Pemmican Wars
Echo Desjardins, a 13-year-old Métis girl adjusting to a new home and school, is struggling with loneliness while separated from her mother. Then an ordinary day in Mr. Bee’s history class turns extraordinary, and Echo’s life will never be the same. During Mr. Bee’s lecture, Echo finds herself transported to another time and place—a bison hunt on the Saskatchewan prairie—and back again to the present. In the following weeks, Echo slips back and forth in time. She visits a Métis camp, travels the old fur-trade routes, and experiences the perilous and bygone era of the Pemmican Wars.Pemmican Wars is the first graphic novel in a new series, A Girl Called Echo, by Governor General Award–winning writer, and author of Highwater Press’ The Seven Teaching Stories, Katherena Vermette.

Pemmican Wars Details

TitlePemmican Wars
Author
ReleaseDec 5th, 2017
PublisherHighWater Press
ISBN-139781553796787
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Young Adult

Pemmican Wars Review

  • Ana Rînceanu
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting way to present history and I hope the next issue focuses more on Echo herself.
  • Victoria Peipert
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel exceeded my expectations. I thought the story was unique and very well done as the beginning of a series - it was not nearly long enough and I can't wait to read the next one!
  • -RadioActiveBookWorm-
    January 1, 1970
    Goodreads Synopsis:Echo Desjardins, a 13-year-old Métis girl adjusting to a new home and school, is struggling with loneliness while separated from her mother. Then an ordinary day in Mr. Bee’s history class turns extraordinary, and Echo’s life will never be the same. During Mr. Bee’s lecture, Echo finds herself transported to another time and place—a bison hunt on the Saskatchewan prairie—and back again to the present. In the following weeks, Echo slips back and forth in time. She visits a Méti Goodreads Synopsis:Echo Desjardins, a 13-year-old Métis girl adjusting to a new home and school, is struggling with loneliness while separated from her mother. Then an ordinary day in Mr. Bee’s history class turns extraordinary, and Echo’s life will never be the same. During Mr. Bee’s lecture, Echo finds herself transported to another time and place—a bison hunt on the Saskatchewan prairie—and back again to the present. In the following weeks, Echo slips back and forth in time. She visits a Métis camp, travels the old fur-trade routes, and experiences the perilous and bygone era of the Pemmican Wars.Pemmican Wars is the first graphic novel in a new series, A Girl Called Echo, by Governor General Award–winning writer, and author of Highwater Press’ The Seven Teaching Stories, Katherena Vermette.My Review:I received a copy of this from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I thought this book would be really interesting, but didn't think anything of it as it wasn't available to request, only wish for. I'm so glad my wish was granted! This book is completely unlike anything I've read lately and I'm really happy and thankful I got the chance to read it. I really like the cover, and also the art in the book. Although this is volume one, the book itself is only about fifty pages long, so it's a super quick read. It packs a punch and I really enjoyed reading it from the moment I started it to the end of the story. It begins with a girl, Echo, in what is now Saskatchewan, but in the year 1814. Usually I'm not a fan of books about long ago, but this one was intriguing. She's surrounded by people from the year, but obviously not of the time herself. She's scared. A herd of buffalo run by her and some of them are shot and killed. Then she wakes up in class, in the present day. Most of the story is Echo listening to music and spending time by herself. Sometimes she goes back in her dreams, other times she's at school or at her foster home. Honestly I love her as a character. The book really shows what kind of culture shock there is because of the history. She feels detached and lost because she doesn't know about her ancestors, all she has are the dreams. Overall I really liked reading this book and wished it was longer. I definitely want to check out the next volume, which I'm assuming there will be because this is called volume one. I really liked it, check it out and see what you think!Here's a link to the book on Amazon, and another link to the authors Twitter!https://www.amazon.ca/Pemmican-Wars-G...https://twitter.com/katherenav?lang=enThanks for reading! Check out this review and more at my blog.(Radioactivebookreviews.wordpress.com)
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  • Lorisia
    January 1, 1970
    So far this looks to be an excellent story with wonderful artistry that captures the struggle with Indigenous identity and history that many Indigenous people feel. The biggest complaint I have is that this first volume is too short since the story pulls you right in and leaves you wanting more. I’m looking forward to future volumes.
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  • Lanica
    January 1, 1970
    Written and illustrated by Native Americans, this is a story about one tiny piece of the greater history of the settling of the United States by Europeans. A girl with a seemingly troubled life (but only hints are given in this book) walks through her new school listening to her mother’s music and daydreaming about the history lessons her classes are presenting. She imagines herself (or perhaps is magically transported) in the villager her ancestors where she sees their interactions with two fur Written and illustrated by Native Americans, this is a story about one tiny piece of the greater history of the settling of the United States by Europeans. A girl with a seemingly troubled life (but only hints are given in this book) walks through her new school listening to her mother’s music and daydreaming about the history lessons her classes are presenting. She imagines herself (or perhaps is magically transported) in the villager her ancestors where she sees their interactions with two fur trading companies. This is a chapter of a larger work. It reads quickly, but leaves a lot of questions unanswered. Think of it as a comic book rather than a full graphic novel. Although I wish this were a complete story, I am going to give it five stars based on its unique presentation, historical accuracy and immediate draw for kids. I would buy this in a minute. Even though the Native American nations where I live are not the same, I believe this would draw in my Native students in a way very few other books can.
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