The Weaver's Daughter
Kate's loyalties bind her to the past. Henry's loyalties compel him to strive for a better future. In a landscape torn between tradition and vision, can two souls find the strength to overcome their preconceptions?Loyalty has been at the heart of the Dearborne family for as long as Kate can remember, but a war is brewing in their small village, one that has the power to rip families asunder --including her own. As misguided actions are brought to light, she learns how deep her father's pride and bitterness run, and she begins to wonder if her loyalty is well-placed.Henry Stockton, heir to the Stockton fortune, returns home from three years at war seeking refuge from his haunting memories. Determined to bury the past, he embraces his grandfather's goals to modernize his family's wool mill, regardless of the grumblings from the local weavers. When tragedy strikes shortly after his arrival, Henry must sort truth from suspicion if he is to protect his family's livelihood and legacy.Henry has been warned about the Dearborne family. Kate, too, has been advised to stay far away from the Stocktons, but chance meetings continue to bring her to Henry's side, blurring the jagged lines between loyalty, justice, and truth. Kate ultimately finds herself with the powerful decision that will forever affect her village's future. As unlikely adversaries, Henry and Kate must come together to find a way to create peace for their families, and their village, and their souls - even if it means risking their hearts in the process.

The Weaver's Daughter Details

TitleThe Weaver's Daughter
Author
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherThomas Nelson
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Romance, Historical Romance, Christian, Fiction, Regency

The Weaver's Daughter Review

  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Now this one is a very good story! A Regency centered around the strife between the weavers and the millers as machine-weaving mills take over the previously hand-done cloth industry—both unique and interesting in scope. It was hard to lay it aside to do other tasks, and I found both Henry and Kate to be equally engaging and principled characters. It was a joy to spend time with both of them, to see how Kate endeavors to show respect to her difficult father, and how Henry defends his livelihood Now this one is a very good story! A Regency centered around the strife between the weavers and the millers as machine-weaving mills take over the previously hand-done cloth industry—both unique and interesting in scope. It was hard to lay it aside to do other tasks, and I found both Henry and Kate to be equally engaging and principled characters. It was a joy to spend time with both of them, to see how Kate endeavors to show respect to her difficult father, and how Henry defends his livelihood with compassion and forgiveness. I wanted to root for both of them to succeed. I also loved how their romance was circumspect and appropriate to the time period they are in.The antagonists were also believable and interesting. For example, Frederica is just as trapped as Kate is, despite her fancy lifestyle and better position in society.I definitely am hoping that this is the start of a new series, and that we get to have a book on Frederica and a book on Kate's brother Charles!Cons: I didn't like how Mollie's having a child out of wedlock was portrayed in a couple places. At first it was made clear that she had asked God's forgiveness for her "indiscretion," but in later scenes it was called "error in judgment" and "perceived sin," which made it sound like she had done something all that bad. It's hinted that her sin of lying is greater than her sexual sin, while Biblically both are against God's laws. Language: "for heaven's sakes" used lightlyThanks to NetGalley for a free review copy. A favorable review was not required.
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  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely tale set in England during the early 1800s. The Weaver's Daughter is about family loyalty, innovation, working conditions and more.Kate is the daughter of a weaver. She loves the family business and loves her father. Her father has plans to marry her to one of his employees. Her father treasures tried and true methods and is resistant to technology changes that could reduce employment opportunities.Henry is the grandson of the owner of a wool mill. His grandfather embraces technology an A lovely tale set in England during the early 1800s. The Weaver's Daughter is about family loyalty, innovation, working conditions and more.Kate is the daughter of a weaver. She loves the family business and loves her father. Her father has plans to marry her to one of his employees. Her father treasures tried and true methods and is resistant to technology changes that could reduce employment opportunities.Henry is the grandson of the owner of a wool mill. His grandfather embraces technology and seeks out new ways.There is clearly tension between the two families. I love that this novel is not so much a romance as it is about the two main characters figuring out their own path and forming their own opinions about how a business should be run and their lives lived.Kate is such a wonderful heroine. She is loyal, loving and hard working. I loved how she put the needs of others above her own.And the cover...stunning.My gratitude to the author and publisher Thomas Nelson for an ARC of this novel. I was not required to post a review and the opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Julie Carpenter
    January 1, 1970
    4.5*Today was a fabulous day! I was able to dive into this book and become immersed in the lives and culture of the weavers and millworkers of Amberdale, Yorkshire, England. The tension was palpable, the strife was straining at the seams, ready to burst and be set aflame with only the slightest spark of anger. With progress comes change. Often, that change means loss of livelihoods for skilled, hard workers. That is exactly what is happening, and has been happening for many years in this little 4.5*Today was a fabulous day! I was able to dive into this book and become immersed in the lives and culture of the weavers and millworkers of Amberdale, Yorkshire, England. The tension was palpable, the strife was straining at the seams, ready to burst and be set aflame with only the slightest spark of anger. With progress comes change. Often, that change means loss of livelihoods for skilled, hard workers. That is exactly what is happening, and has been happening for many years in this little mill town. When the demands for product increase and the ability to meet those demands comes at the price of new equipment, less men to work the equipment and less pay going out, it is hard to ignore progress. Yet how can you ignore the people who have become like family, whom you work with day in and day out for years on end?I loved the prologue. It was a great way to set up a glimpse 10 years prior to the main story, and the frustrations starting, by showing an incident that truly fueled hurt and anger. Yet, I loved having that glimpse of a certain character and then watching that character throughout the whole novel. The choices made and the growth brought on by the goodness and mercy of this character. I should probably include loving heart as well as goodness and mercy when describing said character. I could also tell you who the character is. You've probably already guessed that it is one of the main characters and you'd be correct. Kate. From the beginning setup of the story and her plight, the reader is connected emotionally to her through her hurt, her loss, her ache, her anger. Then throughout the book we watch as she evolves and grows. Becoming better than she began. While all around her is churning turmoil and anger being stirred up and fueled by greed.How long can anger and feuds, past hurts and wrongs last? Especially without it eating away at you? Changing you. Affecting all those around you. What would you do to protect the ones you love? How long can going to any length to protect everything around you not completely change and make you unrecognizable to loved ones. Everyone is affected, especially in a small village where everyone relies on each other. When lines are drawn, which side do you stand on? When loved ones are on either side, what then? Do you try to cover up past mistakes or do you be truthful and honest even with the repercussions that are sure to come? Will peace, redemption and love ever be attainable again?Just a handful of questions for you to think about and all questions that pertain to so many characters throughout this book. It was very well written. I loved the themes of redemption and change and also of not forgiving. Sarah E. Ladd is very skilled in writing flawed characters who endear themselves to the reader, leaving us wishing, hoping and even silently cheering them on in their progression. We're hoping for good to prevail and for love to conquer all. The suspense and sorrow build with a sweet resolution and peace. Yes, if you can't tell, this is a Christian Fiction novel. It wasn't preachy but woven gently throughout the story of everyday characters living their lives and interacting with other as flawed characters.Henry Stockton. He returns to the mill of his childhood. The mill where he left many lingering questions behind, only to return with haunting memories of war. What he returns to isn't peaceful. It's struggle and loss and sorrow. He must learn to navigate it all, keep the peace if possible and try to find peace in his own personal demons. There isn't a lot of emphasis on any particular demon he's dealing with from being at war. (view spoiler)[I thought there would be some big hidden thing he was trying to cover up, but it was just all the destruction, sorrow and death that he saw. There is some buildup at the beginning that there is something bigger, but he is just trying to cope with the memories and tragedies, and adjusting to "normal" life again. (hide spoiler)]Kate is torn. She's loyal to her family. But what happens when that family is on both sides of the struggle? She must choose between family, and decide where to place her loyalty. Or does she sidestep it all, abandoning everything? Or does she choose to do what's right? With the pressure from all sides, friends, family, her heart and sorrows from the past, Kate finds herself torn as to what to do. Yet she could be the means of peace and good if only her family will listen. The weavers and millers must find a way to stop this feud before more heartache and loss ensue.I really enjoyed this story. Anytime Sarah E. Ladd has a new book coming out, I jump for joy. I love her writing style and her stories. If you're looking for a great read I highly recommend this one, or any of her novels. I took off half a star because there were some aspects that were built up throughout the story that didn't resolve, or really just petered out. Aspects that I felt could have been explored a little bit more and develop a little more tension to the story. Don't get me wrong. There was tension, but I would have liked to have these aspects add a little more dimension to the tension. Overall, I enjoyed my time immensely while reading about these characters. The love story is sweet and builds gently throughout the book. Henry's just swell! I am looking forward to seeing if she gives a couple other characters in this book their own story and continues on with this series.Content: Clean. Some remembrances from war, some fighting and gunshots. A murder. No sexual content. This is a Christian Fiction read as I mentioned above in my review but very well written and appropriate for this time period.I received a copy from the publisher, Thomas Nelson, via NetGalley. All thoughts and opinions in the review are my own.Happy Reading!!!
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    A story beset by unrequited love and questions of loyalty, The Weaver's Daughter starts out gently, then culminates in tension-filled scenes and a satisfying ending.The setting and time-period make for a compelling read. At this point in history, mill owners and weavers were at odds. New technologies were making production more efficient, and mill owners had to change or risk losing their business. This didn't sit well with the weavers, who valued tradition and loyalty to each other. The new mac A story beset by unrequited love and questions of loyalty, The Weaver's Daughter starts out gently, then culminates in tension-filled scenes and a satisfying ending.The setting and time-period make for a compelling read. At this point in history, mill owners and weavers were at odds. New technologies were making production more efficient, and mill owners had to change or risk losing their business. This didn't sit well with the weavers, who valued tradition and loyalty to each other. The new machinery that threatened their jobs were the focal point of the strife between the two groups in this story. I found these details to be fascinating. There were North and South vibes all over this story, and I really enjoyed that aspect of it. though Henry Stockton is not quite as stern as Mr. Thornton, it had the same overtones of the disparity between classes. As usual with this time period, I'm always saddened that children were forced to work in order to help their family survive.Kate, our weaver' daughter, is caught in the middle. Fiercely loyal to her father, a weaver, and her brother, a worker at Stockton Mill, Kate is already divided between the two men, as her father will not speak to his son on any condition. When Henry Stockton returns from war, she begins to question her fealty to her father, not necessarily because of Henry himself, but because of her father's own questionable loyalty to her. Is her loyalty misplaced, and how will she respond when lives are at stake?I appreciated that the story is presented from the points of view of both Kate and Henry. They are both likable, yet realistically flawed. Their characters display compassion for others, with a sincere determination to do what is right. I found both of them to be engaging both as individuals and when they interacted with each other.Another character, Frederica, also has a few scenes from her point of view, which had me concerned a bit that she would turn out to be the "villain" of the story and do something cheesy or melodramatic, but that wasn't to be. A complex antagonist, I ended up feeling a lot of empathy for her. It set up things nicely for a story about her, and I hope that's the case because I do think there may be hope for her yet.And, ah, I can't resist saying something about the romance. It was sweet, tension-filled, and utterly swoon-worthy. Regency readers and historical romance readers will be find a worthy read in The Weaver's Daughter. I enjoyed every moment I spent reading it and look forward to reading more of Ladd's books as soon as I can.I received an advanced copy of this novel from the publisher. I was not required to post a positive review; the opinions expressed here are my own.
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  • Kellyn Roth
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted on Reveries Reviews.Title: The Weaver’s DaughterAuthor: Sarah E. LaddGenre: Christian Historical RomanceEra: RegencySetting: mid-England countrysidePublisher: Thomas NelsonSource: from Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)Overall Rating: 3/5 starsThe Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd is a beyond amazing book with a serious moral issue. That may sound harsh, but that’s the only way to describe it. This review may offend some of y’all, but I’ve got to be truthful about my Originally posted on Reveries Reviews.Title: The Weaver’s DaughterAuthor: Sarah E. LaddGenre: Christian Historical RomanceEra: RegencySetting: mid-England countrysidePublisher: Thomas NelsonSource: from Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)Overall Rating: 3/5 starsThe Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd is a beyond amazing book with a serious moral issue. That may sound harsh, but that’s the only way to describe it. This review may offend some of y’all, but I’ve got to be truthful about my convictions, so here goes.I still have some very positive things to say about this book. It was quite well-done. Beautiful writing, interesting setting, intriguing plot, and awesome characters. This book has it all … except that one subplot.I’m again abandoning my regular format because this is a review that defies structure. I need to be able to talk freely.It was really a five-star novel. From the tension between the up-and-coming mills and the old-fashioned weavers, to the (forbidden) romance between Kate and Henry, to Kate’s relationship with her father and on and on … beautiful.It progressed smoothly, kept my attention, had an interesting mystery and a lot of excitement, and was reminiscent of North and South (only I actually like the characters and plot and all a lot better than North and South, shoot me).Also, am I the only one who is just like: YAY MILLS YAY PROGRESS LET’S BOOT THOSE SLOW WEAVERS OUT OF HERE AND ACTUALLY GET SOME WORK DONE!? Because this is how I feel … 😛Also, all the weavers are complete jerks. Some of the mill folks are jerks, too, but the weavers were extra special jerks.The whole setting was so excellent. The description really got me wrapped up in the book, combined with the excellent characters. Henry was my favorite, while Catherine’s brother and Catherine herself ran close second and third. Catherine’s dad was a jerk. #nuffsaidThe only problem was the subplot I mentioned earlier. Now, there are some mild spoilers in this next section, but since they are so mild they probably aren’t even spoilers in some ways, I won’t bother to mark them as such. Also, I hope y’all Christian readers will choose not to read this book, so it doesn’t really matter.Molly, Henry’s younger sister, got pregnant out of wedlock … and Henry as well as Catherine act like this is perfectly okay (as do all the “good guy” characters).Molly wants to keep her pregnancy a secret and comes up with a lie to cover up (understandable, considering the fact that she is going to be thrown off the earth once Regency society finds out), but all the characters are vehement that Molly needs to tell the truth.And once she tells the truth the consequences of her sin (YES I SAID THE S-WORD) will go away?Her lie is a worse sin that her sleeping with a man while unmarried and conceiving a child by him?I am just so steamed about this that I’m getting angry again as I type.Yes, forgiveness is very important … but only if the sinner is repentant. Because that’s what Molly is. A sinner. And I know we’re all sinners … but just ’cause we’re all sinners doesn’t mean that sin is okay.It’s never okay.If Molly’s lie wasn’t “a mistake” or “a temporary lapse of judgment,” neither was her fornication. (The pregnancy isn’t really the problem morally, just to clarify; let it never be said that a pregnancy is anything but a gift. Though it might seem like a consequence.)This entire book treats anyone who judges Molly for her fornication like scum. But … that’s wrong. Judging people is wrong, and no sin is any worse than the other (as far as getting one into Hell and making you need Jesus, that is), but … that doesn’t make sin okay.Also, even though we don’t have a right to judge anyone, of course, Molly will get judged. All the characters are living in this fantasy world where, if Molly is honest about her sin, then nothing bad will happen.Er, excuse me? Regency England, anyone? Welcome to the 19th century? Molly is going to suffer for this for the rest of her life. Henry (and everyone) sheltering her from this fact is gonna do her no good.Nor is acting like everything’s going to be okay, Mr. Protective Big Brother. Dear Henry, your sister cannot just move past this. Sin is never gonna just go away unless you confront it. And though Molly is perhaps very sorry she conceived, even sorry she gave away her virtue, she is definitely not thinking of it on the level of sin.More like an impropriety or an inconvenience of sorts. But what God thinks is what matters … not what society thinks.I get where the author was going. She wanted to show that fornication is not a worse sin than any other sin as far as salvation goes – or that’s my best guess.But you can’t go about that by making lying seem a lot worse than it is and making fornication similar to dropping a plate on the floor. (Which would be a mistake.) (Unless you threw that plate at someone’s head.) (That’s concussioning thy neighbor.) (Or something to that effect.)CONTENT: 4/5Language: n/aViolence: men are shot and killed or badly wounded, one man murdered in cold blood, others killed during a violent attack on the mill. Some talk about blood, treatment of wounds, etc. A brawl at a public dance leads to many a split lip.Sexual: a semi-detailed account of childbearing. Molly has a child out of wedlock and this is treated as a ‘temporary lapse of judgment,’ a ‘mistake,’ and a ‘scandal’ but not as sin which it is (see my whole rant ^^). A couple kisses, a bit detailed.Other: MOLLY LIES HEAVEN FORBID THAT MOLLY LIES OH NO WHAT SHALL WE DO!?!?!?!?! Lies are such a terrible sin … worse than any other, in fact …Not recommended for readers under sixteen unless they are discerning and won’t be strayed by the confirmation of sin.OVERALL: 3/5I’m sorry, but I cannot and will not recommend this book to any Christian reader. Secular readers might enjoy it, as it is a great (5-star!) book except for the Molly fiasco. But Christian readers shouldn’t allow this kind of thing in their fiction. It’s abominable.Review by Kellyn Roth of Reveries Reviews
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Fueled with pride, prejudice and selfishness and then combated with giving, serving and loving others unconditionally is how I would sum this book up! It describes people’s fear of technology even in the 1800’s and the wave of the future and their livelihood.Kate Dearborne is the weaver’s daughter. She helps out doing everything to make cloth. She has been doing this all her life. But the Stockton’s have money and have changed the way things are done and it is taking away jobs with the technolog Fueled with pride, prejudice and selfishness and then combated with giving, serving and loving others unconditionally is how I would sum this book up! It describes people’s fear of technology even in the 1800’s and the wave of the future and their livelihood.Kate Dearborne is the weaver’s daughter. She helps out doing everything to make cloth. She has been doing this all her life. But the Stockton’s have money and have changed the way things are done and it is taking away jobs with the technology. It also has small children doing simple tasks. Kate’s father does well but times are changing and men do foolish things when threatened with their livelihood. Kate’s brother Charles now works for the Stocktons. He is no longer welcome at home and his father doesn’t speak to him. Kate loves them both and sees her brother often. Henry is the grandson and heir to the Stockton legacy. He left for three years and fought a war. He comes back changed. He has nightmares and his perception in life has changed. His once possible future wife is just not what he is looking for or wants anymore. He doesn’t want someone who is fickle or drama laden. He wants someone caring and serving and someone like Kate. As they run into each other often, they both find that they both have the same goals and aspirations in life. He listens to her and tries to make changes based on what she suggests but is met with opposition due to the same pride,prejudice and selfishness and lack of forgiveness in his “enemies”.As time moves forward, things go from bad to worse and people’s lives and livelihoods are tested and hurt. Kate is made to decide where her loyalties are and she can’t decide when it could mean people could be hurt.What I like is that this is like Romeo and Juliet. Except with better outcomes. People have to learn to grow and continue to be kind and humble and open and serve others and then you will be happy no matter how things might turn out! It helps that Kate and Henry are so darn cute for each other. And even in Henry’s home there is turmoil.“Everyone makes mistakes in their life. It is how you respond to them and learn from them that matters.”If you like books that make you think, forgiveness, doing the right thing, protecting what is yours, telling the truth and righting wrongs, babies, finding your match in life, pride, prejudice, and a good book then this might be for you.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Are you looking for a consistent reliable author for clean regency fiction? Then look no further. Sarah Ladd is one of the best when it comes to unique and new plots, well developed characters and an engaging storyline. The Weaver's Daughter is no exception. This is a tale of two families that have been at odds for many years, not only that, they are being torn apart from within. As industry is transforming in the region, the need for weavers is shrinking. Understandably as the Mills switch to m Are you looking for a consistent reliable author for clean regency fiction? Then look no further. Sarah Ladd is one of the best when it comes to unique and new plots, well developed characters and an engaging storyline. The Weaver's Daughter is no exception. This is a tale of two families that have been at odds for many years, not only that, they are being torn apart from within. As industry is transforming in the region, the need for weavers is shrinking. Understandably as the Mills switch to more advanced machinery the traditional laborers in the Yorkshire Moors, are finding themselves out of work, and resorting to desperate measures. They are lashing out in illegal and violent ways as they try to destroy the Mills in the area. Silas Dearborne has been a master weaver his entire life and has already lost one son, whom he considers a traitor of the worst kind, to the Stockton Mill. His daughter Kate, is loyal, smart and true and has judged the Stocktons to be the worst kind of people. Though he has been presumed dead in the war, heir to the Mill, Henry Stockton is back in Amberdale and the news has spread fast. Under pressure from his grandfather, and the Pennington's (the other wealthy Mill owners in the area), it doesn't take long for Henry to realise he has changed, and the things that used to matter to him are fading into the distance. As Kate and Henry negotiate their respective circumstances, they find their situations are not all that dissimilar. Desperate to prove themselves to their respective family heads, they find that stubbornness rules. Will Kate soften towards her brother Charles reasoning for leaving a dying trade to work for what he calls the 'future' in the Mill, and in turn give Henry a chance? Will Henry be able to get through to his Grandfather, and the weavers of the village and find ways to compromise?As tensions escalate, Henry and Kate find themselves coming together despite the climate of conflict. I loved the real history that Sarah always pulls into the story. It's interesting to note that whenever change comes along there will always be that need to accept and adapt. It'll never be without its challenges - in this case, the people lost livelihoods. Skills long valued become useless. Though many could now find employment in the Mill, it's clear the conditions were harsh. The hours long. The pressure to send their young children in also, and the abuse of that by some Mill owners a real problem. Even though the weavers choose a path that appears fruitless and dangerous, you will feel great empathy for their plight. Sarah does a great job of reaching across the barriers and allowing the reading to clearly see both sides of the difficulties being presented and taking you to a place of genuine concern for all. There is a fairly size able group of characters, who all play a significant part. The mystery over Henry's sister Mollie, was intriguing and I'm hoping she gets a story next. I liked the lightness she brought to the serious storyline, despite the situation she has found herself in. Charles also would be a fun one to explore. He plays a pivotal role at supporting Kate through the difficulties that are thrown her way. This is a beautiful story of overcoming barriers, of learning to not judge based on hearsay, or even by association. Both Kate & Henry are so very different from their father and grandfather yet both are judged for them. Discovering who you are may be something very different to what you've always believed. I really enjoyed this book. As a child I visited some of the Mills in England, and really love the history of this time. (I recently read another book based in Yorkshire and with a Mill as the main plot. There was far too much dialect written into the dialogue. Sarah has not done this, and I much preferred it - it works, really well. Thank you, for keeping your writing to a more classical style.)Thanks to Netgalley & Thomas Nelson for a complimentary copy. This is my honest review.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsSarah Ladd writes a Regency with a fresh perspective. This is not your expected Regency story of romance that takes place in drawing rooms and ballrooms. The Weaver's Daughter tells of the advancements made in the textile mills in the early 1800's and their effects on the local artisans in the small villages of England. In Henry and Kate, we are given two strong characters, who are each seeking to overcome the prejudice between the weavers and the mill-workers in a turbulent time of vio 4.5 starsSarah Ladd writes a Regency with a fresh perspective. This is not your expected Regency story of romance that takes place in drawing rooms and ballrooms. The Weaver's Daughter tells of the advancements made in the textile mills in the early 1800's and their effects on the local artisans in the small villages of England. In Henry and Kate, we are given two strong characters, who are each seeking to overcome the prejudice between the weavers and the mill-workers in a turbulent time of violence and destruction. Coming from separate sides of this conflict, they must each decide what is right. " Now he could easily become lost in the murky shades of gray, where ideas were wrong for some and right for others; black for one side and white for the next. Never before had his decisions held such weight and impacted so many."Can their tender feelings for each other grow as tension between the two groups continue to escalate?The thread of love and forgiveness are subtly woven in this story of divided loyalties. The mounting tensions, mystery and unexpected plot twist will have the reader eagerly turning the pages as they come to a satisfying conclusion. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book from the author/publisher. I was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Tricia Mingerink
    January 1, 1970
    Like many of Sarah E. Ladd's books, this is a Regency story set in a part of Regency society not often touched on in novels. The Christianity in the book is very light and only mentioned occasionally, but I expected that since that is how most of Sarah Ladd's novels are. Her style seems to be more subtle Christianity, clean read sort, so that was what I was expecting and that's what this book is. The historical conflict of the old weaving industry clashing with the new machine powered mills was Like many of Sarah E. Ladd's books, this is a Regency story set in a part of Regency society not often touched on in novels. The Christianity in the book is very light and only mentioned occasionally, but I expected that since that is how most of Sarah Ladd's novels are. Her style seems to be more subtle Christianity, clean read sort, so that was what I was expecting and that's what this book is. The historical conflict of the old weaving industry clashing with the new machine powered mills was a part of history I didn't know much about and I found it fascinating learning about it in this book. There is a lot of tension and hurt caused by changing times and lifestyles, and that was really well-portrayed in this book. Thanks to all the conflict, this book also had more action and tension than some of this author's other novels, and I enjoyed it for that reason. Because the conflict between mill owners and weavers was such a big presence in the book, it tended to overshadow some of the other small plot points that sometimes fell by the wayside and weren't fully developed. It is mentioned that Henry is dealing with some sort of PTSD from the Napoleonic Wars, but it isn't really touched on more than a few mentions. The whole storyline with Henry's sister Molly seemed a bit oversimplified to the point it didn't add as much to the plot as it seemed like it wanted to. It seems like that whole situation was added to show how forgiving Henry and Kate were as part of the build up for their actions toward the larger conflict, but there were other ways of showing that. But since the plot with the mill owners and weavers took over, the secondary story line wasn't developed quite as much as it could have been. But other than that, I enjoyed the book and I really liked the characters of Kate and Henry. The reader of the audiobook did a good job, but she isn't my favorite narrator.
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  • Susan Snodgrass
    January 1, 1970
    'She had done what she told herself not to do. Somehow, in the cracks of daily life, she had let the wall around her heart crumble.'Once again, Sarah Ladd has penned a powerful Regency! I have been a fan since her very first book and I eagerly await each offering from her. The small village of Amberdale is torn with divided loyalties. Kate Dearbourne's family are weavers and their means of earning a living is being threatened by the big mills, one of which is run by the Stocktons, the richest fo 'She had done what she told herself not to do. Somehow, in the cracks of daily life, she had let the wall around her heart crumble.'Once again, Sarah Ladd has penned a powerful Regency! I have been a fan since her very first book and I eagerly await each offering from her. The small village of Amberdale is torn with divided loyalties. Kate Dearbourne's family are weavers and their means of earning a living is being threatened by the big mills, one of which is run by the Stocktons, the richest folks in the village. Both Mr. Stockton and Kate's father are men of pride and bitterness. This small village seems to be at war and the sides are drawn well and good, with families set to be ripped apart. Henry Stockton returns home after 3 years at war to this situation. He decides to go with his grandfather and modernize the family's wool mill, paying no heed to the local weavers' grumbling. Tragedy soon strikes and Henry is left to figure out how to proceed with the least amount of damage.Henry and Kate, although seen as enemies in the eyes of all the village, find themselves drawn together, but how can this work without further destroying both their families? Both these young people soon realize that their loyalties may have been misplaced. Can they both stand for what is right even if it means losing what they have in their hearts for each other?Sarah Ladd has such a way with words. When I crack open one of her book, I am transported back to the time and place and find myself walking the lanes with her characters, entering their homes and hearth, hearing their conversations. Her descriptions are vivid, her research impeccable and her characterization amazing. Beautifully written, this book is, and the mystery contained herein quite good indeed. I never guessed the culprit, not for a moment. Heart wrenching emotions also make this book one not to be missed, both for Ladd's fans and anyone who has never read her. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson Publishers. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Rosanne Lortz
    January 1, 1970
    No one thought Henry Stockton would return from the war alive, and when the young heir to Stockton's cloth mill comes back to the village, not everyone is happy about it. Things have changed in the three years he's been away. There's a growing feud between the mill owners and the weavers--who are convinced that the new machines are ungodly means of depriving them of their livelihood. Kate Dearborne is in a difficult position. Her father is leader of the weavers, but her brother has defected to g No one thought Henry Stockton would return from the war alive, and when the young heir to Stockton's cloth mill comes back to the village, not everyone is happy about it. Things have changed in the three years he's been away. There's a growing feud between the mill owners and the weavers--who are convinced that the new machines are ungodly means of depriving them of their livelihood. Kate Dearborne is in a difficult position. Her father is leader of the weavers, but her brother has defected to go work at the mill. Everyone knew that old Stockton didn't care a whit for the weavers' families, but the new heir Henry seems different. Kate befriends Henry's sister and feels increasingly attracted to Henry's care and kindness. But he's still a Stockton, and she's a Dearborne--if the weavers' agitation turns to violence, which side will she take?This Regency romance features on far more than balls and parties, showing the sea change that the Industrial Revolution created in small villages in England as artisans were replaced by manufacturers. Kate and Henry are both sympathetic characters, not afraid to stand up for what they believe in. Henry, in particular, is a rock for his sister to lean on and a fearless leader when protecting his own mill workers. He must learn to re-acclimate to civilian life after the horrors of war and discover just how important his grandfather's work actually was for the village. Kate, on the other hand, must overcome her frustration at being overlooked by her father because of her sex and learn the virtue of forgiveness in a time where everyone is eager to take offense. This book was a quick and satisfying read, one of the most enjoyable Regency romances I've read in a long time.Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. The opinions expressed in this review are my own.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Loyalty, love and family are at the heart of this dramatic tale, set in 1812 Yorkshire. The backdrop of a growing feud between the industrial mill owners and the traditional weavers, sets the stage for a complicated romance. The author does a good job creating tension between the two factions, throwing in an unsolved murder and adding divided loyalties in the main character's family too. The dilemma of choosing to do what is right vs staying loyal to her prideful, stubborn father puts Kate right Loyalty, love and family are at the heart of this dramatic tale, set in 1812 Yorkshire. The backdrop of a growing feud between the industrial mill owners and the traditional weavers, sets the stage for a complicated romance. The author does a good job creating tension between the two factions, throwing in an unsolved murder and adding divided loyalties in the main character's family too. The dilemma of choosing to do what is right vs staying loyal to her prideful, stubborn father puts Kate right in the middle of the conflict. Her gentle, brave soul is torn and it was interesting to see which direction she would choose. I cheered her on as she stood up to the bullies in her world, courageously putting her self on the line to help others. Henry's character grew on me as he changed through events, overcoming his own prejudice and wounds from battles abroad and at home. The writing flows well, and the pace is steady, building in tension as the conflict comes to a head, with a few plot twists to make it extra interesting at the end.Recommend to readers who enjoy Regency era tales with drama and clean romance. 4.5 stars(An e-book was provided by NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Clara
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, Sarah E. Ladd knows how to write an intense plot!And that Henry Stockton gives Mr. Darcy a run for his money.Honor. Loyalty. Justice. All of these are tested throughout the disputes between weavers and mill owners as each one fights for progress.Henry Stockton was declared dead in battle, so what a surprise it is when he arrives galloping back home one day. Only, he doesn’t find things and people exactly as he left them. And he’s not the same either.When tragedy strikes, Henry is seen as th Wow, Sarah E. Ladd knows how to write an intense plot!And that Henry Stockton gives Mr. Darcy a run for his money.Honor. Loyalty. Justice. All of these are tested throughout the disputes between weavers and mill owners as each one fights for progress.Henry Stockton was declared dead in battle, so what a surprise it is when he arrives galloping back home one day. Only, he doesn’t find things and people exactly as he left them. And he’s not the same either.When tragedy strikes, Henry is seen as the greatest threat to the weavers' cause since he’s intent on keeping his family’s legacy. But he’s also questioning how should success be attained, so can he finally be the one to find resolution between weavers and mill owners? Or will decades-old rivalry always be stronger than a person’s character?Kate Dearborne's loyalties and goodness have been tested too much. By her father. By her brother. By her friends. She wants to honor her legacy but she also has a mind of her own. A mind that wants to show she believes in the weavers' cause, even if not in their actions. Still, until when can she have her heart pushed and pulled without breaking?Kate is sure she has Henry Stockton figured out, only to be proven wrong at every turn. Can he truly be different from his grandfather? Is there honesty in his search for an equal ground with the weavers and the people from the village? Or is a plot? A way to get close to them only to sever the fragile tie built once and for all?Solid plot. Intriguing mystery. Endearing characters. This book will keep you on edge and wishing for more with every turn of the page. I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s Sarah E. Ladd’s best yet.I can definitely see it becoming a series *hint hint**many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy. This is my honest review.
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  • Cara Putman
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book with its rich historical conflict and a romance that is sweet and Star-crossed from the beginning.
  • Kellyn Roth
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted on Reveries Reviews.Title: The Weaver’s DaughterAuthor: Sarah E. LaddGenre: Christian Historical RomanceEra: RegencySetting: mid-England countrysidePublisher: Thomas NelsonSource: from Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)Overall Rating: 3/5 starsThe Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd is a beyond amazing book with a serious moral issue. That may sound harsh, but that’s the only way to describe it. This review may offend some of y’all, but I’ve got to be truthful about my Originally posted on Reveries Reviews.Title: The Weaver’s DaughterAuthor: Sarah E. LaddGenre: Christian Historical RomanceEra: RegencySetting: mid-England countrysidePublisher: Thomas NelsonSource: from Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)Overall Rating: 3/5 starsThe Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd is a beyond amazing book with a serious moral issue. That may sound harsh, but that’s the only way to describe it. This review may offend some of y’all, but I’ve got to be truthful about my convictions, so here goes.I still have some very positive things to say about this book. It was quite well-done. Beautiful writing, interesting setting, intriguing plot, and awesome characters. This book has it all … except that one subplot.I’m again abandoning my regular format because this is a review that defies structure. I need to be able to talk freely.It was really a five-star novel. From the tension between the up-and-coming mills and the old-fashioned weavers, to the (forbidden) romance between Kate and Henry, to Kate’s relationship with her father and on and on … beautiful.It progressed smoothly, kept my attention, had an interesting mystery and a lot of excitement, and was reminiscent of North and South (only I actually like the characters and plot and all a lot better than North and South, shoot me).Also, am I the only one who is just like: YAY MILLS YAY PROGRESS LET’S BOOT THOSE SLOW WEAVERS OUT OF HERE AND ACTUALLY GET SOME WORK DONE!? Because this is how I feel … :PAlso, all the weavers are complete jerks. Some of the mill folks are jerks, too, but the weavers were extra special jerks.The whole setting was so excellent. The description really got me wrapped up in the book, combined with the excellent characters. Henry was my favorite, while Catherine’s brother and Catherine herself ran close second and third. Catherine’s dad was a jerk. #nuffsaidThe only problem was the subplot I mentioned earlier. Now, there are some mild spoilers in this next section, but since they are so mild they probably aren’t even spoilers in some ways, I won’t bother to mark them as such. Also, I hope y’all Christian readers will choose not to read this book, so it doesn’t really matter.Molly, Henry’s younger sister, got pregnant out of wedlock … and Henry as well as Catherine act like this is perfectly okay (as do all the “good guy” characters).Molly wants to keep her pregnancy a secret and comes up with a lie to cover up (understandable, considering the fact that she is going to be thrown off the earth once Regency society finds out), but all the characters are vehement that Molly needs to tell the truth.And once she tells the truth the consequences of her sin (YES I SAID THE S-WORD) will go away?Her lie is a worse sin that her sleeping with a man while unmarried and conceiving a child by him?I am just so steamed about this that I’m getting angry again as I type.Yes, forgiveness is very important … but only if the sinner is repentant. Because that’s what Molly is. A sinner. And I know we’re all sinners … but just ’cause we’re all sinners doesn’t mean that sin is okay.It’s never okay.If Molly’s lie wasn’t “a mistake” or “a temporary lapse of judgment,” neither was her fornication. (The pregnancy isn’t really the problem morally, just to clarify; let it never be said that a pregnancy is anything but a gift. Though it might seem like a consequence.)This entire book treats anyone who judges Molly for her fornication like scum. But … that’s wrong. Judging people is wrong, and no sin is any worse than the other (as far as getting one into Hell and making you need Jesus, that is), but … that doesn’t make sin okay.Also, even though we don’t have a right to judge anyone, of course, Molly will get judged. All the characters are living in this fantasy world where, if Molly is honest about her sin, then nothing bad will happen.Er, excuse me? Regency England, anyone? Welcome to the 19th century? Molly is going to suffer for this for the rest of her life. Henry (and everyone) sheltering her from this fact is gonna do her no good.Nor is acting like everything’s going to be okay, Mr. Protective Big Brother. Dear Henry, your sister cannot just move past this. Sin is never gonna just go away unless you confront it. And though Molly is perhaps very sorry she conceived, even sorry she gave away her virtue, she is definitely not thinking of it on the level of sin.More like an impropriety or an inconvenience of sorts. But what God thinks is what matters … not what society thinks.I get where the author was going. She wanted to show that fornication is not a worse sin than any other sin as far as salvation goes – or that’s my best guess.But you can’t go about that by making lying seem a lot worse than it is and making fornication similar to dropping a plate on the floor. (Which would be a mistake.) (Unless you threw that plate at someone’s head.) (That’s concussioning thy neighbor.) (Or something to that effect.)CONTENT: 4/5Language: n/aViolence: men are shot and killed or badly wounded, one man murdered in cold blood, others killed during a violent attack on the mill. Some talk about blood, treatment of wounds, etc. A brawl at a public dance leads to many a split lip.Sexual: a semi-detailed account of childbearing. Molly has a child out of wedlock and this is treated as a ‘temporary lapse of judgment,’ a ‘mistake,’ and a ‘scandal’ but not as sin which it is (see my whole rant ^^). A couple kisses, a bit detailed.Other: MOLLY LIES HEAVEN FORBID THAT MOLLY LIES OH NO WHAT SHALL WE DO!?!?!?!?! Lies are such a terrible sin … worse than any other, in fact …Not recommended for readers under sixteen unless they are discerning and won’t be strayed by the confirmation of sin.OVERALL: 3/5I’m sorry, but I cannot and will not recommend this book to any Christian reader. Secular readers might enjoy it, as it is a great (5-star!) book except for the Molly fiasco. But Christian readers shouldn’t allow this kind of thing in their fiction. It’s abominable.~Kellyn Roth, Reveries Reviews
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  • Dee/ bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    #TheWeaver'sDaughter #NetGalleypublisher synopsis: Kate’s loyalties bind her to the past. Henry’s loyalties compel him to strive for a better future. In a landscape torn between tradition and vision, can two souls find the strength to overcome their preconceptions?Loyalty has been at the heart of the Dearborne family for as long as Kate can remember, but a war is brewing in their small village, one that has the power to rip families asunder –including her own. As misguided actions are brought t #TheWeaver'sDaughter #NetGalleypublisher synopsis: Kate’s loyalties bind her to the past. Henry’s loyalties compel him to strive for a better future. In a landscape torn between tradition and vision, can two souls find the strength to overcome their preconceptions?Loyalty has been at the heart of the Dearborne family for as long as Kate can remember, but a war is brewing in their small village, one that has the power to rip families asunder –including her own. As misguided actions are brought to light, she learns how deep her father’s pride and bitterness run, and she begins to wonder if her loyalty is well-placed. Henry Stockton, heir to the Stockton fortune, returns home from three years at war hoping to find a refuge from his haunting memories. Determined to bury the past, he embraces his grandfather’s goals to modernize his family’s wool mill, regardless of the grumblings from the local weavers. When tragedy strikes shortly after his arrival, Henry must sort out the truth from suspicion if he is to protect his family’s livelihood and legacy.Henry has been warned about the Dearborne family. Kate, too, has been advised to stay far away from the Stocktons, but chance meetings continue to bring her to Henry’s side, blurring the jagged lines between loyalty, justice, and truth. Kate ultimately finds herself with the powerful decision that will forever affect her village’s future. As unlikely adversaries, Henry and Kate must come together to find a way to create peace for their families, and their village, and their souls – even if it means risking their hearts in the process.I think I have read almost every book from Sarah E. Ladd, and I have to tell you... this is.... My favorite Ladd book!! I like how Kate was loyal, and fierce and how her moral compass was pointing in the correct way. Its very easy to get side swiped, especially were family is concerned. This book is full of a spectrum of emotions. Hope, fear, betrayal, love, it is a wonderful, wonderful novel!I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    The Weaver’s Daughter is about loyalties and traditions. What will happen when a daughter keeps her loyalties with her father and want to be loyal to her brother as well. Well, things get a bit dicey when Henry Stockton returns.Kate struggles with wanting to keep her loyalties to her past or they at least bind her to the past. Her father is a weaver and Kate try and prove to her father and the others that she wants to help with wool. Her brother Charles has chosen to work at Stockton Mill.We are The Weaver’s Daughter is about loyalties and traditions. What will happen when a daughter keeps her loyalties with her father and want to be loyal to her brother as well. Well, things get a bit dicey when Henry Stockton returns.Kate struggles with wanting to keep her loyalties to her past or they at least bind her to the past. Her father is a weaver and Kate try and prove to her father and the others that she wants to help with wool. Her brother Charles has chosen to work at Stockton Mill.We are shown what it like for the time period and the history during Weavers vs Mill owners are tested. Weavers are trying to save their job and livelihoods and mill owners are trying to provide and work with the progress of the coming future.Henry seems drawn to Miss Dearborne. Will Miss Dearborne come around or will she fight for what in the past. She is seemed like torn between loyalties to her father and brother. She will have to make a choice. There are tensions with Miss Dearborne father and Henry Stockton? Old man Stockton has tensions with Weavers or at least with the Dearbornes. When someone kills Henry grandfather, who did it and why.Mr. Dearbone seem to think that Old man Stockton's grandson will be the same as his grandfather? Mr. Dearborne tells his daughter to stay away from Stockton Mill and the Stocktons. Kate seems to keep entering Stockton property and is found out. Find out why and you will need to read it and find out the ending.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Not as enthralling as some books, but an interesting read. I loved the crimson cloak and Kate’s relationship with her brother Charles, and the slow-growing romance between Kate and Henry was sweet. Definitely some Darcy/Elizabeth Bennett moments, especially that scene the night Pennington was arrested. (BTW, I totally saw that revelation coming. Pennington was clearly willing to betray friends for his own benefit - it was the first thing he did in the book, when he left his partnership with the Not as enthralling as some books, but an interesting read. I loved the crimson cloak and Kate’s relationship with her brother Charles, and the slow-growing romance between Kate and Henry was sweet. Definitely some Darcy/Elizabeth Bennett moments, especially that scene the night Pennington was arrested. (BTW, I totally saw that revelation coming. Pennington was clearly willing to betray friends for his own benefit - it was the first thing he did in the book, when he left his partnership with the Dearbornes to partner with old man Stockton.)I did enjoy how Kate clung to her convictions rather than simply to ‘weaver’ or ‘miller’ stances. She chose to do what was right and kind, even when it hurt. And Ladd’s books are always well-researched, with the historical details woven in seamlessly. (Pun semi-intended :) )The Mollie angle didn’t really fit with the rest of the story, other than that she was someone Henry loved and protected, thereby humanizing his portrayal of the haunted soldier stereotype. Old Mr. Stockton’s part of the story seemed to end a little too abruptly, and it felt unfinished. Did we get Frederica’s POV just to see the action from another angle? Is she getting her own story down the road?3.8/5 stars, I think.
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  • Lucette Nel
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first book by Sarah E. Ladd and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The beginning was a little slow but not overly or unbearingly so. It has tension, family drama and dinamic characters. And I just have to mention that The publisher did an amazing job with the cover :) I voluntarily posted this review but wish to thank the publisher and netgalley for the opportunity.
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  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    The Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd sweeps readers back in time to January of 1812 in Amberdale, West Riding Yorkshire, England. Kate Dearborne lives with her father at Meadowvale Cottage and helps him with the weaving business. She is shocked when she learns her father has no intention of leaving her the business. Silas Dearborne wishes her to marry a John Whitby, a weaver who will run the business while Kate tends to the home (she is allowed to supervise the dye house). Silas clings to the The Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd sweeps readers back in time to January of 1812 in Amberdale, West Riding Yorkshire, England. Kate Dearborne lives with her father at Meadowvale Cottage and helps him with the weaving business. She is shocked when she learns her father has no intention of leaving her the business. Silas Dearborne wishes her to marry a John Whitby, a weaver who will run the business while Kate tends to the home (she is allowed to supervise the dye house). Silas clings to the old ways along with other men in the area, but the mill owners are bringing change to the industry with machines. The issue has divided the town, and, in Leeds, the mills have been attacked. Henry Stockton, heir to the Stockton Mill, returns home after fighting in the Iberian Peninsula for the last three years. On his way home, he encounters Kate and she captures his interest. Henry is surprised at the changes that have taken place during his absence and does not agree with all of them. Henry does, though, feel that the machines are needed especially if they are to keep up with the demand for their goods. Then tragedy strikes the Stockton family and Henry will face major challenges. Fate keeps bringing Kate and Henry together despite their being on opposing sides. Soon Kate will need to make a choice that will change many lives including her own. What will happen to the weavers of Amberdale? Is there a chance for Henry and Kate?I like how the author introduced three of the characters in the prologue of The Weaver’s Daughter. We get a glimpse of their personalities and it sets the stage for the future. The book is well-written, has a gentle pace and multifaceted. Sarah E. Ladd has a descriptive writing style. She creates a rich environment with her words. I could picture the village with the cottages and businesses as well as the people moving about on foot and in their conveyances. In the description of the mill, I could visualize the people working to create the finished cloth. The whole weaving industry was changing, and it was just the beginning. A process that used to be completed by hand was now being taken over by machines. However, the machines were far from perfect. They still needed to be monitored and many workers received debilitating injuries. It was deplorable that children worked in the mills, but it was a fact of life. This circumstance would not change for another hundred years (longer in the United States). The author did a remarkable job at weaving the history into The Weaver’s Daughter. The characters are well-developed, complex and realistic. The romance between Henry and Kate builds throughout the novel. They slowly get to know each other and do not rush the relationship. They know that they cannot think only of themselves. The Christian element is light and handled deftly. The mystery was well crafted (many will be surprised by the culprit’s identity). The Weaver’s Daughter is filled with tension, love, suspicion, heartbreak, loyalty, drama, and conflict. For readers who enjoy the Regency period, you will not want to miss The Weaver’s Daughter.
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  • Monique Daoust
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing had prepared Henry Stockton for what awaited him in the small village of Amberdale upon his return from war. The animosity between millers and weavers has reached a point where deadly attacks are carefully planned to eliminate the millers, whose new machines threaten the weavers’ very livelihood. The Stocktons are millers, Henry has come home to continue the family’s legacy, and maybe to rekindle a romance from years ago, but the war has changed Henry.THE WEAVER’S DAUGHTER caught my eye Nothing had prepared Henry Stockton for what awaited him in the small village of Amberdale upon his return from war. The animosity between millers and weavers has reached a point where deadly attacks are carefully planned to eliminate the millers, whose new machines threaten the weavers’ very livelihood. The Stocktons are millers, Henry has come home to continue the family’s legacy, and maybe to rekindle a romance from years ago, but the war has changed Henry.THE WEAVER’S DAUGHTER caught my eye because it does not deal with dukes, rogues, or spies, but with the lives of ordinary people during the Regency. However it does deal with class issues, which I found way more powerful than what we are used to. In 1812, industrialisation has begun and progress is disrupting the foundation of British society. In THE WEAVER’S DAUGHTER, Sarah E. Ladd takes us to Yorkshire for a glimpse into what ailed the cloth industry, and the author had me completely mesmerised. The author’s extensive research and her meticulous attention to historical detail vividly recreate a moment in time; this is the sort of book that, if you stop, you blink a few times to get back to the twenty first century. The backdrop of the cloth industry plays a critical part in every aspect of the story, as Henry Stockton, the well-off miller, and Kate Dearborne, THE WEAVER’S DAUGHTER, come to acknowledge that they are attracted to each other, but Kate’s father forbids her to even speak to Henry. She had been prepared to hate Henry on principle, but he is not the devil her father made Henry out to be. THE WEAVER’S DAUGHTER is such a gripping story with innumerable layers that I found it almost impossible to review. Ms. Ladd is a formidable storyteller, making us experience every facet of the conflict that shakes the village, and that perturbs Kate and Henry’s lives in more ways than one. The romance develops very slowly, it could not have been otherwise; the spark between Kate and Henry is akin to a microscopic flame hovering over a powder keg: society dictates that they should remain enemies, but can they change that? Do they want to, do they dare to? What could be the outcome? People are hurt and killed, allegiances shift, betrayals occur, lives are ruined, and some shocking developments have lasting consequences. Ms. Ladd has created characters of indescribable depth, and some unforgettable secondary characters such as Charles, Kate’s brother, and Mollie, Henry’s sister, whom I hope will have her own story, or even Frederica, who finds herself in a situation she never expected. Sarah E. Ladd’s writing is sublime; her prose is exquisite and incandescent, flowing and utterly flawless, always faithful to the era’s language; light yet descriptive. The dialogues are stunning in their accuracy and tone, down to simplest endearments, and without a hint of stiffness. THE WEAVER’S DAUGHTER should not be missed by readers who really appreciate historical reality with their romance; it is absolutely outstanding.I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Lynda Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    Having read Sarah E. Ladd’s books before, I knew I could expect an enjoyable novel, but this particular book’s depth of characters and complex questions of family held me riveted until I turned the final pages. With every story, Ladd continues to hone her craft and create wonderful books that a reader can get lost in!I love these characters; both Kate and Henry are layered, with competing desires and lots of unpredictability. Their backstories provide a lot of this layering, but we also watch th Having read Sarah E. Ladd’s books before, I knew I could expect an enjoyable novel, but this particular book’s depth of characters and complex questions of family held me riveted until I turned the final pages. With every story, Ladd continues to hone her craft and create wonderful books that a reader can get lost in!I love these characters; both Kate and Henry are layered, with competing desires and lots of unpredictability. Their backstories provide a lot of this layering, but we also watch them grow and change over the course of the book; the people who finish the novel are quite different from those with whom we begin the story. Their slowly forming romance adds to their development without minimizing the other subplots or divisions within their families and the community as a whole.There is a lot about how we choose to navigate various relationships, those within the family, friends, and yes, romantic ones. Generational differences are part of this and expectations are often unreasonable, while the desire to be heard, to feel valued as a person, even if one is a “mere” woman, make for an incredibly complex and sometimes intense novel.As with any good Regency novel, history plays a significant role--the rigid customs and rules must be considered, of course. But in this particular story, the conflict between technological advancement and the traditional methods is vividly portrayed and almost becomes a character in itself, present in most every scene, hovering over the fictional events like a black cloud. Even though I remember reading about some of these events, experiencing them through characters I came to care about made it much more real to me than the history books ever did.This book is a fantastic mix of history, a suspenseful plot, intriguing characters, romance, and murky questions of loyalty and what is right. I highly recommend it especially for those who enjoy Regency novels, but also for readers who like some suspense mixed into their historicals. Those who have devoured Ladd’s previous books will surely be pleased by this latest novel, and even people new to her writing can enjoy this one without the larger time commitment of reading an entire series.I received a review copy of this book from the author and publisher but was under no obligation to post a positive review. The opinions expressed are both honest and my own.
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  • Trixi
    January 1, 1970
    Penned by a master writer who knows how to draw a reader into her regency tales! This one has divided loyalties and family ties clashing with progress and modern methods of doing an age old job.Henry and Kate find themselves at opposite ends with him being part mill owner and her a weaver's daughter. They should never have reason to cross paths, but often do when circumstances throw them together. Each must be loyal to their families but those lines become blurred when tensions run high between Penned by a master writer who knows how to draw a reader into her regency tales! This one has divided loyalties and family ties clashing with progress and modern methods of doing an age old job.Henry and Kate find themselves at opposite ends with him being part mill owner and her a weaver's daughter. They should never have reason to cross paths, but often do when circumstances throw them together. Each must be loyal to their families but those lines become blurred when tensions run high between the two worlds. Will they find common ground for themselves and other workers and perhaps begin to see eye-to-eye? Or will loyalty win out over peace?I always love a story by Sarah Ladd! I know I can count on not only an entertaining read but one that completely engulfs me in its' pages. Each character became real to me and the struggles they faced in everyday life were ones I could easily understand. Though the faith message was light, I still found spiritual nuggets I could apply to myself. Since I am a hopeless romantic, of course my favorite parts of this was the journey Henry and Kate took to get to their happily-ever-after! Well worth reading for anyone who loves the Regency period filled with history, love, faith and a story to connect with in so many ways!Favorite lines:“At one time nothing mattered more than having a beautiful wife, amassing possessions, and claiming power. Now, his heart—his soul—longed for things not so tangible. Safety. Security. Happiness. Justice. Hope. Forgiveness.” ~page 64“Her soul felt at rest, for now she knew the true power of love, the unbending strength of loyalty, and the eternal beauty of forgiveness. ~page 338* I received a complimentary copy of this book and was not obligated to post a favorable review. *
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    "He's back! Henry Stockton's back from the grave!"Kate Dearborne has already seen the local ghost with her own eyes; the Stockton Mill owner's grandson was apparently never killed in the war, for Henry Stockton has returned to Amberdale to join his family's thriving business, and while unbeknownst to her father, Kate; through no fault of her own, has just become reacquainted with the imposing local figure.Returning home after serving his country, Henry Stockton mistakenly believes that he is arr "He's back! Henry Stockton's back from the grave!"Kate Dearborne has already seen the local ghost with her own eyes; the Stockton Mill owner's grandson was apparently never killed in the war, for Henry Stockton has returned to Amberdale to join his family's thriving business, and while unbeknownst to her father, Kate; through no fault of her own, has just become reacquainted with the imposing local figure.Returning home after serving his country, Henry Stockton mistakenly believes that he is arriving back to the same peaceful community that he left behind; however, nothing could be further from the truth. His grandfather's iron clad business tactics have hardened his approach to profit, stirring wide discontent between the local weavers and those who have chosen to step forward and become employed by Stockton Mill. One man has truly crossed the line; Charles Dearborne, son of a formidable weaver. But it's the beautiful weaver's daughter that strikes the eye of Henry Stockton; in spite of their differences, and it in spite of his business partner's alluring daughter; who makes it quite clear that she wants to become Mrs. Henry Stockton.As tensions rise and the stakes become higher, will Kate and Henry rise to the occasion, or will they fall back on conventionality and destroy any chance of happiness between them? For, "they were two people fighting the same battle on different sides of the war". Enjoy Sarah Ladd's melodic style, as she demonstrates her own knowledge of weaving; using the power of words to fabricate a beautiful story.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 I remember when Sarah E. Ladd released her debut novel and I’ve been a fan ever since then. Her latest release takes you again back to England, with a story of family, changing times and of course, love.I really appreciated the tension of change and community Ladd looked at. Was there one right answer? How did these communities deal with industrial change that took jobs away from people, but also sought to move industries forward and make them more efficient? I think of the ways life has cha 3.5 I remember when Sarah E. Ladd released her debut novel and I’ve been a fan ever since then. Her latest release takes you again back to England, with a story of family, changing times and of course, love.I really appreciated the tension of change and community Ladd looked at. Was there one right answer? How did these communities deal with industrial change that took jobs away from people, but also sought to move industries forward and make them more efficient? I think of the ways life has changed during my lifetime, growing up in such a technological world, and that while it has changed in very different ways, we can see some of the same effect changes have made on industries today. What an interesting and scary time that was for England.I also really appreciated that the ending was fitting and accurate. A satisfying ending to an entertaining read. If you enjoy historical romances with family and loyalties tested, be sure to snag a copy of The Weaver’s Daughter.Do you have a recent favorite historical read?(Thank you to BookLook Bloggers for a copy of the book. All views expressed are my own.)
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    The history behind the story is fascinating; it puts a different meaning to the Industrial Revolution--maybe not to compare with the French or American or Russian Revolutions, but bloody just the same. I never thought about how the skilled workers would react as they were put out of their jobs by machines, not when their options were so limited. The romance is a cross between Romeo and Juliet and North and South, but with some twists. I really appreciated how their relationship develops: the jou The history behind the story is fascinating; it puts a different meaning to the Industrial Revolution--maybe not to compare with the French or American or Russian Revolutions, but bloody just the same. I never thought about how the skilled workers would react as they were put out of their jobs by machines, not when their options were so limited. The romance is a cross between Romeo and Juliet and North and South, but with some twists. I really appreciated how their relationship develops: the journey from enmity (at least on her part) to respect to friendship, which all happens well before romance comes into play. Both are thinking of what would be best for the people of their village, but I especially love Henry's sense of honor. He isn't a doormat, but he's a good man; better than others in the village who complain about the evils of the mills and refuse to give them business that would help the innocents of the village in clear, tangible ways. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Trisha Robertson (Joy of Reading)
    January 1, 1970
    Cultures clash in this enjoyable regency romance. While the story is set in the Regency era in England, there are still nuggets of truth that apply today. Misunderstanding and Prejudice can easily destroy not only families but entire towns. With progress, comes change, and change can be very difficult. Especially when you are a weaver and factories are starting to take over.For me, the story started out a bit slow, but before I knew it the characters had walked their way into my heart and I foun Cultures clash in this enjoyable regency romance. While the story is set in the Regency era in England, there are still nuggets of truth that apply today. Misunderstanding and Prejudice can easily destroy not only families but entire towns. With progress, comes change, and change can be very difficult. Especially when you are a weaver and factories are starting to take over.For me, the story started out a bit slow, but before I knew it the characters had walked their way into my heart and I found myself not only talking to the characters but also holding my breath and rapidly turning pages to find out what would happen next.I enjoyed the character growth, with both Kate and Henry. Watching them as they began to understand the role they played in not only their respective family, and in the community, but also in the future. With a gentle reminder of forgiveness and "Everyone makes mistakes in their life. It is how you respond to them and learn from them that matters." This story is sure to not only entertain but warm your heart.Fans of Elizabeth Gaskell's North & South are sure to be delighted with this latest story from Sarah! I give this story 4-stars. I look forward to reading more from Sarah in the future.(I receive complimentary books for review from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including Netgalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own.)
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  • Kelly Tyree
    January 1, 1970
    The Weaver's Daughter is a well written historical novel that really draws you in immediately. Kate is a loyal weaver's daughter. The weavers are losing ground in their community due to the Stockton Mill that uses less than ethical ways to get more product prepared and quicker. There is a divide in the community between those that support the mill and weavers. Loyalty is everything to Kate's father. Kate's brother went to work at the mill and that broke the ties between son and father.Henry Stoc The Weaver's Daughter is a well written historical novel that really draws you in immediately. Kate is a loyal weaver's daughter. The weavers are losing ground in their community due to the Stockton Mill that uses less than ethical ways to get more product prepared and quicker. There is a divide in the community between those that support the mill and weavers. Loyalty is everything to Kate's father. Kate's brother went to work at the mill and that broke the ties between son and father.Henry Stockton returns home after serving in the war. He plans to take his place alongside his grandfather and work at the family mill. But when he arrives in town, things have changed since he has been gone. He meets Kate quickly after arriving in town and is drawn to her right away. But there can be no relations between Henry and Kate. Henry soon learns that Kate is a passionate woman who cares for others. He finds that honesty and integrity to be refreshing. Kate learns that Henry is not at all like his grandfather. Tensions between the weavers and the mill owners heat up when machines are brought in that would further cut the staff of the mill. Henry finds himself defending his mill and his home against attack. When his grandfather is killed he works to find out who killed him. Kate befriends Henry's sister and spends time at the Stockton home. She gets to know them so when she learns of an impending attack against them, she has to decide if loyalty to her father is worth the damage that could come to Henry and his sister. The characters are wonderful and the book is very well written. An A+ in my opinion!
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  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    This is the story of Kate and Henry, who find themselves struggling between right and wrong, friendship and enmity, and the pull of family dynamics! They are “real” people to whom I could fully relate and I found myself hoping (along with them) for a better and brighter future. The period is Yorkshire England in the early nineteenth century during a time of great transition for the weaving community as machines and mass production are impacting their lives and their very livelihood. I found myse This is the story of Kate and Henry, who find themselves struggling between right and wrong, friendship and enmity, and the pull of family dynamics! They are “real” people to whom I could fully relate and I found myself hoping (along with them) for a better and brighter future. The period is Yorkshire England in the early nineteenth century during a time of great transition for the weaving community as machines and mass production are impacting their lives and their very livelihood. I found myself fully immersed in the richly detailed setting, with pacing and timing that was perfect - true to the circumstances and situation at hand. There were not easy answers or platitudes to resolve all of the hurt and hardships that had to be faced. The secondary characters also came alive on every page. I was so thoroughly frustrated with Henry’s grandfather and Kate’s father; I cringed at the thought of John with Kate or Frederica with Henry. I loved Charles as well as Molly. All of these characters added so much dimension to The Weaver’s Daughter. This is truly a book not to be missed. (I hope it will eventually be available on Audible as well so I can share it with my daughters who are too busy running after little ones to sit down with a book for a cozy read.)Thank you, NetGalley for an advance copy and thank YOU, Sarah E. Ladd for a tremendous, heartwarming and unforgettable story. I received this ebook from NetGalley but the review truly represents my opinion, thoughts and feelings upon finishing it. #TheWeaver’sDaughter #NetGalley
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  • Kelly Tyree
    January 1, 1970
    The Weaver's Daughter is a well written historical novel that really draws you in immediately. Kate is a loyal weaver's daughter. The weavers are losing ground in their community due to the Stockton Mill that uses less than ethical ways to get more product prepared and quicker. There is a divide in the community between those that support the mill and weavers. Loyalty is everything to Kate's father. Kate's brother went to work at the mill and that broke the ties between son and father.Henry Stoc The Weaver's Daughter is a well written historical novel that really draws you in immediately. Kate is a loyal weaver's daughter. The weavers are losing ground in their community due to the Stockton Mill that uses less than ethical ways to get more product prepared and quicker. There is a divide in the community between those that support the mill and weavers. Loyalty is everything to Kate's father. Kate's brother went to work at the mill and that broke the ties between son and father.Henry Stockton returns home after serving in the war. He plans to take his place alongside his grandfather and work at the family mill. But when he arrives in town, things have changed since he has been gone. He meets Kate quickly after arriving in town and is drawn to her right away. But there can be no relations between Henry and Kate. Henry soon learns that Kate is a passionate woman who cares for others. He finds that honesty and integrity to be refreshing. Kate learns that Henry is not at all like his grandfather. Tensions between the weavers and the mill owners heat up when machines are brought in that would further cut the staff of the mill. Henry finds himself defending his mill and his home against attack. When his grandfather is killed he works to find out who killed him. Kate befriends Henry's sister and spends time at the Stockton home. She gets to know them so when she learns of an impending attack against them, she has to decide if loyalty to her father is worth the damage that could come to Henry and his sister. The characters are wonderful and the book is very well written. An A+ in my opinion!
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