Batman/Elmer Fudd Special #1
After a chance meeting with billionaire Bruce Wayne, Elmer Fudd’s obsession quickly escalates into stalking Batman through the dark alleys and high-class social settings of Gotham City. Welcome to Bat Season! And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters written by Tom King and artwork by Byron Vaughns.

Batman/Elmer Fudd Special #1 Details

TitleBatman/Elmer Fudd Special #1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 28th, 2017
PublisherDC
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Dc Comics, Batman, Superheroes, Graphic Novels

Batman/Elmer Fudd Special #1 Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    I think like most people I viewed the DC/Looney Tunes crossover comics skeptically, that they were simply novelty products that couldn’t possibly be any good. And while I can’t speak to the quality of the others as I haven’t read them, Batman/Elmer Fudd was bizarrely quite decent! Elmer Fudd and Silver St Cloud fall in love so her jealous ex, Bruce Wayne, has her killed - or so Elmer thinks. Wabbits? No. Elmer’s hunting wich pwayboys for revenge - ssshhh!The relative success of this comic stems I think like most people I viewed the DC/Looney Tunes crossover comics skeptically, that they were simply novelty products that couldn’t possibly be any good. And while I can’t speak to the quality of the others as I haven’t read them, Batman/Elmer Fudd was bizarrely quite decent! Elmer Fudd and Silver St Cloud fall in love so her jealous ex, Bruce Wayne, has her killed - or so Elmer thinks. Wabbits? No. Elmer’s hunting wich pwayboys for revenge - ssshhh!The relative success of this comic stems in large part from the expectations the reader brings to it. Because I had no idea what angle this comic would take and expected it to be the usual Looney Tunes hyper-silliness, I was pleasantly surprised and immediately interested with the dead-serious, noirish tone writer Tom King went for - it upends those assumptions, immediately becoming more interesting, and actually works really well! King writes Elmer completely straight - though he retains his characteristic and humorous speech impediment which, as the issue is written from his perspective, does get annoying to read quite quickly - and I liked that he gave him dignity and honour when he’s usually the farcical clown, the butt of every joke. I even bought that he was a quasi-serious threat to Batman and thought their encounter was astonishingly exciting. In keeping with the tone, artist Lee Weeks draws the famous Looney Tunes characters as realistic humans. It’s fascinating to see Weeks’ interpretations, particularly for the animal characters like Porky, Taz and Wile E. Coyote, to name a few. Bugs especially was kinda shocking and unexpectedly sad. As clever as the setup is, the story’s resolution is very weak, abrupt and forgettable (as most noir stories tend to be as they’re overly reliant on a huge dump of clunky exposition to wrap things up). It lets the issue down, exposing it as the contrived and half-baked crossover it seemed like from the title. There’s also a Batman/Elmer Fudd backup written/drawn in the classic Looney Tunes style full of wacky comedy that, like the cartoons themselves from a grown-up’s viewpoint, was more tedious than funny. All that said, Batman/Elmer Fudd definitely wasn’t bad. The premise, characterisation and art were very strong though the way the story played out was unsatisfying and the backup was disposable. On the whole it was an unusually clever crossover comic that’s worth a look for curious fans of either franchise.
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  • Christopher
    January 1, 1970
    There's some nonsense to how ratings work. There's a lot of nuance involved in how one book can be 5 stars and a seemingly (objectively) better book can be 4 stars. A lot of times, expectations are at the heart of these oddities, and that is certainly the case here. What did you expect when you saw this book has Batman and Elmer Fudd in it? If you said anything other than "complete garbage, terrible jokes, and a reminder of why crossovers are terrible," you're a liar. Which is why this gets as m There's some nonsense to how ratings work. There's a lot of nuance involved in how one book can be 5 stars and a seemingly (objectively) better book can be 4 stars. A lot of times, expectations are at the heart of these oddities, and that is certainly the case here. What did you expect when you saw this book has Batman and Elmer Fudd in it? If you said anything other than "complete garbage, terrible jokes, and a reminder of why crossovers are terrible," you're a liar. Which is why this gets as many stars as it does. It's not that it's great. It's that it is so much better than expectations that I don't know what else to do with it. The only things you need to know about this is that the Looney Tunes characters are humans, it's a noir story, and it's way better than it has any right to be.But now you're read this and your expectations are all messed up, so it's going to be terrible. Sorry.
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  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    So, this was great! It's a very noir-y tale about a scorned man (who happens to be Elmer Fudd) wanting revenge on the man who took his woman. The man he's seeking happens to be Batman. They've gone about the route of setting this in Gotham and making it a Batman style comic, but all the supporting characters are regular people made out to be familiar looney tunes character. That's a terrible way for me to explain, its best you just read it for yourself. And there's also the classic looney tunes So, this was great! It's a very noir-y tale about a scorned man (who happens to be Elmer Fudd) wanting revenge on the man who took his woman. The man he's seeking happens to be Batman. They've gone about the route of setting this in Gotham and making it a Batman style comic, but all the supporting characters are regular people made out to be familiar looney tunes character. That's a terrible way for me to explain, its best you just read it for yourself. And there's also the classic looney tunes style as a back up in the back
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  • Scott Mills
    January 1, 1970
    This was way better then it had any right to be. Wow. Tom King and Lee Weeks crushed it.
  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    Following a successful first year of the current Batman run, which is now on The War of Jokes and Riddles, Tom King inserts our favorite bumbling hunter who likes to go after wabbits into the dark abyss that is Gotham City.Please click here for my full review.
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  • Julio Bonilla
    January 1, 1970
    I love the noir of the first story! Second one is a straight-up short, like the cartoon.
  • Brandon St Mark
    January 1, 1970
    I was expecting this one to be good since Batman's involved, and I was right. Elmer Fudd was actually a really interesting character and I wouldn't mind if he got his own series in this manner similar to The Flintstones.
  • Quentin Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    This one would seem impossible to pull off, but they did it. Not only did they do it, they put Elmer Fudd in a noir style tale and made it work. Some of the other Looney Tunes characters show up, but they are presented as human. Bugs Bunny is a human murderer, Elmer Fudd is a speech impaired hitman, and Batman is well...Batman. I really can't do this one justice in a summary but this is a dark noir that was shockingly good.The back up was beyond silly, but fit in well as some lightness following This one would seem impossible to pull off, but they did it. Not only did they do it, they put Elmer Fudd in a noir style tale and made it work. Some of the other Looney Tunes characters show up, but they are presented as human. Bugs Bunny is a human murderer, Elmer Fudd is a speech impaired hitman, and Batman is well...Batman. I really can't do this one justice in a summary but this is a dark noir that was shockingly good.The back up was beyond silly, but fit in well as some lightness following the dark. Hats off to the creative team on this one.
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  • Shelby
    January 1, 1970
    4 starsThe reason why I had read this book is because one of my goodreads friends had recommended this book to me. He thought I would like it and I did like it a lot. I am not a big into all the marvel comics and super hero stuff but after reading this book then I change my mind about the marvel hero's. I never read any marvel comic books because it never had tooken my interest like this book. I thought this book was really good and it had amazing art done to the book. I am glad I had read it. I 4 starsThe reason why I had read this book is because one of my goodreads friends had recommended this book to me. He thought I would like it and I did like it a lot. I am not a big into all the marvel comics and super hero stuff but after reading this book then I change my mind about the marvel hero's. I never read any marvel comic books because it never had tooken my interest like this book. I thought this book was really good and it had amazing art done to the book. I am glad I had read it. I would recommend this book to anyone that is interested or already into the marvel comic books.
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  • Logan
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't really get it... Why was bugs bunny humanized, did I miss something?
  • Ryan Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    2019 re-read: Still amazed by how good this is.2018: Howy cwap. This is the bwest Tom King Batman stowy I've wead yet and it's a siwwy Wooney Twoons mwashup? Sewiouswy? This is honestly astoundingly good. A silly idea executed perfectly. This made me smile from the opening line to the last. The script is clever, smart, funny, touching and deeper than this silly idea deserves. This, somehow, is one of the top 5-10 individuals issues I've read in a few years. It's really that good. That's all, fol 2019 re-read: Still amazed by how good this is.2018: Howy cwap. This is the bwest Tom King Batman stowy I've wead yet and it's a siwwy Wooney Twoons mwashup? Sewiouswy? This is honestly astoundingly good. A silly idea executed perfectly. This made me smile from the opening line to the last. The script is clever, smart, funny, touching and deeper than this silly idea deserves. This, somehow, is one of the top 5-10 individuals issues I've read in a few years. It's really that good. That's all, folks.
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  • Kayıp Rıhtım
    January 1, 1970
    Crossoverlar her zaman ilginç veya güzel olmaz. Farklı kişilerin yarattığı iki farklı dünyayı alıp aynı sayfalara taşıdığınızda birbirleriyle uyuşmayan şeyler göze batarcasına parlayabiliyor. Ya da belki de bana hitap etmiyorlardır. Ancak sizlere aşık olduğum bir crossover’ı anlatmak istiyorum, Batman: Elmer Fudd!Yavasa Sezonu!Son zamanlarda Looney Tunes karakterlerini DC evreninde çokça görüyoruz. Tam olarak içinde görmüyoruz aslında, varyant kapaklardan bahsediyorum elbette. Fazlasıyla da ilgi Crossoverlar her zaman ilginç veya güzel olmaz. Farklı kişilerin yarattığı iki farklı dünyayı alıp aynı sayfalara taşıdığınızda birbirleriyle uyuşmayan şeyler göze batarcasına parlayabiliyor. Ya da belki de bana hitap etmiyorlardır. Ancak sizlere aşık olduğum bir crossover’ı anlatmak istiyorum, Batman: Elmer Fudd!Yavasa Sezonu!Son zamanlarda Looney Tunes karakterlerini DC evreninde çokça görüyoruz. Tam olarak içinde görmüyoruz aslında, varyant kapaklardan bahsediyorum elbette. Fazlasıyla da ilgi çeken bir varyant çeşidi oldular. DC ve Looney Tunes’un sahiplerinin Warner Bros. olduğu düşünüldüğünde bir yerde bu karakterlerin çatışmasını beklemeliydim.Tom King’in yazarlığını üstlendiği Batman: Elmer Fudd, kendilerinden daha eski çizgi filmleri izlemek için sabahları erkenden kalkan bir nesil için büyük bir değer taşıyor. Tom King’in Batman için harika bir yazar olduğunu düşünmüşümdür her zaman. Özellikle de kısa soluklu işlerinden her daim tatmin olmuşumdur. Aksiyon uğruna sizi olayların ortasında atmak yerine hikayelerinde Batman’in ruhsal durumu ve yaşamı üstüne yaptığı karakter gelişimleri beni etkiler. Elmer Fudd da bundan nasibini fazlasıyla almış. - Burak İpek İncelemenin tamamı için: https://kayiprihtim.com/inceleme/batm...
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  • Marc
    January 1, 1970
    We discovered (by which I mean just realized there's this great place that's been there all along) Third Eye Comics in Annapolis, MD. One of their staff was kind enough to give us recommendations and he gushed over the DC-Looney Tunes series (specifically, this one and the title where Wile E. Coyote hires Lobo the bounty hunter to kill the Road Runner). The execution is delightful and the whole thing is captured in Fudd's accent. It's like when peanut butter met chocolate (only grittier and mor We discovered (by which I mean just realized there's this great place that's been there all along) Third Eye Comics in Annapolis, MD. One of their staff was kind enough to give us recommendations and he gushed over the DC-Looney Tunes series (specifically, this one and the title where Wile E. Coyote hires Lobo the bounty hunter to kill the Road Runner). The execution is delightful and the whole thing is captured in Fudd's accent. It's like when peanut butter met chocolate (only grittier and more Dark Knightish)...
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  • Frédéric
    January 1, 1970
    Never thought I'd give 4* to a book whose title is "Batman/Elmer Fudd". No siree. Yet here I am, disconcerted for having liked this book I totally dismissed in the first place. I've been a huge fan of Lee Weeks for decades and really like most of Tom King's latest stuff but that wouldn't have been enough if not for the good reviews I'very seen here and there.So I bought it. And liked it. The plot is as basic as can be. It's the context that makes it good. King brilliantly appropriates all the no Never thought I'd give 4* to a book whose title is "Batman/Elmer Fudd". No siree. Yet here I am, disconcerted for having liked this book I totally dismissed in the first place. I've been a huge fan of Lee Weeks for decades and really like most of Tom King's latest stuff but that wouldn't have been enough if not for the good reviews I'very seen here and there.So I bought it. And liked it. The plot is as basic as can be. It's the context that makes it good. King brilliantly appropriates all the noir codes (rainy night, off monologues, seedy barroom, femme fatale, etc.) in a situation where most of the characters are humanized Looney Tunes characters and the main antagonist is Batman. It's as seriously written-with a somehow surprising level of violence- as it's seriously fun-with of course lots of references to the cartoons- and Weeks is just the guy that was needed to illustrate it.The 2nd story, illustrated by Byron Vaughns is much more innocuous, totally cartoony in style and spirit. Fun but not amazingly fun. Not a problem, the first one totally makes up for it.
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  • Octavi
    January 1, 1970
    Una puta MARVILLA! Leedlo YA! Puro Noir+Batman+Looney Tunes.
  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    This has absolutely no right to be as good as it is. And yet, it is.
  • Zach
    January 1, 1970
    Vewy vewy intestwing
  • Chris Haley
    January 1, 1970
    What a strange time to be alive.
  • Ian De Quadros
    January 1, 1970
    WAAAAAAY better than it has any right to be! My favourite DC / Looney Tunes crossover so far!
  • Kevin Frank
    January 1, 1970
    Amazeballs I couldn't believe that they'd made an Elmer Fudd / Batman crossover. But they did. And it works. Really really well.
  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Tom King has quickly proven to be one of the most proficient comic authors with an amazing run on Batman, an unprecedented take on the Vision, and, especially, an unbelievable series following Mister Miracle. However, this DC and Looney Tunes match-up shows his skill brilliantly as he takes a ridiculous concept and makes a grounded and emotionally heavy tale that will forever change how I view Elmer Fudd. This noir, murder mystery is full of easter eggs and clever nods to Looney Tunes' classics, Tom King has quickly proven to be one of the most proficient comic authors with an amazing run on Batman, an unprecedented take on the Vision, and, especially, an unbelievable series following Mister Miracle. However, this DC and Looney Tunes match-up shows his skill brilliantly as he takes a ridiculous concept and makes a grounded and emotionally heavy tale that will forever change how I view Elmer Fudd. This noir, murder mystery is full of easter eggs and clever nods to Looney Tunes' classics, but the story is full of some great beats that drive to a wonderful conclusion. Lee Weeks art is exceptional matching King's dramatic tone, and his gritty re-designs of classic anthropomorphic characters into gangster bar patrons makes for a fun who's-who on each page. However, Lovern Kindzierski's coloring takes the great art to another level washing the scenes with muddied ambers and browns fitting the narrative perfectly.The second story is a quick, funny play on the classic Looney Tunes formula that is a stark contrast to the first tale, but Tom King and artist Byron Vaughns seem to just have fun with it casting Batman as a foil to Bugs Bunny (and even comparing the famous rabbit to another clever jokester). I did not expect this single issue to be so entertaining, but it proves that no matter how unlikely, a good story can come from the most unlikely combination of ideas.
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  • Madhav
    January 1, 1970
    Ok, so here is a character famous for his scowl and here is another- a seemingly harmless comic relief from Looney Tunes, would a team up story of these two characters work? It worked. Well, the story would be anything but noir, wouldn't it? No. It would not. You can tell, this was a surprising read for me. Some of it has to do with Tom King writing, but most of it's because of Lee Weeks art being terrific. It hasn't been long since King's first comic publication, but he has already written more Ok, so here is a character famous for his scowl and here is another- a seemingly harmless comic relief from Looney Tunes, would a team up story of these two characters work? It worked. Well, the story would be anything but noir, wouldn't it? No. It would not. You can tell, this was a surprising read for me. Some of it has to do with Tom King writing, but most of it's because of Lee Weeks art being terrific. It hasn't been long since King's first comic publication, but he has already written more than a couple seminal graphic novel, and he deserves all the praise he is getting. But, the art by Lee Weeks took me by storm. If you follow comics featuring Batman, you would already know the talented artists who have rendered the character on its pages this year- David Finch, Mikel Janine, Francis Manapaul, Jock, Greg Capullo and many others. Batman comics have always had some of the most talented creators in business, but Lee Weeks Batman art is perhaps the most dynamic I have seen in years and quite possibly ever. He has expressed the motion in still frames like I haven't seen before. In conclusion- this was a gweat wead.
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  • David Caldwell
    January 1, 1970
    This is part of a seven issue crossover event that brought the Looney Tune characters into the superhero world of DC Comics. The books can be read in any order. All of the issues were listed as issue #1. All of the books have part of the story told by DC talents and the other part by Looney Tunes writers and artists.Elmer Fudd is a hitman. First, he is hunting Bugs "the Bunny" but then he sets his sights on Bruce Wayne. This is a great noir story that perfectly adapts the Looney Tunes characters This is part of a seven issue crossover event that brought the Looney Tune characters into the superhero world of DC Comics. The books can be read in any order. All of the issues were listed as issue #1. All of the books have part of the story told by DC talents and the other part by Looney Tunes writers and artists.Elmer Fudd is a hitman. First, he is hunting Bugs "the Bunny" but then he sets his sights on Bruce Wayne. This is a great noir story that perfectly adapts the Looney Tunes characters into the world of Batman.This is the best os all of the DC and Looney Tunes crossovers. The DC side of the story doesn't try to bring th Looney Tunes characters straight over into Batman's world. Instead they adapt them into human characters that fit into the noir atmosphere of the story while retaining their basic characteristics. On the Looney Tunes side, Batman is placed into the classic Rabbit season - Duck season cartoon with Duck being replaced by Bat. Very silly but fun. This is the one that is actually worth the price.
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  • Camilo Guerra
    January 1, 1970
    De esas ideas que hace un tiempo empezó a tener DC Comics, de tomas a personajes de Hanna Barbera ( Flinstoes,Scooby-Doo ) y Warner ( Bugs Bunny,Taz) no tenia muchas esperanzas, pero llegan comentarios muy buenos de todos lados y hasta el niño mimado de DC Comics Tom King se encuentra mezclado, llevando acá una historia rápida, llena de noir que homenajea a Sin City a manos llenas, nos da un Elmer Fudd que va detras de Bruce Wayne, para hacerle pagar la muerte de su amada. No cuento mas para no De esas ideas que hace un tiempo empezó a tener DC Comics, de tomas a personajes de Hanna Barbera ( Flinstoes,Scooby-Doo ) y Warner ( Bugs Bunny,Taz) no tenia muchas esperanzas, pero llegan comentarios muy buenos de todos lados y hasta el niño mimado de DC Comics Tom King se encuentra mezclado, llevando acá una historia rápida, llena de noir que homenajea a Sin City a manos llenas, nos da un Elmer Fudd que va detras de Bruce Wayne, para hacerle pagar la muerte de su amada. No cuento mas para no destripar la historia, pero los 3 arcos de la historia están ahí mismo; presentación, nudo y desenlace, tomándose su tiempo para darnos homenajes por todo lado, además con la pelea obligatoria de los crossovers, rápida y muy bien manejada, además, el arte de Lee Weeks en un nivel que lo quieres dibujando series grandes, superheroes que sean mas grandes que la vida y den golpes que te duelan verlos.
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  • Scott Cumming
    January 1, 1970
    I heard about this one through Dan Malmon on the Writer Types podcast and immediately sought it out. It was just too silly and intriguing a prospect not to.King writes it as a straight up noir narrated by Fudd lisp and all. He heads to Porky's bar where we meet the personification of the Looney Tunes characters most notably Bugs "The Bunny" who Fudd believes murdered his girlfriend. Bugs admits it, but that he did it for Bruce Wayne thus entangling The Dark Knight into the scenario.King has cert I heard about this one through Dan Malmon on the Writer Types podcast and immediately sought it out. It was just too silly and intriguing a prospect not to.King writes it as a straight up noir narrated by Fudd lisp and all. He heads to Porky's bar where we meet the personification of the Looney Tunes characters most notably Bugs "The Bunny" who Fudd believes murdered his girlfriend. Bugs admits it, but that he did it for Bruce Wayne thus entangling The Dark Knight into the scenario.King has certainly set himself up well as the latest comics superstar with his Vision run also earning plaudits. This book shows someone thinking outside the book to deliver the best he can no matter how ridiculous the premise handed out.
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  • Joe Bogue
    January 1, 1970
    Out of all the DC/Hanna Barbara crossover specials, I think this is the best one. It is certainty my favorite out of all these crossover specials. The Noir setting and art set the tone for this story from the first page. My favorite part was seeing the Hanna Barbara characters drawn as humans. Noir fiction is one of the best elements suited to Batman and Tom King uses this to his full advantage. King's take on the Hanna Barbara characters allow them to rise above only being zany comic figures. I Out of all the DC/Hanna Barbara crossover specials, I think this is the best one. It is certainty my favorite out of all these crossover specials. The Noir setting and art set the tone for this story from the first page. My favorite part was seeing the Hanna Barbara characters drawn as humans. Noir fiction is one of the best elements suited to Batman and Tom King uses this to his full advantage. King's take on the Hanna Barbara characters allow them to rise above only being zany comic figures. In this special King has really created something unique and fun. This story elevates the characters and gives the reader an entertaining experience.
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  • David Turko
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my goodness. If you told me years ago that I would love a cross over between Elmer Fudd and Batman I would've said your crazy. Whelp I guess I'm crazy. This is a noir story through and through. And it's way better than it has any right to be. I don't want to go into the plot because its surprisingly full of twists and turns for one issue. The art was also a stand out. It was grimy and dark and it had the perfect blend of shadowing that made me feel like I was in Gotham. Finally seeing the Loo Oh my goodness. If you told me years ago that I would love a cross over between Elmer Fudd and Batman I would've said your crazy. Whelp I guess I'm crazy. This is a noir story through and through. And it's way better than it has any right to be. I don't want to go into the plot because its surprisingly full of twists and turns for one issue. The art was also a stand out. It was grimy and dark and it had the perfect blend of shadowing that made me feel like I was in Gotham. Finally seeing the Looney Tune cast as Gotham criminals was fantastic. A must read issue for not only batman fans but for Noir fans as well. Its goofy and silly yet at the same time I couldn't put this down. Incredible.
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  • James Rodrigues
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think I've read a more perfect composition of two separate worlds. Tom King once more turns whatever he touches to gold, as the Looney Tunes are brought to life in a fascinating noir tale set in the Batman universe. A gripping and enticing tale that makes Elmer Fudd more than a match for the Caped Crusader, in such a believable manner. Then there's the back-up tale, where Batman visits the Looney Tunes world, which proves hilarious. One of the years best comics.
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  • Victor Catano
    January 1, 1970
    The team up you didn't know you wantedWhen I heard of DC's plan to make a series of crossover issues that combined their iconic superheroes with Warner Brothers cartoon characters I was...skeptical. But then I read this noir reimagining of Elmer Fudd as a gun for hire. Be vewy qwiet. He's hunting Batman, all because of getting crossed by a dame. This has some excellent action scenes and sharp, hard boiled dialogue. Check this one out.
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  • Nathan Olson
    January 1, 1970
    As crazy as this idea was to combine looney toons with Batman it sure paid off, the storyline and art are outstanding for a one issue crossover. I never thought I would want to see a darker take on looney toons characters but after reading this treasure I do hope that they do more comics of this nature. If you are a looney toons fan, Batman fan or both I think you will find a bit of happiness in this comic.I give it 5/5 wabbits 🐰🐰🐰🐰🐰
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