The Lost Castle (The Lost Castle #1)
Launching a brand-new series, Kristy Cambron explores the collision of past and present as she discovers the ruins of a French castle, long lost to history.A thirteenth century castle, Chateau de Doux Reves, has been forgotten for generations, left to ruin in a storybook forest nestled deep in France's picturesque Loire Valley. It survived a sacking in the French Revolution, was brought back to life and fashioned into a storybook chateau in the Gilded Age, and was eventually felled and deserted after a disastrous fire in the 1930s.As Ellie Carver sits by her grandmother's bedside, she hears stories of a castle . . . of lost love and a hidden chapel that played host to a secret fight in the World War II French resistance. But her grandmother is quickly slipping into the locked-down world of Alzheimer's, and Ellie must act fast if she wants to uncover the truth of her family's history.Sparked by the discovery of a long forgotten family heirloom, Ellie embarks on a journey to French wine country to uncover the mystery surrounding The Sleeping Beauty--the castle so named for Charles Perrault's beloved fairy tale--and unearth its secrets before they're finally silenced by time.Set in three different time periods--the French Revolution, World War II, and present day--The Lost Castle is a story of loves won and lost, of battles waged, and an enchanted castle that inspired the epic fairy tales time left behind.

The Lost Castle (The Lost Castle #1) Details

TitleThe Lost Castle (The Lost Castle #1)
Author
ReleaseFeb 6th, 2018
PublisherThomas Nelson
ISBN-139780718095468
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Romance

The Lost Castle (The Lost Castle #1) Review

  • Deanne Patterson
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing! You will need to keep the box of tissues handy and a lump in your throat is guaranteed! What does a grandmother with Alzheimer's, an 18th century French woman and the grandmother's granddaughter all have in common? How about foxes,French wine and a brooch ? This story about the Sleeping Beauty is remarkable, partly based on fact part fairy tale. Beautiful sumptuous you will swear you are there with the vivid descriptions described within. Three story lines taking place here that I'll ad Amazing! You will need to keep the box of tissues handy and a lump in your throat is guaranteed! What does a grandmother with Alzheimer's, an 18th century French woman and the grandmother's granddaughter all have in common? How about foxes,French wine and a brooch ? This story about the Sleeping Beauty is remarkable, partly based on fact part fairy tale. Beautiful sumptuous you will swear you are there with the vivid descriptions described within. Three story lines taking place here that I'll admit are slightly confusing to keep track of at first but the more you read the easier it is to understand and it all masterfully ties together at the end. Cambron is a master storyteller here and I don't know how her next one can beat this one as she's at the top of her game here!Pub Date 06 Feb 2018 Thank you to NetGalley and Thomas Nelson--FICTION for a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    This novel is unique in that it has three storylines in different time periods going on at once. All the stories revolve around a castle and vineyard in the Loire Valley. I’ve traveled here and love this setting. The stories go back and forth between Gilded Age, WWII and the present. The transitions between these stories could’ve been better, trying too dicipher when and where the story was took a lil time to figure out. I still really enjoyed it overall & would recommend.
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  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    {4.5 stars}When this book ended, my brain couldn't stop whirling. Everything came together so well—all three settings, 1789, 1944, and Present day. I'm so amazed how Krisy Cambron weaved all three stories into one. It is her most well-written, easy to follow stories yet. And it is only the first of a trilogy—I can't wait for the next two!Three woman—Avaline, Vi, and Ellie. They each have stories that reach into the heart of mankind and reveal raw emotions. I couldn't decide who I preferred more. {4.5 stars}When this book ended, my brain couldn't stop whirling. Everything came together so well—all three settings, 1789, 1944, and Present day. I'm so amazed how Krisy Cambron weaved all three stories into one. It is her most well-written, easy to follow stories yet. And it is only the first of a trilogy—I can't wait for the next two!Three woman—Avaline, Vi, and Ellie. They each have stories that reach into the heart of mankind and reveal raw emotions. I couldn't decide who I preferred more. There is something special about each woman that made me anxiously await for each of their chapters.The descriptions were phenomenal. Everything came to live through the imagery words and it really did feel like a fairy tale, adorned with the most glorious sights and scenes. There are dark and sad moments, but so many happy times too. The theme of the story is faithfully living the life God gives each of us.Spiritual content was more than in The Illusionist's Apprentice, but still light and minimally threaded throughout. Somehow, though, it seems stronger because of the way this author brings to life her theme and intentions of a beautiful story. The romance is soft and sweet. It never came too soon, but followed the story perfectly. Content: There are several kisses, some slightly detailed, but all written sweetly. There are a couple social drinking scenes, and a setting involving a winery. There are a few intense scenes surrounding war, and some blood mentioned. Nothing overally detailed on that account. Also, there was one phrase that I consider a profanity, and it was why I took a half of star off for an otherwise phenomenal book. This is the type of book I could read again and view it through fresh eyes. Also, a warning: once you start this, don't put it down for too long in between reading times. It will grip you far too much ;) If you've never read Kristy Cambron, then you must try one of hers. Because her stories are the type that will linger for years to come, ones I would consider a classic in every essence of the word.“'Titus says the land is a witness of the generations who have come before. That it stands resolute. It's the same yesterday. Today. And who knows what tomorrow will look like. He likens it to God's influence over creation. That He's immovable. Steady. Watching from a distance, yet ever-involved. A bit like a lost castle, hmm?'”*I received this book from Thomas Nelson publishing in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Mia
    January 1, 1970
    Solid five along with a box of tissues. You ripped my heart with this one, girl!I've been trying to compose myself to write a proper review but I've failed miserably. So I'm just gonna try to get some words out without giving away too much of the plot.Kristy Cambron is one of my favorite authors and I first fell in love with her stories through her split-time WWII books, therefore I knew how masterfully she could write this type of story. Even so, I confess I warily started out "The Lost Castle" Solid five along with a box of tissues. You ripped my heart with this one, girl!I've been trying to compose myself to write a proper review but I've failed miserably. So I'm just gonna try to get some words out without giving away too much of the plot.Kristy Cambron is one of my favorite authors and I first fell in love with her stories through her split-time WWII books, therefore I knew how masterfully she could write this type of story. Even so, I confess I warily started out "The Lost Castle" because we wouldn`t be taken through only two different time-settings but three...But I should not have doubted. Right from the beginning, this book owned my heart.When you see ruins, do you believe in a potential story there or do you just see a decaying useless place? Do you see possibilities or just waste?The historical settings tell the stories of Aveline during the French Revolution and Viola Hart during WWII and how each one of these brave women came to a magnificent castle. Theirs is a world torn apart by wars challenging human beings to survive and to not treat each other with hostility. And, honestly, once you've seen true devastation and once you've experienced desolation, how can you go back to a naive and protected life? I dived into these two stories from the beginning and held my breath many times. My heart also melted through sweet moments of tenderness woven here in there, which promised to be more than a calm before the storm, but an honest building of camaraderie to see through battles coming ahead. Present day, we follow Ellie Carver in search for answers about her grandma, the one person who she used to think she knew best of all but who might actually have secrets never shared with her granddaughter. In the brisk of loss caused by Alzheimer, Ellie is willing to cross sea and valleys in search of a story before it is too late. I adored this setting with Quinn butting heads with Ellie, and Titus's sense of humor adding the perfect spice to keep me turning the pages. Oh, and don't get me started on the descriptions of wine country France and small enchanting French villages - oh la la!Nevertheless, I didn't put much faith in this part, didn't believe in its potential to add depth to the story or to make me connect and understand the characters. May I say I was so wrong, so very wrong. The author brought everything together so beautifully and organically that I shed tears through most of the last quarter of the book. I was (am) awestruck.To be able to provoke such strong compassionate and thought-provoking feelings through the entire book, one, may I point out again, set during three different timelines, is a true work of art and surrender of a gift. In sum, the past stories were about two women working alongside their people to persevere, maintain a legacy, keep hope alive and find contentment in not just being, but genuinely living. And so they (re)build a story greater than themselves. The present time story is also about restoration and the opening of eyes to the gifts we each have been given. But, in addition, it is also about rediscovering and reawakening of an ever-present and ever faithful Love that overflows and exceeds understanding.*Many thanks to the publisher for providing an ARC. This is my honest review.
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    "But then the brooch, the photo....the discovery of a lost love and the breaking open of a story she'd never known existed. As fairy-tale romances went, Ellie had to admit that finding him in the photo and giving him her grandmother's decades-long answer to a secret proposal was up there" The three separate time periods --modern day, WWII and the French Resistance and the height of Revolutionary France are interwoven well with the crux of their action emblemized in a decaying castle in the Loire "But then the brooch, the photo....the discovery of a lost love and the breaking open of a story she'd never known existed. As fairy-tale romances went, Ellie had to admit that finding him in the photo and giving him her grandmother's decades-long answer to a secret proposal was up there" The three separate time periods --modern day, WWII and the French Resistance and the height of Revolutionary France are interwoven well with the crux of their action emblemized in a decaying castle in the Loire Valley. While the descriptions and historical verisimilitude are exceptional throughout, I found myself a little disappointed when it turned to the modern setting once more. Mostly because Cambron is such a superb historical writer and it is in these instances that her voice truly comes to life and the world is painted in such a deft and intricate way.Personally, my favourite story was that of Avaline and Robert: the second son of a duke who manages the vineyard in the cottage adjacent the eponymous castle. Their love story was heart tugging and unfolded gracefully and naturally on the page as well as set during a time period I wish was involved more in CBA fiction. Fans (like myself) of the Alice Network will appreciate the tenacity and verve of Vi's mission as well as her budding relationship with Julien.It is Ellie and Quinn's story that I felt the most detached from ( though Titus' link in the chain that binds the centuries was incredibly poignant. That being said, I fell deeply into this accessible and immensely readable tale. It just meant ( in a good way) that since the interlocking historical events were so heart-pulsing and fascinating, the modern counterpart became ( quite understandably) a duller shade in comparison.Cambron did well at putting the ticking time of Alzheimers on her modern frame --- comparing its destruction to the wars that threatened the the preceding portions of the complex book. And some of the words cultivated magic: "Spring was toying with them, keeping Paris under skies of a colourless gray, plaguing the streets with a chilling drizzle that refused to release its steadfast grip in winter."All in all an exceptionally smart and well-plotted look at an enchanted castle shrouded in an enchanted wood with a keen eye for historical detail and a fresh fuse of imagination. 2 out of the 3 narratives get an A+ for me. I would love to read more about Avaline and Robert--- that just deserved a novel of its own. Indeed, readers, go find Robert--- he is one of my favourite heroes this year. read it!
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  • Hayden
    January 1, 1970
    Dual storylines are something you either love or hate, and I've felt both emotions depending on the book. They are, after all, tricky things to handle, and The Lost Castle isn't even a dual storyline: it contains three different plot threads and time periods that alternate with each other. While they all interweave together beautifully at the end, the format isn't without its issues: every time I'd get interested in one plot, it would switch over to another. That could be a little frustrating an Dual storylines are something you either love or hate, and I've felt both emotions depending on the book. They are, after all, tricky things to handle, and The Lost Castle isn't even a dual storyline: it contains three different plot threads and time periods that alternate with each other. While they all interweave together beautifully at the end, the format isn't without its issues: every time I'd get interested in one plot, it would switch over to another. That could be a little frustrating and hindered me from becoming attached to any of them. (That being said, even with all the time-jumping, I didn't find the book confusing) Strangely enough, I think my favorite section was the modern-day one with Ellie and Quinn, which is unusual given that I almost always like historical settings best. All three romances were sweet, and the book was very clean: I wouldn't have a problem handing it over to my younger teen self.It was a little difficult for me to connect with this book, but I think that is less of a reflection on the author's talent and more of a personal preference issue on my part. I really liked the dreamlike feel of the novel, which I thought was more pronounced in the modern day sections (which might be why I liked those best?). I'm very curious to see what a second book in this series would look like, and I look forward to finding out.I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    “I think all along, it’s what she was trying to tell me. That the story we’re writing in this life, day by day, it’s a gift from God and we can’t afford to waste a moment of it.” -EllieThe meshing of three stories, each in a unique time period, into one book is a work of art in this latest novel by Kristy Cambron. In the year 1789 we meet Aveline Saint-Moreau, wealthy and beautiful young aristocrat, engaged to be married to Philippe, the Duc et Vivay’s heir; followed by Viola Hart, a Resistance “I think all along, it’s what she was trying to tell me. That the story we’re writing in this life, day by day, it’s a gift from God and we can’t afford to waste a moment of it.” -EllieThe meshing of three stories, each in a unique time period, into one book is a work of art in this latest novel by Kristy Cambron. In the year 1789 we meet Aveline Saint-Moreau, wealthy and beautiful young aristocrat, engaged to be married to Philippe, the Duc et Vivay’s heir; followed by Viola Hart, a Resistance fighter in France during WWII in the year 1944; and last is Ellie Carver, a young woman in the present day struggling with her grandmother Viola’s fading health. All three young women are connected through history in a very unique manner. As Ellie works to resolve a mysterious photo, a castle called The Sleeping Beauty, a brooch, and a mysterious marriage proposal, she meets Quinn Foley, slightly rebellious grandson of Titus Vivay and her life becomes linked with his in ways she could not have predicted. Kristy Cambron helps us to realize the importance of awakening to the gifts around us as she weaves this intriguing tale of love, war, sickness and health, as well as faith and inspiration. The two historical storylines were very strong and appealed to me the most, but the present day telling of Quinn and Ellie’s story adds to the overall book. She does an excellent job of combining historical people and places in with her fiction. If you love historical fiction or romance, this book will definitely appeal to you on so many levels. Wonderful read! This copy was received from Netgalley and Thomas Nelson Publishers in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.
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  • Damaris Tonner
    January 1, 1970
    Kristy Cambron captured my heart with her debut album The Butterfly and the Violin and I have been following her ever since, reading each of her novels as they come out. I was ecstatic to be accepted to read the ARC for The Lost Castle prior to its publication. What a beautiful piece of literature this is!The Lost Castle timelessly weaves together three stories of three women in the picturesque French countryside of the Loire Valley, around a castle that encompasses the French Revolution, World Kristy Cambron captured my heart with her debut album The Butterfly and the Violin and I have been following her ever since, reading each of her novels as they come out. I was ecstatic to be accepted to read the ARC for The Lost Castle prior to its publication. What a beautiful piece of literature this is!The Lost Castle timelessly weaves together three stories of three women in the picturesque French countryside of the Loire Valley, around a castle that encompasses the French Revolution, World War Two, and present day. Cambron brilliantly paints an incredible story of loss, love, and triumph - even amidst the darkest days of revolution, war, and losing a loved one.Kristy does a beautiful job of creating an awe-inspiring landscape through her words, painting delicate portraits of the world around her characters. "Sunrise was already streaking yellow in a line across the stone floor, piercing the chapel with colored light sifted through the stained glass. Strange, but Vi could hear birdsong in the stillness, a melody just as lovely as ever. And a loud cry cut the morning—a hawk maybe, circling somewhere overhead. It was peace. Defiance even, as if nature itself resisted war with beauty in the birth of the day’s first moments." I really loved her descriptions of nature and the colourful backdrop she placed her characters into. I also appreciated how Kristy tied all three of the stories together. I'm not typically a huge fan of criss crossing dates so much in a book, but Kristy did a masterful job of linking all three together with the castle as the main backdrop and touchstone that she kept coming back to. As always, Kristy's characters themselves shone beautifully and their relationships with one another sparked intricately and effervescently.In short, Kristy has managed to write not only a charming fairytale about a French castle, but a timeless story about loss and love that revolves around a familiar landmark such as the ones we all know and love. Kristy takes a lofty thing like a castle, something that we usually reserve for shallow stories or noble poetry, and brings it to the human level: reminding us of the true things in life that transcend boundaries or time itself, things like loss, adversity, strength, and love. Thank you so much to Kristy Cambron, the publisher, and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my fair and honest review.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come
  • Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first Kristy Cambron book and I can see why so many readers have been singing her praises. The Lost Castle is one of the most intelligent mesmerizing books I've ever read! The book has three timelines going with stories of Aveline from the 1780's, Vi from the 1940's and Ellie from present day. This is a book the reader will have to pay close attention to so as not to miss the clues as the mystery of the castle, The Sleeping Beauty, unfolds. As layers of history are peeled back, I foun This is my first Kristy Cambron book and I can see why so many readers have been singing her praises. The Lost Castle is one of the most intelligent mesmerizing books I've ever read! The book has three timelines going with stories of Aveline from the 1780's, Vi from the 1940's and Ellie from present day. This is a book the reader will have to pay close attention to so as not to miss the clues as the mystery of the castle, The Sleeping Beauty, unfolds. As layers of history are peeled back, I found myself so intrigued I couldn't stop reading if I'd wanted to. Each woman has her own struggles going on, situations and choices in the face of hardship and yet each one triumphs in the face of adversity. This book is full of history and suspense, and the loves the three women encounter along the way. I was especially drawn to Robert and his sense of honor and family loyalty, I would love for his and Aveline's story to be further explored and written about. From the very prologue, The Lost Castle described Ellie's view as "an ethereal memory she had lived herself", that is what this book is for me, a book I didn't just read, a book I experienced. It directed my focus to the key verse noted, from Isaiah, "Your people will rebuild the ancient ruins and will raise up the age-old foundations; You will be called Repairer of Broken Walls." That is what this well told and well written inspirational story does, it reminded me of a powerful truth, with God's help in repairing the broken things in life, we can all be restored. Masterful from start to finish!I appreciate Thomas Nelson making a copy of The Lost Castle available for review.
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  • Susan Snodgrass
    January 1, 1970
    I fell in love with Cambron's work in her first novel. She writes very convincingly in a dual time period. This time she again writes in more than one time period. Three major time periods, but goes back and forth with five, actually. I understand why she had to do it for this story, but it was a bit confusing for me. I wish she'd kept it to just two. I think the story could have been told quite well with a dual timeline.Ellie Carver's grandmother is slowly slipping away from Alzheimer's when sh I fell in love with Cambron's work in her first novel. She writes very convincingly in a dual time period. This time she again writes in more than one time period. Three major time periods, but goes back and forth with five, actually. I understand why she had to do it for this story, but it was a bit confusing for me. I wish she'd kept it to just two. I think the story could have been told quite well with a dual timeline.Ellie Carver's grandmother is slowly slipping away from Alzheimer's when she begins telling Ellie of the past and her part in it. A lost love, a brooch and a valley in France call out and Ellie sets out to discover what has her grandmother so disturbed. Her journey takes her back many years, even a couple centuries. A tale told well, but here is where I lost interest, when the 1780s came into play. It was written so well and captured my interest in every respect but this one. I'm sure Cambron's fans will enjoy this very much.*My thanks to the publisher for a preview copy of this book . My opinion is entirely my own.
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  • Beth Vogt
    January 1, 1970
    Against the backdrop of France, Kristy Cambron weaves together the lives of three very different women with vivid emotion. Months after reading The Lost Castle, I am still recalling certain scenes that brought me to tears. I also appreciated the themes of family, loyalty, and courage.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fantastic book by Ms. Cambron. This is the first book that I have read of hers, but it will definitely not be the last! This novel provides an in-depth look at three different time periods at one historical location. The reader is able to learn about three different main characters and how they are all connected. The book will have you guessing what is going to occur (or what did occur) throughout the entire book. This is a well-written novel that will not disappoint you as you read it This is a fantastic book by Ms. Cambron. This is the first book that I have read of hers, but it will definitely not be the last! This novel provides an in-depth look at three different time periods at one historical location. The reader is able to learn about three different main characters and how they are all connected. The book will have you guessing what is going to occur (or what did occur) throughout the entire book. This is a well-written novel that will not disappoint you as you read it. I highly recommend this book!***I was given a free electronic copy of this book from the publisher. This is my honest opinion. Even though I received this copy free, this is my own opinion.
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  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    Ellie Carter is watching her last family member succumb to old age and Alzheimer's. Her beloved grandmother who raised her has become more restless of late and Ellie is trying to figure out why. During Ellie's visit, a photo is found in a book. A photo of her grandmother and a man Ellie's never seen before in front of a castle. The back of the photo says Loire Valley, France 1944. Ellie is shocked she's never heard of her grandmother being in France during WWII, let alone this man who is not her Ellie Carter is watching her last family member succumb to old age and Alzheimer's. Her beloved grandmother who raised her has become more restless of late and Ellie is trying to figure out why. During Ellie's visit, a photo is found in a book. A photo of her grandmother and a man Ellie's never seen before in front of a castle. The back of the photo says Loire Valley, France 1944. Ellie is shocked she's never heard of her grandmother being in France during WWII, let alone this man who is not her grandfather. She immediately goes to France to see if she can find answers that will give peace to her grandmother and answers to her.Aveline Sainte-Moreau prepares to meet her fiancé, the heir to the Duc et Vivay, as the Third Estate rumbles revolutionary tides across France. Even though women aren't supposed to even know politics or economics exist, Aveline has been too interested for her own good. She hopes her future husband will appreciate her interests more than her father. But is that too much to hope for? And as a member of the Second Estate, is her family safe anywhere in France?Viola Hart can no longer stand by idly while she watches the Nazis bomb her British home city, so she signed up with SOE and months later finds herself a fugitive in Nazi occupied France. She stumbles into the Loire Valley starving and exhausted, looking for food and accidentally meets Julian, a member of the local French Resistance.As the stories of Aveline, Vi, and Ellie spin out and come together, one character remains central, a castle in the Loire Valley.I thoroughly enjoyed this read and all three very different women's stories. It is told enthrallingly, and even though chapters alternate between stories, the clear dates at the beginning of chapters and the castle weaving throughout helps it flow quite well. (But do take note of dates as Vi and Aveline's stories go back and forth in time a few times.) Figuring out how they all tied together was a fun puzzle that kept me engaged too. The writing really makes the Loire Valley come to life and points out ways an area can change drastically as well as stay the same over long periods of time. The choice to weave together these three time periods in one book isn't one I've seen before, but I liked it. I think Aveline was my favorite of the three main characters, but Vi is a close second. Ellie comes in third only because she frustrated me with how she went about her hunt for answers once she gets to France. It didn't make sense to me that she felt like seeing the castle would give her more answers than showing the photo of her grandmother around and asking if anyone knew the man in it. I will acknowledge that since she is in a highly emotional state so she's not likely to think super logically. It also sounds in the end like even if she did show the photo certain people wouldn't have given her answers straight out, that they felt she had to go on a journey of discovery. Her story does end up pretty touching and cute. All three of the women have romantic interests, but each story plays out in very different ways. The Christian elements in this are light, with just casual comments about faith or God's provision. It isn't preachy at all. It feels like natural conversations and as something woven into their lives. I liked the way it was done. The author says this is the start of a series, but this book feels pretty complete as a stand alone. I do have just one lingering question (view spoiler)[What happened to Vi's brother and his family that Ellie thinks her grandmother is the last of her living family? (hide spoiler)]. I'll be ordering a copy of this for our library. I think it will appeal to teens as well as adults.Notes on content: No language issues. No sexual content beyond some kisses. The French Revolution chapters and WWII chapters include some severe injuries and deaths. A very bad wound is bloodily described in a WWII chapter. Wine making is the main income of the Loire Valley, so those who have issues with drinking wine may want to avoid this book.I received an ARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    My problem with there being three storylines is that I wish they could each be a novel in their own right. But doubling or tripling the length of the book would work too. (For the record, this is my biggest complaint with the book--it simply wasn't long enough. I wanted more.) The three storylines are nicely interwoven, tied together by the crumbling, neglected castle.Ellie's storyline--the present--was perhaps the hardest for me. She's dealing with her dying grandma, and it is only two years si My problem with there being three storylines is that I wish they could each be a novel in their own right. But doubling or tripling the length of the book would work too. (For the record, this is my biggest complaint with the book--it simply wasn't long enough. I wanted more.) The three storylines are nicely interwoven, tied together by the crumbling, neglected castle.Ellie's storyline--the present--was perhaps the hardest for me. She's dealing with her dying grandma, and it is only two years since I lost my own grandma, who was named Violet (very similar to Ellie's grandma Viola) and also took part in WWII (though safe in a Nebraskan airplane factory, not with the French Resistance). So that aspect of it hit a little close to home. But I could also sympathize with Ellie's journey, as I also, on my first trip overseas, visited France, and it was definitely an experience.Vi's storyline--WWII--is the most suspenseful and danger-filled. Her adventures in France, what brought her to France--all are exciting. I had a pretty good inkling where this story was going from early on, so I spent the story steeled for what I was pretty sure was bound to happen. And I was basically right.Avaline's story--the French Revolution--was my favorite, in part because of my long love of The Scarlet Pimpernel and partly because it felt the most fairy-tale-ish, but mainly because I really liked her character. She's smart and makes a point to understand the politics of the day, but she's also incredibly generous--both unusual for a young woman of her station. She's also very honorable; even after her injuries and being separated from her fiance, she remains true to him. Thank you Thomas Nelson and NetGalley for the free e-book. I was not required to write a positive review, and all opinions are my own.
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  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    This story is set in three different time periods. The pace starts very fast and once all three stories connect at the same castle, it slows down drastically to a point that I lost interest in reading it. It gets very stagnant and unengaging. Set during the French Revolution in the Loire Valley, Aveline is about to celebrate her engagement to the Duc et Vivay and is about to become the “mistress of a grand chateau and multiple estates, and become a social princess in the top ranks of the beau mo This story is set in three different time periods. The pace starts very fast and once all three stories connect at the same castle, it slows down drastically to a point that I lost interest in reading it. It gets very stagnant and unengaging. Set during the French Revolution in the Loire Valley, Aveline is about to celebrate her engagement to the Duc et Vivay and is about to become the “mistress of a grand chateau and multiple estates, and become a social princess in the top ranks of the beau monde: France’s most elite nobility.” But right before her engagement party, she receives a missive by carrier. A warning to leave the Loire Valley as violence is spreading due to populace starvation. The poor and hungry are revolting by attacking estates and burning them. While she tries to retrieve her mother from the party, the windows shatter and fire explodes inside.In present time, Marquette cares for her ailing grandmother Vi at a nursing facility in Michigan. At her recent visit, she sees a photo of a man she has never seen before and questions her grandma about the man. Vi relates her story to Marquette, which slips into third time period of WWII. After hearing her grandma’s story, she rushes to Loire Valley in search of the man in the photo.Set in 1944, the end of WWII, Vi recollects her story as she was trying to hide from SS officers in the Loire Valley. As she is searching for a place to hide, she comes upon the ruins of a castle. She takes refuge in an old chapel nearby. As she is enjoying a moment of peace, she hears an intruder. A uniformed man asks her to leave for the safety of the villagers as they are carefully watched by SS officers. But instead of leaving, she asks him to hide her.And this is where three stories connect at the ruins of the same castle and slow down with an uninteresting dialogue not moving the story [email protected]: Best Historical Fiction
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  • Cafinated Reads Molly
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a historical Christian fiction lover, but sometimes I find the multiple time lines hard to follow. However, reading this beautifully moving novel by the very talented Kristy Cambron was so easy to follow and was absolutely captivating. This book has what I call "all the feels". It's incredibly detailed, with characters that are chiseled magnificently. Each time line brings the reader to a character that will make way into your heart and stay their long after the book is finished. The beautif I'm a historical Christian fiction lover, but sometimes I find the multiple time lines hard to follow. However, reading this beautifully moving novel by the very talented Kristy Cambron was so easy to follow and was absolutely captivating. This book has what I call "all the feels". It's incredibly detailed, with characters that are chiseled magnificently. Each time line brings the reader to a character that will make way into your heart and stay their long after the book is finished. The beautiful ruins of the castle that Ms. Cambron describes come to life for me. I could feel myself transported to the heart of France, finding the castle and living the life of these three women, Avaline, Vi and Ellie. I loved that feeling! It's not often that a multi timeline can do that and I was so pleased that it did. Watching Ellie deal with her grandmother, brought back memories of my own dealings with Alzheimer's with my grandfather. It was a bittersweet time for me! This incredible story is filled with longing, hope, faith, and finding love. I turned page after page of this 4 star novel until I reached the final one. I shut the novel, sat back and reflected on all I felt through this book, from smiles, to sadness, to butterflies in my stomach. Ms. Cambron has created another keeper in my opinion. This book will be one that I recommend to all, and have already asked my local libraries to carry it for others to read! Well done, Ms. Cambron! Well done! *I received a complimentary copy of this book from Book Look Bloggers/Publisher and was under no obligation to post a review, positive or negative.*
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  • Christie
    January 1, 1970
    The Lost Castle hit all the right notes. I was immediately drawn into the story and the characters. The romance and atmosphere of a castle in the French countryside swept me away. At first it was a little confusing to keep the timeline and characters straight, but it didn't take long to get sucked into the story. We are introduced to three ladies- Aveline, a titled Lady about to announce her engagement to a man she hasn't met in the late 1700s; Vi, a fearless traveler who may have found the perf The Lost Castle hit all the right notes. I was immediately drawn into the story and the characters. The romance and atmosphere of a castle in the French countryside swept me away. At first it was a little confusing to keep the timeline and characters straight, but it didn't take long to get sucked into the story. We are introduced to three ladies- Aveline, a titled Lady about to announce her engagement to a man she hasn't met in the late 1700s; Vi, a fearless traveler who may have found the perfect hiding place during WWII or has walked into an enemy's hideaway; and modern-day Ellie Carver and her grandmother whose memory of her past is fading.There is a lot to love here- especially for fans of historical romance. I'm looking forward to more in this series! Ms. Cambron has quickly become a stand-out author; her books never fail to carry you away to another time and place, with characters and stories that tug on your heartstrings and linger past the last page.Thank you Thomas Nelson and NetGalley for this eARC.
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  • Anita Ojeda
    January 1, 1970
    What can an 18th century noble Frenchwoman, a lady ravaged by Alzheimer’s and her granddaughter have in common? Nothing—until Lady Vi has a moment of lucidity and tells her granddaughter, Ellie Carver, about a mysterious first love. When Ellie finds a never-before-seen photograph of her grandmother as a young woman posing with a handsome young man along a castle wall, she knows she has to uncover the story. What Ellie discovers has the power to heal—not just her, but an entire community. I loved What can an 18th century noble Frenchwoman, a lady ravaged by Alzheimer’s and her granddaughter have in common? Nothing—until Lady Vi has a moment of lucidity and tells her granddaughter, Ellie Carver, about a mysterious first love. When Ellie finds a never-before-seen photograph of her grandmother as a young woman posing with a handsome young man along a castle wall, she knows she has to uncover the story. What Ellie discovers has the power to heal—not just her, but an entire community. I loved this book for many different reasons. The layered stories feel like what I imagine biting into one of Adriano Zumbo’s Desserts must be like. If you love mystery, romance, suspense, and good stories, this book is for you.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Net Galley for a review copy in exchange for my honest opinion.Split time—1789, 1944, present day with 3 wonderful heroines! Cambron weaves together a beautiful tale of love and bravery in the face of adversity. Her gentle handling of Vi’s Alzheimer’s is so authentic to anyone who has seen a loved one succumb. I really wasn’t ready for the story to end. You won't go wrong if you take the time to read this novel.
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  • Velma
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved all of Kristy Cambron's previous novels, and this new book is no exception. I love the way she is able to tell three distinct stories that weave together in the end. The plot lines center around the beginning of the French Revolution, World War II in France leading to D-Day, and present day France all set surrounding a castle in French wine country while telling stories of love, loss, bravery, and healing. I was happy to see that this novel was the beginning of a series and look for I have loved all of Kristy Cambron's previous novels, and this new book is no exception. I love the way she is able to tell three distinct stories that weave together in the end. The plot lines center around the beginning of the French Revolution, World War II in France leading to D-Day, and present day France all set surrounding a castle in French wine country while telling stories of love, loss, bravery, and healing. I was happy to see that this novel was the beginning of a series and look forward to reading the next book.I was provided this book by Netgalley for my honest opinion.
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  • Cosima demaglie
    January 1, 1970
    I quickly got pulled into this book. There are several smaller story lines that all connect in some way. This is a great Christmastime story, full of family and connections. I enjoyed this book
  • Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars.
  • Alissa Wied
    January 1, 1970
    The Lost Castle was an enjoyable read. I always love a good Christian romance that takes place in Europe. And this one even had a castle! The author does a great job of weaving three different timelines of quite-differing time periods together into one cohesive story. If I'm honest, it was still missing a "certain something" for me to have made it fantastic, but I would still recommend this to my friends and family, especially if they love being whisked away to Italy's wine country.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    If history were simply about recording events in linear fashion, there would be little point in knowing history. The reality is that history forms a tapestry, with various events creating small images or patterns that work together to form a story or grand picture. That’s why I enjoy exploring small segments of history that dig into a more personal level, perusing how the experiences of one individual can impact those of others who live further along the progressive line. That concept of shared If history were simply about recording events in linear fashion, there would be little point in knowing history. The reality is that history forms a tapestry, with various events creating small images or patterns that work together to form a story or grand picture. That’s why I enjoy exploring small segments of history that dig into a more personal level, perusing how the experiences of one individual can impact those of others who live further along the progressive line. That concept of shared experiences is what author Kristy Cambron draws on to create the beautifully woven tale of The Lost Castle. Aveline Sainte-Moreau, daughter and fiancée of wealthy and elite late-eighteenth century nobles, cannot turn a blind eye or ear to the plight of France’s commoners, even as she stands in her fiancé’s beautiful castle waiting to be announced at their extravagant engagement ball. As revolution’s grip takes hold of her country, Aveline is torn between the needs of the people and the risk to her own life because of her noble status. Just over 150 years later, SOE operative and Nazi fugitive Viola Hart stumbles across the same castle in which Aveline stood decades before. In a neighboring chapel, she meets the mysterious Julien who agrees to hide her. Viola’s choice to trust Julien thrusts her into a corner of World War II she had never seen before, changing her perspective and her life.Two generations later, Ellie Carver stands on the brink of losing the last thing she holds dear as the dreaded and bleak world of Alzheimer’s steadily steals the soul of the grandmother who had raised her. But, in a single, precious moment of lucidity, Lady Vi reveals a side of her past that her granddaughter has never known, sending Ellie to France on an unexpected search for a lost castle. Three stories all converge in one location, a French castle nestled in the woods and surrounded by a thriving vineyard. But, the castle and vineyard are not all that connect Aveline, Viola, and Ellie, and Kristy Cambron does a masterful job of intertwining and connecting the three women and their vibrant stories. With each narrative switch, I found myself not wanting to leave the character of the moment. Yet, I very quickly became immersed in the advancement of the next character’s tale, equally drawn to all three women and their stories. Their connection began to become increasingly clear as the stories progressed, but Cambron successfully saved little morsels of revelation until the end. There were moments when the time switches - especially when involving flashbacks that added a bit of confusion to the narrative - made the flow of reading feel a bit choppy. But the quality of the stories themselves overcame the choppiness. Then there is the history. Some historical novels teach about segments of history through the narrative. Others assume a foundational knowledge of the time period in question. The Lost Castle fits in the latter category. Confusion might have existed had I not had an understanding of the French Revolution and events of World World II (both general and specifically related to the progression of WWII in France, including knowledge of the French resistance), so I would not recommend this book to friends who do not have a good grasp on history. All in all, though, The Lost Castle is a fantastic novel that I’ve already handed off to my teenage daughters for them to enjoy as well. It makes me want to explore Kristy Cambron’s other novels and leaves me hopeful for a continuation of Ellie’s story.
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  • Honeybee
    January 1, 1970
    This was a lovely story that kept me captivated from beginning to end. The Lost Castle centers around a family estate during the French Revolution, World War II and the present. As events unfold, the reader sees the budding of three romances--that of a young noblewoman and a winemaker at the beginning of the upheaval in mid-18th-century France, that of an English spy and a member of the French resistance in the months leading up to Normandy, and that of the Englishwoman's American granddaughter This was a lovely story that kept me captivated from beginning to end. The Lost Castle centers around a family estate during the French Revolution, World War II and the present. As events unfold, the reader sees the budding of three romances--that of a young noblewoman and a winemaker at the beginning of the upheaval in mid-18th-century France, that of an English spy and a member of the French resistance in the months leading up to Normandy, and that of the Englishwoman's American granddaughter and the heir of the Domaine du Renard.The author has done her homework. In addition to weaving into the story facts about each of the two wars in question, Kristy Cambron includes tidbits about the modern-day wine-making process. Her descriptions of the land are vivid and evocative. She splashes phrases of French and even a bit of Irish colloquialism into the conversation. The romances unfold naturally and with no hint of being forced. You think you know how everything is going to play out, but then there is a new dimension or twist added to the plot through flashbacks or some other means.Managing the flow of three different romances in as many time periods had to be tricky. One pleasant surprise is that the author manages to create a unique voice for each of her point-of-view characters. The dates and locations given for each entry were extremely helpful in keeping track of who's who and where and when. However, once you are familiar with the characters, those headings are simply an added bonus, a generous nicety that isn't actually needed to keep track of what's going on. I really appreciate how the author tidily, but not too conveniently ties up all the loose ends at the conclusion of her book. Each of the three romances, conflicts and crises are resolved. One had a tragic, yet heroic ending. One was quite unexpected, and the last was very satisfying. Although it sounds like the author is doing a trilogy, this book can certainly stand on its own.The author is Christian. God and church are mentioned in the book. There is no language or inappropriate behavior in the story. However, you are not really going to find a Gospel message or even much talk about faith in this book. The courage and conduct of the characters is inspiring, but nobody is going to "get saved" as a result of reading this novel. If you are looking for an enjoyable read in which you a gain a bit of insight into the French Revolution, occupied France during World War II, or modern wine-making, then this would be a nice choice.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    Ellie Carver arrives at her grandmother’s bedside expecting to find her silently slipping away. Instead, the beloved woman begins speaking. Of a secret past and castle ruins forgotten by time. Of a hidden chapel that served as a rendezvous for the French Resistance in World War II. Of lost love and deep regret . . . Each piece that unlocks the story seems to unlock part of Ellie too—where she came from and who she is becoming. But her grandmother is quickly disappearing into the shadows of Alzhe Ellie Carver arrives at her grandmother’s bedside expecting to find her silently slipping away. Instead, the beloved woman begins speaking. Of a secret past and castle ruins forgotten by time. Of a hidden chapel that served as a rendezvous for the French Resistance in World War II. Of lost love and deep regret . . . Each piece that unlocks the story seems to unlock part of Ellie too—where she came from and who she is becoming. But her grandmother is quickly disappearing into the shadows of Alzheimer’s and Ellie must act fast if she wants to uncover the truth of her family’s history. Drawn by the mystery surrounding The Sleeping Beauty—a castle so named for Charles Perrault’s beloved fairy tale—Ellie embarks on a journey to France’s Loire Valley in hopes that she can unearth its secrets before time silences them forever. Bridging the past to the present in three time periods—the French Revolution, World War II, and present day—The Lost Castle is a story of loves won and lost, of battles waged in the hearts of men, and of an enchanted castle that stood witness to it all, inspiring a legacy of faith through the generations.I so looked forward to getting to read this, and that anticipation was well-rewarded! This book is written over three eras (the present, WWII, and the French Revolution), each of which is a high-drama time period! It is a time travel book, and while those can be difficult to read, this one flows fairly smoothly, especially given the multiple timelines. It's not a fast read - you'll want to pace yourself and make sure that you're not just skimming along, or you're going to get lost. The story centers around a castle; each of the three main characters comes to find herself at this castle during a pivotal point in both world history and her own life. While the beginning may seem a bit disjointed, you absolutely must bear with it, because it will all make sense at the end. You won't even see it coming until you're in tears! (No spoilers.) The stories feature strong female characters who persevere through tragedy, find their rock bottom, and then find the hope they desire to build upon a strengthened-by-trials foundation of faith. This is the first book in a trilogy, and I am eagerly awaiting the next two!
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  • MT
    January 1, 1970
    Meet three intriguing heroines as the story hurtles you back in time to the French Revolution, World War II and back to present day time. Aveline is from French Nobility. Violet is hiding in France during Hitler's reign. Ellie wants to make her grandmother's wish come true and travels to modern day France to find answers to a mystery romance hidden in her grandmother's memories as she suffers from Alzheimers. As I read about Aveline I became so engrossed I forgot there were other seasons to this Meet three intriguing heroines as the story hurtles you back in time to the French Revolution, World War II and back to present day time. Aveline is from French Nobility. Violet is hiding in France during Hitler's reign. Ellie wants to make her grandmother's wish come true and travels to modern day France to find answers to a mystery romance hidden in her grandmother's memories as she suffers from Alzheimers. As I read about Aveline I became so engrossed I forgot there were other seasons to this story. But then Violet's encounters as she strives to remain hidden and alive in war torn France captured my attention. Ellie's story was seeped in mystery upon mystery keeping me anxious to know the outcome of her discoveries. It is impossible to be bored while reading this book because each young lady has so many facets to her tale and then as you get further into the pages of the book and see how all three are actually very entwined with each other it just becomes that much more engrossing and fascinating. Kristy Cambron knows how to tell a story and tell it beautifully with deep emotion and purposeful meaning.
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  • Marian Baay
    January 1, 1970
    Kristy Cambron's writing style has a way of drawing the reader right into the story. I kept turning the pages, eager to find out Grandma Vi's story and couldn't wait to see how Ellie unraveled the mysteries of the past.The Lost Castle is an interesting three generation story centered around The Sleeping Beauty castle. My favorite storylines were about Grandma Vi and Ellie. I didn't really connect with Aveline's life, although I do see how it fits into the whole story.This is a good book to get l Kristy Cambron's writing style has a way of drawing the reader right into the story. I kept turning the pages, eager to find out Grandma Vi's story and couldn't wait to see how Ellie unraveled the mysteries of the past.The Lost Castle is an interesting three generation story centered around The Sleeping Beauty castle. My favorite storylines were about Grandma Vi and Ellie. I didn't really connect with Aveline's life, although I do see how it fits into the whole story.This is a good book to get lost in while unraveling the castle's mysteries.
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  • Rosevine Cottage Girls
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a masterpiece! Truly a work of art, a book not be read but inhaled. It takes you on a journey of fairy tales and legends secrets and love and the un-fairytale-like messiness of life. It follows the story of three women, in three different times but all touched by the Sleeping Beauty. This book had me laughing so loud I was worried I would wake everyone in the house and crying into my pillow. It's one the best books I have ever read and will forever remain one of my favorites. Receiv This book is a masterpiece! Truly a work of art, a book not be read but inhaled. It takes you on a journey of fairy tales and legends secrets and love and the un-fairytale-like messiness of life. It follows the story of three women, in three different times but all touched by the Sleeping Beauty. This book had me laughing so loud I was worried I would wake everyone in the house and crying into my pillow. It's one the best books I have ever read and will forever remain one of my favorites. Received this book from Netgalley for our honest review.
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