Why Kill the Innocent (Sebastian St. Cyr, #13)
In the newest mystery from the national bestselling author of Where the Dead Lie, a brutal murder draws Sebastian St. Cyr into the web of the royal court, where intrigue abounds and betrayal awaits.London, 1814. As a cruel winter holds the city in its icy grip, the bloody body of a beautiful young musician is found half-buried in a snowdrift. Jane Ambrose's ties to Princess Charlotte, the only child of the Prince Regent and heir presumptive to the throne, panic the palace, which moves quickly to shut down any investigation into the death of the talented pianist. But Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, and his wife Hero refuse to allow Jane's murderer to escape justice. Untangling the secrets of Jane's world leads Sebastian into a maze of dangerous treachery where each player has his or her own unsavory agenda and no one can be trusted. As the Thames freezes over and the people of London pour onto the ice for a Frost Fair, Sebastian and Hero find their investigation circling back to the palace and building to a chilling crescendo of deceit and death . . .

Why Kill the Innocent (Sebastian St. Cyr, #13) Details

TitleWhy Kill the Innocent (Sebastian St. Cyr, #13)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 3rd, 2018
PublisherBerkley
ISBN-139780399585623
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Historical Mystery, Fiction

Why Kill the Innocent (Sebastian St. Cyr, #13) Review

  • Chris Carroll
    January 1, 1970
    Great story loaded with history and mystery! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~This book has been an experience. I’ve read a lot of historical books in my time but I have to say the detail and the authenticity of this story added so much to the underlying theme.One of the things I got me worried was the fact that I had never read any of the series. This was my first book and was missing the intimate knowledge of the main characters, Sebastian and Hero. While I was at a deficit to begin with it only took m Great story loaded with history and mystery! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~This book has been an experience. I’ve read a lot of historical books in my time but I have to say the detail and the authenticity of this story added so much to the underlying theme.One of the things I got me worried was the fact that I had never read any of the series. This was my first book and was missing the intimate knowledge of the main characters, Sebastian and Hero. While I was at a deficit to begin with it only took me a few chapters to break into the story.There was some things to overcome in this book. One of which was, of course, my unfamiliarity with the characters and the authors writing style. The other was the amount of characters in the book. It became difficult at times to keep track of everyone.However, once the book had ended and you look back on the minuscule threads and the authors ability to paint a picture of mystery surrounding the incident, you understand why there were so many fingers in the pie, so to speak.For me, the first third of the book was a little more difficult to get through but by the time I got into the investigation and started connecting dots, I was thoroughly engaged and loved the minute detail the author developed.She is definitely at the top of her game with the intricacy of her story and plot. This book is thoroughly enjoyable! For those that love history and mystery, this is an author you must check out and Why Kill the Innocent is full of the twists we crave!I especially loved the mini history lesson at the end where she detailed the truths in the history and her creative license in developing the story. So interesting! And the cover is awesome!I never felt like I was missing a big portion of the background by not reading the other books before. However, I will definitely check out more of this series. Great escape reading! 4 Stars!
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    To be reviewed over at Fresh Fiction!
  • Barbara Rogers
    January 1, 1970
    Series: Sebastian St. Cyr #13Publication Date: 4/3/18I anxiously await each new release in this series and can hardly wait to start reading. Then, I am bereft when it ends. I always think that I’ll pace myself, read slower, enjoy longer, but, I always find myself flying through because I can’t wait to see what happens next. This book falls right into that mold. I really wish this author could write as quickly as I read! I love the characters, of course, but I also love the accuracy of the histor Series: Sebastian St. Cyr #13Publication Date: 4/3/18I anxiously await each new release in this series and can hardly wait to start reading. Then, I am bereft when it ends. I always think that I’ll pace myself, read slower, enjoy longer, but, I always find myself flying through because I can’t wait to see what happens next. This book falls right into that mold. I really wish this author could write as quickly as I read! I love the characters, of course, but I also love the accuracy of the history that the author weaves into the stories – and she always includes our characters meeting one real historical character – this one included the widower of Mary Wollstonecraft. Harris’ command of the English language is unparalleled – I learned several new vocabulary words. She used one word, ‘broquins’ that I can’t even find in any of the dictionaries but I remember my grandmother using it when referring to a particular type of shoe. The online dictionaries keep showing me the definition of ‘bruins’ – say what. I love the way this author writes, her research is impeccable and her character development is superb. This book concentrated more on the mystery than on any new developments in the relationship between Sebastian and his father (Hendon) or any real hints of what is happening between Hero’s father and her cousin. There were some hints of what might be coming – a new hint surfaced about Sebastian’s natural father. There was somewhat less life-threatening excitement in this book than in the others – one small scene for each that was very quickly resolved. I’m still anxious to see whether Hero’s father (or her cousin – or both) had a hand in the death of Hero’s mother – she was ill, but maybe they helped her along a bit . . . . Hero and her friend Alexi Sauvage traveled to Clerkenwell in a raging snowstorm during one of the worst winters in English history. Hero was researching a story on the families left behind when the men were impressed into the English military. While they were there, the woman went into labor and Alexi and Hero stayed to deliver the baby. As they headed back to the carriage, it was long past dark, the snow was blowing and the wind was howling when Hero tripped, pitched forward and landed in a deep snow drift. She froze in place as she realized she had landed on a body. When they turned the rapidly freezing body, they realized two things. First, it was a woman who had been murdered and second, Hero knew who she was.As Hero and Sebastian investigate, there are clues and suspects everywhere – not to mention the palace intrigues and interference from Hero’s father, Jarvis as well as international intrigue. How could one sweet, gentle, caring and sad young piano teacher have so much happen to her and then end up murdered? There are so many possibilities, so many suspects and it takes a lot of effort to unravel it all – especially when more bodies start to turn up. Can they solve it before one of them becomes a victim? You’ll just have to read this exciting new entry in the series to find out.Please check out my reviews at:Blog: https://flippinpages.blog/Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/flippinpages...Twitter: https://twitter.com/FlippinPagesRevTwitter: https://twitter.com/BarbBookReview"I requested and received this e-book at no cost to me and volunteered to read it; my review is my honest opinion and given without any influence by the author or publisher."
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  • Caz
    January 1, 1970
    Breathtaking.Review to follow at AAR nearer release date.
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely love this series. However, this particular book fell a little flat for me. There were a lot of characters running all over the place and pointing fingers without a lot of substance to it. In most of the other books there is a lot of character development with Sebastian and Hero, either together or independently of each other, and I felt like that was missing from this book. As always, more hints into future plots with Sebastian’s family and I will anxiously await book #14.I was give I absolutely love this series. However, this particular book fell a little flat for me. There were a lot of characters running all over the place and pointing fingers without a lot of substance to it. In most of the other books there is a lot of character development with Sebastian and Hero, either together or independently of each other, and I felt like that was missing from this book. As always, more hints into future plots with Sebastian’s family and I will anxiously await book #14.I was given an advanced copy of this book from Netgalley.
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  • Jo (Mixed Book Bag)
    January 1, 1970
    I have to start by saying I was disappointed in Why Kill the Innocent. This is one of my favorite mystery series and I have never missed any. In fact I have read then all in order. So to start this is a nice mystery and we get to watch Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, and his wife Hero work to solve the murder of Jane Ambrose, a murder that the crown wants swept under the table. A lot of the actual history of the period is used to solve the murder and makes for some very interesting reading. I have to start by saying I was disappointed in Why Kill the Innocent. This is one of my favorite mystery series and I have never missed any. In fact I have read then all in order. So to start this is a nice mystery and we get to watch Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, and his wife Hero work to solve the murder of Jane Ambrose, a murder that the crown wants swept under the table. A lot of the actual history of the period is used to solve the murder and makes for some very interesting reading. What I felt missing was the tension between the various characters and any lead toward solving the issues that have been set up as part of the backstory in the series. Where any of that comes up lacks the connection to the series characters. I want Sebastian to still be looking into his past and I want more of a conflict between Hero and her father. That would have added to this story and would have moved the story arc instead of stalling it leaving me with a feeling that the story was just a little flat.I received a free copy of the book in return for an honest review.
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  • Mskychick
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of WHY KILL THE INNOCENT through the Goodreads Book Giveaway program. I am an avid C.S. Harris fan. Her books are extremely well written. Meticulously researched and insightful, the words ringing off the pages. I love the way she writes- WHY KILL THE INNOCENT (as all her other St. Cyr books) contains beautiful prose! I even got a few new vocabulary words from this book. As someone who has a huge vocabulary, I love it when a book I adore has a word or two that I have to look up! I received an ARC of WHY KILL THE INNOCENT through the Goodreads Book Giveaway program. I am an avid C.S. Harris fan. Her books are extremely well written. Meticulously researched and insightful, the words ringing off the pages. I love the way she writes- WHY KILL THE INNOCENT (as all her other St. Cyr books) contains beautiful prose! I even got a few new vocabulary words from this book. As someone who has a huge vocabulary, I love it when a book I adore has a word or two that I have to look up!WHY KILL THE INNOCENT is book 13 in the Sebastian St. Cyr series. It is set in the time of the London Frost Fair of 1814. A few unusually frigid weeks in Britain led to the compete freezing of the Thames, and a winter fair was held on the frozen ice of the river. Sources even describe an elephant being led across the iced-over river below the Blackfriars Bridge (although Harris didn't incorporate this into her tale)! The historical setting is skillfully brought to life by Harris. I love all the little details that spice up the scene, like descriptions of clothing and conveyances. Hero Devlin discovers the body of a murdered young woman, Jane Ambrose, hidden in a snowbank. Hero is married to fellow sleuth Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin. Hero is the daughter of Lord Jarvis, who himself is cousin to the grotesque and corrupt Regent. Despite her aristocratic upbringing and marriage, Hero is reformer, using her intelligence and wealth to bring to light the injustices perpetrated on the poor by the ruling class. I really like how Hero is committed to social justice, but is firmly and appropriately set in her time period. A common complaint I have with much current publishing is the placement of overly-modern feminist heroines that do not correspond to their historical time period.The murdered woman was the long-term piano teacher to Princess Charlotte, the reviled Prince Regent's daughter. The political intrigues of the palace and environs as well as the unrest of the populace provide many suspects for the murderer. Hero and Sebastian must fight their entitled fathers as well as the resources of the monarchy as they race to find the killer. Deftly drawn characters and lush backdrops make this a compelling read.
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  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Received free from Penguin First to Read, my thoughts are my own.I read the first two books of this series, then lost interest, but decided to try this later book. I'm pleased to say they improved over time. The character development over the subsequent books is summed up in bits and pieces, well enough to keep reading, without being an info dump. It all starts with the murder (or manslaughter) of princess Charlotte's piano teacher. The government hushes it up as a tragic accident, but it's clea Received free from Penguin First to Read, my thoughts are my own.I read the first two books of this series, then lost interest, but decided to try this later book. I'm pleased to say they improved over time. The character development over the subsequent books is summed up in bits and pieces, well enough to keep reading, without being an info dump. It all starts with the murder (or manslaughter) of princess Charlotte's piano teacher. The government hushes it up as a tragic accident, but it's clear her body was moved. As St.Cyr investigates, it's clear there are several motives, and plenty of deceit. He soon realizes he's missing an important piece of the puzzle, though not before more people die.The solution is quite smart, tying together all the motives and seeing some kind of justice done (without scandal, of course.) It's not entirely satisfactory, but it does give some hope for the survivors. And the Author's Note separates fact from fiction, and tells a little more about the real people's lives (not a lot of happy endings there, either.)
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    *Advanced copy provided by Netgalley* Another excellent installment in the Sebastian St Cyr series! Instead of going stale, this series keeps on getting better. The intersection of real historical events such as the controversy over Princess Charlotte's betrothal and the impressment gangs was fascinating. She was a figure that I wouldn't mind seeing more in future novels. Hero has always been my favorite character due to her strength and smarts and I enjoyed the active role she played in this bo *Advanced copy provided by Netgalley* Another excellent installment in the Sebastian St Cyr series! Instead of going stale, this series keeps on getting better. The intersection of real historical events such as the controversy over Princess Charlotte's betrothal and the impressment gangs was fascinating. She was a figure that I wouldn't mind seeing more in future novels. Hero has always been my favorite character due to her strength and smarts and I enjoyed the active role she played in this book.
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  • Robin Brock
    January 1, 1970
    OK, I am seriously in love with this series! This latest entry just reminded me how much. The plot was absorbing, the historical details spot-on...this author continues to amaze me. I think the true test of a good book is its ability to be played out vividly in your mind like a movie. This series does that. I ❤ these characters! I cannot recommend this series highly enough...all the ⭐s!!! If you try it, please start at the beginning, get to know the characters as you go along and simply savor yo OK, I am seriously in love with this series! This latest entry just reminded me how much. The plot was absorbing, the historical details spot-on...this author continues to amaze me. I think the true test of a good book is its ability to be played out vividly in your mind like a movie. This series does that. I ❤️ these characters! I cannot recommend this series highly enough...all the ⭐️s!!! If you try it, please start at the beginning, get to know the characters as you go along and simply savor your time in their world. Thanks to #Berkley for the ARC!❤️
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  • Celine
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars, I received an arc of this book through Penguin's First to Read program.It takes a lot of skill to have a thirteenth book in the series still feel fresh and interesting. Luckily Harris seems to have this skill. I love the characters she's created and the way they continue to evolve. Her knowledge and use of actual historical events is what always makes her books stand apart from the others. I loved how this one felt so relevant to today's culture while simultaneously making me feel lik 4.5 stars, I received an arc of this book through Penguin's First to Read program.It takes a lot of skill to have a thirteenth book in the series still feel fresh and interesting. Luckily Harris seems to have this skill. I love the characters she's created and the way they continue to evolve. Her knowledge and use of actual historical events is what always makes her books stand apart from the others. I loved how this one felt so relevant to today's culture while simultaneously making me feel like I was transported to 1814 England.
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  • Joseph Dubey
    January 1, 1970
    A murder mystery set in London in 1814 during the Great Fog. The dead body of a young musician is tripped over by Hero. Hero just happens to knows that the woman is a piano teacher for Princess Charlotte. While Sebastian and Hero are trying to solve this murder, other murders start happening. Overall pretty good. Find out who murdered whom on your own.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    During the extremely cold winter of 1814, Hero, the wife of Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, literally stumbles over the dead body of a woman with whom she is acquainted....the piano teacher of Princess Charlotte. The woman, Jane Ambrose, has died of a head injury, and the lack of blood at the scene means she died elsewhere and was moved to the place she was found. Because of her connection with the princess, the death is treated as accidental by the government. Hero and her husband Sebastian During the extremely cold winter of 1814, Hero, the wife of Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, literally stumbles over the dead body of a woman with whom she is acquainted....the piano teacher of Princess Charlotte. The woman, Jane Ambrose, has died of a head injury, and the lack of blood at the scene means she died elsewhere and was moved to the place she was found. Because of her connection with the princess, the death is treated as accidental by the government. Hero and her husband Sebastian investigates the death and many ugly secrets are revealed. I thoroughly enjoy this series, especially the relationship between Hero and Sebastian. We are treated here to an example of a truly dysfunctional family as we see how the Prince Regent treats his estranged wife and his daughter and heir. We also see the effects of the Napoleonic wars on the poor of Great Britain...impressment and the subsequent poverty and crime of the families left behind as they struggled to survive.I am grateful to the publisher and NetGalley, who provided an eARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    "Why Kill the Innocent" is a mystery set in January 1814 in London (during a bad winter storm and then a Frost Fair). This book is the 13th in a series, but you can understand it without having read the previous novels. This novel did not spoil the mysteries from the previous books.The characters were complex, interesting, and acted in realistic ways. Both Hero and Sebastian were deeply involved in the investigation. As usual, several social issues of the time were woven into the story as they t "Why Kill the Innocent" is a mystery set in January 1814 in London (during a bad winter storm and then a Frost Fair). This book is the 13th in a series, but you can understand it without having read the previous novels. This novel did not spoil the mysteries from the previous books.The characters were complex, interesting, and acted in realistic ways. Both Hero and Sebastian were deeply involved in the investigation. As usual, several social issues of the time were woven into the story as they touched on the investigation. There were several suspects but Sebastian had difficulty finding the critical clues that definitively pointed to one person. I began to suspect whodunit near the end but was not certain until the final clue was found.There were no graphically described sex scenes, but there was a scene that ended with two brief paragraphs indicating sex between a married couple. There was a fair amount of bad language. Overall, I'd highly recommend this interesting historical mystery.I received a free ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Make Kay
    January 1, 1970
    Harris explores the many social injustices of the time, including income inequality, oppression of women, and corrupt monarchy. All while giving us a compelling mystery deftly set in a fantastic historical setting. Brava!!
  • Jessica Howard
    January 1, 1970
    I've always loved the personal lives of the characters in this series, even though often the mysteries themselves are sometimes fairly meh. But this one had awesome personal stuff going on, AND a great mystery. Win win.
  • Sheena
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge C.S. Harris fan. I love this series. A little mystery, a little intrigue, a little romance. These books have it all. What I really liked about this book was the author touched on some of the societal issues of the time. The lack of rights for women and the societal belief that women should give up everything once they were married are prevalent in this book and add depth to the story. Very well done. I can't wait to read more.
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  • harplady
    January 1, 1970
    I love historical fiction, and this book did not disappoint! What an amazing author, to be able to weave so much true history in a wonderful story. Being an American my English monarchy history and customs is sketchy at best, and I had no idea of the machinations and assassinations that actually took place in all aspects of the monarchy. I've always loved the Charles Todd series and the Anne Perry series, but I had not read a book from this early in English history, and I will definitely be look I love historical fiction, and this book did not disappoint! What an amazing author, to be able to weave so much true history in a wonderful story. Being an American my English monarchy history and customs is sketchy at best, and I had no idea of the machinations and assassinations that actually took place in all aspects of the monarchy. I've always loved the Charles Todd series and the Anne Perry series, but I had not read a book from this early in English history, and I will definitely be looking for more. I especially like the postword that listed the events and told just how authentic they were. I would never have known what was actually true if it had not been written. I give this book five stars and encourage anyone who likes to learn their history from novels to add it to their reading list asap.
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  • Jeannette Silhavy
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank NetGalley for my ARC. I love this series and the latest installment didn't disappoint. The 13 book in this series is as good as the first one. I love the characters In these books and the historical facts that are interwoven. We are in the Year 1814, right after the Great Fog that smothered London from December to January. The fog was followed by weeks of freezing temperatures that killed many of London's poorest. Hero stumbles upon a dead body of a musician who teaches pia I would like to thank NetGalley for my ARC. I love this series and the latest installment didn't disappoint. The 13 book in this series is as good as the first one. I love the characters In these books and the historical facts that are interwoven. We are in the Year 1814, right after the Great Fog that smothered London from December to January. The fog was followed by weeks of freezing temperatures that killed many of London's poorest. Hero stumbles upon a dead body of a musician who teaches piano to the Regent's daughter. Of course the crown wants the murder covered up and here enters Sebastian getting to the truth, again not willing to let matters lie. With many twists and turns as the truth is uncovered it's a book you cannot put down.
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  • Argum
    January 1, 1970
    Sebastian is back and Hero has once again found a cause and a body. This time Hero and Alexei are out visiting women impacted by the military practice of impressment aka government kidnapping men into service as cannon fodder. Hero literally trips over a body and its one she knows. The Princess Charlotte aka the heir before Victoria is the connection - the dead woman was the royal piano teacher so of course the death is written off as an accident except to Sebastian. Lots of drama surrounds this Sebastian is back and Hero has once again found a cause and a body. This time Hero and Alexei are out visiting women impacted by the military practice of impressment aka government kidnapping men into service as cannon fodder. Hero literally trips over a body and its one she knows. The Princess Charlotte aka the heir before Victoria is the connection - the dead woman was the royal piano teacher so of course the death is written off as an accident except to Sebastian. Lots of drama surrounds this poor woman - personal marital strife, crossing the Regent's plans for his daughter, stumbling on war secrets, and who knows what else. Somehow all the drama with Hero's mother is basically ignored which almost makes me take a star but Hendon and Sebastian getting along was great.
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  • Laura Knopp bonnell
    January 1, 1970
    I won a contest here on good reads and was given a copy by Berkeley Publishing. Great, solid addition to the series. C.S. Harris is one of the best writers out there. As always, the historical facts are spot on. In my opinion, this one was a little darker than the preceding books. The characters are so well written. This is not one I would recommend without reading the rest of the series. Too much back story would be lost. I love this series and now I begin the wait for the next.
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  • Shirley
    January 1, 1970
    I won a free copy of this book from Goodreads First Reads. Hero literally trips over a body and its one she knows. The dead woman was the royal piano teacher so of course the death is written off as an accident except to Sebastian. Lots of drama surrounds this poor woman and they must sort through it all. SOme but not a lot of personal developments for long time readers
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  • Sammie
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received a free eARC copy of this from Penguin Random House First To Read in exchange for an honest review.One-Line Summary:When a piano teacher is found dead, Sebastian St. Cyr has to decide if it was manslaughter or murder while being swept up into a deadly and dangerous plot that threatens not only his life but the stability of England.Summary:When Hero Devlin first stumbles over the body of Jane Ambrose, her death appears to have been an accident. The ruling family is all too e Disclaimer: I received a free eARC copy of this from Penguin Random House First To Read in exchange for an honest review.One-Line Summary:When a piano teacher is found dead, Sebastian St. Cyr has to decide if it was manslaughter or murder while being swept up into a deadly and dangerous plot that threatens not only his life but the stability of England.Summary:When Hero Devlin first stumbles over the body of Jane Ambrose, her death appears to have been an accident. The ruling family is all too eager to sweep everything under the rug, but Viscount Devlin is determined to find the woman’s murderer, though whether it was cold-blooded murder or accidental manslaughter, he isn’t sure.Nothing is as straightforward as it seems, though, as Sebastian finds himself pulled deeper into England’s secrets—ones that people are wont to keep quiet at any cost. Sebastian finds himself in the middle of a plot that has him receiving threats from some of the most powerful people in England. The one thing that’s become painfully clear is that Jane Ambrose was anything but merely a piano instructor.The Positive:- There’s a marvelous cast of leading characters here that really had me rooting for them. Since this is book 13 in a series, it’s pretty obvious that I’m attached to Sebastian at this point. I mean, I wouldn’t read him if I wasn’t, right? In this, though, he’s matched perfectly with his wife, Hero, who is every bit his equal in a time when women weren’t allowed to be smart and conniving. They’re a great power couple, and I just love their dynamic.- Though murder is obviously at the forefront here, this book tackles so many other important issues that are every bit as relevant today as they were then. I mean, let’s face it, nobody likes a book that comes across as an after-school special. I’m not reading to be lectured to. But Why Kill The Innocent broached important topics like gender equality and the sad lot in life women faced in the early 1800s without beating the reader over the head with it. It felt natural and authentic, and the fact is really hammered home a couple times when characters point out if Jane had just been born a man…- Even though she’s dead, I found that I really connected with Jane Ambrose. Which is a feat when a writer can make me remorseful that a person who dies on page, like, three is actually dead. The more entangled the investigation into her death became, the more the reader gets to know her, and the more I fell in love with everything that she was and the more tragic her death felt.- The ending gave me so many feels. Ugh, I’m so torn. I mean, it’s a murder mystery, so I’m not sure anyone would go in expecting a happy ending because, you know, at least one person is dead. And if you’ve ever read a St. Cyr novel before, there’s never just one person dead by the end. Never. But I actually really liked this ending? It was tragic in all the right ways.The Negative:- The Frost Fair was neat, and I enjoyed learning about it, but it took up way too much screen time. I’m pretty sure I skimmed over these parts, because it just wasn’t that important to me. Someone else might really enjoy the setting building, but I don’t want pages upon pages spent on something that doesn’t actually end up tying into the plot in any way. That’s just me personally, but I felt like it really slowed things down and was a distraction more than anything else.Overall:I’d highly recommend this book, or more accurately this whole series, for anyone who enjoys fast-paced murder mysteries. The culprit is never immediately clear, and you have to commit, because the book’s going to take you for a ride, for sure, which is part of what I love about the series. Despite being a part of the series, it works okay as a standalone. There’s things that you’ll miss, particularly in the way of character building and a bit of backstory, but each book is designed to be more or less a standalone. I don’t have much negative to say about this. I read it quickly because I really had to know what poor Jane had gotten herself into. Oh the tangled webs we weave. What I loved most about this is the ethical and societal questions that are raised as far as class and gender and so many other things. There was so much packed in between the murder that I enjoyed almost as much as the mystery, and the story focused on three strong women defying the restraints placed on them by their society, which was delightful.
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  • Emilie
    January 1, 1970
    I have read the first book in this series and really enjoyed it. So was very interested to read this book and see what the hero has been up to and how he would solve this mystery. I found myself a little disappointed, however.The mystery involved quite a bit of politics which at times could get a little confusing. There were a lot of lords and newspaper journalists and Whigs and governesses and I had a hard time keeping everyone straight. Some of the characters felt a bit superfluous, especially I have read the first book in this series and really enjoyed it. So was very interested to read this book and see what the hero has been up to and how he would solve this mystery. I found myself a little disappointed, however.The mystery involved quite a bit of politics which at times could get a little confusing. There were a lot of lords and newspaper journalists and Whigs and governesses and I had a hard time keeping everyone straight. Some of the characters felt a bit superfluous, especially with the way that Sebastian goes about "detecting." He seemed to just get some secret information about a "suspect," go hunt him or her down somewhere in London, and then accuse that person of killing Jane Ambrose based on the tidbit he'd just received. Then that person would say, "No! I would never kill her! Didn't you know about _______?" And then it would either go one of two ways: the suspect would say, "That person threatened her/accused her/hated her/etc. and you should go ask him/her about it," or "You have no idea how deep this goes. You should stay out of this before you or someone else gets hurt." And then Sebastian would go hunt down the new suspect and the very same thing would happen: "You killed her because______." And then that suspect would say, "No I didn't!" And THEN as soon as Sebastian discovered ANOTHER new piece of information that pointed to someone else, he was off to accuse that person of murder. It got a bit tedious and repetitious.I did enjoy the insight in the members of the Royal Family and the descriptions of the Frost Fair. The subplot (? maybe just a tangent?) about impressment was interesting but I'm not sure how that fit in to the story.Although this was not my favorite Sebastian St. Cyr book, I will not let it keep me from reading other books in the series. I know that Sebastian is a better detective than this and does not usually run around London accusing one person after another of murder based upon whatever information he's stumbled upon that day. I do not think that I would recommend this book to someone who is new to the series, however.
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  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    3.5. Thank you for the ARC from First To Read and Penguin Random House. Why Kill the Innocent is part of a series that I haven’t read before. For me this was an average historical mystery. I certainly enjoyed it but I found it a bit scattered and repetitious. It did ask one question that I’ll forever wonder about - how many great artists, playwrights, musicians, etc were simply lost to us because they were women. Very sad to think about......
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  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting work of historical fiction/mystery. Good characters, both real and fictional set in a mystery based on real events.
  • RoyalFrost
    January 1, 1970
    A great and spooky book, this is a situation that could have happened. I just love the flawed hero of the book, and his wife. I do love the mysterious background of the hero. ( I want to know more!)
  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to come...
  • Dr G
    January 1, 1970
    A very interesting and intriguing story line and plot. Will be returning to read others in series!
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