Tomorrow Will Be Different
A timely and captivating memoir about gender identity set against the backdrop of the transgender equality movement, by a leading activist and the National Press Secretary for the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest LGBTQ civil rights organization.Sarah McBride is on a mission to fight for transgender rights around the world. But before she was a prominent activist, and before she became the first transgender person to speak at the Democratic National Convention in 2016, she was a teenager struggling with her identity.With emotional depth and unparalleled honesty, Sarah shares her personal struggle with gender identity, coming out to her supportive but distraught parents, and finding her way as a woman. She inspires readers with her barrier-breaking political journey that took her, in just four years, from a frightened, closeted college student to one of the nation's most prominent transgender activists walking the halls of the White House, passing laws, and addressing the country in the midst of a heated presidential election. She also details the heartbreaking romance with her first love and future husband Andy, a trans man and activist, who passed away from cancer in 2014 just days after they were married.Sarah's story of identity, love, and tragic loss serves as a powerful entry point for readers who want to gain a deeper understanding of gender identity and what it means to be openly transgender. From issues like bathroom access to healthcare, identification and schools, Sarah weaves the important political milestones, cultural and political debates, and historical context into a personal journey that will open hearts and change minds.Tomorrow Will Be Different highlights Sarah’s work as an activist and the key issues at the forefront of the fight for trans equality, providing a call-to-arms and empowering look at the road ahead. The fight for equality and freedom has only just begun.“We must never be a country that says there’s only one way to love, only one way to look, and only one way to live.” –Sarah McBride

Tomorrow Will Be Different Details

TitleTomorrow Will Be Different
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 6th, 2018
PublisherCrown Archetype
ISBN-139781524761479
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Lgbt, Feminism

Tomorrow Will Be Different Review

  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    "Amazing Grace."That line, repeated over and over again in the midst of the darkest days of her life, says so much about Sarah-- that in the midst of any hardship, she can look for, and see, the hope in the broken and beautiful world we live in.I read this book in one sitting (while sobbing on a train next to concerned and loving strangers). It is such a gorgeous, honest, and brilliant lesson for all of us. It's a lesson about what we give to and take from each other. It's a lesson about ordinar "Amazing Grace."That line, repeated over and over again in the midst of the darkest days of her life, says so much about Sarah-- that in the midst of any hardship, she can look for, and see, the hope in the broken and beautiful world we live in.I read this book in one sitting (while sobbing on a train next to concerned and loving strangers). It is such a gorgeous, honest, and brilliant lesson for all of us. It's a lesson about what we give to and take from each other. It's a lesson about ordinary and extraordinary courage. It's a lesson about fighting, raging, and loving without regret, about protecting the people we love, and about choosing grace over fear, even in our darkest hours.I am beyond blessed to know first-hand how much it means when Sarah tells us that she will never stop "fight[ing] like hell to make sure that every single one of us is treated with the dignity, respect, and fairness we all deserve." I cannot recommend this gorgeous book highly enough.
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  • Mandy Wultsch
    January 1, 1970
    Few introductions in books are worth reading. The one in this book is worth it. It is by Joe Biden (yes, that Joe Biden, the past vice president of the US) and it is very moving. I was almost in tears and I hadn't even started the book!There are books where the blurb on the back and the introduction is very promising but the book fails to deliver. Not this book. It was a moving story with very high highs and very low lows. I don't usually get emotional over books, but I did with this one startin Few introductions in books are worth reading. The one in this book is worth it. It is by Joe Biden (yes, that Joe Biden, the past vice president of the US) and it is very moving. I was almost in tears and I hadn't even started the book!There are books where the blurb on the back and the introduction is very promising but the book fails to deliver. Not this book. It was a moving story with very high highs and very low lows. I don't usually get emotional over books, but I did with this one starting, like I said, with the introduction and riding that roller coaster all the way to the last page.Sarah McBride is a trans woman. You will read about her decision to come out and how she deals with the fall out. Thankfully, her family and social circle were very supportive. She still faces issues and discrimination, something that I, as someone who is not trans, don't experience. Seeing life through her eyes is very educational and, at times, depressing. However, Sarah doesn't take the discrimination laying down. She fights back hard for her right to be treated as other humans are treated. The story did get a little slow when describing the machinations of law making in Delaware, but only for a few pages. Those in Delaware or more interested in the political process than I am may enjoy it. It was short enough that I didn't bother skipping or skimming text to get to the next interesting bit so I don't really count this as a reason to not read the book. Just be aware if you are bored by it like I was that it will only be for a short while and it is worth continuing to read.The first part of the book focuses on discrimination and the law with some of Sarah's life thrown in. The second part is the other way around; it gets very personal and emotional. Someone very close to Sarah dies from cancer. The sickness and its effects on the body are described. Those who have recently been through this or are going through it might not want to read about it (but also want to read about it to see that others have been through it, too).There is not much, other than a rare curse word (seriously rare, like I can count them on one hand rare) and illness and subsequent death, that would stop me from recommending this book to all ages who can read it. Exposing young people to the discrimination and ongoing fight for civil rights for some groups can make them aware of what is going on in the world around them. It will encourage those who are not trans to still fight for rights for trans people, and may give young readers who are trans hope for the future and help them see that they are not alone.I received this book through the Goodreads Giveaways program. Thank you to the author and/or publisher.
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  • Katya Kazbek
    January 1, 1970
    My one wish right now is that Sarah McBride stays healthy, both physically and mentally, so she can one day become the president of the United States. This is a wish packed with hope: I want to live in the US that can have a woman president, a transgender president, and a young president. Hey, even a progressive president right now seems like a stretch :( Anyway, I also selfishly want Sarah to be happy, because that means that we as a society will benefit from her light, so strong and brave. I a My one wish right now is that Sarah McBride stays healthy, both physically and mentally, so she can one day become the president of the United States. This is a wish packed with hope: I want to live in the US that can have a woman president, a transgender president, and a young president. Hey, even a progressive president right now seems like a stretch :( Anyway, I also selfishly want Sarah to be happy, because that means that we as a society will benefit from her light, so strong and brave. I am in absolute awe of the power that this sweet young woman exudes, and the calm, measured way in which she approaches things. Wise, self-aware, loving, incredibly smart and so resilient: a natural born leader, a beacon for change. I am queer person who mostly presents as a woman, originally from Russia, now trying to stay in the US. I came here because Russia is terrible for queer people: but that was during Obama. Now, that Trump is in power, being queer, an immigrant, or a woman-presenting person is still better than doing the same in Russia, but not by far. And it's easy to lose hope. But knowing that there are people like Sarah in this world, or her beloved Andy, or all the other folk who are pushing for dignity and equality for everyone on the LGBTQ spectrum, makes me hopeful. I know that this is a country where I can and will belong.As I read the book, sometimes sobbing, sometimes smiling warmly, sometimes a little lost in the bureacracy of legislative processes, one thing remained unchanged: I wanted to hug Sarah. I am often cautious about people in politics, and know too well the challenges of activism that sometimes strip a person of humanity in unexpected places. But Sarah gives the air of wholeness. She is still an idealistic doe-eyed kid who wants to be president and makes a DNC diorama, but also an incredibly smart adult who understands how things in politics work. And I think that this balance of the two is exactly what makes her such a promising figure. I really hope that life works out in a way where Sarah's political career progresses further, and that one day I might—who knows?—vote or just campaign for her.
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  • Andrea Razi-Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Sarah McBride's book Tomorrow will be different is a combination of inspiring, packed with hope and tragic. The book reads like a best-selling novel. It's a page turner. The introduction written by Joe Biden is an insider look at the strong connection and love he feels for this amazing young advocate, public speaker and now author. Whether you want to learn about gender identity or the movement toward equal rights for non-binary and trans folks, or simply want a great read, this book is for Wow! Sarah McBride's book Tomorrow will be different is a combination of inspiring, packed with hope and tragic. The book reads like a best-selling novel. It's a page turner. The introduction written by Joe Biden is an insider look at the strong connection and love he feels for this amazing young advocate, public speaker and now author. Whether you want to learn about gender identity or the movement toward equal rights for non-binary and trans folks, or simply want a great read, this book is for you!Even though I knew in advance about the passing of trans-affirming legislation, knew a bit of Ms. McBride's story and of the tragic death of her love Andy, I still found myself eager to read on. All that passion and detail, and it's all true. This story is extremely compelling both in considering where the movement to support the rights of transgender and non-binary people has come from, as well as looking at all that this young woman has been through. She's an impassioned leader and inspiring voice working actively to encourage equity for all in our great country. I am left feeling both sad and hopeful, energized to work aside progressives alike to help more and more Americans feels safe. If you are not a liberal person, this book may indeed appeal to you as well. If you have not met a transgender person, Ms. McBride opens her soul in sharing her path and that of her parents in coming to terms with what was shocking and at first scary and sad news. They felt they were losing their son, and not ready or prepared. Their journey toward embracing Sarah as their daughter is compelling, heart-warming and real. Any reader will find love for this family in hearing of their journey. This book is worth a read, for anyone. Well done, Sarah McBride, and thank you for your hard work and advocacy in helping our country to make forward progress toward equal rights and fair treatment for all. Your strength and courage in being true to yourself and in sticking by your love, and even further sharing your grief publically is admirable.
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  • Jessica Crouse
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways.Sarah's story was compelling, and the flow of her book was engaging. Sarah invites the reader in to learn more about her own experiences and her journey through self-acceptance, and her pursuit of a career where she could create tangible change for the benefit of LGBTQ Americans. Her sincerity, passion, and vulnerability shines throughout this book. In addition to sharing her own personal story, she also provides an overview of I received an advanced copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways.Sarah's story was compelling, and the flow of her book was engaging. Sarah invites the reader in to learn more about her own experiences and her journey through self-acceptance, and her pursuit of a career where she could create tangible change for the benefit of LGBTQ Americans. Her sincerity, passion, and vulnerability shines throughout this book. In addition to sharing her own personal story, she also provides an overview of some of the more significant legislation that has been passed in recent years that affects the LGBTQ community. It's great to read books written by LGBTQ individuals who are bringing their voices and experiences forward to be shared with and understood by others.
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  • Amanda Mc
    January 1, 1970
    This book was very moving. I felt Sarah’s triumphs, her fears, her grief (and shed some tears over her loss). Overall, this book is well-written, and I thought it had good flow, something many memoirs struggle with. Learning about Sarah’s life and how she came to accept herself and her identity was really compelling. I also appreciate that even as she is telling her story, she consistently highlights her relative privilege and elevates the struggles faced by trans* community. An important and po This book was very moving. I felt Sarah’s triumphs, her fears, her grief (and shed some tears over her loss). Overall, this book is well-written, and I thought it had good flow, something many memoirs struggle with. Learning about Sarah’s life and how she came to accept herself and her identity was really compelling. I also appreciate that even as she is telling her story, she consistently highlights her relative privilege and elevates the struggles faced by trans* community. An important and powerful memoir. I received a copy of this book for free through Penguin's First to Read program.
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    This book, hands down has been one of the best books I have ever read in my life. I read the book in one day because I didn't want to put it down. I laughed, I cried, I connected with real characters. If you are looking for a new book, make sure this is on your list!
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    Truly moving and inspiring.
  • Minerva Spencer
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic book and very moving. Reading about a persistent fighter like Sarah McBride makes me believe there might be hope for human kind. I highly recommend this book.
  • Mikey
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this on a Goodreads review. Thank you so much!
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