Ellie, Engineer
The hilarious and smart start of a series about a girl who loves to build—STEM-powered, creative fun for girls.Ellie is an engineer. With a tool belt strapped over her favorite skirt (who says you can’t wear a dress and have two kinds of screwdrivers handy, just in case?), she invents and builds amazing creations in her backyard workshop. Together with her best friend Kit, Ellie can make anything. As Kit’s birthday nears, Ellie doesn’t know what gift to make until the girls overhear Kit’s mom talking about her present—the dog Kit always wanted! Ellie plans to make an amazing doghouse, but her plans grow so elaborate that she has to enlist help from the neighbor boys and crafty girls, even though the two groups don’t get along. Will Ellie be able to pull off her biggest project yet?Illustrated with Ellie’s sketches and plans, and including backmatter with how-tos, this is full of engineering fun!

Ellie, Engineer Details

TitleEllie, Engineer
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 16th, 2018
PublisherBloomsbury USA
ISBN-139781681195193
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Chapter Books

Ellie, Engineer Review

  • Caitlin Zonder
    January 1, 1970
    I am so in love with this book! I just adored Ellie and I am so glad that this is going to be a series. I love that Ellie, as a 3rd grader, has a tool belt and wears it over skirts! Love the message that both girls AND boys should be able to like whatever they want to. Girls being engineers, boys drinking tea with pinkies up! I think this holds a special place because I was, and still am an Ellie. I also am so glad Ellie will be around for my girls to read and be inspired by!
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  • Carin
    January 1, 1970
    What a great middle grade read! Ellie wants to be an engineer and in fact, already thinks she is one. She has her own tool belt, which she straps on over her skirt, and gets to work building things. Mostly she builds with her best friend, Kit, and they start off by building a giant slingshot to shoot water balloons in a group of boys in another yard. Ellie makes sure to write detailed explanations of all her projects (and whether or not they were successful) in her notebook (illustrations includ What a great middle grade read! Ellie wants to be an engineer and in fact, already thinks she is one. She has her own tool belt, which she straps on over her skirt, and gets to work building things. Mostly she builds with her best friend, Kit, and they start off by building a giant slingshot to shoot water balloons in a group of boys in another yard. Ellie makes sure to write detailed explanations of all her projects (and whether or not they were successful) in her notebook (illustrations included in the book).Kit invents an amazing hair braiding machine for Kit's birthday and they decide to try it out even though it's a week before her actual birthday. And it's a huge disaster. Kit doesn't end up getting any hair cut off, but adults reading the book will all know how close a call that was. Despondent that her gift is a bust, and with not much time left, Ellie comes up with a new idea. She and Kit overheard that Kit is getting a dog from her parents, so Ellie decides to build the best doghouse ever. And because she's got so little time, she needs help. She first enlists one of the neighborhood boys, and then she also gets help from a group of crafty girls for the interior.But the boys and girls in her neighborhood don't get along. So she isn't exactly honest about each's involvement with the others. When they find out, they're all mad at Ellie, and all abandon her. But in the end, they pull together to give Kit the most amazing present of all time!My favorite part of the book is when Ellie says that, as her father says, there aren't "boy things" and "girl things." There are "Ellie things" and "Kit things." As someone who used to do shipping & receiving with long, painted nails, in a mini skirt, I will testify that one can both dress like a girl, and yet do more a traditionally masculine job. This is a great book for STEM programs, for crafty girls who might spill into more building-engineering projects, and heck, boys should read about girls interesting in building things, too.
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  • Jen Naughton
    January 1, 1970
    Ellie is a STEM-oriented girl who loves to build things and self-identifies as an engineer. She loves finding out how things work by not only building but by taking things apart (which sometimes gets her into trouble). There is typical age-appropriate friend drama included, and I liked how Ellie eventually involved all her friends in her hobby. There are end pages which describe various hand tools and their uses. Overall I'd place this as an ok read for kids up to 5th grade. There isn't anything Ellie is a STEM-oriented girl who loves to build things and self-identifies as an engineer. She loves finding out how things work by not only building but by taking things apart (which sometimes gets her into trouble). There is typical age-appropriate friend drama included, and I liked how Ellie eventually involved all her friends in her hobby. There are end pages which describe various hand tools and their uses. Overall I'd place this as an ok read for kids up to 5th grade. There isn't anything wrong with it- I just don't love it. The story was predictable and I have a low tolerance for peer drama so it may just be me.Verdict- borrow
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusEllie loves to build things, drawing up plans and using her impressive array of tools to create and build all manner of innovative projects. When her best friend Kit's birthday is approaching, and the friends overhear that Kit is getting Miss Penelope, a dog, Ellie sets out to build a dog house. She needs some help, and even though the neighborhood boys are annoying, she enlists the help of Toby for a lot of the project. She also asks some other girls to help with the wa E ARC from Edelweiss PlusEllie loves to build things, drawing up plans and using her impressive array of tools to create and build all manner of innovative projects. When her best friend Kit's birthday is approaching, and the friends overhear that Kit is getting Miss Penelope, a dog, Ellie sets out to build a dog house. She needs some help, and even though the neighborhood boys are annoying, she enlists the help of Toby for a lot of the project. She also asks some other girls to help with the wall paper, and as the project progresses, has to keep a lot of secrets from Kit. When Ellie is afraid that the house won't be done in time, she has a large group of people to help her, and invites them all to Kit's beauty pageant party. Luckily, everyone is understanding, and Ellie's project is a big hit. Strengths: This is absolutely on trend for how young girls with progressive parents are being raised today. Pink and sparkles are okay, and so are wrenches and building things. Lots of STEM sorts of issues, and Ellie is insistent that she is an engineer. The friend drama is true to life, and it's nice that all of the children eventually learn to work together. There is even a bit of a twist at the end. Weaknesses: This would be a hard sell for middle school, and the initial reaction to the boys alarmed me a little, although Ellie did manage to work things out with everyone and establish that while boys sometimes do stinky things, this doesn't make all of them stinky all the time. What I really think: This just made me feel old. When my daughters were this age 20 years ago, the philosophy was just different, although my older daughter went through a phase where she would answer "chemical engineer" when asked what she was going to be when she grew up. My younger daughter wanted to be a super hero princess, which is why I encouraged more gender neutral trappings for everyone... it's hard to explain. So I think I find myself annoyed not because of the change of philosophy so much, but by the fact that so much time has passed. To my credit, my older daughter in working in organic farming, and my younger one is in college to be either a forensic account or an actuary, so I think I did okay with math and science and girls!
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  • Vera Godley
    January 1, 1970
    Girls will love reading about the interesting things in which Ellie and her friend Kit involve themselves. Most of it is pretty standard tween stuff but some of it is pretty much off the wall because Ellie is quite an unusual girl. She envisions solutions and those solutions are things she makes or builds. She is a tool-weilding, solution-finding, object-building, girly friend to have around.Parents today are afforded the opportunity in today's world to raise their boys and girls to be creative Girls will love reading about the interesting things in which Ellie and her friend Kit involve themselves. Most of it is pretty standard tween stuff but some of it is pretty much off the wall because Ellie is quite an unusual girl. She envisions solutions and those solutions are things she makes or builds. She is a tool-weilding, solution-finding, object-building, girly friend to have around.Parents today are afforded the opportunity in today's world to raise their boys and girls to be creative individuals who can use their minds and talents to achieve in whatever they have an interest. Typically boys were guided toward the manly professions and girls were guided toward the pursuit of becoming skilled homemakers and loving mothers. Nothing is wrong with any of that. However, some girls have the ability to pursue careers involving the sciences and mathematics. In fact, they can also be loving parents as well as career professionals.Just what is STEM? STEM education is an interdisciplinary approach to learning where rigorous academic concepts are coupled with real-world lessons as students apply science, technology, engineering, and mathematics in contexts that make connections between school, community, work.... (source: a general search of Google)By reading stories such as Ellie, Engineer young girls can see how they can engage in activities in which they are interested and still remain true to themselves. They don't have to be a sterotyped cookie cutter person. They can pursue their interest in the study of chemistry, science, biology, earth science or mechanical, electrical, or any other form of engineering. They can become a performing artist in the field of dance or music or they can develop their talents in these fields for their own personal pleasure while becoming a career professional in another field such as medicine, the legal field, or whatever. Or they can become the world's greatest wife and mother and stay home in that pursuit.Ellie, Engineer is a cute story brimming with typically joyful young girl interactions with friends and family. A girl who loves being girly and who loves to work with tools creating original items that could conceivably be precursers of a professional career in design.Now about the text and book itself: The text is written in a style that will capture the interest of the tween reader. That is to say it isn't too "easy" and it isn't complicated behond their interest or ability. The illustrations are quite simple are adequate. In light of the fact that as young readers' skills develop and their books evolve from picture book to chapter book to novel, their books have fewer and less involved illustrations. This allows the reader to mentally visualize the story completely in his or her mind processing word meanings, descriptions, scenes, actions, and characters. It is the ultimate goal of literacy to enable the reader to experience the entire story as he or she processes it in the quiet of the mind.I think the book is a good book for tweens to read and that they will enjoy it.DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary paperback copy to facilitate a review. Opinions expressed are my own and are freely given.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Young Emily (whose dad built her a kid-sized tool bench) would have loved this book. Adult Emily (who recently brought her power drill to work to build a bookshelf) DID love this book! Ellie is now my inspiration, building clever projects from nothing, and bringing all the neighborhood kids (girls AND boys) together for one epic build. Loved the message in this book that there aren't girl things and boy things, there are just Ellie things!
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  • Rosemary
    January 1, 1970
    Ellie, Engineer, by Jackson Pearce, (Jan. 2018, Bloomsbury USA), $15.99, ISBN: 9781681195193Recommended for readers 7-10Ellie is a 9 year-old engineer: she can take darn near anything apart and make it something even cooler. Most of the time. When she sets out to make an amazing birthday gift for her best friend, Kit, she finds herself in the middle of a friendship mess: the girls normally don't like the "jerk boys", but Ellie's discovered that they're not so bad after all. So she works with eac Ellie, Engineer, by Jackson Pearce, (Jan. 2018, Bloomsbury USA), $15.99, ISBN: 9781681195193Recommended for readers 7-10Ellie is a 9 year-old engineer: she can take darn near anything apart and make it something even cooler. Most of the time. When she sets out to make an amazing birthday gift for her best friend, Kit, she finds herself in the middle of a friendship mess: the girls normally don't like the "jerk boys", but Ellie's discovered that they're not so bad after all. So she works with each group in secret, hoping to avoid drama. Oops. Ellie has to get both groups talking to her again, and to each other, to finish Kit's birthday present on time!This is such a fun story about a positive female character who wears what she wants and does what she wants: she rocks a tool belt over her skirts and matches outfits with her best friend. She draws up her own blueprints and can make anything, from a water balloon launcher to a security system that will keep annoying little brother's out of her friend's room. Her best friend, Kit, is a pageant girl and ballet dancer who works right alongside Ellie, and the boys in the neighborhood enjoy a good tea party as much as they do a soccer game. Get it? They're kids. They like to play. This whole story is about bringing boys and girls together under common interests, and it does so nicely. Girls will see themselves in Ellie, especially those who find themselves confused about whether or not girls *can* be friends with boys, or wonder if it's okay to still like pretty dresses if they can rock a screwdriver. There are some laughs: Ellie's got a few backfires, and a few successes that will make kids laugh, and the heart of the story - cooperation and friendship - is a gratifying message. Black and white illustrations showcase Ellie's sketches for different projects, and a section at the end provides illustrations and a guide to basic tools for burgeoning builders and engineers. Give this to the kids who have grown out of Andrea Beaty's Rosie Revere, Engineer; Iggy Peck, Architect; and Ada Twist, Scientist. Display and booktalk with the Girls Who Code and the Lucy's Lab chapter books. Put out paper and ask kids to come up with their own plans - what do they want to make? Leave straws, pipe cleaners, cardboard, toothpicks, glue, marshmallows - anything the kids can build with - out and let the room have at it.
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  • Sarah Monsma
    January 1, 1970
    When the boys of the neighborhood exclude the girls from their soccer game, Ellie Engineer and her best friend Kit strike back by building an amazing water balloon launcher and soaking them all. The water balloon launcher is just one of the many engineering ideas that Ellie keeps in a notebook in her tool belt along with her hammer, two screwdrivers, and her prized possession, a mini electric drill. Ellie loves engineering, and all the neighborhood kids are eager to help, but the ins and outs of When the boys of the neighborhood exclude the girls from their soccer game, Ellie Engineer and her best friend Kit strike back by building an amazing water balloon launcher and soaking them all. The water balloon launcher is just one of the many engineering ideas that Ellie keeps in a notebook in her tool belt along with her hammer, two screwdrivers, and her prized possession, a mini electric drill. Ellie loves engineering, and all the neighborhood kids are eager to help, but the ins and outs of friendship prove a bit harder to solve than the problems Ellie encounters with a hammer and nails. Nevertheless, Ellie persists and puts her brain to work to solve problems both physical and personal.I predict that Ellie, Engineer will inspire a generation of tool-carrying, invention-drawing kids in the same way that Harriet the Spy inspired note-scribbling, sneaking kids in my generation. Readers will root for Ellie as she designs solutions to problems and gets herself out of scrapes. Themes include questioning gender roles, friendship, and inventiveness. For teachers looking for strong girls and STEM connections, you’ll find them in this delightful new series.Ellie, Engineer is the first of Jackson Pearce’s books I’ve read, but I’m now inspired to look for more. You can bet I’ll be waiting expectantly for the next book in the Ellie, Engineer series to come out.I received a review copy of Ellie, Engineer from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. It will be on sale Tuesday, January 16, 2018.
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  • michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to @NetGalley and @bloomsburypublishing for providing me with a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.What a fun book! The book starts with a boys vs girls issue that Ellie solves by inventing a giant water balloon launcher, but as the book progresses, Ellie learns that we can't and shouldn't always divide things by gender. One area where Ellie is sure that gender doesn't matter is engineering and it is her biggest passion.I really liked that there were a wide variety of ch Thank you to @NetGalley and @bloomsburypublishing for providing me with a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.What a fun book! The book starts with a boys vs girls issue that Ellie solves by inventing a giant water balloon launcher, but as the book progresses, Ellie learns that we can't and shouldn't always divide things by gender. One area where Ellie is sure that gender doesn't matter is engineering and it is her biggest passion.I really liked that there were a wide variety of characters in this book. This book does a great job as an enticement for young girls to consider engineering. She is always thinking outside of the box and problem solving and is good at thinking quickly on her feet. As we continue to encourage more and more kids to embrace STEM, books like this are a wonderful addition to their arsenal.I also love that gender roles are seen as problematic in this book. The girls had been left out of the soccer game in the beginning of the book, even though Ellie is apparently a better goalie than the Dylan. Kit didn't invite any boys to her birthday party because it was a tea party, but Toby loves tea and the idea of a fancy party. In the end, all of the kids learn that working together gets great results.This is a great addition for grades 2-5.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I approached this book with mixed feelings, but was quickly enchanted by this fun-loving kid who loves to invent and build. In the opening pages of this chapter book, we meet Ellie and her best friend, Kit. They are deeply absorbed in building a large water balloon launcher out of broomsticks, exercise bands, and Ellie’s dad’s funnel (let’s hope the holes Ellie drills in the funnel don’t prevent him from changing his oil!).While the invention itself is cool, I adored the reason WHY Ellie needed I approached this book with mixed feelings, but was quickly enchanted by this fun-loving kid who loves to invent and build. In the opening pages of this chapter book, we meet Ellie and her best friend, Kit. They are deeply absorbed in building a large water balloon launcher out of broomsticks, exercise bands, and Ellie’s dad’s funnel (let’s hope the holes Ellie drills in the funnel don’t prevent him from changing his oil!).While the invention itself is cool, I adored the reason WHY Ellie needed to build a giant water balloon launcher. The neighborhood boys are playing soccer a few backyards over, but when Ellie asked to join, they told her that only boys were allowed to play. So Ellie created the Water Empress to shoot water balloons across a few backyards at them.I was delighted to discover that Ellie isn’t just a one-sided character (which was the root of my apprehension as I began the book). She isn’t simply a tool to create a STEM book, but a girl with wide-ranging interests and personality traits.I highly recommend Ellie, Engineer for your boys and girls. It is fun to read, and informative (we even get a lesson on flat-head and Phillips screwdrivers). I am grateful to have received an advance reader copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review.
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  • Kristyn
    January 1, 1970
    kidlitexchange #partner I received a review copy of this book as part of the Kidlitexchange network. Opinions are my own.I loved Ellie, Engineer. This story is so cute! This book follows Ellie and her friends as they attempt to engineer and build a birthday present for Ellie’s best friend, Kit. The story sends wonderful messages about friendship, teamwork, and telling the truth. It also touches on the topic of “gendered” activities (such as tea parties, for example), which I really liked. Ellie, kidlitexchange #partner I received a review copy of this book as part of the Kidlitexchange network. Opinions are my own.I loved Ellie, Engineer. This story is so cute! This book follows Ellie and her friends as they attempt to engineer and build a birthday present for Ellie’s best friend, Kit. The story sends wonderful messages about friendship, teamwork, and telling the truth. It also touches on the topic of “gendered” activities (such as tea parties, for example), which I really liked. Ellie, Engineer is designated for readers aged 8-12, but I read it aloud to my five-year-old and she really liked it. It’s scheduled to be released tomorrow (Jan. 16, 2018).
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    I read an egalley from Netgalley.Ellie is a girl who likes to wear dresses that match her best friend Kit, and she also likes to build things. She has a notebook of ideas, which includes a balloon launcher she uses to retaliate when the neighborhood boys won't let Ellie and Kit play soccer.When Kit and Ellie eavesdrop on Kit's mom and find out that Kit is getting Miss Penelope for her birthday, Ellie sneakily includes the neighborhood in building a doghouse. Hurt feelings occur. Can Ellie finall I read an egalley from Netgalley.Ellie is a girl who likes to wear dresses that match her best friend Kit, and she also likes to build things. She has a notebook of ideas, which includes a balloon launcher she uses to retaliate when the neighborhood boys won't let Ellie and Kit play soccer.When Kit and Ellie eavesdrop on Kit's mom and find out that Kit is getting Miss Penelope for her birthday, Ellie sneakily includes the neighborhood in building a doghouse. Hurt feelings occur. Can Ellie finally make it all right?While being a bit heavy handed in the idea that there are no such things as boy activities vs. girl activities, this is a fun read.
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  • ❇Critterbee
    January 1, 1970
    I was not a fan of much of the grammar and wording in this book, but it was nice to see a character modeled after a young aspiring engineer, but somehow Ellie did not feel completely realistic. But perhaps it was meant to be a bit fantastical. Perhaps in the manner of Roald Dahl? Further evidence of this in the part where Ellie's mother says:'If anyone gets electrocuted, come find me, OK?'eeeeeeeeA little odd, a little creepy, but without addressing it in the story itself. Kind of a question mar I was not a fan of much of the grammar and wording in this book, but it was nice to see a character modeled after a young aspiring engineer, but somehow Ellie did not feel completely realistic. But perhaps it was meant to be a bit fantastical. Perhaps in the manner of Roald Dahl? Further evidence of this in the part where Ellie's mother says:'If anyone gets electrocuted, come find me, OK?'eeeeeeeeA little odd, a little creepy, but without addressing it in the story itself. Kind of a question mark.*eARC Netgalley*
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  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    Ellie is a new favorite character - she's breaking gender norms and having fun while she does it! Let's read kids more books like this so they grow up knowing it's about what they like and what feels right instead of following societal "rules".
  • Jacqui
    January 1, 1970
    2.5
  • Andréa
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
  • TJ Burns
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from Bloomsbury USA Children's Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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