The Accidental War (Dread Empire's Fall #4)
It’s been seven years since the end of the Naxid War. Sidelined for their unorthodox tactics by a rigid, tradition-bound military establishment, Captain Gareth Martinez and Captain the Lady Sula are stewing in exile, frustrated and impatient to exercise the effective and lethal skills they were born to use in fighting the enemy.Yet after the ramshackle empire left by the Shaa conquerors is shaken by a series of hammer blows that threaten the foundations of the commonwealth, the result is a war that no one planned, no one expected, and no one knows how to end.Now, Martinez, Sula, and their confederate Nikki Severin must escape the clutches of their enemies, rally the disorganized elements of the fleet, and somehow restore the fragile peace—or face annihilation at the hands of a vastly superior force.

The Accidental War (Dread Empire's Fall #4) Details

TitleThe Accidental War (Dread Empire's Fall #4)
Author
ReleaseSep 4th, 2018
PublisherHarper Voyager
ISBN-139780062467034
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction

The Accidental War (Dread Empire's Fall #4) Review

  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsThe Accidental War kicks off a new trilogy in Walter John Williams’ Praxis universe. This time, it’s not a power vacuum that threatens the empire – now the Praxis is the victim of its own success. A financial crisis leads to a fracturing of the Empire’s coalition on racial lines, with several non-Terran member groups exploiting the nouveau riche Martinez family’s connection to the troubles to band all Terrans as criminals. As tensions boil over, military conflict ensues. Gareth Martinez 3.5 StarsThe Accidental War kicks off a new trilogy in Walter John Williams’ Praxis universe. This time, it’s not a power vacuum that threatens the empire – now the Praxis is the victim of its own success. A financial crisis leads to a fracturing of the Empire’s coalition on racial lines, with several non-Terran member groups exploiting the nouveau riche Martinez family’s connection to the troubles to band all Terrans as criminals. As tensions boil over, military conflict ensues. Gareth Martinez and Lady Sula are still the focal point of events, and though their romance was long ago scuttled, the two haven’t moved on as much as they would like to think.Space opera has undergone such a radical shift in the ten years since the last Praxis novel, the Machiavellian maneuvering and Plutocratic decadence on display in The Accidental War often feels like a relic of a bygone era. Williams considerable skills have not diminished in that time: the pace is engrossing - tensions germinate, bloom, and pollinate in a natural progression. The plot develops so logically and consequentially that the book’s title takes on something of an ironic bend. Williams plants a lot of seeds in The Accidental War, too many to come to fruition between the covers of this entry, and for me this felt more like the first act in a long novel than a complete story unto itself. Definitive judgment of its success isn’t easy to parse at this point, but this is a very promising start.
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  • Craig
    January 1, 1970
    I won an advance reading copy of this latest book in the Praxis series in a Goodreads giveaway. I enjoyed it very much, and think that readers new to the series will be able to pick up what's going on and enjoy it as well as those familiar with the previous volumes. It's a military science fiction book, but it's a carefully crafted and slowly developed story of empire rather than a zip-zoom-bang-boom space opera. The politics, diplomacy, and economics figure more heavily than military action in I won an advance reading copy of this latest book in the Praxis series in a Goodreads giveaway. I enjoyed it very much, and think that readers new to the series will be able to pick up what's going on and enjoy it as well as those familiar with the previous volumes. It's a military science fiction book, but it's a carefully crafted and slowly developed story of empire rather than a zip-zoom-bang-boom space opera. The politics, diplomacy, and economics figure more heavily than military action in this volume, and I occasionally grew a little impatient for the titular war to get started. The characters are all exceptionally well-developed, one of Williams' hallmark strengths. (The only complaint I had was that there are several members of the Martinez family, so when a character is called Martinez in narration I was lost a time or two trying to figure out which Martinez was meant, but that's a minor nitpick.) The tension and suspense build quite successfully on a number of levels, and I'll be sure to read the next volume when it appears.
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  • Liviu
    January 1, 1970
    I had very high expectations for this one and the beginning was excellent, picking up where earlier series and the novellas that continued the story of the original trilogy ended; later on the story started to scatter (the accidental of the title is really apt, though the way the author structured it didn't really excite me and it was kind of obvious very early on - without major spoilers, let's just say that the author seems to have seriously studied the financial crisis of 2008 and how it came I had very high expectations for this one and the beginning was excellent, picking up where earlier series and the novellas that continued the story of the original trilogy ended; later on the story started to scatter (the accidental of the title is really apt, though the way the author structured it didn't really excite me and it was kind of obvious very early on - without major spoilers, let's just say that the author seems to have seriously studied the financial crisis of 2008 and how it came about with derivatives and separate balance sheets) so hopefully the storyline will get better in volume 2 now that the action is really startingOverall, great beginning, but then a considerable drop as the way the author structured the "accidental" didn't seem a good fit for the universe and more like being forced to make a point about events in our times, but the ending finally has the action getting going, so hopefully the next book will get back to the level of the original trilogy
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  • Becky Carr
    January 1, 1970
    In this first Novel of the Praxis, Walter Jon Williams beautifully builds the society, characters, family structure without sinking too far into significant “info dumps” that often lose a reader. This story falls comfortably into the genre of science fiction epic, stylistically reminiscent of Star Wars. While it’s a bit more linear than Tolkien, The Accidental War can sit proudly next to the Epics of Middle Earth as well.While this is not the first book in this world created by Williams, it’s my In this first Novel of the Praxis, Walter Jon Williams beautifully builds the society, characters, family structure without sinking too far into significant “info dumps” that often lose a reader. This story falls comfortably into the genre of science fiction epic, stylistically reminiscent of Star Wars. While it’s a bit more linear than Tolkien, The Accidental War can sit proudly next to the Epics of Middle Earth as well.While this is not the first book in this world created by Williams, it’s my first reading of his work. Williams utilizes third person limited POV to weave a tale of political intrigue, action, and privilege.He establishes his main characters early, building the society and politics around them and their relationships with each other and with the minor characters rather than planting them in an established world. The growth when done this way, is more organic and centered on characters more than thematic and genre elements. This is what will make The Accidental War stand out from other sci-fi.
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  • David Pedreira
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very enjoyable blend of space opera and military science fiction. Williams has a light touch with his prose, and he builds a rich universe that is both exotic and identifiable at the same time--which is no small feat. I was particularly impressed with the economic underpinnings of war in this first volume of a planned trilogy, and how they are reminiscent of recent financial upheavals here on Earth. I look forward to the next book! Disclaimer: I received an Advanced Reading Copy from This was a very enjoyable blend of space opera and military science fiction. Williams has a light touch with his prose, and he builds a rich universe that is both exotic and identifiable at the same time--which is no small feat. I was particularly impressed with the economic underpinnings of war in this first volume of a planned trilogy, and how they are reminiscent of recent financial upheavals here on Earth. I look forward to the next book! Disclaimer: I received an Advanced Reading Copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.
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  • Clyde
    January 1, 1970
    With this book the Dread Empire's Fall series restarts with a bang.Good read; I'm looking forward to more.
  • Robyn
    January 1, 1970
    I was disappointed by this book, after falling in love with the previous trilogy. It follows in the first book's footsteps by spending an inordinate amount of time laying out groundwork, only this time, since we're already familiar with the world, it's just boring. Nothing much new or particularly interesting happens, unless you count several chapters dedicated to vague, yawn-inducing economics. But hey, we still get all the exciting military stuff in the last third of the book, and there are go I was disappointed by this book, after falling in love with the previous trilogy. It follows in the first book's footsteps by spending an inordinate amount of time laying out groundwork, only this time, since we're already familiar with the world, it's just boring. Nothing much new or particularly interesting happens, unless you count several chapters dedicated to vague, yawn-inducing economics. But hey, we still get all the exciting military stuff in the last third of the book, and there are goofy aristocrats aplenty -- something you must appreciate if you've made it this far in the series. It has a sort of charm, and I would give it three stars, except for one thing that really dragged it down for me. Williams has introduced a trans woman character (and, if memory serves, the first queer character in the series), and good lord, nearly every time she makes an appearance, the book emphasizes how big and square she is and what a deep voice she has. I want to look past it -- I appreciate it when cis authors work to include trans characters -- but she also wears heels to a gun fight (she sees them as part of the uniform, the book says) and is described as seeming to be putting on an act contra her more authentic masculine personality. So, that was a huge bummer, as hard as I tried to root for her and be glad the Praxis universe has trans people in it. I hope that she or some other cool trans/queer characters appear in book 5, without the offensive tropes.Anyway, I like the prose and where the war stuff is headed, and a certain character who was reintroduced has me intrigued. I will be here for the next entry in the series, but I don't think I would recommend it to anyone who isn't already a big fan of the Dread Empire's Fall.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    As a lover of military science fiction, this first book in a proposed trilogy starts a little slow but pulls you in so that you can't wait until the next book comes out. Set in the future (a long time in the future), humans are part of the Praxis, an empire made up of a number of different species. The characters have appeared in a previous series and that background would probably add to the enjoyment of the book but I liked the book without that knowledge. It's been seven years since the war d As a lover of military science fiction, this first book in a proposed trilogy starts a little slow but pulls you in so that you can't wait until the next book comes out. Set in the future (a long time in the future), humans are part of the Praxis, an empire made up of a number of different species. The characters have appeared in a previous series and that background would probably add to the enjoyment of the book but I liked the book without that knowledge. It's been seven years since the war detailed in the previous series. Lord Gareth Martinez, a hero of that war has been sidelined because apparently life has tried to go on as it had before: the rulers are from families that have always ruled and the upstarts that helped win the war are back to being kept away from any major influence. Lord Gareth has spent his time racing space yachts and trying to get a military command back. Lady Sula, a former colleague of Lord Gareth has also been kept from a command. This empire runs on influence and influence peddling and both protagonists are given a chance to acquire influence; for a price of course. The reader finds out some of their backgrounds and how that will affect their choices. Lady Sula especially is given a chance to influence events and the law of unintended consequences takes over.
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  • Ken Burruss
    January 1, 1970
    Glory to the illustrious Shaa and their servants, our honored ancestors. I speak before you all today to provide you my thoughts on The Accidental War, the long-awaited fourth book in the Dread Empire's Fall series (not that our empire is dread or shall ever fall). Finally released by the Board of Censors after several years, the next adventures of Senior Captain Lord Gareth Martinez and Captain "the Lady Sula" are finally ours to peruse. The book follows on the first three books of the series, Glory to the illustrious Shaa and their servants, our honored ancestors. I speak before you all today to provide you my thoughts on The Accidental War, the long-awaited fourth book in the Dread Empire's Fall series (not that our empire is dread or shall ever fall). Finally released by the Board of Censors after several years, the next adventures of Senior Captain Lord Gareth Martinez and Captain "the Lady Sula" are finally ours to peruse. The book follows on the first three books of the series, re-establishing where each of our main characters are nine years after their last published adventure (minor spoiler: largely where we left them). As the first book in a new trilogy, much of the book is spent setting the scene and establishing the chain of events that will power the coming narrative. While necessary, it does mean much of the novel is spent on build-up with only approximately the last 20% of the book devoted to the explosive fall-out. An economic downfall is largely taken from events from the last decade on the planet Terra, on the one hand an interesting prism through which to view recent events on that planet, on the other hand a bit too on the nose for those who closely follow news on that planet. A denouement is almost entirely lacking, leaving a slightly sour taste in the reader's mouth at the end; it's one thing to be the first book in a new trilogy, it's another to automatically presume all your readers will follow you to the next one.But at the end of the day (a strict 29 hours, as set down by the munificent Shaa), these are minor criticisms on a rousing read. This is "space-opera" at its best, with economic machinations, political intrigue, combat (space and hand-to-hand) set in an intergalactic civil war. It's a story that will keep you turning page after page as you read of events spinning out of control. Williams' narrative style remains a pleasure to peruse. It is an enjoyable novel and one that you won't regret purchasing.Thank you, fellow Peers and Convocates, thank you. Long live the Praxis.
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  • Youko
    January 1, 1970
    The Accidental War is, apparently, the start of a new series in WJW's Praxis setting. It follows the same leads (Gareth Martinez and Caroline Sula) from the previous trogy and sets them up as leading players in a new conflict. ProsGenerally hard sci fi with believable space battles. Gareth and Sula often win because of smarts or grit, which is nice in a science fiction setting. ConsThe first 50% of the book could pretty much be compressed into a single chapter, with no negative impacts to the st The Accidental War is, apparently, the start of a new series in WJW's Praxis setting. It follows the same leads (Gareth Martinez and Caroline Sula) from the previous trogy and sets them up as leading players in a new conflict. ProsGenerally hard sci fi with believable space battles. Gareth and Sula often win because of smarts or grit, which is nice in a science fiction setting. ConsThe first 50% of the book could pretty much be compressed into a single chapter, with no negative impacts to the story. There's a long section on economics which fell super flat. There's also a lot of political intrigue which felt like it had no stakes. I felt little to no tension during that whole sequence and it's difficult to put my finger on it. Maybe the end result just felt inevitable - so the build up seemed like a waste of time. I had a lot of qualms with the writing this time too; questionable vocabulary and stylistic choices (why is Gareth always referred to as "Martinez", even among his family?) kept pulling me out of the narrative. And the juvenile relationship between Sula and Gareth is completely unnecessary.The action in the last 30% made up for it though. It's interesting to see the costs of waging war starting to wear at Sula. Hopefully the series explores this some more. WJW writes extremely compelling space battles, including boarding actions, but for some reason land battles just don't have the same intensity or quality.Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the ARC!
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  • Marilyn
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank William Morrow for providing this book, I was a winner of a galley copy of the Accidental War by Walter Jon Williams.Usually, I lean more toward time travel, or Tolkien type Sci Fi books when reading this genre but I like to be exposed to new books and this book was military science fiction. The Accidental War is, apparently, the start of a new series in WJW's Praxis setting. It follows Gareth Martinez and Caroline Sula, they were from a previous trilogy from this author th I would like to thank William Morrow for providing this book, I was a winner of a galley copy of the Accidental War by Walter Jon Williams.Usually, I lean more toward time travel, or Tolkien type Sci Fi books when reading this genre but I like to be exposed to new books and this book was military science fiction. The Accidental War is, apparently, the start of a new series in WJW's Praxis setting. It follows Gareth Martinez and Caroline Sula, they were from a previous trilogy from this author that I have not read. You can read this as a stand alone book without having read the previous trilogy because the author does give you background of these characters and of a previous conflict that happened 7 years in the past. The book starts out slow between catching you up on previous happenings, you learn that the Praxis is an empire consisting of different species and humans are part of this empire. There is a section on economics which is the catalyst for this war. The pace steps up in the last half of the book and I enjoyed this part of the book more . It goes into the escape of Gareth and Sula and a variety of other characters. Gareth and Sula are both excellent military fighters, so there are some really good descriptive space battles which I really enjoyed.I will read the next book in this series when it comes out.
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Williams, Walter Jon. Accidental War. Dread Empire’s Fall No. 4. Harper, 2018.Like Peter F. Hamilton, Walter Jon Williams is a science fiction writer whose forte is world-building. I missed the first trilogy and short fiction in this series, which began in 2002 and has not had a major addition since 2005. The Dread Empire World reminds me somewhat of the world in the Vorkosigan saga that has defined the career of Lois McMaster Bujold; it also resembles the monarchy in David Weber’s Honor Harring Williams, Walter Jon. Accidental War. Dread Empire’s Fall No. 4. Harper, 2018.Like Peter F. Hamilton, Walter Jon Williams is a science fiction writer whose forte is world-building. I missed the first trilogy and short fiction in this series, which began in 2002 and has not had a major addition since 2005. The Dread Empire World reminds me somewhat of the world in the Vorkosigan saga that has defined the career of Lois McMaster Bujold; it also resembles the monarchy in David Weber’s Honor Harrington series. It describes a complex space-faring society of multiple cultures and species that are kept in uneasy equilibrium by strict social hierarchies and codes of honor. Caught in the middle of all this are two frenemies, a warship captain, Caroline Sula, and Gareth Martinez, a merchant prince. They are fiercely competitive with each other but thrown together to fight common enemies. Williams does a good job of describing the tactics and technologies of his space battles, and he keeps the action bubbling along. I look forward to the next installment.
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  • Paul Wilcox
    January 1, 1970
    It's been years since I read the original Praxis trilogy, and I had trouble finding a good online summary, so remembering all the details from books 1-3 was hard. But this is a lovely return to that setting. Years have passed since the Naxid rebellion ended, and the Praxis has re-ossified into the old ways. Or has it? Walter Jon Williams takes "ripped from the headlines" ideas and overlays them onto Praxis society, with delightful results.Military scifi fans familiar with the original trilogy be It's been years since I read the original Praxis trilogy, and I had trouble finding a good online summary, so remembering all the details from books 1-3 was hard. But this is a lovely return to that setting. Years have passed since the Naxid rebellion ended, and the Praxis has re-ossified into the old ways. Or has it? Walter Jon Williams takes "ripped from the headlines" ideas and overlays them onto Praxis society, with delightful results.Military scifi fans familiar with the original trilogy be warned: yes there is action, but the first half to two-thirds of the book are largely filled with political and social intrigue. I enjoyed it a great deal as I felt it served well to set up the fall, but it does take quite a long while for things to truly start coming apart for the protagonists.Also, this is clearly the first book in a new chapter in the Praxis. The story has resolution, but the accidental war is just getting started.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Couldn't wait for it to endThis is not one of Williams's best novels. It's not even 1 of the best novels in this series. It's not long but it is tedious. Like the earlier novels, this one follows Lady Sula and Gareth Martinez as the Shaa Empire experiences a major crisis. This time, the crisis is economic in nature, caused by corruption among the parasitic aristocracy. For reasons that I won't spoil, a major part of the aristocracy pins the blame on humans. And humans, who have seen the Empire w Couldn't wait for it to endThis is not one of Williams's best novels. It's not even 1 of the best novels in this series. It's not long but it is tedious. Like the earlier novels, this one follows Lady Sula and Gareth Martinez as the Shaa Empire experiences a major crisis. This time, the crisis is economic in nature, caused by corruption among the parasitic aristocracy. For reasons that I won't spoil, a major part of the aristocracy pins the blame on humans. And humans, who have seen the Empire wipe out entire species in the past, are not prepared to go meekly. This may sound interesting, particularly given how much certain politicians are using scapegoating and other forms of demogogery to seize power in our declining empire, but the narrative is too basic, obvious, and filled with useless odds and ends to be compelling. I may read the next volume but I'm not awaiting it anxiously.
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  • Thomas Lennek
    January 1, 1970
    Even if you win the war, can you win the peace? Walter Jon Williams has crafted an interesting start to a new series set in the Praxis Universe. Although the shooting has stopped, and the losers stripped of their properties and/or executed, an uneasy peace has settled in the Empire. Economic turmoil, unbridled speculation, coupled with an influx of unemployed veterans and underemployed naval personnel cause social and political unrest between the species. When one species is singled out as crimi Even if you win the war, can you win the peace? Walter Jon Williams has crafted an interesting start to a new series set in the Praxis Universe. Although the shooting has stopped, and the losers stripped of their properties and/or executed, an uneasy peace has settled in the Empire. Economic turmoil, unbridled speculation, coupled with an influx of unemployed veterans and underemployed naval personnel cause social and political unrest between the species. When one species is singled out as criminal and faces potential genocide, a number of unforeseen events triggers "The Accidental War." Ideally, readers will be familiar with the events and characters from Dread Empire's Fall 1-3, but this can be read and enjoyed as a standalone introduction to the Praxis Universe. It's fast moving and the storyline leaves plenty of unanswered questions for additional volumes.
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  • William Bentrim
    January 1, 1970
    The Accidental War by Walter Jon WilliamsI haven’t read any Walter Jon Williams in quite awhile. This book is a novel of the Praxis and I’m guessing part of a series. The story ends without a conclusion so I expect to see a sequel. The two main characters are Sula and Gareth. Former lovers and now no more than associates or so it seems. I just opened the book again and see this isn’t a first book of the series but at least the third. I guess I have some back reading. An association of species br The Accidental War by Walter Jon WilliamsI haven’t read any Walter Jon Williams in quite awhile. This book is a novel of the Praxis and I’m guessing part of a series. The story ends without a conclusion so I expect to see a sequel. The two main characters are Sula and Gareth. Former lovers and now no more than associates or so it seems. I just opened the book again and see this isn’t a first book of the series but at least the third. I guess I have some back reading. An association of species brought together as an empire by a now deceased race is struggling to maintain the status quo. A society wrapped in layers of bureaucratic rigmarole and entrenched hereditary leadership is starting to crumble. Sula and Gareth are both symptomatic and causative. The story had enough nuances and action to keep me entertained.
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  • Joe Crowe
    January 1, 1970
    (Review from an advance copy.) Space opera! That's what this is, with spaceships shooting at each other and lots of good old fashioned fightin'. Walter Jon Williams returns to his Dread Empire Falls storyline with this book, but you don't necessarily have to read the first series to enjoy this one. If you want more of this kind of thing, you should -- but Williams pushes his whole narrative forward in a way that separates it from the previous stuff. Williams also writes funny stuff amid the spac (Review from an advance copy.) Space opera! That's what this is, with spaceships shooting at each other and lots of good old fashioned fightin'. Walter Jon Williams returns to his Dread Empire Falls storyline with this book, but you don't necessarily have to read the first series to enjoy this one. If you want more of this kind of thing, you should -- but Williams pushes his whole narrative forward in a way that separates it from the previous stuff. Williams also writes funny stuff amid the space explosions. My favorite part: Williams' description of bad guys who aren't trained in anti-gravity fighting. "They clutched at each other, shrieked, squalled, raved...furred bodies bounced off the walls, the deck, the ceiling."
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  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, probably why I didn't like this novel was that I jumped into the middle of the series. I have found in the past that makes me much less likely to like the book, due to not understanding what is going on. I do it all the time anyway because I hope that an author can draw me into his universe at any point (some can).So, my hopes for this novel were that I could figure out WTF was going on soon since it honestly DID seem so pretty...It looks like I will just have to order the first one because Oh, probably why I didn't like this novel was that I jumped into the middle of the series. I have found in the past that makes me much less likely to like the book, due to not understanding what is going on. I do it all the time anyway because I hope that an author can draw me into his universe at any point (some can).So, my hopes for this novel were that I could figure out WTF was going on soon since it honestly DID seem so pretty...It looks like I will just have to order the first one because my library does not have it. It has a number of series like this. I don't know what the problem is. I wonder if it's just with science fiction...
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  • Mitchell
    January 1, 1970
    huh. So kind of a slow moving character study wrapped around a sf version of The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine. I do like this author but I've actually not read the books in this series, so given that this was a book 4, it was surprisingly readable. And then it has late in the book action of various sorts. So definitely okay. But I might have liked it more if I had read the earlier books. This was from an Uncorrected Proof so basically an ARC - Advance Reader Copy.
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  • Kathy Duffy
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy this Sci Fi novel and will be hunting up the other books set in the Praxis but not having read those others did not encroach on enjoying this one. The list at the beginning of the various families and the government agencies had me a bit worried but I didn't actually need to consult them. The main characters are well drawn and three dimensional, the government with all their department their ministers, etc. reminded me of Chinese bureaucracy but he action in the story was different -- ya I enjoy this Sci Fi novel and will be hunting up the other books set in the Praxis but not having read those others did not encroach on enjoying this one. The list at the beginning of the various families and the government agencies had me a bit worried but I didn't actually need to consult them. The main characters are well drawn and three dimensional, the government with all their department their ministers, etc. reminded me of Chinese bureaucracy but he action in the story was different -- yacht racing by bored fleet officers and the slow turning and targeting of one group -- The Terrans builds to a crescendo. I will be adding Walter Jon Williams to the list of authors I follow.
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  • Geoff Clarke
    January 1, 1970
    Williams at his best. At first, the book seems like the last two Praxis novels/novellas: some intrigue, some treachery. But the setting is Zanshaa and there are no small events on Zanshaa. Entirely satisfying in every way.Not only that, but it's easy to read in this book a callout to our current world. Sure, all SF is like that, but Williams does a great job of making the plot alien, yet very very familiar.
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  • Myo Denis
    January 1, 1970
    Interstellar EconWell not Williams' 's best, but still shows his flair for invention and very welcome humor. I've greatly enjoyed my other visits to the universe of the Praxis, and I look forward to me y more. I'm not a great fan of economics, but even so managed to find interesting aspects of the scenario Williams creates, combining universal greed and inter-species friction in a lively space opera.
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  • Sontaranpr
    January 1, 1970
    It's book four so if you haven't read the first three you'll already be lost. This book is a very slow burn. It's two thirds through before any real shots get fired. The first half of the book is setting the scene where a fair duplicate of the 2008 banking crisis hits the economy hard. Noble Houses fall and take everyone down with them. Yet what good is a wide ranging crisis without scapegoats to take the blame? Which is how a new civil war breaks out.
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  • Mark Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. An enjoyable romp. It plays within what I perceive as standard tropes of space opera. Set seven years after the first trilogy. I don’t believe you need to have read the first trilogy to read this book. I really don’t have that many memories of the first trilogy other than I enjoyed it. I can recommend it to anyone who enjoys a well written space opera that you will not find too taxing. Well I read it in a weekend. 😊
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  • Addy
    January 1, 1970
    Like most good SF, A comment on our times.The rich thinking their wealth is a right. A callous indifference to the suffering of "others". Incompetence at the top, failing when stressed...All told with engaging personalities. And a lead, kick-ass, female!
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  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    This is an outstanding fast paced action adventure full of twists, turns and surprises. A definite joy to read. However, it does take some time getting used to the language, style of speech, and unique words. But, it's full of believable characters and a fun future plot.
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  • Nicole Luiken
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed the original Praxis trilogy and am happy that the author decided to continue it. Great space opera with a lot of world depth: interesting aliens, actual economics, character conflict. Looking forward to book two.
  • Elb4966
    January 1, 1970
    Book is not a good read if you have not read the previous 3 novels. Since I have not read the earlier books, I do not know how this story fits with the series. But I do not like it as a new reader to the series.
  • L.
    January 1, 1970
    great stuff
  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    A nice military science fiction with well-developed characters.
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