All These Worlds (Bobiverse, #3)
Being a sentient spaceship really should be more fun. But after spreading out through space for almost a century, Bob and his clones just can't stay out of trouble. They've created enough colonies so humanity shouldn't go extinct. But political squabbles have a bad habit of dying hard, and the Brazilian probes are still trying to take out the competition. And the Bobs have picked a fight with an older, more powerful species with a large appetite and a short temper. Still stinging from getting their collective butts kicked in their first encounter with the Others, the Bobs now face the prospect of a decisive final battle to defend Earth and its colonies. But the Bobs are less disciplined than a herd of cats, and some of the younger copies are more concerned with their own local problems than defeating the Others. Yet salvation may come from an unlikely source. A couple of eighth-generation Bobs have found something out in deep space. All it will take to save the Earth and perhaps all of humanity is for them to get it to Sol — unless the Others arrive first.

All These Worlds (Bobiverse, #3) Details

TitleAll These Worlds (Bobiverse, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 8th, 2017
PublisherWorldbuilders Press
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Audiobook, Fiction

All These Worlds (Bobiverse, #3) Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Homo SideriaI love it. Actually, I love this entire series.So much happens, but it's mostly snippets and sub-plots for multiple personalities spread across vast distances across space. Of course, that's kinda necessary since it's one man in an AI matrix duplicating himself massively and communicating real-time over fantastic spaces, doing good as he mines and fabricates and fights battles with aliens, insane AIs from old Earth, talks with friends or adopted relatives or just goes the terraformin Homo SideriaI love it. Actually, I love this entire series.So much happens, but it's mostly snippets and sub-plots for multiple personalities spread across vast distances across space. Of course, that's kinda necessary since it's one man in an AI matrix duplicating himself massively and communicating real-time over fantastic spaces, doing good as he mines and fabricates and fights battles with aliens, insane AIs from old Earth, talks with friends or adopted relatives or just goes the terraforming route or just about anything else he wants to do.He's pretty much a machine god in our future, but he's also just Bob. Geek from our century. Doesn't really want anything for himself but is perfectly willing to do so much good for so many people, it's really rather sad how much people take advantage of him.In this third book, however, we come to a head with the alien ships that chew up and spit out whole worlds, and it's everything I'd hoped it would be. :) All the sub-plots include romance, exploration, guilt, and just plain getting pissed off, but what else can we expect? I feel for him. :)Great trilogy. Possibly some of the most refreshing stuff I've read in ages. :)
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  • J.L. Sutton
    January 1, 1970
    Can the unabashed geekiness of the first two Bobiverse books continue and deliver on their protagonists' mission to find new habitable worlds for humanity in the final book of the trilogy? Yes! I enjoyed Dennis Taylor's All These Worlds and felt it reached a satisfying conclusion (although if there was a Bobiverse #4, I wouldn't complain). For me, it took a little while to get going, but it hit its stride when it returned to issues of what it means to be human and whether that could change the w Can the unabashed geekiness of the first two Bobiverse books continue and deliver on their protagonists' mission to find new habitable worlds for humanity in the final book of the trilogy? Yes! I enjoyed Dennis Taylor's All These Worlds and felt it reached a satisfying conclusion (although if there was a Bobiverse #4, I wouldn't complain). For me, it took a little while to get going, but it hit its stride when it returned to issues of what it means to be human and whether that could change the way we interact with each other in the future. From there, it sped on to the Bobs completing their mission and their withdrawal (into the sunsets).
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  • TS Chan
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.All These Worlds was a great and satisfying conclusion to the Bobiverse trilogy, one which I will deem as pretty darn original. It's really not your typical space opera nor near-future cyberpunk science fiction story. Well-written and combining various elements of science, space exploration and humanity, it was a compelling and oft-times humourous package. Given that this is the final chapter in the many adventures of Bob, I will refrain from mentioning anything about the plot to avoid 4.5 stars.All These Worlds was a great and satisfying conclusion to the Bobiverse trilogy, one which I will deem as pretty darn original. It's really not your typical space opera nor near-future cyberpunk science fiction story. Well-written and combining various elements of science, space exploration and humanity, it was a compelling and oft-times humourous package. Given that this is the final chapter in the many adventures of Bob, I will refrain from mentioning anything about the plot to avoid even the tiniest potential spoiler. I will, however, relate why I wholeheartedly enjoyed this entire trilogy. Firstly, it satisfied the geek in me. The one who yearned to have the opportunity of space exploration and at the same time realised that the time and distances being contemplated are just simply too vast and incomprehensible for a mortal's lifetime. The technological advances that the Bobs eventually brought to fruition was realistic as well as it didn't feel way too expedient nor convenient. The Bobs also had to contend with resource bottleneck and management when it comes to producing enough vessels, stasis pods for the migrating human colonies, and ordnance for defence. After a full century since the original Bob woke up to discover that he became a computer programme, what I'd prefer to call nonbiological human intelligence as artificial intelligence just doesn't cut it, the engineer in him had made significant leaps in advancement for the human race to start colonising other planets. However, dealing with an even more advanced power-hungry alien race was another matter altogether. The writing style was accessible while maintaining some elements of hard science and astrophysics, such as time dilation of space travel and all the other abstract concepts that come with this field. It was the audiobook narration that truly made a difference to my enjoyment. Ray Porter injected personalities into the Bobs, with distinct yet subtle nuances between the many generations of clones from the original Replicant. The episodic feel of the story gradually begun to fade as the narrative moved towards an event which was suitably climactic. The switching of first-person POVs between the key Bob characters (that's the first time I ever wrote a phrase like that) was executed seamlessly in my opinion. What I love most about this story was how it dealt with the aspect of what it means to be human. Bob was not an AI learning to have emotions. He was essentially human; simply a nonbiological one with all the capabilities to feel love, happiness, grief, sorrow, regrets.. the whole shebang. Through the various Bobs' engagement and inevitable relationships with "ephemerals", there was quite a lot of emotionally-charged moments as the reality of outliving their loved ones hit hard, as in really really hard. Their lives were now less than a footnote in history. As gone, as utterly forgotten as any random individual from the Middle Ages. No longer even a ripple in time, except to the extent that I could keep their memories alive. With that, I have to say that I highly recommend this series to fans of science-fiction and space geeks, and especially for audiobook fans of this genre. This review can also be found at Booknest
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    So ... I guess this is it. Time to say goodbye. *sniffles* Though the author has promised he isn't done with the Bobiverse, the We-Are-Bob-cycle has come to an end with this third volume.Again, we have different replicants of the original Bob in different corners of the universe (but by now, they all have or can have bodies thanks to ever improving designs for android bodies). Again, they are either on a discovery trip, trying to save what's left of humanity, or watching aliens species on their So ... I guess this is it. Time to say goodbye. *sniffles* Though the author has promised he isn't done with the Bobiverse, the We-Are-Bob-cycle has come to an end with this third volume.Again, we have different replicants of the original Bob in different corners of the universe (but by now, they all have or can have bodies thanks to ever improving designs for android bodies). Again, they are either on a discovery trip, trying to save what's left of humanity, or watching aliens species on their respective planets. This is a nice continuation of the story arcs opened up in the previous two volumes with a few more or less unexpected twists (some thrilling, some sad, some funny). What I like is that this trilogy is an exploration of what would happen if time/distance wasn't an issue and you'd have a whole universe to play in/with. Nevertheless, as broad as the scope can be, there are also story elemens that focus on the smaller (read: not less important) settings/themes. Some might say there is little to no action, but I disagree because it depends on how you define "action". To me, it was very thrilling to go with the original Bob and watch an alien civilisation live their lives; or to explore another planet's marine wildlife (I'm so on board getting into all kinds of android bodies like that of a dolphin-equivalent in order to be able to study those oceans on Poseidon or whatever other environment on any planet); or to save humanity. Not to mention that we did get two pretty cool space battles!I was surprised that almost nobody was tempted by the offer to become a replicant. That was seriously weird considering how humans love the idea of living forever (I count myself amongst those people). Not to mention the freedom and sheer endless possibilities in the universe.Some characters infuriated me ((view spoiler)[Bridget's children, especially her eldest daughter, who actually thought they could pull that shit on their mother and Howard and how far they were prepared to go (hide spoiler)] spring to mind immediately, but also (view spoiler)[the damned Council, especially one member of it, who has no problem with killing heaven knows how many civilians to exercise power (hide spoiler)]). Lucky for everyone involved (and reading), all Bobs do feel at least a certain amount of responsibility so it's all hands on deck.The book was, as the previous two of this trilogy, full of geeky goodness and I loved it. Sure, some Bobs have become darker after certain events in the previous two volumes, but they will always be awesome as a person. And they all stay true to themselves which also explains the truly perfect ending (we come full circle and yet there is no actual limit/ending).And for anyone wondering: the narrator was brilliant (again) when voicing each replicant in a unique way (he also does a pretty good Aussie accent) so I recommend the audio.
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  • Nathaniel
    January 1, 1970
    In All These Worlds, Dennis E. Taylor abruptly tied up all the many enticing loose strings from the series so far, and it felt rushed, almost as though he had skipped to the last chapter and just written that instead of giving his readers all of the intervening content that they expected. Or, at any rate, that I expected.The thing is, he had a lot going on based on the first two books. Major sci-fi themes that are usually centerpieces for entire trilogies each served as minor subplots in Taylor' In All These Worlds, Dennis E. Taylor abruptly tied up all the many enticing loose strings from the series so far, and it felt rushed, almost as though he had skipped to the last chapter and just written that instead of giving his readers all of the intervening content that they expected. Or, at any rate, that I expected.The thing is, he had a lot going on based on the first two books. Major sci-fi themes that are usually centerpieces for entire trilogies each served as minor subplots in Taylor's work. Species-annihilating bad-guy alien race hell-bent on eliminating Earth? Check. Post-apocalyptic race for time to save the human race from ecological fallout of their own self-destructive wars--not to mention suicidal politics and terrorism? Check. Shaggy-God plotline where human shepherds primitive but intelligent alien race through potentially catastrophic evolutionary bottleneck with all the accompanying philosophical conundrums? Check. Fledgling young colony fights to throw off the totalitarian oppressors to fully realize the freedom of their new world? Check. And this is just a sampling of the plots that Taylor was juggling all at once. The series was a smorgasbord of sci-fi delights.And then, in a mere 8 hours, it was all over. This was not enough time to give these plotlines their just deserts. Not even close.A couple of corollary observations. First, the book really was short. The first book in this series, We Are Legion (We Are Bob), was 9.5 hours long. The second book, For We Are Many, was 9 hours long. Those are short books, but within typical length for military sf. (This isn't exactly military sf, but close to.) All These Worlds clocked in at 8 hours. Any shorter than that, and we start to feel like we're in novella territory instead of novel territory. (Times are based on audiobook run-time.)Second, there was a foreward from the author before the book started that--especially in retrospect--seemed really ominous. In it, Taylor thanked his wife for allowing him to go full-time as a writer. Why is this ominous? Because the Bobiverse felt like a first-novel project. It had all the hallmarks, including (initially) a very simple narrative structure, characters who were obviously at least partially autobiographical, and a heavy, heavy reliance on well-worn genre tropes. It fit nicely alongside works like Monster Hunter International or Wool: all admirable first-efforts from (at the time) working stiffs who (later) went on to go full-time and try their hands at more ambitious works. This is kind of the natural way of things, but with the prevalence of self-publishing the cycle has sped up considerably.I think of someone like Jim Butcher and Storm Front. The book had a lot of the same hallmarks of a first-effort, but it was trad-published (back in 2000) and--probably because of that--Jim Butcher kept writing in that setting. He's still writing the Dresden Files, which are now up to over a dozen books. That's how things worked in trad-publishing of yesteryear. It was harder to get your first book out there, and the publisher had more say in making sure that--once you did get it out there--you kept pumping out work in that series until it was done. But when it's easier to get a book out there and when the publisher has less influence, the temptation for authors to walk away from their first projects and start something new is much higher. After all, many authors--when they are working on their first novel--intentionally pick something other than their true passion to work on. They pick something that might be a little more disposable and/or that they think will be easier to execute and/or that they think will be more marketable. And--as soon as they get a chance--they abandon it for what they really wanted to write. (Or, perhaps, just for the new, shiny idea.)This is bad.It's bad for two reasons. First, because if you become a fan of an author for Series X, then you're invested in that series, and you'd like the author to complete it. I'm not saying that an audience has a right to dictate what an author writes. I am saying that an audience who comes in for Series X has a vested interest in seeing Series X through, and is much less likely to be enthusiastic about Series Y.It's also bad because, perversely, artists seem to get much, much worse when they lose constraints. One great example of this is George Lucas. The less money, time, and power he has, the better his movies are. The more money, time, and power he has, the worse they get. I think some of this is just the way creativity works. Creativity is always most vibrant when it is a response to constraints. Obviously you don't want to be too constrained, or you can't have creativity at all. But it seems like the comfort zone for creators is often so unconstrained that creativity sort of languishes. And some of it is because those constraints that are actually good for art. Take marketability, for example, which is shorthand for "what a lot of people want to read." This is not an irrelevant consideration. When an author is thinking about not only what they want ot write, but also what their audience wants to read, that's not a bad thing. Sure, it can go too far and become fan-service, which is its own kind of gross. But, once again, if left to their own devices entirely artists can far too quickly detach from their audience entirely and spiral off into their own echo chamber of weird irrelevance.This might seem like a lot of analysis to pull from an off-handed comment in a forward / acknowledgment to his wife, but I'm telling you the truth when I say: I was alarmed when I heard that because my immediate thought was, "Surely he can't think that he can just tie up this entire series with a bow and wander off to do something new, can he?"Well, yes, apparently, he could. Because that's just what he did.So--while I really liked the book--I also feel robbed. There should have been at least 2-3 more novels in this series, and quite potentially more. I get that Taylor apparently didn't want to write them, and that he gets to make that call. He's the God of his universe. That's how it works.But, as someone just visiting, I'm really disappointed that he dropped the final curtain in the middle of Act II. I will probably give Taylor's next project a shot. And--if it's really, really amazing--I will even come back and edit this review to apologize and say that he did the right thing. But I would also happily take a bet that his next series will be worse than this one. I mean, have you guys (who are fans of the Dresden Files) read Jim Butcher's Codex Alera? I read it out of pity because he kept plugging it again and again in the Dresden Files, always talking about how "horse and sword fantasy" (I think that's how he put it) was his first love. I read the entire series, and it just wasn't really any good. On the other hand, The Aeronaut's Windlass was fantastic. By that time, Butcher was an amazing, accomplished writer. So my suspicion is that fledgling authors who find they've written a hit should really, really stick with that hit until it actually reaches an organic conclusion, and not bail out prematurely. Chances are they don't have the chops to pull off their more ambitious scheme as well as it deserves, that they will find the sudden decrease in external constraints corrosive more than enabling, and that just as afterthought they're going to alienate (at least a little bit) the core audience that has just started to get to know them.Just my $0.02, anyway.
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  • Wesley Dryden1
    January 1, 1970
    The best book I haven't read this year!
  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Bobiverse. Dennis Taylor has created a fun, entertaining and sometimes thoughtful series, and I’m genuinely sad to see it end.In saying that, I don’t feel that All These Worlds is a worthy finale for the Bobiverse trilogy. While this is still an enjoyable book it just isn’t the big finisher that the Bobiverse needs or deserves.The format of the two previous books continues here- a series of first person almost diary-like vignettes from the various Bob’s that are spread throughout the I love the Bobiverse. Dennis Taylor has created a fun, entertaining and sometimes thoughtful series, and I’m genuinely sad to see it end.In saying that, I don’t feel that All These Worlds is a worthy finale for the Bobiverse trilogy. While this is still an enjoyable book it just isn’t the big finisher that the Bobiverse needs or deserves.The format of the two previous books continues here- a series of first person almost diary-like vignettes from the various Bob’s that are spread throughout the galaxy, exploring, inventing, helping sentient species and shepherding the remainder of humanity after war has devastated Earth.The threat of the others is still hanging over humanity and as the Bob’s severely pissed their enemies off in the last book, the danger this time around is directed straight at our (many) heroes and their human charges.Conflict and danger abounds, but... It all feels a bit cursory. Perhaps due to the first two books being so full of ideas, so jam packed full of plots that need resolution- The Others, original Bob’s sentient humanoids, a potential Bob-human romance, Bill’s exploration of new tech, Riker’s need to evacuate Earth’s remaining millions before the hostile climate kills everyone, the crazy Brazilian probes that pop up to derail Bobkind's plans – one (short) book just doesn’t feel like it offers enough room to tie all the loose ends off.As a result the big threat – The Others - is knocked off too easily, in a manner that you would expect a menacing alien super-civilisation to have thought of and perhaps planned for. It just felt too convenient, and a big space battle that the Bob’s have with the Others lacks the excitement of their earlier engagement around the Pav homeworld in For We are Many.Original Bob’s relationship with Archimedes is carried through to a conclusion that is more satisfying, and a romance angle works out pretty well, but my overall impression is one of a series being wrapped up too quickly for my tastes.That’s not to say this is a bad book – it isn’t – but it also isn't what it could have been and it leaves what is a great series a little undercooked.
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  • Veronique
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 (review edited)To say that I am a fan of this series is no secret. Therefore, the fact that I downloaded the audiobook as soon as it was available (yesterday) and consumed it as fast as I could, around real life that is, will shock no one :O)Taylor offers us the continuing adventures of the Bobs. If you loved the second book, you'll be very happy with this one too, especially since we get some resolutions. Once more, the narration is shared between several iterations of our favourite geek ex 4.5 (review edited)To say that I am a fan of this series is no secret. Therefore, the fact that I downloaded the audiobook as soon as it was available (yesterday) and consumed it as fast as I could, around real life that is, will shock no one :O)Taylor offers us the continuing adventures of the Bobs. If you loved the second book, you'll be very happy with this one too, especially since we get some resolutions. Once more, the narration is shared between several iterations of our favourite geek extraordinaire, keeping us in the loop with their 'missions', whether dealing with the ever present threat from The Others, witnessing Archimedes and his people, managing the relocation of the surviving humans, and coping with the shenanigans of the ones already relocated (you know, the power hungry idiots). Yes, it is more of the same, but it is such a brilliant and compelling 'same'. I just love listening to all the different 'Bobs', their ideas, their pains, their hopes, their loves, and yes their sense of humour. It is also different. The Bobs, especially the 'older' ones, have changed under the influence of their experiences. Additionally, Taylor does bring the curtain down in a satisfying fashion, while leaving enough scope for another series in the future. Call me happy. Now to resist the temptation to start book 1 again...
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  • Richard Derus
    January 1, 1970
    When the limitations of a single human lifespan are removed from a sentient being's development, what will happen? Will the being go mad, become frozen emotionally, decide to destroy the Universe and see what happens next?Bob Johansson finds out.I am jealous of Bob, I am happy Author Taylor decided to write Bob down, and I am all done with the series of novels explaining the Bobiverse. Kinda sorta wish I wasn't but I am, and I think a lot of y'all should pack a Kindle with these three novels and When the limitations of a single human lifespan are removed from a sentient being's development, what will happen? Will the being go mad, become frozen emotionally, decide to destroy the Universe and see what happens next?Bob Johansson finds out.I am jealous of Bob, I am happy Author Taylor decided to write Bob down, and I am all done with the series of novels explaining the Bobiverse. Kinda sorta wish I wasn't but I am, and I think a lot of y'all should pack a Kindle with these three novels and light out for the Bobiverse right quick. The reason is that, in reading the books in order, you'll come to realize that Author Taylor doesn't have a high opinion of the species and still makes a concerted effort to save us. He doesn't consign us to the scrapheap of history with a shrug and a ~meh~.In this moment of US national history, it's probably more than I'd be able or even willing to do, so it made my days a bit brighter. I'm happy to be jollied along by the greater generosity of a Man with a Plan. And so, I suspect, might other guys be. And I stress the "guys" part—this is a Guy Book in every particular. There are very few female characters and only one is at all developed. Even she is a guy in a woman suit.She does provide something unique to the Bobiverse...she has a family, kids who grow into beings both like and unlike her. Her relationship with those kids as all the parties age...Bob, in his own way, ages as well...makes for some excellent drama and some astonishing emotional resonances with readers over 50.I'm also at the point in life where another factor of the Bobiverse, the meditation on personal immortality and the options it provides, is particularly interesting to me. I don't think I'm quite as eager for it at my age as I would have been at Bob's age (31) when he dies. I'm not saying it doesn't have a huge upside. I'm saying that I now feel as well as see the downside, the inevitable losses and griefs piling up under the carpet until the Karastan is basically a blip on the Everest of stuff not dealt with. Author Taylor goes there, as well, and I suspect it's a subject of newfound interest to the intended audience for the book.The idea of family comes in for some particularly inventive workouts in the Bobiverse. One of the intriguing things about immortality, particularly in Bob's form of multiple "clones" of his conscious mind branching from the moments of separation, is the expanded family sense it offers. Each new generation of Bob-clones is one more removed from Original Biological Bob, then Replicant Bob, then the cloned Bob-minds that cloned Bob-minds that now clone Bob-minds...yet all have perfect digital recall of the "ancestral" Bobs to the moment of their awareness as individuals begins.Mind-blowing, isn't it? Think on it: generations of sibling-selves with your character! Every facet would be fully explored, of course, like all siblings each unique individual would seek to become different, to distinguish itself from all the others around it. In effect, though the clones would start with certain memories as a base of contact with all the other sibling consciousnesses, as the generations of cloning take place the point of commonality would be deeper and deeper under the sense of personal uniqueness.It would be fascinating to see this play out! I wanna be in the Bobiverse, dammit!Except, of course, for the Bobiversal solution to the Fermi Paradox ("where is everybody?"), the Others. A better monster-movie villain I ain't never read. Scary. Don't deny yourself the simultaneous pleasure and fear of experiencing the Bobiverse! Like, now!
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  • Brent
    January 1, 1970
    Excitement, closure, new adventures. A great ending to a great series.
  • Bram
    January 1, 1970
    I can really appreciate the fact that the parts of this trilogy are being released so close to each other. Not even a year went by between the release of We Are Legion (We Are Bob) and All these Worlds. As a reader, I applaud this. I know it's not something every author can pull of, but respect to Dennis Taylor for this.Also, the audiobook rendition is truly worth its money. Ray Porter really gives each Bob their own character and eventually I was able to recognize which specific POV I was liste I can really appreciate the fact that the parts of this trilogy are being released so close to each other. Not even a year went by between the release of We Are Legion (We Are Bob) and All these Worlds. As a reader, I applaud this. I know it's not something every author can pull of, but respect to Dennis Taylor for this.Also, the audiobook rendition is truly worth its money. Ray Porter really gives each Bob their own character and eventually I was able to recognize which specific POV I was listening too, based on the voice he used. Really good stuff.World-buildingThe world / universe building takes a bit of a back-seat in this one. The "known" universe doesn't really expand anymore, in stead we focus more on the planets that have been previously discovered / terraformed and how they develop. There's still some very interesting stuff there, regarding the evolution of fauna and the Deltans, but it doesn't take up so much page-time anymore. The focus is definitely on the development of the plot.CharactersWhat's there to say? There's still a bunch of Bobs, they keep diversifying in interesting ways and there's even a little romance in there. All of it felt real and I felt completely immersed in their worlds VR's.WritingDennis Taylors writing is still very fun to read. It's fluid, witty and full of pop / geek / nerd - culture references, which my inner geek LOVES. There's a dry kind of humor that perpetuates through all 3 of the books and that resonates with me on a personal level.Plot / StoryThe story switches POV's constantly, but doesn't feel all that complicated. The transitions are seamless, even when jumping through time. All story threads get wrapped up nicely and we get a big finish at the end, befitting the epicness of the universe. Great story, with all the ingredients required to propel this series into the science fiction hall of fame.ConclusionThroughtout this series, I've constantly been able to effortlessly put myself in the shoes of whichever Bob was doing the talking. The thought process and the decision making feel so close to me, that it feels like this story was written, just for me. I've loved every minute of this epic saga and I'm sure I'll be re-reading this again. In the meantime, I can say that this was an absolutely bloody brilliant ending, to an epic saga and I'm going to recommend the shit out of it, to everyone that dares admit they like science fiction.A million stars.
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    The Bobs are in trouble. Humanity is in trouble. Even the Pav and the Deltans are in the firing line.The Others are coming.“Is there no way we can co-exist? The universe is a large place.”That also makes no sense. You are food. It is not the purpose of food to co-exist. We will, in time, make our way to your Sol and your Epsilon Eridani. We have seen your radio beacons. Food always thus announces itself.The Bobs fought a battle at Delta Pavonis and while they bloodied the collective nose of the The Bobs are in trouble. Humanity is in trouble. Even the Pav and the Deltans are in the firing line.The Others are coming.“Is there no way we can co-exist? The universe is a large place.”That also makes no sense. You are food. It is not the purpose of food to co-exist. We will, in time, make our way to your Sol and your Epsilon Eridani. We have seen your radio beacons. Food always thus announces itself.The Bobs fought a battle at Delta Pavonis and while they bloodied the collective nose of the creatures they're calling the Others, the planet of the Pav species was still destroyed. The Others have already announced their next targets. While the whole Bobiverse has this existential threat hanging over it, the Bobs are facing the ongoing problem of their immortal existence among ephemeral people that they love. Howard, Will and the original Bob all have to face what this means. Meanwhile other Bobs have to decide just how much they want to remain as part of human society.There are hundreds of Bobs at this point of the story and rather than take the scatter-gun approach of the last two books, the story in this one focuses mainly on the Bobs I mentioned above and the way they have to deal with loss. The rest of the story finishes up what was begun in book two with the evacuation of the Earth and dealing with the Others. If you've read this far, the conclusion won't disappoint.
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  • Rob
    January 1, 1970
    Executive Summary:A satisfying conclusion to the series, albeit with a somewhat rushed ending.Audiobook: Another good job by Ray Porter. He has good inflection and volume. He speaks clearly and does a few voices. He's definitely made this an enjoyable listen. Full Review I only discovered this series earlier this year thanks to a lot of buzz here on goodreads. It's just the most recent reason that makes me glad this site exists and I finally found it a few years ago.If you want to win me to your Executive Summary:A satisfying conclusion to the series, albeit with a somewhat rushed ending.Audiobook: Another good job by Ray Porter. He has good inflection and volume. He speaks clearly and does a few voices. He's definitely made this an enjoyable listen. Full Review I only discovered this series earlier this year thanks to a lot of buzz here on goodreads. It's just the most recent reason that makes me glad this site exists and I finally found it a few years ago.If you want to win me to your side, the easiest thing to do is have a protagonist who's a 30 something computer programmer into a lot of SFF and video games. This series isn't as heavy on the fan service as say Ready Player One, but there are some nice references dropped throughout as appropriate to make me geek out a bit as I was listening.I really love all the different Bob's we meet, and I was happy to see he didn't expand the number of POVs too much in this book. Especially given it's rather short length. At just 8 hours in audio, I seemed to be finished with this book in no time at all.In fact that's my only real complaint here. The ending felt a bit rushed. While many of the subplots were wrapped up pretty nicely, the main plot seemed to go from mostly background noise to overdrive in the last several chapters. I was expecting a bit more of a climax than we actually got.That isn't to say I was disappointed. This was a fun series, and it's been pretty faced paced all the way though. While I'm fine with how things leave off at the end, I wouldn't mind if Mr. Taylor decided to revisit the Bobs later on with some kind of sequel, ideally set hundreds (or maybe thousands?) of years after this one wraps up.Either way I'll have to keep an eye out for Mr. Taylor's next book and hope that it's as much fun as this series has been.
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  • Stuart
    January 1, 1970
    All These Worlds: The action-packed Bobiverse finaleOriginally posted at Fantasy LiteratureDennis E. Taylor’s BOBIVERSE series has turned out to be a real winner, starting with We Are Legion (We Are Bob) in September 2016 and continuing with For We Are Many in May 2017. Usually I tend to read fairly serious, literary, and ambitious SFF books, but after going through not one, but two long episodes dealing with a debilitating herniated disc this year and being confined to lying on my back for week All These Worlds: The action-packed Bobiverse finaleOriginally posted at Fantasy LiteratureDennis E. Taylor’s BOBIVERSE series has turned out to be a real winner, starting with We Are Legion (We Are Bob) in September 2016 and continuing with For We Are Many in May 2017. Usually I tend to read fairly serious, literary, and ambitious SFF books, but after going through not one, but two long episodes dealing with a debilitating herniated disc this year and being confined to lying on my back for weeks, I badly needed a comic break, and the BOBIVERSE series is a perfect place to get an action-packed, science-literate, hilarious, and even moving story in under 8 hours of audiobook bliss. It would not be an exaggeration to say that narrator Ray Porter is brilliant and absolutely perfect for this series. His delivery is so in tune with the snarky tone of the book that Dennis E. Taylor really should buy him a round or two if he hasn’t already.If you’re looking for an ultra-fast-paced SF adventure featuring multiple AIs originating from the same individual, Von Neumann probes exploring the galaxy, the moral dilemmas of whether to assist a primitive race as a mechanical god, trying to combat the misguided policies of a human government on a new ocean colony, and battling to save the entire human race AND Bobiverse from an implacable alien race that consumes planetary systems and sentient species as a light snack, these are the books for you.In All These Worlds, the third and final installment in the Bobiverse, Bob and his other fellow AIs remain engaged in dozens of different situations, mainly exploration and terraforming of planets to create new homes for the surviving remnants of humanity. This is not an easy business, and Taylor devotes a lot of time explaining the science and technology of it, but in a very understandable and reader-friendly way. This time he focuses on the various technologies involved in terraforming, starship engine drive back-engineering, and finding the optimum balance of producing enough technology and equipment to support terraforming while at the same time building enough weaponry to defend humanity from the rapacious Others, who simply have zero interest in sitting down for a cup of tea and discussing their differences like a civilized species.The terraforming story on Poseidon involves a lot of political machinations between Marcus, one of the Bobs, and the local governing body of this water planet that seems to disagree on EVERY SINGLE POINT of managing the colonies’ development, and this rapidly develops from tense discussions, to embargoes, and finally open warfare. It’s all very frustrating for Marcus, as he is only trying to help them out, but they just won’t see common sense (at least from an immortal AI perspective).There is also again a bittersweet love story for one of the Bob AIs, Howard, as he is in love with a mortal woman biologist, who is a perfect personality match for him but refuses to consider the idea of being digitally stored and made immortal. Howard, who has seen so many “ephemerals” come and go, cannot idly watch as she ages while he does not, and finds himself in a nasty fight with her children over her last wishes. Once again, this adds an element of thoughtful speculation on what it might mean to live forever, and whether most people really would take this option.Finally, we have the Others, the implacable advanced alien race that likes to turn star systems into raw materials, and treats sentient beings as food. This time the Others plan to annihilate humanity wherever it has settled in the galaxy, and are racing to Earth to destroy it completely, so it is up to a group of “younger” Bobs to find a way to stop the Others to save both humanity and all the other sentient races that will be callously wiped out if they can’t find a last-ditch solution. Once again, it reminded me of a more light-hearted version of the unstoppable aliens of Alastair Reynolds’ REVELATION SPACE series.All These Worlds’ story just flies along at near light speed — there are 76 chapters in only 281 pages, which translates to 3.6 pages per chapter. If anything, I think Taylor could slow things down a little and flesh out some of the side story elements, but then again part of the charm of the BOBIVERSE is that it never rests, unlike so many of the bloated series that jam the shelves of bookstores. All the Bobs are relentless workaholics, so the story never stops for very long, despite the wealth of ideas that could get more in-depth treatment in a longer book.Finally, I must again say that the Kindle versions of all the books are only $4.99 each on Amazon.com and adding Audible narration is only an extra $1.99 if you are an Audible member. That is a ridiculously good deal, and one of the reasons I gave it a try in the first place, so take a trip to the Bobiverse!
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this trilogy and highly recommend it in audio - Ray Porter does a great job with the many Bobs.
  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    When it comes to final books in a trilogy, I need more than just more continuations from the previous books. The last book should give some closure and bring some conclusions to the various themes it brought up. This didn't do those things. While I could forgive the run-of-the-mill nature of the second book, having the final book be more of the same was disappointing. Yes, there are conclusions to a handful of the side-plots, but nothing satisfying in terms of making a statement on the various t When it comes to final books in a trilogy, I need more than just more continuations from the previous books. The last book should give some closure and bring some conclusions to the various themes it brought up. This didn't do those things. While I could forgive the run-of-the-mill nature of the second book, having the final book be more of the same was disappointing. Yes, there are conclusions to a handful of the side-plots, but nothing satisfying in terms of making a statement on the various themes.The writing is still nice and light, with the narrator of the audiobooks doing a great job throughout the series. However, over the course of the series, you start to notice a lack of depth in terms of characterization and plotting. While there were a few original ideas initially in the series, by the time we get to this instalment, there's nothing noteworthy to talk about.I liked some of the ideas which were explored touched on, but I often found myself disagreeing with the author on how humans would behave in the various scenarios. Like how many people would want to make use of the consciousness replication technology and how many would bother picking a fight with an AI like Bob. There were a few cases like that where the humans made decisions based on plot, rather than common sense or believable human behaviour.This was a very short book and a relatively short series, so while it's nothing spectacular, I would recommend it to people looking for a light sci-fi story. Might have worked better as a single book with a big chunk of the fluff taken out, but even so, I'd rate the series a 3/5.
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  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third book and I guess the last book of the series. The people of Earth are scattered over a number of planets and it looks as if humanity is safe for a while. But the old political battles continue and now they are starting to continue the battles that destroyed Earth. The Bobs are faced with stopping an alien they call “Other” who is destroying everything in its path. The Bobs are having a problem working together to face this new challenge. Some 8th generation Bobs may have found This is the third book and I guess the last book of the series. The people of Earth are scattered over a number of planets and it looks as if humanity is safe for a while. But the old political battles continue and now they are starting to continue the battles that destroyed Earth. The Bobs are faced with stopping an alien they call “Other” who is destroying everything in its path. The Bobs are having a problem working together to face this new challenge. Some 8th generation Bobs may have found something out in deep space that may save them from the Other.The book is well written. There are plots within plots and many personalities to keep track of. Taylor has combined science, space exploration and tossed in some philosophy, mixed in humor along with action and suspense for a great story. The author was also successful in tying up all the subplots into an interesting ending.I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is eight hours long. Ray Porter did an excellent job narrating the book. Porter did a superb job creating various personalities for each of the Bobs. He made subtle distinct differences so the listener knew exactly which Bob was talking. I think Porter’s narration helped make this into a great trilogy.
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    From the first book in the Bobiverse, I had some qualms about the whole premise. I hadn't planned on reading anything past that book, but the ending had enough questions left unanswered that I persevered. I didn't find much more to like in the second book, but having come that far, I figured I should finish it out and read the third book. This is a long way of saying I wasn't expecting much out of All These Worlds.The books have been easy to read, and are strangely compelling, despite that they From the first book in the Bobiverse, I had some qualms about the whole premise. I hadn't planned on reading anything past that book, but the ending had enough questions left unanswered that I persevered. I didn't find much more to like in the second book, but having come that far, I figured I should finish it out and read the third book. This is a long way of saying I wasn't expecting much out of All These Worlds.The books have been easy to read, and are strangely compelling, despite that they feel so distant. The stories have felt emotionless, with things happening so quickly (and sometimes off screen) that it's hard to feel a connection with any of the characters. It doesn't help that Bob and his progeny have this smartassery about them that gets tiresome over the course of one book, much less three. All These Worlds has the first moment in the trilogy where I felt like I was having an emotional response, but then Taylor had to go and ruin it by ending it with one of the Bobs saying "Live long and prosper."All of the characters in this series -- even those outside of the Bobs -- have similar voices. They're all witty and sarcastic, but ultimately charming. Even the human characters who are set up as foils have these characteristics, which pushes credibility. And everyone -- everyone -- chuckles. They don't titter, or guffaw, or laugh; they chuckle. For some reason, this started to annoy the crap out of me near the end of the book.My biggest complaint with the second book was that it was so repetitious, with the Bobs constantly on the move to search and adapt worlds for human life. There's an element to that here, too, but since most of the settlements have been established, the story focuses on the main threat of the entire series -- the Others. There's much more at stake with this book, and it helps anchor the book and give it a focus, which the previous book didn't have. It still has several plots interacting at once (possibly meandering through time? At one point I think one of the chapters jumped back a decade or two), but the threat of the Others prevails.There were other subplots that kept my interest, but in looking back, I realize they play little to no role in the battle with the Others. I think Taylor is trying to establish the different personalities of the Bobs by giving them a focus outside of the larger threat, but they seem useless in retrospect. The cast of Bobs has grown large (a couple of hundred, I believe; regardless, it's large enough that Taylor didn't bother with a family tree this time around), and Taylor clearly wants to end the stories of the most prominent Bobs that began the story, but it winds up making the book feel unfocused by comparison.The book is fine, and has a strong ending that fits the trilogy, but it doesn't change my opinion of the overall series. Remove the smartassery, create characters that feel more distinct, and expand on the themes of the trilogy, and this could have been a classic science fiction novel. As it is, though, it feels amateurish, despite its readability.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Yeah, I'm kind of unabashedly fangirling over this trilogy. I love the IDEAS behind this work. I love that it manages to be tech-positive without betraying intrinsic humaness. I like the questions it asks and I would encourage you to ask yourself all the questions the Bobs ask about what makes or doesnt make them human.I got so attached to the different Bobs that I'm pretty sad to see the end of the trilogy, but I think it ended where it needed to. Escalation becomes an especial problem in scifi Yeah, I'm kind of unabashedly fangirling over this trilogy. I love the IDEAS behind this work. I love that it manages to be tech-positive without betraying intrinsic humaness. I like the questions it asks and I would encourage you to ask yourself all the questions the Bobs ask about what makes or doesnt make them human.I got so attached to the different Bobs that I'm pretty sad to see the end of the trilogy, but I think it ended where it needed to. Escalation becomes an especial problem in scifi and fantasy. All These Worlds tie up all the storylines that were running nicely and is a bit more action packed than Book 2. Also- absolutely excellent narration on the audiobook.
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  • Jānis Ekmanis
    January 1, 1970
    Trīs aizraujoši vakari ar trešo triloģijas grāmatu. Nodaļas kā šaha simultānspēle - katra savā visuma nostūrī, tāpat kā pirmajās divās grāmatās. Es patiešām nejutos vīlies ne vienā mirklī. Salīdzinājumā ar Marsieti, kur bija nu tik pārspīlēti daudz laimīgu sagadīšanos, šī likās kā reāla dokumentāls stāsts :)
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    All These Worlds was a very satisfying ending to the Bobiverse trilogy. It's going to be lonely without all the Bobs. I'll miss them!I listened to this on audible and once again, Ray Porter was brilliant as he performed the many incarnations of "Bob". He managed to make them all unique. This series of the Bobiverse was truly an original and very unique premise. I didn't think there could be any more surprises, but there were a couple more that had me shaking my head muttering WOWWW to myself. We All These Worlds was a very satisfying ending to the Bobiverse trilogy. It's going to be lonely without all the Bobs. I'll miss them!I listened to this on audible and once again, Ray Porter was brilliant as he performed the many incarnations of "Bob". He managed to make them all unique. This series of the Bobiverse was truly an original and very unique premise. I didn't think there could be any more surprises, but there were a couple more that had me shaking my head muttering WOWWW to myself. Well done!!
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  • Kacy❁
    January 1, 1970
    What a great conclusion to the Bobiverse. I loved the little bits of humor, the nerdiness, and the Bobbbbb's small weakness of wanting to help humanity (over and over again).For some reason Howard and Guppie were my 2 favorites throughout this whole series.Ray Porter does a phenomenal job of narrating this. I honestly think the audio version of this story makes it.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    What a great ending to the series. As much as I want more Bobiverse, I'm glad this one wraps things up and the only questions we have are the fun kind. I keep trying to get my family and friends to read this series; they don't know what they're missing.
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  • Sinisa Mikasinovic
    January 1, 1970
    I still can't believe I listened to this book 3 months ago, and haven't rated nor reviewed it. And I preordered it!How does that even happen!? I have simply forgotten about it! :OI'll just put this out there - This has been one of the best Sci-Fi series I've read in my life. Very difficult to explain to anyone who hasn't listened or read the first two parts.And you shouldn't really even try to do so in the first place, simply point those lucky souls to a world of fun at Audible!Seriously, this i I still can't believe I listened to this book 3 months ago, and haven't rated nor reviewed it. And I preordered it!How does that even happen!? I have simply forgotten about it! :OI'll just put this out there - This has been one of the best Sci-Fi series I've read in my life. Very difficult to explain to anyone who hasn't listened or read the first two parts.And you shouldn't really even try to do so in the first place, simply point those lucky souls to a world of fun at Audible!Seriously, this is as best series finale as you can get. Every single one of the books is pure gold for Sci-Fi fans. It's rare that I have so many words of praise for one book, but all three in a series?!Listened to all of them in 2017, and must say that it has really been a good year ;-)Of course, Dennis' genius writing is perfectly complemented by Ray Porter's superhuman delivery of the audiobook. Something I'm very much used to now.I'm not going to write about the book, but let's say that it finishes the long and convoluted storyline in a particularly satisfying way. Additionally, it also nicely sets the stage for a new one. Oh joy! :)Honestly, it shouldn't come as a surprise. First, because the series is a huge success, and second, perhaps somewhat more telling, the author himself said so! :)))Dennis E. Taylor: The trilogy itself is 3 books (obviously). This isn't by any stretch the end of the bobiverse, though. I have a half-dozen story ideas lined up right now, and I'm sure more will present themselves. I'll keep writing them as long as people keep liking them.So there you go folks! Keep liking and Dennis will keep delivering :-)With the series finished, I think it's time for a new one.But now, since there's no more Bob, I'll have to find another one.(view spoiler)[Three candidates, so far: Expeditionary Force, Chaos of the Covenant and Ascension .First one is narrated by R.C. Bray, others by Jeff Hays. Making a mistake here is impossible! (hide spoiler)]Fantastic closure. 5*Or, on a new scale: Writing 100/100, Delivery +10%.Total: 110/100This review hasn't been properly reviewed nor proofread. Spell check is still a common sense, however. This is an experiment.
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  • Sprogg2001
    January 1, 1970
    "All your base are belong to us"  - Let the war commence.
  • Narilka
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4.5 starsWasn't being a sentient spaceship was supposed to be more fun and less work? A hostile alien species "consuming" their way through the universe, political unrest on some of the colonies, more Medieros probes and resource bottlenecks are certainly NOT what the Bobs need if they are to finish evacuating the Earth and save humanity. It's going to take more Bobs in order to keep the schedule and get through the next several years in one piece.All these Worlds is the final book in De Rating: 4.5 starsWasn't being a sentient spaceship was supposed to be more fun and less work? A hostile alien species "consuming" their way through the universe, political unrest on some of the colonies, more Medieros probes and resource bottlenecks are certainly NOT what the Bobs need if they are to finish evacuating the Earth and save humanity. It's going to take more Bobs in order to keep the schedule and get through the next several years in one piece.All these Worlds is the final book in Dennis E. Taylor's Bobiverse trilogy. All of the story lines in book two are carried through and reach a satisfying conclusion. There still are some fun SFF pop culture references though they are fewer than previous books. While there is a more serious tone over all, the humor and wit are still great. Of all the story threads, Howard and Bridget's story really helps capture the running theme of what it means to be human. The Bobs are not just intelligent AI. They are essentially inorganic humans with all of the capacity for emotion as organic humans only worse as this makes the price of immortality especially hard as you constantly outlive friends and loved ones.There are so many Bobs now! They are up to their eighth generation. You start to see more deviance from Original Bob's personality. This is where Ray Porter's narration of the audio book really shines as he made distinct yet subtle differences with each Bob, it's impressive.I've enjoyed this series immensely. I read on the author's blog that he is planning future books in this world as there are many stories still to tell. I'm looking forward to it.
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  • Charles Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    Hope you *just* finished Book 2Love these books, fun writing, good science, multiple story lines, but my only issue is no refresher or recap or lead in to the last book. For those of us who read the last two books a while ago, it was tough to remember what happened last book. This one picks up on all the story lines. I think there’s a fine line to not irritate those who are just reading all the way through, but wish I had a little recap or a bit more summary on starting! I’ll bring this up in th Hope you *just* finished Book 2Love these books, fun writing, good science, multiple story lines, but my only issue is no refresher or recap or lead in to the last book. For those of us who read the last two books a while ago, it was tough to remember what happened last book. This one picks up on all the story lines. I think there’s a fine line to not irritate those who are just reading all the way through, but wish I had a little recap or a bit more summary on starting! I’ll bring this up in the next Moot.
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  • Hank
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect end to a great trilogy. I was left with good memories of the world yet not really wanting another story. Characterization is weak in this book, there really is only one, but the premise and the imortality+humanity themes made it richer. A great, easy to read, finished trilogy.
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  • Stephen Richter
    January 1, 1970
    Each book in the Bobiverse just got better. The narrator, Ray Porter. was easy to listen for long periods of time. In this case an early start to some spring cleaning. Noting like being reminded of your mortality and getting the desire to get rid of stuff. Looking forward to whatever Dennis E Taylor does next.
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  • Orhan Capas
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect sci fi and humor combination. Fun and emotional moments guaranteed. I cried out when the trilogy ended because I do not know if I will be getting any more of Bob
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