Inside the Star Wars Empire
Bill Kimberlin may refer to himself as "one of those names on the endless list of credits at the close of blockbuster movies." In reality though, he's a true insider on some of the most celebrated and popular movies and franchises of the past century. Jurassic Park. Star Trek. Jumanji. Schindler's List. Saving Private Ryan. Even Forrest Gump. And perhaps most notably, Star Wars. Inside the Star Wars Empire is the very funny and insightful tell-all about the two decades Kimberlin spent as a department director at LucasFilm Industrial Light and Magic (ILM), the special effects studio founded by the legendary filmmaker George Lucas.

Inside the Star Wars Empire Details

TitleInside the Star Wars Empire
Author
ReleaseFeb 1st, 2018
PublisherLyons Press
ISBN-139781493032310
Rating
GenreMedia Tie In, Star Wars, Nonfiction, Biography, Autobiography, Memoir

Inside the Star Wars Empire Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Really just a series of anecdotes and essays. Sometimes about the movie industry, often not. The book is a bit misleading in that Kimberlin didn't work on Star Wars until Return of the Jedi and maybe 20% of the book is about this topic. Another 30% of the book is about the author's time at Lucasfilm with the other 50% being about his personal life. While there are some interesting stories about Lucasfilm, none go into much depth. The book is all over the map as far as the structure goes. One cha Really just a series of anecdotes and essays. Sometimes about the movie industry, often not. The book is a bit misleading in that Kimberlin didn't work on Star Wars until Return of the Jedi and maybe 20% of the book is about this topic. Another 30% of the book is about the author's time at Lucasfilm with the other 50% being about his personal life. While there are some interesting stories about Lucasfilm, none go into much depth. The book is all over the map as far as the structure goes. One chapter will be about Jurassic Park, the next about the history of his family. It reminded me of sitting down next to a retired fellow at a coffee shop and not being able to extract yourself for several hours.
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  • Scott Rhee
    January 1, 1970
    It’s hard to get too angry at Bill Kimberlin for his extremely misleading memoir, “Inside the Star Wars Empire”, although I can understand why readers might be. Star Wars fans (like myself) may be tempted, based on the cover (an f/x action still from “Return of the Jedi”), to believe that the memoir is about working on the Star Wars films or an insider’s look into Lucasfilm or even a tell-all about working for George Lucas himself.While he does include some of this, the book is not really about It’s hard to get too angry at Bill Kimberlin for his extremely misleading memoir, “Inside the Star Wars Empire”, although I can understand why readers might be. Star Wars fans (like myself) may be tempted, based on the cover (an f/x action still from “Return of the Jedi”), to believe that the memoir is about working on the Star Wars films or an insider’s look into Lucasfilm or even a tell-all about working for George Lucas himself.While he does include some of this, the book is not really about any of that. It is actually not really about anything except Kimberlin’s own random thoughts about living and working in Hollywood and northern California. It is so random as to be unfocused and directionless, just a series of humorous anecdotes and vignettes that don’t really amount to much and aren’t even really that revealing or notable.The only truly forgivable trait that makes this book bearable is Kimberlin’s avuncularity. This book reads like a one-sided conversation of a Hollywood has-been sitting in a coffee shop relating long-winded albeit fascinating (sometimes) stories of when he worked with the special effects team for the first “Star Wars” film back in 1976, or ran the editorial department at Lucasfilm in the early 80s, or when he made a low-budget documentary about drag-racing called “American Nitro” that got decent reviews and today has over a thousand hits on Youtube, or when he discovered that his grandfather was a rumrunner during the Prohibition era.The first couple stories may be pretty interesting. One may even have to get a refill. But after awhile, one may begin to suspect that there’s really not a lot more that Kimberlin can add to his life story that will make one want to sit in that coffee shop for four more hours.
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  • Amy Sturgis
    January 1, 1970
    I would give this 3.5 stars if I could.Bill Kimberlin didn't really share any new information about Star Wars that I didn't already know, but it was interesting seeing Lucasfilm and ILM from his perspective. This isn't a history or even a proper autobiography; it's more a series of reminiscences, a recording of memories both personal and professional. What makes the book work is that Kimberlin is a fascinating man with wide-ranging interests in history and culture as well as film. His anecdotes I would give this 3.5 stars if I could.Bill Kimberlin didn't really share any new information about Star Wars that I didn't already know, but it was interesting seeing Lucasfilm and ILM from his perspective. This isn't a history or even a proper autobiography; it's more a series of reminiscences, a recording of memories both personal and professional. What makes the book work is that Kimberlin is a fascinating man with wide-ranging interests in history and culture as well as film. His anecdotes are genuinely entertaining. If you approach this book less like attending an instructive lecture from a specialist and more like grabbing a casual coffee with a friend, you likely won't be disappointed. If you're looking for a perspective that will challenge or change your view of Star Wars, George Lucas, or the film industry as a whole, however, look elsewhere.
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  • L.H. Brown
    January 1, 1970
    A nice, personal insight into what it was like working at Lucasfilm. I always find biographies like this interesting. As a child, you wonder what it's like to work for places like this.
  • Margaret Sankey
    January 1, 1970
    This is an insider's memoir of Lucasfilm and Industrial Light and Magic from the late 1970s onward, probably of far more interest to film industry readers than me. Kimberlin has seen it all, including the many things that worked because of (or in some cases, despite) George Lucas' personal touch.
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  • Online Eccentric Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ Kimberlin is a Northern California native with a love of movie making and a career that included indie films and a long-standing editor position at ILM. This memoir is a very personal series of recollections and vignettes of what he saw or experienced while in the movie making industry as well as his own biography. The book is notable for contrasting the 'outsider' feel of being in the greater San Francisco/San Marino ar More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ Kimberlin is a Northern California native with a love of movie making and a career that included indie films and a long-standing editor position at ILM. This memoir is a very personal series of recollections and vignettes of what he saw or experienced while in the movie making industry as well as his own biography. The book is notable for contrasting the 'outsider' feel of being in the greater San Francisco/San Marino areas as opposed to Los Angeles/Hollywood. As well, the very insular life of working for decades at the Skywalker Ranch for ILM is a perspective we have rarely seen. The focus is not on Star Wars but on ILMs work in the movie industry in the 1980s/1990s (Jurassic Park, Cocoon, etc.)Problematic for me is the writing. Though friendly and conversational, it is a hot mess - jumping around willy nilly with no segues and a lot of confusion. Often, the writer would start talking about one thing in the 1970s and then abruptly be in the 1980s on a completely different topic. I'm sure the transitions made sense to him but a lot of them were baffling. And to be honest, for those of us reading, it would have greatly helped put so much into perspective better (especially how special effects changed in the 1980s from analog to digital) had we been given a more chronological presentation. This stream of consciousness randomness can have its own appeal, I know, but by the end of the book, I felt somewhat cheated out of a good story. There was too much to reassemble into cohesion and too many meaningful connections lost. There was absolutely no structure and flow - and that perhaps is the greatest irony considering this was written by an editor.Because Kimberlin is very much about filmmaking before the solid state era, he has some interesting perspectives as digital overtook celluloid. He was there at ILM through the 1980s all the way up until the move to the Presidio. This is definitely a book for cinemaphiles since there is so much about the technical side side of the business. The book feels more like a love letter for cinema romanticists than for those looking for 'juicy gossip' on ILM, Star Wars, and George Lucas. Indeed, despite the title, the book has very little about Star Wars in it, unless you count editing concerns. He was never in contact with the sets or stars, so we only really get perspective on what the second in the trilogy (and the eventual remasters) did for series. And about the preservation of the first film and the troubles they ran into when remastering. Add in a few discussions about how to make the Star Wars vehicles fly realistically.There are some odd notes. E.g., talking about how all the interns were white and he was pushing to get a black intern - and then when he did, talked about how the kid couldn't fit in. And a lot of the book talks about his side projects, from real estate to his indie films to finding his family's rich history. Too much of it did feel like he had a self promotion agenda - almost as if we are watching an infomercial on his side projects to give them visibility in order to 'pay' for the inside information he would present about ILM.One of the most interesting takeaways, especially in light of what is happening in the movie industry with the Weinstein scandals, is the 'bad boys' man-child mentality of the up-and-coming Silicon Valley computer whiz kids. Even ILM had the 'geniuses' who could create magic with computers (read: Jurassic Park dinosaurs) but who also caused headaches and unpleasantness with their demands and antics.Those looking for inside information about Star Wars will be disappointed. This is really about technical editing at ILM in the 1980s, an indie filmmaker, his quest for his roots, and the changing of filmmaking from analog to digital special effects. As well, there are interesting observations about George Lucas and how ILM was run, life on the remote and insular Skywalker Ranch, and the development of Silicon Valley/Northern California into a filmmaking town outside of Hollywood. But be prepared for a choppy, chaotic, and random-feeling read. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.
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  • Pete Labrozzi
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley, Rowman & Littlefield, and Bill Kimberlin for the opportunity to read and review "Inside the Star Wars Empire: A Memoir".I unfortunately had a tough time with this book. Ultimately I haven't finished it, but instead read about two thirds of it before becoming too flummoxed by the many bizarre tangents the stories within would go on. Being that I love Star Wars and am a big fan of ILM, this seemed like a great title to get an insider's view of the work that went into so Thank you to NetGalley, Rowman & Littlefield, and Bill Kimberlin for the opportunity to read and review "Inside the Star Wars Empire: A Memoir".I unfortunately had a tough time with this book. Ultimately I haven't finished it, but instead read about two thirds of it before becoming too flummoxed by the many bizarre tangents the stories within would go on. Being that I love Star Wars and am a big fan of ILM, this seemed like a great title to get an insider's view of the work that went into some of my favorite movies. At times there's some really unique insights into ILM, George Lucas, the film industry at large, and even the author's own work that is fascinating. But more often than not the author sidetracks his stories to a lot of things that have little or nothing at all to even do with the film industry, or jumps from a really interesting story seemingly before it's finished to tell a different anecdote. The stories that do stay focused and on-topic, sadly often seem to fizzle out before they are fully told or at least left me feeling like there was more to hear but didn't get elaborated on.I also realize this is a review copy before official release, but I've never read a book that felt like it needed an editor's touch as much as this. Unless something is wrong with my copy, stories often flow one from the next, to totally different topics without much in the way of chapters changing or anything that would indicate a particular story had ended and a new one had begun. As an example, one couple page section went from talking about the early days working at ILM into his side interest in acquiring cheap real estate and his missed opportunities therein, into discussing how the computer system Oracle was a large part of ILM's success. None of this with any segue. The other trouble is portions being almost overwritten. At another point in the book he mentions how a screening room was "hot miked so the projectionists could hear instructions from the directors". In the next sentence he stops to explain this already clear idea in essentially the same way, just to expound on the phrase "hot mike".I think the section that ultimately was the nail in the coffin for me was right in the middle of talking about the location for the train scene from Back to the Future III. I love the Back to the Future movies and was excited to be learning a little about how this famous scene was conceived. But right in the middle of talking about the location, the author jumps ship and starts talking about an aunt who lived in the area who raced horses. At the end of this discursion he doesn't return to talking about Back to the Future and instead jumps into a different story altogether about Steve Job's Porsche, foley and ADR.I really wanted to like this book and tried to keep forcing myself ahead several times. While there are some diamonds in the rough that gleam here and there (the effects shot SB19, the section on Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and the story of his creating American Nitro in particular stick in my mind) it was just too choppy, and too consistently off the advertised topic to keep going. When you title a book "Inside the Star Wars Empire" you need to dedicate a heck of a lot more time to talking about Star Wars, or at least stick much more to the insider view of ILM. This book would have worked a lot better for me if it was titled "Inside Industrial Light and Magic" and kept just to stories dealing with the many projects worked on during his time there without any of the detours.
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  • Rick
    January 1, 1970
    Filmmaker and Special Effects Editor Bill Kimberlin, a 20-year employee of LucasFilm and ILM, has written a fascinating memoir about his years working in the editorial department that brought you Star Wars, along with such other notable films as Schindler’s List, Saving Private Ryan, Cocoon, Forest Gump, Gangs Of New York, Back to The Future, and the under-appreciated Roger Rabbit.  We learn about his involvement in the very complex art of special effects editing, including a 60+ shot battle sce Filmmaker and Special Effects Editor Bill Kimberlin, a 20-year employee of LucasFilm and ILM, has written a fascinating memoir about his years working in the editorial department that brought you Star Wars, along with such other notable films as Schindler’s List, Saving Private Ryan, Cocoon, Forest Gump, Gangs Of New York, Back to The Future, and the under-appreciated Roger Rabbit.  We learn about his involvement in the very complex art of special effects editing, including a 60+ shot battle scene from Star Wars that he engineered with his four-Oscar-winning boss Ken Ralston.  Kimberlin’s hands-on special effects compiling for SB19 shot for Return of the Jedi represents an historical moment in the history of special effects for cinema, and is featured on the front cover.  We also are privileged to spend time with the author as he becomes involved in side ventures, which he has generated to remain positive while clocking the grueling hours that high-end film jobs like LucasFilm seem to require.   One project in particular, his movie entitled American Nitro, not only proved to George Lucas that he should hire Kimberlin, but became economically successful in its own rights (it earned money in the crap-shoot of film distribution…).  We learn that Kimberlin made full use of his talents as a filmmaker, to create that low-budget documentary, because he attended film school.  He used such hands-on abilities as writing, shooting, editing and producing that, as Kimberlin says, some very famous movie directors are incapable of.  This and other ‘Hollywood’ myths are nicely exploded throughout the chapters.Inside The Star Wars Empire really comes in two parts (as the author has carefully explained in his Foreword), one where we are led through the door into a secret inner sanctum of Hollywood-style film work (famous names working on famous movies), and the other being Kimberlin’s search for meaning outside the daily grind.  It’s the side projects that nourish him. And the connections he uncovers to his ancestry also renew him and give him self-knowledge.  Because his parents both died suddenly from different causes, Kimberlin had to become self-sufficient at an early age, and in portions of the book he is in search of answers to the cause-and-effects of that situation.  Few have encountered the personal challenges he’s faced. The author’s intellectual curiosity seems to have ferreted out facts and vignettes from every facet of his activities, and thereby encourage readers to operate in a similar fashion, striving to expand one’s own life experiences through observations and research. During the time that Kimberlin remained a high-paid employee living with the constant threat of termination (most salaried film workers jobs terminate at the end of each production), he insisted that his life also grant to him some of the glamour and perks of his millionaire (billionaire!) bosses, including rides in personal jets, investing in real estate, having a personal yacht, all the while trying to become economically self-sufficient.  Kimberlin illustrates how he pulled all that off.  While some may prefer being spoon-fed endless Star Wars factoids, I appreciate a book like this, that can help direct me toward a path of “finding my bliss,” as mythologist Joseph Campbell called it.  For those who desire a DIY life (‘do it yourself’), and a peek inside the Star Wars building, this one's for you. 
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  • Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    I may be rating this a bit unfairly, but this is not the book that the publisher is selling it to be. Kimberlin worked at Industrial Light & Magic, worked on Star Wars, Jurassic Park, and other big name Hollywood films and there are bits about this in the book but it's in no way a "behind the scenes" of the work done or the process of making the special effects for these movies. This is really just the memoirs of a man who happened to work at ILM. Had Kimberlin been my grandfather or uncle, I may be rating this a bit unfairly, but this is not the book that the publisher is selling it to be. Kimberlin worked at Industrial Light & Magic, worked on Star Wars, Jurassic Park, and other big name Hollywood films and there are bits about this in the book but it's in no way a "behind the scenes" of the work done or the process of making the special effects for these movies. This is really just the memoirs of a man who happened to work at ILM. Had Kimberlin been my grandfather or uncle, this probably would have been more interesting to me. As someone expecting a window into the early special effects done at ILM, a company that literally changed the way we watch movies, this was a huge let down. There are small tidbits about George Lucas, and chapters with Jurassic Park titles yet they house anecdotes of Kimberlin's life from that time, mentions of random people at ILM or from his side hustle, and other ramblings about how he saw the future coming when no on else did rather than breaking out the work done on such a seminal movie. The book is broken up into chapters that one would think would help mark the passage of time and give a natural way to architect the "story" of the book, but Kimberlin jumps back and forth in time, will provide an anecdote sort of related to the chapter, and then jump back to his here and there/this and that disjointed storytelling method. This lead to repetition of stories and content and a pretty sluggish pacing.I was just really looking for the book that was being promised to me, a memoir about being inside the Star Wars Empire and its related movies by someone who had a hand in it, not a personal memoir of a man's life who happened to work at ILM with the focus on his own personal history. ARC provided by NetGalley
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  • Dominic
    January 1, 1970
    When I was a kid, I wanted to work at ILM. I loved learning about the magic behind the movies and ILM was THE place for special effects back then. Bill Kimberlin got to live the dream and writes about it in "Inside the Star Wars Empire." Before going any further, it's important to clarify what this book is and is not. The title is a bit misleading. Although Kimberlin worked for ILM, this isn't really about the making of Star Wars or a history of ILM. It's a memoir of one person's time as an empl When I was a kid, I wanted to work at ILM. I loved learning about the magic behind the movies and ILM was THE place for special effects back then. Bill Kimberlin got to live the dream and writes about it in "Inside the Star Wars Empire." Before going any further, it's important to clarify what this book is and is not. The title is a bit misleading. Although Kimberlin worked for ILM, this isn't really about the making of Star Wars or a history of ILM. It's a memoir of one person's time as an employee at the company. Kimberlin worked a bit on the original films and special editions, but most of his work focused on other film projects that had contracted ILM.Kimberlin's memoir is refreshingly blunt and candid about his former company. There's sometimes a tendency to overly glamorize the industry, and ILM in particular, but one really gets the sense that Kimberlin is just telling it like it is. To a large extent, this was a job, just like any other. Kimberlin talks about some of the creative challenges and opportunities he experienced at ILM, but also the petty office politics and management problems. I do wish Kimberlin had spent a bit more time organizing the book. It seems he just collected a number of anecdotes with a loosely chronological organization. The narrative seemed to jump around in time. It was sometimes hard to follow where the it was going. I also wish he'd spent more time actually discussing his work as a film editor for those of us not in the business and not familiar with the equipment he used. Recommended for readers interested in cinema history. (Not quite as recommended if you're just interested in Star Wars.)[Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review]
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  • Deni Ciubotaru
    January 1, 1970
    -Arch provided by NetGalley-This book is nothing that you might think it is (or even what I thought it might be). This is just an unknown man's biography, but wait for it, it happened that he worked at ILM along George Lucas. Oh, yes, I forgot to mention, he also met some famous people along the way.At first you might expect to actually catch a glimpse of a Star Wars behind the scenes. You might think he's gonna tell you how the effects were made and present interesting details, encounters with -Arch provided by NetGalley-This book is nothing that you might think it is (or even what I thought it might be). This is just an unknown man's biography, but wait for it, it happened that he worked at ILM along George Lucas. Oh, yes, I forgot to mention, he also met some famous people along the way.At first you might expect to actually catch a glimpse of a Star Wars behind the scenes. You might think he's gonna tell you how the effects were made and present interesting details, encounters with the actors, some Carrie Fischer magic but I ended up with nothing.There are some glimpses about Star Wars, Jumanji, Jurassic Park and others but nothing relevant and clearly not enough. I didn't like the fact that he just mentioned some unknown names and talked about subjects that were irrelevant for this book. I couldn't care less. Should I even mention the timeline?! There is no chronological order so you might end up being a little bit confused.I just ended up being slightly frustrated because it was a huge let down. I can just tell you that if you want a legit story about the making of Star Wars, don't read this one.
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  • J.D. Dehart
    January 1, 1970
    Being a self-confessed cinephile, I found this book interesting in a variety of ways. First were the author’s notes on the construction and purpose of his own filmmaking projects, including American Nitro.Of course, there are layers of experience shared in this book about working for George Lucas, with techniques described and anecdotes aplenty. The author takes us film by film through many of the projects he worked on, commenting on the process, sharing behind-the-scenes insights, and speaking Being a self-confessed cinephile, I found this book interesting in a variety of ways. First were the author’s notes on the construction and purpose of his own filmmaking projects, including American Nitro.Of course, there are layers of experience shared in this book about working for George Lucas, with techniques described and anecdotes aplenty. The author takes us film by film through many of the projects he worked on, commenting on the process, sharing behind-the-scenes insights, and speaking on the cultural impacts of the films.Finally, there is a human voice at the center of this book, sharing personal and sometimes painful life experiences. I appreciated this too.I greatly enjoyed reading this book, and recommend it for others, as well.
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  • Raymond
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from NetGalley and Lyons Press in exchange for a fair and honest review. Thank you!🙂I was a bit disappointed with this book. I’m a fan of ILM and Star Wars and really thought that this would be an insightful look at the workings of the film company and perhaps learn about the work behind Jurassic Park and Back to the Future, but alas. The author mentions these topics but goes off on a tangent into his background and relatives, which is interesting and I don’t have any partic I received this book from NetGalley and Lyons Press in exchange for a fair and honest review. Thank you!🙂I was a bit disappointed with this book. I’m a fan of ILM and Star Wars and really thought that this would be an insightful look at the workings of the film company and perhaps learn about the work behind Jurassic Park and Back to the Future, but alas. The author mentions these topics but goes off on a tangent into his background and relatives, which is interesting and I don’t have any particular problem with. But it needs more information on the films the author has worked on. This is the reason a person would buy the book in the first place. Interesting but needs more editing.
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  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    I was a little disappointed. I was hoping this whole book was on Star Wars. Had person in mind for it, too, as a gift. Still, for readers interested in the movie industry and this authors insider look at many popular films he's been involved with, this will be a terrific book!I received a Kindle copy in exchange for a fair review from Netgalley.
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    #InsideTheStarWarsEmpire #NetGalley
  • Shane Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    A few movie tidbits but nothing that interesting.
  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Inside the Star Wars Empire: A Memoir from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Described as a memoir with juicy details about the countless blockbusters from Lucas Films, Inside the Star Wars Empire is by and about a man named Bill Kimberlin. He’s worked in the industry for years, and there’s little doubt that he’s picked up libraries worth of information about the field and the people in it. Unfortunately I feel that this novel was marketed incorrectly; I w I received a copy of Inside the Star Wars Empire: A Memoir from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Described as a memoir with juicy details about the countless blockbusters from Lucas Films, Inside the Star Wars Empire is by and about a man named Bill Kimberlin. He’s worked in the industry for years, and there’s little doubt that he’s picked up libraries worth of information about the field and the people in it. Unfortunately I feel that this novel was marketed incorrectly; I was given the impression that I would be reading heavily about the behind the scenes for several movies (most obviously Star Wars, thanks to the title of the book) but what I received was a memoir about one man and some of the experiences he had while working on those films. I would argue that the novel is wholly a memoir, and barely a behind the scenes peek. Maybe I’m being just a bit unfair there, as I was really looking forward to getting a behind the scenes look from somebody that spent years in the industry. I couldn’t wait to hear all of the funny stories, quirks, and tricks that went on behind the scenes for Star Wars and Jurassic Park (to name a couple). I felt pretty letdown with the product that was handed to me because of this. Frankly, I would have been ok with that had the structure of this book been a bit more manageable. I’m the first one to fess up and say that I can easily get confused with different time periods and dates, so reading a novel where they’re constantly jumping around in time, talking about real world events left me lost and confused. I felt like half of what I was reading was lost due to my trying to figure out where in the timeline everything fit. I do feel that Bill Kimberlin is an interesting man, and he certainly has a lot to say and share with us, but I also feel this novel could have used another round of editing. Just a bit more to make it more user friendly, so to speak. It could also benefit from a change in title (or marketing/description), since it is somewhat misleading at present. For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Kasey
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by NetGalley for an honest review.I love reading anything that gives insight and personal stories into the process of how larger movies are made. However, I'm not quite familiar with all the terms or how the process works, so some explanation would have been helpful, but I understand that maybe going into this book the author excepts those interested to have knowledge of the subject at hand.Some of the stories are hard to place on the time line as it seems to jump around a bit, but ARC provided by NetGalley for an honest review.I love reading anything that gives insight and personal stories into the process of how larger movies are made. However, I'm not quite familiar with all the terms or how the process works, so some explanation would have been helpful, but I understand that maybe going into this book the author excepts those interested to have knowledge of the subject at hand.Some of the stories are hard to place on the time line as it seems to jump around a bit, but I do like the author's style. Some memoirs can be so bland, but this was fun and enlightening.**I think it's worth noting that you should not go into this book thinking it's completely about the making of Star Wars; there may be some misconception there.
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  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    This memoir of working with George Lucas contains some interesting tidbits, but lacks organization.
  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent perspective of the movie industry from an actual employee. He provided his point of view and his experience. I would like to see some pictures about the author during his experience.
  • J.B.
    January 1, 1970
    This is for the Star Wars junky. If you live and breath that world you'll absolutely love everything to do with this book. I'm not one of those people, but still, I respect the level of attention and love put into this effort. If I can dig it, hardcore SW fans will adore it.
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