Bloom
A dazzling picture book biography of one of the world's most influential designers, Elsa Schiaparelli. Elsa dared to be different, and her story will not only dazzle, it will inspire the artist and fashionista in everyone who reads it. By the 1930s Elsa Schiaparelli had captivated the fashion world in Paris, but before that, she was a little girl in Rome who didn’t feel pretty at all. Bloom: A Story of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli is the enchanting story for young readers of how a young girl used her imagination and emerged from plain to extraordinary.As a young girl in Rome, Elsa Schiaparelli (1890–1973) felt “brutta” (ugly) and searched all around her for beauty. Seeing the colors of Rome’s flower market one day, young Elsa tried to plant seeds in her ears and nose, hoping to blossom like a flower. All she got was sick, but from that moment, she discovered her own wild imagination.In the 1920 and '30s, influenced by her friends in the surrealist art movement, Schiaparelli created a vast collection of unique fashion designs—hats shaped like shoes, a dress adorned with lobsters, gloves with fingernails, a dress with drawers and so many more. She mixed her own bold colors and invented her own signature shades, including shocking pink.Bloom: A Story of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli is a stunning and sophisticated picture book biography that follows Schiaparelli’s life from birth and childhood to height of success.Kyo Maclear and Julie Morstad (creators of Julia, Child) have gorgeously interpreted Schiaparelli’s life. Maclear tells a lyrical story with moments both poignant and humorous and Morstad’s elegant imagery saturates the pages with Schiaparelli-inspired shapes and colors.Informative backmatter and suggested further reading included.

Bloom Details

TitleBloom
Author
ReleaseFeb 6th, 2018
PublisherHarperCollins
ISBN-139780062447616
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Biography, Nonfiction, Couture, Fashion, Art

Bloom Review

  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure, I am a HUGE Kyo Maclear fan and love everything she writes. Bloom is no exception. Throw in the fact it is illustrated by the magnificent Julie Morstad and you have a five star picture book on your hands. Bloom is the true story about avant guard fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli; miles ahead of her time and not afraid to be bold, outrageous, and creative. Honestly, after reading the book I fell down a Google rabbit hole, needing to know more information about this incredibly c Full disclosure, I am a HUGE Kyo Maclear fan and love everything she writes. Bloom is no exception. Throw in the fact it is illustrated by the magnificent Julie Morstad and you have a five star picture book on your hands. Bloom is the true story about avant guard fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli; miles ahead of her time and not afraid to be bold, outrageous, and creative. Honestly, after reading the book I fell down a Google rabbit hole, needing to know more information about this incredibly courageous woman. The drive to learn more about a subject is the mark of a fantastic book. This story will have your students/children, wanting to learn more. Bloom provides an excellent portrayal of Elsa Schiaparelli without being overly wordy and overly detailed. It’s perfect for the 6-10 year old audience. I would even share it with those younger and older, especially as an anchor text to any discussion about perseverance and courage. Kyo Maclear gets to the heart of who Schiaparelli was and her impact on the world of fashion and the women’s movement. Bloom is an incredibly timely book which provides encouragement to those out there who may feel less than. It is a study in beauty and how we define beauty in ourselves and in what we view in the world. Schiaparelli continues to be an example for all young people who strive to add a little colour and light to the world, to those just waiting to Bloom.
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  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    This certainly is a gorgeously-illustrated picture book.But like the author herself says at the end of it, it’s very hard to tell someone’s story in such a small amount of pages, especially someone who was an important figure in the fashion world.Elsa Schiaparelli was someone to be admired. From a very young age, she realizes she thinks and behaves differently than others. I mean, who would ever think of planting seeds on their faces and inside their bodies to see flowers grow and make them beau This certainly is a gorgeously-illustrated picture book.But like the author herself says at the end of it, it’s very hard to tell someone’s story in such a small amount of pages, especially someone who was an important figure in the fashion world.Elsa Schiaparelli was someone to be admired. From a very young age, she realizes she thinks and behaves differently than others. I mean, who would ever think of planting seeds on their faces and inside their bodies to see flowers grow and make them beautiful?That’s… wow. Seeing that I hadn’t heard of this fashion designer before, everything in this book was new to me. I appreciate the narrator mentioning that not everything Elsa did became a success, and that not everything was handed to her on a silver platter even if she had help from many different people. I wasn’t enchanted by this story per se, although I did find it interesting, because it feels more like a series of facts placed in order than an actual story.Regardless, I would definitely recommend this to little aspiring fashion designers. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Heidi Burkhart
    January 1, 1970
    I must give this picture book four stars because the illustration is so lush. The opening scene shows two disappointed parents looking down on their baby daughter. Of course the idea was that they wanted a son. They already had a daughter so the idea of having a son isn't too shocking. Many people would like a boy and a girl, and it doesn't mean that girls aren't valued. My concern with the text was that it made females look downtrodden, and that Schiaparelli succeeded despite many odds. Keep in I must give this picture book four stars because the illustration is so lush. The opening scene shows two disappointed parents looking down on their baby daughter. Of course the idea was that they wanted a son. They already had a daughter so the idea of having a son isn't too shocking. Many people would like a boy and a girl, and it doesn't mean that girls aren't valued. My concern with the text was that it made females look downtrodden, and that Schiaparelli succeeded despite many odds. Keep in mind that she came from an aristocratic family who had made a number of intellectual contributions. I don't think that we want girls to get the message that they can only succeed despite great odds against them. It sets a tone that isn't helpful for an elementary student.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    It took me years to recognize fashion as an art form; while I myself am not fashionable, I can now appreciate the creativity behind clothing design. Kyo Maclear's BLOOM would make a great gift for young readers as well as older fashionistas who want to be inspired by the story of a creator with a singular vision: Elsa Schiaparelli. http://www.avidbookshop.com/book/9780...
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  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    A picture book biography of Italian fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli who didn't feel loved or lovely as a child, and didn't have quick success as an adult, but eventually became a famous fashion designer with unconventional styles and colors. Most readers will know Elsa Schiaparelli best for the colors the introduced to the world, like shocking pink and ice blue. Her story is a little sad, especially the way her parents treated her growing up. But eventually Elsa's story is that you shouldn't A picture book biography of Italian fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli who didn't feel loved or lovely as a child, and didn't have quick success as an adult, but eventually became a famous fashion designer with unconventional styles and colors. Most readers will know Elsa Schiaparelli best for the colors the introduced to the world, like shocking pink and ice blue. Her story is a little sad, especially the way her parents treated her growing up. But eventually Elsa's story is that you shouldn't give up. She wasn't a "success" until her late 30s, an age that will seem quite old to the target audience. Some readers will be enthralled most by her brave and unique sense of style. A bittersweet but in the end hopeful picture book biography.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting look at fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli the creator of shocking pink. Her non-traditional designs hit Paris by storm. This story serves to inspire readers to follow their dreams and don't be detoured by the obstacles you may face.
  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    Not being remotely into fashion, I'm not the right audience for this book at all. I tend to think of older children as getting into fashion, so this seems to be missing its audience to some degree. It's really pretty and well told, though.
  • Milky Mixer
    January 1, 1970
    The queen of Shocking Pink! This is discussed in the book right after she wears a shoe for a hat. I really bought this for the illustrations but it's a great little biography of her life, work, and contemporaries.
  • Marianne
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully made and intriguing.
  • Lynn Davidson
    January 1, 1970
    A very interesting story about a girl who grew up to be an inspirational, inventive, talented fashion designer.
  • Lian
    January 1, 1970
    Superb in every way.
  • Michelle (FabBookReviews)
    January 1, 1970
    Bold beauty. Quiet beauty. Hidden beauty.By the age of seven, I wonder: What makes something beautiful? Canadian author and artist duo Kyo Maclear and Julie Morstad have worked together previously- on the delightful and beautiful picture book Julia, Child- and return here in glorious , vibrant and poetic fashion with Bloom: A Story of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli. A biographical picture book about the life of the illustrious, rule-breaking and rule-bending designer Elsa Schiaparelli, Bloo Bold beauty. Quiet beauty. Hidden beauty.By the age of seven, I wonder: What makes something beautiful? Canadian author and artist duo Kyo Maclear and Julie Morstad have worked together previously- on the delightful and beautiful picture book Julia, Child- and return here in glorious , vibrant and poetic fashion with Bloom: A Story of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli. A biographical picture book about the life of the illustrious, rule-breaking and rule-bending designer Elsa Schiaparelli, Bloom takes readers through major moments, breakthroughs, and legacies in the designer's life.Bloom is told in the first-person narrative of Elsa, and opens to a scene in which a newborn Elsa looks up to frowning parents who, we are informed, had been hoping to have a boy. As we soon learn, Elsa's older sister Beatrice- apparently favoured by their mother- is recognized as the bella in the family, while Elsa is called brutta- ugly. This harsh judgment of ugliness by her own immediate family seems to remain a relatively constant cloud in much of Elsa’s early (and perhaps later) life. It is through a failed experiment involving flower seeds, as well as the encouragement from an innovative and kind uncle, that ‘a seed of wild imagination’ and artistry is planted in Elsa- something that moves her and propels her life and life's work to be 'daring, different, and whole...[to] plant a new seed of beauty'. With Maclear's beautifully melodic, empathetic storytelling style leading the way, Morstad's incredible, meaningful illustrations follow to highlight just some of Elsa's significant moments: her stirring time with artists such as Picasso and Dahli; her Trompe l'oeil design breakthrough; the mixing and making of her signature shocking pink; and 'why not' approach to making fashion for women extravagant, unusual, bold, colourful, talked-about- and unforgettable.Overall, Bloom: A Story of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli is a gorgeous work that balances biography, lyricism, and art in picture book format. For readers who adore biographical picture books, or simply love Kyo Maclear's and Julie Morstad's respective (or joint!) work, Bloom is a sensorial feast whether read quietly or shared aloud. Those both familiar and unfamiliar with Schiaparelli's life and continuing influence in fashion will likely find something- or many things!- to appreciate and savour about Bloom. At the back pages, A Note from the Author and the Illustrator mentions that 'it is difficult to express everything [Schiaparelli] was and did in such a short book'; Maclear and Morstad have added a concise yet rich catalog of the designer's contributions, as well as a list of Sources and Further Reading for those interested.I received a copy of this title courtesy of Penguin Random House Canada/Tundra Books in exchange for an honest review. All opinions and comments are my own.
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  • Patricia Gmitrovic
    January 1, 1970
    Fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli grew up feeling ugly. She planted a new seed of beauty with her fashion designs. Beauty is not about conforming to certain standards. Elsa was imperfectly perfect.
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Stunning and inspiring!
  • Baby Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Our book today is Bloom: A Story Of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli, written by Kyo Maclear and illustrated by Julie Morstad, a moving story of the fashion innovator and her passion for color and redefining beauty.When Elsa was born in 1890 in Rome, her parents were disappointed – they had wanted a boy. Her mother heavily favored her older sister, giving her the nickname “Bel This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Our book today is Bloom: A Story Of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli, written by Kyo Maclear and illustrated by Julie Morstad, a moving story of the fashion innovator and her passion for color and redefining beauty.When Elsa was born in 1890 in Rome, her parents were disappointed – they had wanted a boy. Her mother heavily favored her older sister, giving her the nickname “Bella”. She gave a nickname to Elsa as well: “Brutta”, Italian for “Ugly.” Elsa so wished to be beautiful that she tried to plant flower seeds in her ears and mouth so she could grow a face full of the beautiful flowers of Rome, but she only made herself sick. But from these heartbreaking beginnings, an artist grew; Elsa went on to travel the world, to learn how to design and construct clothes, to become friends with prominent artists such as Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali. She became a massive success – people adored her colorful, playful fashions that let women express themselves. She even invented her own color with Jean Clemént: “Shocking Pink”! All because Elsa decided that she would let no one else define her beauty – she was beautiful just the way she was.Wow! I was not expecting this at all. I confess to having never heard of Elsa before reading the book, and the experience of learning her story was a moving one. I adored that the story was told from the first person – it allowed a real connection with Elsa, and insight into her feelings and motivations. Morstad’s illustrations are as stunning and energetic as always, and she uses color and detail to make each illustration not only tell a story, but be an emotional experience. The length isn’t bad, perhaps a bit long for very young bookworms, but JJ loved the vibrant colors. An inspiring story of a great artist, and the empowering lesson against letting others define your beauty or worth. Baby Bookworm approved!Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I had never heard of Elsa Schiaparelli before, but I had heard of her color: shocking pink! I was amazed to read about her revolutionary fashion ideas that are listed in the back of the book. What a wonderful little picture biography to introduce young readers to the art of fashion, and to talk about perseverance to accomplish your dream.
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  • Bonnie Ferrante
    January 1, 1970
    This is a 8X10 picture book that tells the story of a fascinating and unique individual, Elsa Schiaparelli. It begins in early childhood where we learned that Elsa was a disappointment to her parents because they wanted a boy and she wasn’t as pretty as her sister. This compelled Elsa her to examine the concept of beauty.Her experiences might have crush her spirit if it had not been for her uncle Giovanni. He was an astronomer and also a dreamer like Elsa. He encouraged her imagination and told This is a 8X10 picture book that tells the story of a fascinating and unique individual, Elsa Schiaparelli. It begins in early childhood where we learned that Elsa was a disappointment to her parents because they wanted a boy and she wasn’t as pretty as her sister. This compelled Elsa her to examine the concept of beauty.Her experiences might have crush her spirit if it had not been for her uncle Giovanni. He was an astronomer and also a dreamer like Elsa. He encouraged her imagination and told her she was beautiful. Elsa took refuge in the world of make-believe. She yearned to become an artist.As a single mother she realized, “To be an artist is to dream big and risk failure.“ In spite of the unlikelihood of success, she brought her dress design sketches to Paris. Fortunately, she fell in with the most creative and innovative people of her time, including Salvador Dali and Pablo Picasso. Although she could neither sew nor knit,  she was able to have her creations made by others and through hard work became an international sensation. She invented the colour shocking pink and her dress designs were like nothing seen before.The last two pages of the book give more details of her life. It was wonderful to read that she offered high wages and benefits to her employees when she achieved success. Her personal motto was "Dare to be different."This would be a wonderful book to read to a child who is labelled as different or not beautiful or too imaginative or a daydreamer. Like Einstein said, imagination is more important than knowledge. Without the Elsas of the world, our lives would be stagnant and dreary.The pictures in this book have have a stylish quality that suits the topic without being ostentatious. The pictures of Elsa clearly show us her gentle, creative personality and her vulnerable introspection. This success story should encourage children to follow their dreams and never give up. Highly recommended for children age 6 and up. Even adults will enjoy this wonderful book.This book review will run on my blog on March 6 and be the first recipient of an FFF badge for Fostering Female Fulfillment.
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  • Jeanie (Read Write Sparkle Coffee) Cullip
    January 1, 1970
    An ugly duckling story within the fashion world. Kyo Maclear's Bloom is a story of fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. This biographical picture book is told in first person narrative, as Maclear shares the story of Ella Schiaparelli. The illustrations, by Julie Morstad are absolutely stunning, adding to the beauty of the words written upon the page.The book begins with the birth of Ella, September 10,1890 in Roma, Italy. Her parents wanted a boy; leaving Ella to feel indifferent, alone, and unw An ugly duckling story within the fashion world. Kyo Maclear's Bloom is a story of fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. This biographical picture book is told in first person narrative, as Maclear shares the story of Ella Schiaparelli. The illustrations, by Julie Morstad are absolutely stunning, adding to the beauty of the words written upon the page.The book begins with the birth of Ella, September 10,1890 in Roma, Italy. Her parents wanted a boy; leaving Ella to feel indifferent, alone, and unwanted. Her older sister, mama's favorite was bella and Ella was just brutta (ugly). Yet, at a very young age she sought out the beauty that surrounded her; color and joy.At the age of seven she asked, "What makes something beautiful?" This question led to her life's mission to create beauty in the world and planted a seed of wild imagination. Ella's motto was, Dare to Be Different and that she was. Throughout the remainder of the story, Maclear shares how her uniqueness and imagination caused her to become one of the world's influential fashion designers and left the idea that she was brutta; seeing the beauty of the art reflected in her work.I was delighted to read this book of Ella Schiaparelli and learn about her life before and after becoming a famous person of fashion and fame. This is a great read aloud to share with students to show them of a person who lived out their childhood dreams and dared to be different. An inspiration to let go of what others think of you and choose to BLOOM!
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    The life of Elsa Schiaparelli, sad in the beginning and delightful as she matures, celebrates her creative spirit, is beautifully told in first person by Kyo Maclear, with Julie Morstad illustrating using some of Schiaparelli’s own extraordinary fashion firsts. The illustrations blend with Schiaparelli’s designs, fill pages with stunning images of flowers and other images. Be sure to see the pages where Elsa’s face shows up in the blooms. She is blooming! Elsa, through Maclear’s words, shares p The life of Elsa Schiaparelli, sad in the beginning and delightful as she matures, celebrates her creative spirit, is beautifully told in first person by Kyo Maclear, with Julie Morstad illustrating using some of Schiaparelli’s own extraordinary fashion firsts. The illustrations blend with Schiaparelli’s designs, fill pages with stunning images of flowers and other images. Be sure to see the pages where Elsa’s face shows up in the blooms. She is blooming! Elsa, through Maclear’s words, shares part of her childhood, when parents were disappointed that they had another girl, didn’t even have a name, so hers was borrowed from the nurse. They called her older sister “bella” but her name was “brutta”. No matter, Elsa delighted in the flowers of her city, came home and tried to plant seeds in her nose and ears, thinking she would become beautiful with flowers covering her face. It was not a great idea to do this, but after help from a doctor, she continued using her wild imagination. She declares: "I am an explorer, a circus performer, and even the night sky. Dress up. Pretend. Make believe. The world feels brighter." Elsa's words toward the end of the story show what she came to know: “Beauty itself blooms to reveal the irregular, the smart, tough, goofy, surreal, and wild.” There is extra information in the backmatter with further sources. I enjoyed learning about this famous fashion icon.
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  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    Raised as an unwanted second daughter who was considered ugly due to the moles on her face, Elsa grew up attracted to the bright colors of the slower market in Rome. Her imagination soars as she dreams of the stars, tries to fly and finds ideas in books and objects in the attic. Elsa become an artist and soon is designing dresses for herself, her husband, friends and her daughter. After years of work, Elsa has joined a group of artists and starts to design modern clothes that take Paris by storm Raised as an unwanted second daughter who was considered ugly due to the moles on her face, Elsa grew up attracted to the bright colors of the slower market in Rome. Her imagination soars as she dreams of the stars, tries to fly and finds ideas in books and objects in the attic. Elsa become an artist and soon is designing dresses for herself, her husband, friends and her daughter. After years of work, Elsa has joined a group of artists and starts to design modern clothes that take Paris by storm. Elsa finds her own style, freedom from the harshness of her parents’ criticism and brings everyone else along on her journey to bloom.Maclear has created a picture book biography that shows how a harsh upbringing can be overcome with imagination and hard work. The author’s note at the end of the book offers more insight into Schiaparelli’s designs that could not be shared in the short format of a picture book. It is very impressive therefore how much they did manage to share in the book itself, the illustrations and text applauding Schiaparelli’s life and her accomplishments. The illustrations move from Schiaparelli as a little girl to her designs and the incredible pink that she made famous (that is also the color of the end papers.)This is a bright and well-designed look at Schiaparelli’s life and her designs. Appropriate for ages 6-9.
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  • Pink STREAM
    January 1, 1970
    Are you the girl who designs clothes wherever she finds a blank paper? Are you the girl who wears the fanciest clothes every day? Are you the girl who makes suggestions to her friends about their clothes? Are you the trendsetter girl in the school? If your answer is yes, you found the book you are searching for. “Bloom” is about a famous fashion designer named Elsa Schiaparelli who was a disappointment for her family because she wasn’t a boy when she was born. As she grows up she loses herself i Are you the girl who designs clothes wherever she finds a blank paper? Are you the girl who wears the fanciest clothes every day? Are you the girl who makes suggestions to her friends about their clothes? Are you the trendsetter girl in the school? If your answer is yes, you found the book you are searching for. “Bloom” is about a famous fashion designer named Elsa Schiaparelli who was a disappointment for her family because she wasn’t a boy when she was born. As she grows up she loses herself in the beauty of the colors and shapes. She meets with well-known artists such as Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso, Alberto Giacometti and much more. They inspire her and she opens a boutique in Paris. Her boutique becomes the beating heart of Paris. She did it. Like lots of other powerful women. So, you can also do it. Even if people don’t believe you, believe in yourself. Illustrations of the book are very pretty. Especially the “shocking pink” color Elsa Schiaparelli found is a perfection. It is bright, impossible, life-giving. Harmony of the colors in the book are magical. Even if it is not now, pink will become your favorite color. As in the book, the author said “All of us, together: We bloom and bloom.”
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  • Phyllis
    January 1, 1970
    This is a children's book, but also a great introduction to fashion as well as the life of fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. Simplified in order to be understood by younger readers, it's an entertaining story of how a young girl in the 1920's overcame her family's disappointment with her to become a creative and independent woman. It is also encouraging to see how Elsa pursued her dreams and became successful. The illustrations compliment the text, plus the addition of actual quotes by Picasso This is a children's book, but also a great introduction to fashion as well as the life of fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. Simplified in order to be understood by younger readers, it's an entertaining story of how a young girl in the 1920's overcame her family's disappointment with her to become a creative and independent woman. It is also encouraging to see how Elsa pursued her dreams and became successful. The illustrations compliment the text, plus the addition of actual quotes by Picasso, Poiret, Dali, and Schiaparelli herself give the story an added dimension of the creative trend from that time. Now I want to read a biography or Schiaparelli's autobiography (books listed in Bloom) for more depth and emotion.
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  • Doren Damico
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing true story about a woman who defied others' negative perceptions of her by becoming an artist, and an influential and successful fashion designer. I love the illustrations by Julie Morstad, and the way the story includes quotes by the subject, Elsa Schiaparelli, in a hand written font. Motivational and fun. The endnotes and additional sources for further reading, make this a marvelous find for young fashion designers!
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  • Barbra
    January 1, 1970
    This beautifully illustrated picture book tells the story of Elsa Schiaparelli, a young girl whose imagination blossomed her into an iconic fashion designer. As a young girl she always saw things in a different light, one with brilliant colours. Her motto was Dare to be Different. A great inspirational book for aspiring young artists.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Bloom is a beautiful story about a young girl who follows her dreams and becomes one of the most influential fashion designers of the twentieth century. Elsa Schiaparelli loves color. Color speaks to her. This vibrant book has illustrations that jump off the pages and really expresses the beauty and confidence that Elsa brought to her designs.
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Told in a bold and confident first-person point of view, along with gorgeous, bright, and vivid illustrations (liquid watercolor, gouache, and pencil crayons) help to tell the story of Elsa Schiaparelli, the inventor of the color “shocking pink” or as we now call it “hot pink” Additional backmatter provides more details on her life.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I beautifully illustrated picture book biography about fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. Her designs broke all the rules in the 20s and 30s. Also invented the colors "shocking pink" and "ice blue". Great lesson on choosing what makes you happy despite what other people say and never giving up.
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    Picked it up because of the cover. I didn’t even know what it was about and I had never heard of Elsa Schiaparelli before. I’m glad I was able to learn about someone new and in such a fun, colorful way.
  • Jo Oehrlein
    January 1, 1970
    Another book about a girl who didn't fit the mold her parents and society wanted her in, not as a child and not as an adult.She grew up to invent the color "shocking pink" and to treat fashion as art, mixing materials in ways never done before.
  • Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob)
    January 1, 1970
    A tiny bit preachy like most books about female trendsetters and go-getters. BUT, so stinkin pretty that it gets a free pass anyways. The illustrations are just so much fun that you just want to linger over them. Definitely a recommend particularly for children interested in fashion.
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