN (with the plot-irrelevant nudity and near-porn) is included, but will be missed by anyone not familiar with that story.
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  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    This one returns to a similar theme of dealing with trauma in a four-issue arc. Then the final issue is a stand-alone that feels way more Deadpool fourth-wall breaking comedy, which is 180 degrees from the previous issue. So the primary story was not as strong as the opening story, and the minor episode was dissonant, so the best I can offer this issue is a 3 of 5 stars.The best bit of humor was dark and completely in line with the theme:“I was in high school the first time I read Mary Shelley’s This one returns to a similar theme of dealing with trauma in a four-issue arc. Then the final issue is a stand-alone that feels way more Deadpool fourth-wall breaking comedy, which is 180 degrees from the previous issue. So the primary story was not as strong as the opening story, and the minor episode was dissonant, so the best I can offer this issue is a 3 of 5 stars.The best bit of humor was dark and completely in line with the theme:“I was in high school the first time I read Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. …I reread it a few months ago. It’s not the book you think it is.A lot of it is about icebergs.”
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  • Juan
    January 1, 1970
    It was okay. In a way I cant take this entire volume serious which is evident by the last issue where Jen breaks the fourth wall on "date night." For the majority of the volume, the bad guy was like a make shift Abomination. It wasnt all that bad of a villain. Here and there Jen Walters inner monologue was thought provoking as she discusses what it means to live as a monster, have no control over being a monster, and then making a comparison to Frankenstein. I would say that the down side would It was okay. In a way I cant take this entire volume serious which is evident by the last issue where Jen breaks the fourth wall on "date night." For the majority of the volume, the bad guy was like a make shift Abomination. It wasnt all that bad of a villain. Here and there Jen Walters inner monologue was thought provoking as she discusses what it means to live as a monster, have no control over being a monster, and then making a comparison to Frankenstein. I would say that the down side would be at the very end with the fate of the villain. Anyways, on to Legacy....
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  • Izza
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars | I have so much love for the first volume in the series, so of course I had high expectations going into it, but this second installment was simply not good. The story-arc is all over the place and it lacks the dept the first one has (there are barely any mentions of her ptsd). The only redeeming quality is the Jen's friendship with Hellcat and even then...the last issue was super dumb and cheesy.
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  • Adam Osth
    January 1, 1970
    The story about another accident producing a Hulk-like creature was kind of interesting as it involved somebody being non-consensually drugged with the formula during a live broadcast to create a viral video. The story kind of faltered after that and the ending wasn't great, however. What redeems this and got the 3 star mark was a nice short story about a bad date with a dude that couldn't stop talking about himself that had both comedy and commentary.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I tried to like this but at some point the plot just lost me. The start of the story is a little goofy but then it turned into an interesting situation with a neatly constructed parallel. Then that parallel just fell flat and it ended with the most cringe worthy mini-story ever that seemed pretty out of place. I won't abandoned anything by Mariko Tamaki just yet because up until now I have been a fan.
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  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    Another entertaining volume. The discussion of dealing with trauma was less heavily discussed this volume, but Jen dealing with Bruce’s death through the Frankenstein(‘s monster) lens worked well. Didn’t always like the art and hope that the plot threads of the Monster drug, robots, and Jen-stalkers tie up next volume.And I kinda ship Jen and Hellcat now. Even though the Netflix series makes me want to ship Jessica and Hellcat...
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  • Mallory
    January 1, 1970
    I am really enjoying this run of She-Hulk, but why I loved about this volume more than Vol 1 was the friendship between Jen and Patsy (Hellcat). The portrayal of two female friends, who just happen to be super heroes, and who totally love and support one another even through the hard stuff is something I’m so here for. This put a huge smile on my face and I can see revisiting it when I’m in need of some self-care.
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  • Hurdylyn
    January 1, 1970
    Fun readThis grey Hulk form of Jennifer is different than her normal happy go lucky She Hulk but the writer creates a great world for Jen to work in. The last story is quite a change of pace but still fun. Good read but this is not your typical She Hulk.
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  • cory l. west
    January 1, 1970
    Poor story lineThe story line is weak and the dialogue as well. Felt like as I was reading, so much was underdeveloped. Lots of holes and unnecessary dialogue. I wish I could get my money back.
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Far more mainstream than the first volume, which was one of the best things I read last year. Done with therapy and trauma and healing? Too bad, I prefer that to a 4 issue monster procedural plus a wacky date issue.
  • Craig
    January 1, 1970
    Too many artists and a somewhat trying-too-hard narrative with an out of left field/ weirdo last issue make this a hot mess of a book. The idea is still good (superhero PTSD), but if the idea cannot be sustained, then make it a mini-series instead. Bonus star for Hellcat!
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    After what I read in the first volume, I had no doubt that I absolutely had to continue reading this series. For those of you who haven’t read Deconstructed I can’t recommend it enough, it’s so wonderful. Mariko Tamaki is absolutely what we needed for a She-Hulk reboot, and I couldn’t be happier with her. Which is going to make my next statement that much more depressing. Before the release of this volume it was announced that the series was going to be cancelled. We’ve got at least one more vo After what I read in the first volume, I had no doubt that I absolutely had to continue reading this series. For those of you who haven’t read Deconstructed I can’t recommend it enough, it’s so wonderful. Mariko Tamaki is absolutely what we needed for a She-Hulk reboot, and I couldn’t be happier with her. Which is going to make my next statement that much more depressing. Before the release of this volume it was announced that the series was going to be cancelled. We’ve got at least one more volume ahead of us, but beyond that I can’t say. I sincerely hope Tamaki and her team were given enough warning to give this series the proper sendoff it deserves. I’d be heartbroken if it ended with an unfinished plotline in the air. I’m sure that they’ll reboot She-Hulk again at some point, but I’m still feeling the loss pretty heavily. Especially since there’s no guarantee that Tamaki will be a part of said reboot. In the meantime I strongly urge everyone to keep an eye on Tamaki’s future works, as I’m sure they’ll be worth it (I’ve read a few other series by her, so I feel confident saying that). (view spoiler)[ Some people out there are saying that the second volume isn’t as strong as the second; and maybe they’re right. It didn’t hit me in the feels as much as the first one did (seeing Jennifer react to the loss of Banner the first time was really rough) but I’m still finding myself fascinated with the puzzle laid out before us. Take a look at the cover, what do you see? Does that look like the normal green tone we’re all used to seeing Jennifer take upon herself? No, it doesn’t. And it wasn’t a printing mistake or artistic license either (that can happen on covers, after all). She-Hulk is grey. And I’ve got to say, she looks fantastic that way. There are some changes that coincide with the color swap, which based on the other Hulks we know isn’t terribly surprising. I’d love to know the how and why of everything that is going on here, and I sincerely hope it is answered soon. Ironically the whole She-Hulk being grey bit isn’t even the main plot (hard to believe, isn’t it?). There are actually two plot arcs in this volume, the first one taking up four issues, and the second taking the final fifth issue. And before you worry, yes Hellcat makes an appearance in both plots. The main plot revolved around unfortunate circumstances that can turn one into a monster (or a Hulk) and how sometimes it’s the luck of the draw. It doesn’t change the loss one feels, or the betrayal (which some will experience more than other). The concept of grief continues to be explored as well, thankfully (I’m loving how Tamaki is handling it), and if I’m being honest I suspect this is the root of She-Hulks change to a greyer tone (or maybe they were implying somebody drugged her? Now that would be scary). I’m still blown away by how much emotion is crammed into a few short issues every time. It’s amazing, really. She-Hulk has never felt so real or so human, and I hope she never goes back. I hadn’t really felt the impact of Banner’s death before I read her series – but now it’s like this aching black hole I can’t deny the existence of, and it’s all because of her pain, her grief. I just want to reach out to her and help her make it all better (not that anyone can really do that). The second plot is a whole lot lighter in tone, I promise you. At first I actually thought it was a whimsical one-shot sort of story, especially with the fourth-wall breaking that was going on. I wouldn’t have blamed them for going for a comic relief episode, to be sure. That being said, I’d suggest that you don’t skip this issue; it actually contains some important information. I suspect it’s going to be related to the plot for the third volume, though I couldn’t say that for certain. Regardless, I can’t wait until volume three releases, even if that means we’re that much closer to the end (my poor heart). I do find some irony in that we’ve been watching She-Hulk learn how to deal with loss, only to learn that we’re going to be losing this series. This has been one of my favorite She-Hulk series, so I am very saddened by its loss, and I don’t care if anybody thinks I’m silly for feeling that way. (hide spoiler)]For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Joshua
    January 1, 1970
    I continue to enjoy the new take on she-hulk (now just hulk since Banner is dead) but this volume just lacked a solid story or overall theme/feel.
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