The Mayflower Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower #1)
A New Series Begins for Lovers of History, Adventure, Romance, and Ancestry A brand new series for fans of all things related to history, romance, adventure, faith, and family trees. Mary Chapman boards the Speedwell in 1620 as a Separatist seeking a better life in the New World. William Lytton embarks on the Mayflower as a carpenter looking for opportunities to succeed—and he may have found one when a man from the Virginia Company offers William a hefty sum to keep a stealth eye on company interests in the new colony. The season is far too late for good sailing and storms rage, but reaching land is no better as food is scarce and the people are weak. Will Mary survive to face the spring planting and unknown natives? Will William be branded a traitor and expelled? Join the adventure as the Daughters of the Mayflower series begins with The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse.  More to come in the Daughters of the Mayflower series:The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo - set 1725 New Orleans (coming April 2018)The Captured Bride by Michelle Griep - set 1760 during the French and Indian War (coming June 2018)

The Mayflower Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower #1) Details

TitleThe Mayflower Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower #1)
Author
ReleaseFeb 1st, 2018
PublisherBarbour Books
ISBN-139781683224198
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Christian, Romance

The Mayflower Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower #1) Review

  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Preliminary thoughts:I liked Mary and William as characters and enjoyed the descriptions of what they faced on the Speedwell and the Mayflower. Jarring historical errors:—Pneumonia: Not only were the symptoms and treatment and the statistics of fatality off, pneumonia wasn’t even discovered and named until 1881—Washing one’s mouth out with soap as a treatment of swearing: First, there wasn’t bar soap as we know it. Most soap was “brown soap,” with lye sourced from ash, which doesn’t fully harden Preliminary thoughts:I liked Mary and William as characters and enjoyed the descriptions of what they faced on the Speedwell and the Mayflower. Jarring historical errors:—Pneumonia: Not only were the symptoms and treatment and the statistics of fatality off, pneumonia wasn’t even discovered and named until 1881—Washing one’s mouth out with soap as a treatment of swearing: First, there wasn’t bar soap as we know it. Most soap was “brown soap,” with lye sourced from ash, which doesn’t fully harden. Further, the earliest instance of using soap to wash out one’s mouth as a punishment was in 1832.Format choices: I get that she wanted to stay as close to Biblical quotes as possible, and included the ampersands for “and” in the quotes, but it was extra-distracting to try to interpret symbols instead of a simple word during character conversations.
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  • Jocelyn Green
    January 1, 1970
    A marvelous feat. Through The Mayflower Bride, Kimberley Woodhouse has woven a tender tale of love and endurance through a rich historical tapestry. The momentous voyage and landing takes on new depths of meaning through every carefully crafted page. What an inspiring tribute to the hope that filled those men and women’s sails, and to the courage that buoyed them through their storms.
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  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    The lovely cover is what drew me first to this novel. Then when I saw it was a series starting with the crossing of the Mayflower, be still my historical loving heart!The author does a fabulous job of setting up the story in the introductory comments to the reader. Likewise, the afterward provides additional details about what was Fiction and which parts were fact in the afterward. I especially loved reading about some famous descendants from those that sailed and survived the crossing of the Ma The lovely cover is what drew me first to this novel. Then when I saw it was a series starting with the crossing of the Mayflower, be still my historical loving heart!The author does a fabulous job of setting up the story in the introductory comments to the reader. Likewise, the afterward provides additional details about what was Fiction and which parts were fact in the afterward. I especially loved reading about some famous descendants from those that sailed and survived the crossing of the Mayflower.I think it was the introductory comments to the reader that set my expectations high for the level of historical detail about to unfold in the pages. While the novel included historical details about the time, this could have been enhanced. I did feel the despair the passengers must have felt so the mood was established by the author. Overall, it was a good story. One of my favorite parts of reading historical fiction is learning something new. I absolutely learned a few new things from The Mayflower Bride and for that I come away from my time spent reading this novel gratified.My gratitude to the publisher Barbour Books for a complimentary NetGalley copy of the novel. The opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Kellyn Roth
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsOriginal Review:That was a great book! Made me remember how much I love about the Mayflower story. It was extremely well-researched, which I appreciated because I apparently know everything about the Mayflower. (That awkward moment when you suddenly realize you know everything about a historic event and you had no idea?)Also, finishing it on Thanksgiving was picture-perfect because it reminds me of Thanksgiving even though the first Thanksgiving never actually happened on-page.Actual Re 4.5 starsOriginal Review:That was a great book! Made me remember how much I love about the Mayflower story. It was extremely well-researched, which I appreciated because I apparently know everything about the Mayflower. (That awkward moment when you suddenly realize you know everything about a historic event and you had no idea?)Also, finishing it on Thanksgiving was picture-perfect because it reminds me of Thanksgiving even though the first Thanksgiving never actually happened on-page.Actual Review:(Read the review with original formatting here.)Title: The Mayflower BrideAuthor: Kimberly WoodhouseSeries: Daughters of the Mayflower, #1Genre: Historical/Christian RomanceEra: 1620s (Pilgrims)Setting: England and then New England, 1620Publisher: Barbour BooksSource: from NetGalley (in exchange for honest review)Time Taken to Read: seven days (during NaNoWriMo, too!)Overall Rating: 4.5/5 starsThis novel is a lovely read about the Pilgrims of Plymouth. I enjoyed it quite thoroughly and would definitely recommend it to anyone interested in this era.It was so much fun to read it in the days leading up to Thanksgiving even though the first Thanksgiving didn’t happen on-page. Got me in the stuff-myself-to-death mood with all the starvation and what-not. *shudders*It was a light, clean historical romance read – though the romance thread wasn’t too heavy. Not the best I’ve ever read … but quite sweet.PLOT: 4/5At times, it did seem like it just wouldn’t get to the point. It was always quite interesting, and I never was exactly bored, but still. I kept waiting and waiting for something to happen out of the ordinary going-to-Plymouth of history (lol) … and it was forever until something did!I also take issue with the title. What bride? She was no longer on the Mayflower, per se, by the time she became a bride – at the very, very end of the book. This book should be The Mayflower Single Girl. ;)None of this is to say that I didn’t enjoy the book! It’s just easier to list the negatives than the positives. It was a really good book, and I’m happy to have read it.CHARACTERS: 5/5All very well-done! I liked them a lot, and they all seemed well-developed. The author plainly took time to create them all individually.There were quite a few characters, but it was never confusing. Don’t let that long list at the beginning deter you! They were all individualistic. I loved the way they all got along together and cooperated on the Mayflower and then when they finally arrived at Plymouth.Mary was a sweet, brave girl. I just want to give her a hug! Poor angel … she had to bear so much in her life. I really got to understand her feelings and thoughts as the book progressed. It was like being right there with her!William was also cool. I mean, he wasn’t exactly swoon-worthy, but he was still a neat, upstanding guy. It was cool to see him grow close to Christ. His backstory was so sad, poor baby. *gives him lots of chocolate*SETTING: 5/5Very well done! I was surprised by the depth of the research. I know a lot about this era and these people (got a little obsessed when I was younger – or rather my mom did, haha), and I was deeply impressed.A fellow reviewer has mentioned some historical errors. The first is that pneumonia was not diagnosed until the late 1800s (this article contains more details) and the second that washing a person’s mouth out with soup as a punishment for swearing wasn’t used until later.But … honestly, I didn’t even notice – nor do I care – and it didn’t decrease my enjoyment one whit. Still, if you’re a super history buff, I guess that’s something to think about.WRITING: 4/5I really appreciate that the author chose to use slightly more modern speech. I love Shakespeare as much as the next gal, but I don’t want to have to unravel what people are saying when I’m reading a just-for-fun novel!Still, it definitely wasn’t too modern. Modern enough to be understood – but not slangy or full of contemporary terms.The book was fairly well-written overall. There was a time or two when I thought sentences could have been improved upon, but these were few and far-between and more a matter of personal preference than anything. *is a writer who edits peoples’ books in my head* *shrugs*CONTENT: 1/5Language: n/aViolence: people fear that the local Indian tribe may attackSexual: brief mentions of childbirth and pregnancyOther: passengers on the Mayflower are ill a great deal and many die, lots of hungerSqueaky clean! Probably 13+ for reading level, but no objectionable content.OVERALL: 4.5/5I really did love this book! I haven’t delved in the Pilgrims’ lives in forever, and I was so glad to have the opportunity to do so again! Definitely a book I’d recommend to anyone interested in or studying this era or simply historical romance/adventure readers looking for their next novel.~Kellyn Roth, Reveries Reviews
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  • Julie Carpenter
    January 1, 1970
    I've often wondered what it would be like to live during some of the more famous events from history. Not that I necessarily want to live during some of those events but just wondering about the people who did live during those events. I have several ancestors who have been in some amazing parts of history, reading some of the stories that have been kept about those events have been neat. One of my favorite movies is based on the book, North and South. In it Margaret goes to the Great Exhibition I've often wondered what it would be like to live during some of the more famous events from history. Not that I necessarily want to live during some of those events but just wondering about the people who did live during those events. I have several ancestors who have been in some amazing parts of history, reading some of the stories that have been kept about those events have been neat. One of my favorite movies is based on the book, North and South. In it Margaret goes to the Great Exhibition in London to see all the wonders of the world. I always love that scene because I have an ancestor who lived at that time who walked several miles to visit her grandmother. Her grandmother wanted the granddaughter to stay and go see the exhibition, and especially the first steam powered locomotive. My ancestor talked about how they laid tracks down on the street to watch this train engine work. To think about how much of an advance that was for them but to us it seems small due to all that we have and see in our lives today.The first printing press, the first airplane, the first lightbulb. Columbus sailing off to find a new world. Pilgrims leaving behind all they knew to find religious freedom in a land unknown and undeveloped. The fears they might have had. The excitement. The stress. The joy. All of it building as they sold their possessions and chartered ships and land agreements and worked towards that day arriving and setting sail into the vast and open ocean. The unexpected (or maybe expected and anticipated) casualties and sorrows. The sickness. The change in plans. The weather. All that they had to encounter to go from point A to point B and being those early pioneers(yes they were called pilgrims but I use the word pioneer because they were pioneering the way) to help bring about change. This book opens with two dear friends, Mary Elizabeth (our main female character) and Dorothy, eavesdropping on the meeting of the elders to discuss leaving for this new land and who would go with the initial group. Dorothy is full of excitement and adventure and is practically bouncing off the walls with anticipation when she first hears the plan. Mary Elizabeth? Not so much. She is reserved, scared, fearful of what's to come, fearful to leave behind her life and fearful of how her family will survive. She's already lost her mother to illness, her father is still mourning her and has not been himself since her passing. Mary Elizabeth is unsure about the path that lies before her. But drawing from her deep beliefs that God will direct her path as she puts her faith and trust in him, she moves forward in preparing for her journey.Our main male character then comes on the scene in his own story. He is in a different part of Europe than Mary Elizabeth and has had his own struggles in life. He is joining the group bound for the new world as a master carpenter and is happy to not look back on his dear old mother land. Life has not been anything marvelous and wonderful for him. Being orphaned young, ignored and unwanted by family, living on the streets for years until finally a kind man rescues him and teaches him the skills of a carpenter. His rescuer dies after encouraging William to join this group and find a better life.These two characters' lives collide as they start their adventure on the two ships bound for America. The love story between them is sweet and tender and very befitting a Separatist's life. It's not easy or necessarily pleasant at some points but it was very sweet. They help strengthen each other with all the trials and sorrows that come their way on this journey.I think a good way to describe this book is to connect it to its subject matter. The Separatists group. Nothing flashy and glamorous. Not anything fast paced and big. But slow and steady (I mean that in a good way, not degrading). The pacing of the book is constant, but it isn't fast. There are moments of peril and many, many moments depicting struggles and trials that were faced by this group. The author did a great job in her research of this group and compiling it all into her novel. Each chapter has a date in the voyage so we see the time frame of the voyage and of how long certain events or sicknesses lasted. There are many, many characters within this book that she pulled from actual people who were on the voyage. At first when I was reading the list of characters at the beginning of the book, my head spun a little bit. I wasn't sure if I was going to be able to keep them all straight or not. Honestly, there are a lot. But I took a deep breath and decided that at least I had a reference chart to look back at if I couldn't remember who was who. But guess what? I didn't need it. The way they were presented was done in a way that me, with my spinning head, was able to keep them all straight and I didn't feel overwhelmed once with who was who. Most of those listed were just minor characters but the author shows us who they are at the beginning in a glossary of characters. So don't fret if you see the big list and think, like me, how you're going to keep them straight.There were moments that I skimmed. Ok, maybe I should explain something. I'm a very fast reader. Usually I read each and every word. But when I skim through sections I'm still taking in everything that is happening. So my skimming is not quite the same skimming as other readers. Does that make sense? If not, no worries. Maybe speed reading sections might be a better way to say that. I don't know. But some parts were a little slower paced that I needed to move along the story otherwise my super exhausted brain was going to fall asleep. Not because of the book, but because of everything going on in my life that keeps me very busy and going full speed right now. The writing was well done. The style and characterization fit very nicely with the time period and the group of people being written about. I think any reader who loves history, especially this time period or subject matter, will give this book 5 stars or more because it is done well. I enjoyed it but there are only so many times I can read about sickness after sickness, and struggle after struggle, and not feel completely wowed by the book. But this book is about the group on the Mayflower so I know why it was included. There's peril in the form of a bad guy. He's angry and feels slighted so he's out to cause problems and gain back what he feels should be his. So watch out for him. Hell hath no fury like a woman, um scratch that cause it's a man in this case...Hell hath no fury like a man scorned. Ok, maybe not quite the best reference for the bad guy here because all said and done he really wasn't super scary or horrible. But, he did fit in great with the rest of the feel and pacing of the book. So kudos to the author for keeping it all connected that way. Overall it was a great depiction of this time and group of people. Their trials, their beliefs, their having to sacrifice and say goodbye to home, friends and family. There is a lot of depiction of death and storms on the seas, tragedies but some happiness too. If you're looking for a good historical read this is one that I would recommend picking up. I know many will really enjoy it. It is a Christian fiction genre book. I think that those who love that genre will really love this book and if you're not usually one to read Christian fiction because of the fear that it might be preachy but you love historical novels, I will say this to you...try it. Go into the book with the knowledge that it is about a group of people who were seeking for religious freedom. It is very historical and it does have a lot of talk about God and their beliefs but remember that was who these people were and why they were sailing on the Mayflower, crossing the ocean to find a new home. It's not preachy but it's who they were and what they lived. Just a little thought for you. If you still aren't interested, no worries. I am looking forward to the other books in this series. I've not read anything else by this author but did notice that she wrote one of the other books in this series. I'm looking forward to reading that book by her as well to see how I like it and her writing style with a little bit different time period. Each book moves forward in time just a little bit.Content: Clean. I think I've pretty much touched on everything that should be listed in the content section throughout my review. But for anyone who just jumped to the bottom to see if I listed content, here you go. Moments of peril due to storms on the sea, sickness, death from sickness, but nothing graphic. Some mild religious talk but that is due to the Separatist group that the story is about, I wouldn't say that it is preachy.I received a copy from the publisher, Barbour Books, via NetGalley. All thoughts and opinions in the review are my own.Happy Reading!!!This book doesn't come out until February 1st if you start looking for it now.
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    An expertly researched look into a time period rarely explored in CBA fiction and the worthy first bookend to Barbour's new (and ambitious) span through American history.No one can doubt the author's research nor the attention to detail. I, did, however think there were some limitations in the pairing of historical authenticity with the dialogue and world created. I must, however, assume that this was to create a sense of accessibility for the modern reader while sparking their interest into a l An expertly researched look into a time period rarely explored in CBA fiction and the worthy first bookend to Barbour's new (and ambitious) span through American history.No one can doubt the author's research nor the attention to detail. I, did, however think there were some limitations in the pairing of historical authenticity with the dialogue and world created. I must, however, assume that this was to create a sense of accessibility for the modern reader while sparking their interest into a little-explored tenet of American history.The lack of a rating star wise from me is not a detriment, it is more that I am not quite sure HOW to rate it. I thought for a long time from reader to personal perspective and decided just to let everyone check this one out on their own :-)Definitely woven by a talented and competent voice. Review copy provided by netgalley.
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  • Dana Michael
    January 1, 1970
    I love history. This book was filled with actual hisrtorical events and it is fascinating. This author did her research. I can't even imagine being on the Mayflower and experiencing all the hardships that they endured. These pilgrims were Faith filled people and knew God had called them to this new land. The story uses fictional characters as for the hero and heroine and the romance was so sweet. What I loved the most besides the history and romance was the inspirational message throughout the b I love history. This book was filled with actual hisrtorical events and it is fascinating. This author did her research. I can't even imagine being on the Mayflower and experiencing all the hardships that they endured. These pilgrims were Faith filled people and knew God had called them to this new land. The story uses fictional characters as for the hero and heroine and the romance was so sweet. What I loved the most besides the history and romance was the inspirational message throughout the book.*I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest opinion
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  • Yvette
    January 1, 1970
    Faith, hunger, hardship, sickness, loss, and grief are strong threads through this story, though they failed to engage me as a reader. The mixing of the fictional leads, however, with the historical figures was well done. I found I quite liked the portrayals of Miles Standish, John Alden, and especially Priscilla Mullins. The fictional characters did not fare so well and I found I had little sympathy or liking for them.As a draft, this would be fine, though in need of some work to give the story Faith, hunger, hardship, sickness, loss, and grief are strong threads through this story, though they failed to engage me as a reader. The mixing of the fictional leads, however, with the historical figures was well done. I found I quite liked the portrayals of Miles Standish, John Alden, and especially Priscilla Mullins. The fictional characters did not fare so well and I found I had little sympathy or liking for them.As a draft, this would be fine, though in need of some work to give the story a good flow, enrich the descriptions, provide stronger motivations and make the dialogue more natural while making it have more of a feel for the actual speech, values, and behavior of the times. The author herself notes that she chose not to use language like 'thee' and 'thou' to make it more readable, and that does sometimes benefit the modern reader, but there seems to have also been a loss of authenticity in the dialogue as well as the story. 2.5 stars. Rather than transporting me to the 1600's, this story brought fourth grade social studies units to mind. If you are interested in this series, as I am, then this is worth a quick read as it is the foundational novel in a linked series. My thanks to Barbour Books for allowing me to read an e-galley through NetGalley. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Missy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from NetGalley and Barbour Publishing, and thank you Kimberly Woodhouse for writing it. My goodness the perils the first colonists endured to get religious freedom. Which in turn caused me to not want to put this book down. The story is about Mary Elizabeth Chapman, her brother, and father,. It also follows the lives of her best friend Dorothy, and William Lytton - a carpenter on the Mayflower. The ships encounter setbacks, illness, and terrible seas. But through it all Mary I received this book from NetGalley and Barbour Publishing, and thank you Kimberly Woodhouse for writing it. My goodness the perils the first colonists endured to get religious freedom. Which in turn caused me to not want to put this book down. The story is about Mary Elizabeth Chapman, her brother, and father,. It also follows the lives of her best friend Dorothy, and William Lytton - a carpenter on the Mayflower. The ships encounter setbacks, illness, and terrible seas. But through it all Mary Elizabeth and William find friendship and then love. Departing so late put the Mayflower arriving in the New World later than expected. It also put them in line with terrible storms which cause horrible seasickness -- to which Mary Elizabeth and Dorothy cared for the settlers. Once they reached the New World is when Mary Elizabeth faced her biggest tribulations. But in the end her faith, love for others and William get her through, to which she is truly happy.This book was very good, you could tell the author did a lot of research into the events of the crossing of the Mayflower and its passengers. The things they encountered on their travels over were so much more than I could ever imagine. I would highly recommend this book to other readers. Now on to the next book.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    "We are persecuted, but not forsaken; cast downe, but we perish not."After reading this book about the 'Separatists'--the group we commonly call the Pilgrims--I find myself very thankful, like Mary Elizabeth, for all the seemingly small things that I take for granted. Clean water, fresh fruit and vegetables, a warm house, and clean clothes. This group was amazing in their zeal for worshipping God as they believed from their Bible study, leaving everything (more than once) to live according to th "We are persecuted, but not forsaken; cast downe, but we perish not."After reading this book about the 'Separatists'--the group we commonly call the Pilgrims--I find myself very thankful, like Mary Elizabeth, for all the seemingly small things that I take for granted. Clean water, fresh fruit and vegetables, a warm house, and clean clothes. This group was amazing in their zeal for worshipping God as they believed from their Bible study, leaving everything (more than once) to live according to their faith, and traveling to a new land. Endurance and faithfulness were key themes, also trust, grace and hope as they suffered tremendous hardship and loss.The author does a good job of mingling fictional characters with historical ones, recreating the journey of extreme hardship and ultimate loss. It was easy to imagine what it must have been like on the journey. The growing faith of William and Mary Elizabeth was inspiring, and encouraging. William was my favorite character. Honorable, hardworking, hoping for a fresh start in a new land. His relationship with Mary Elizabeth was tender and sweet. I liked how she went from a timid, insecure young woman, to a stronger, caring, outgoing individual as she helped others, believing that "...I can do all things through Christ who strengtheneth me."Recommend to readers who enjoy historical Christian fiction based on real events, with a squeaky clean romance. This would be a good read for teens. 3.5 stars(An e-book was provided by NetGalley and Barbour Publishing. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Trisha Robertson (Joy of Reading)
    January 1, 1970
    See full review at: https://joyofreadingweb.wordpress.com... The characters will take a hold of your heart, in this deeply poignant story. I was glued to the pages of this story, even though I know the history of the Mayflower, and have read journal accounts of those on board. Kimberley Woodhouse breathes new life into the history of not only the Mayflower but also the beginnings of what would become the United States of America.This eloquent story gives readers an intimate look at what life was See full review at: https://joyofreadingweb.wordpress.com... The characters will take a hold of your heart, in this deeply poignant story. I was glued to the pages of this story, even though I know the history of the Mayflower, and have read journal accounts of those on board. Kimberley Woodhouse breathes new life into the history of not only the Mayflower but also the beginnings of what would become the United States of America.This eloquent story gives readers an intimate look at what life was truly like on the Mayflower. The strength of character that is required to embark on a dangerous ocean crossing. No cozy private cabin, only a gun deck shared by strangers and littered with supplies. You won’t find bathrooms, the only privacy provided is a sheet separating your family from the next. No sturdy beds, or even straw mattress, just the blanket you brought (you did pack a blanket, I hope!), and the hard wood-plank floor beneath you.Come travel across an ocean with the brave colonists on the Mayflower. With little more than the clothes on their backs, into a wild untamed wilderness. Into a vast unknown land fraught with dangers. There wasn’t a sturdy home, and stores filled with supplies on the other side of the voyage. Uncharted land welcomes them to the New World. Mature forests, thick with vegetation, there are no roads or signs to mark the way. It’s the end of fall and the beginning of winter. Will the dwindling supplies hold out until the gardens can be planted and start producing?With a faith in God, and a desire to bring their families out of the persecution of the Church of England and to a New World where they can openly worship and follow the Bible. The brave Separatists embark on the journey of a lifetime.I appreciated the strong threads of faith seamlessly woven throughout. I genuinely enjoyed reading this story and I’m eagerly anticipating the stories to follow! I give this story 4.5 stars and encourage you to pick up a copy or request it from your local library. You are sure to not only enjoy yourself, but learn something along the way!(I receive complimentary books for review from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including Netgalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own.)
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    As a Mayflower descendant I am wicked stoked for this new series!
  • Wanda Maynard
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading about history, and this story opens with a bang! Historical novels just make my day, especially when I can read about these wonderful characters from the past, and especially about our new world and how it all began, and how they seemed to come to life before my very eyes. Even if some of them are fictional, they seemed so real to me. This story of faith, along with fear of the unknown gripped these people, and tore their world apart as they raced to a new world through a new adve I love reading about history, and this story opens with a bang! Historical novels just make my day, especially when I can read about these wonderful characters from the past, and especially about our new world and how it all began, and how they seemed to come to life before my very eyes. Even if some of them are fictional, they seemed so real to me. This story of faith, along with fear of the unknown gripped these people, and tore their world apart as they raced to a new world through a new adventure. What a struggle these people had to go through! Their trials and suffering just to survive! But what will the future hold for them? Will they make it safely to their new home, or will most of them perish? Amazing story! THE MAYFLOWER BRIDE: DAUGHTERS OF THE MAYFLOWER by Kemberley Woodhouse overwhelmed this reader as emotions swept over and through me. I cried with them through their sorrows. I laughed along with them through their joy and happiness. Dorothy, Mary Elizabeth's best friend seemed excited about going on a new adventure and traveling to a new world, but Mary Elizabeth seemed more surprised about what was going on around her. The whole ordeal made her nervous with fear and doubt to think that she would be leaving everything she knew behind, so much so she started to cry. In this wonderful never-ending plot, would Mary Elizabeth, being a worrier, be able to leave everything and travel to a new and unexplored place? If not, what would she do? As the Speedwell rocked over the ocean carrying Mary Elizabeth to her new home, the author's skills showed this reader the hardships and sadness she had to deal with. Would she be able to step foot on new ground, or because of the fears she is having to face, will she have to try to find a way back to Holland? Another lonely person on this voyage, leaving a lonely world behind was William Lytton. Will their paths cross? If so, will someone or something come between them? Only the reader will know for sure. A must read!I want to thank Bookish First, Barbour Publishing, and the author for the opportunity to read this great work of art.
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  • Kristi
    January 1, 1970
    I know a book is good when I read half of it in one sitting. This is what happened when I sat down to begin The Mayflower Bride. The story was captivating and soon had me swept away into the world of Mary Elizabeth Chapman and her experience on the Mayflower and in the New World.I liked the mixture of fictional characters and historical figures. It lent a believability to the story and made it interesting. The author lets the reader know at the beginning of the book that there is a mixture so th I know a book is good when I read half of it in one sitting. This is what happened when I sat down to begin The Mayflower Bride. The story was captivating and soon had me swept away into the world of Mary Elizabeth Chapman and her experience on the Mayflower and in the New World.I liked the mixture of fictional characters and historical figures. It lent a believability to the story and made it interesting. The author lets the reader know at the beginning of the book that there is a mixture so the reader doesn't have to guess who is real and who isn't. All the characters soon seemed real to me and it was easy to have empathy for them as they made a not-so-pleasant journey to a new life. I liked Mary Elizabeth and William and really enjoyed reading the natural progression of their relationship. I also enjoyed Mary and Dorothy's friendship and how they were always there for each other and were almost like sisters.One of my favorite things about this book though was the character development. These characters change and grow throughout the story and the author did an excellent job of expressing these changes. Mary goes from a girl to a young woman who is much stronger than she ever thought she was. Watching this occur was an enjoyable part of the story for me. I like this author's writing style and her way of describing events that made me feel as if I were there with the characters experiencing everything along with them. The story has a good pace to it and I didn't find any parts to be boring. I'm glad that she didn't use the language of the day and bog down the story with a lot of "thee's and thou's". (She explains at the beginning of the book she wrote it in modern day language and that we could thank her later so her is her thank you from me.)This was a really well-written book about a time in history that I don't see much about in books. This is a book with characters that I won't soon be forgetting. I'll definitely be adding this author to my must-read list.I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher and was not obligated to write a review. All opinions are mine.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, the cover of this book is beautiful. I was also very intrigued by the premise…the story follows Mary Chapman, who is travelling to the New World from Holland. I have never read a book about this time period so I was looking forward to this story.The author does a great job at capturing the emotions that the Mayflower passengers experienced during their long journey. The story really made me reflect on the apprehension and fear that these people felt.The story includes both fictiona First of all, the cover of this book is beautiful. I was also very intrigued by the premise…the story follows Mary Chapman, who is travelling to the New World from Holland. I have never read a book about this time period so I was looking forward to this story.The author does a great job at capturing the emotions that the Mayflower passengers experienced during their long journey. The story really made me reflect on the apprehension and fear that these people felt.The story includes both fictional characters and true passengers from the Mayflower. I learned a lot about the voyage and enjoyed the atmospheric quality of the story. I could easily picture the sights and smells that the author so vividly described throughout the story.At times I felt that the story was a bit slow moving but overall it was very interesting and atmospheric. I will definitely pick up the other books in the series.My Rating: 3 starsI received this book from the publisher to review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Kay
    January 1, 1970
    .Kimberley Woodhouse has written a heartbreakingly beautiful, yet realistic story of the life happenings onboard the Mayflower as it traveled to the New World. During all the struggles, deaths and sickness, but not losing sight that God was with them.I truly wait in anticipation for the next Mayflower Bride book!This is definitely a Five Star + book.
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  • Donita Corman
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this historical fiction book on the Mayflower era. Full of rich history it was a fast read. Tear jerking at times reading the trials they endured but also endearing as we read Mary and Williams love story . I received a copy of thus from Barbour House and under no obligation to post a review
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  • Susan Snodgrass
    January 1, 1970
    Mary Chapman boards the Speedwell in 1620 as a Separatist seeking a better life in the New World. William Lytton embarks on the Mayflower as a carpenter looking for opportunities to succeed—and he may have found one when a man from the Virginia Company offers William a hefty sum to keep a stealth eye on company interests in the new colony. The season is far too late for good sailing and storms rage, but reaching land is no better as food is scarce and the people are weak. Will Mary survive to fa Mary Chapman boards the Speedwell in 1620 as a Separatist seeking a better life in the New World. William Lytton embarks on the Mayflower as a carpenter looking for opportunities to succeed—and he may have found one when a man from the Virginia Company offers William a hefty sum to keep a stealth eye on company interests in the new colony. The season is far too late for good sailing and storms rage, but reaching land is no better as food is scarce and the people are weak. Will Mary survive to face the spring planting and unknown natives? Will William be branded a traitor and expelled?If you love history and are fascinated with true to life stories, here's a book for you. Well written and populated with more than a few real life characters, Woodhouse has done fine job giving her readers a glimpse into and onto the Mayflower as she makes her way to the New World. A must read for history buffs.*My thanks to the publisher for a preview copy of this book. My opinion is my own.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I am very excited for this series. I love the idea of a multi-generational saga covering the important historical events in the United States. And I loved that it started with the Mayflower because there are not enough books about the Pilgrims. Having said that, this is the first novel I have read by Kimberley Woodhouse. And while the historical details were fascinating and seemed accurate, I felt that I was being told the story. I never lost myself in the story and never forgot I was reading a I am very excited for this series. I love the idea of a multi-generational saga covering the important historical events in the United States. And I loved that it started with the Mayflower because there are not enough books about the Pilgrims. Having said that, this is the first novel I have read by Kimberley Woodhouse. And while the historical details were fascinating and seemed accurate, I felt that I was being told the story. I never lost myself in the story and never forgot I was reading a book. I am looking forward to the rest of this series and to seeing what other authors and events I discover. Thanks to Netgalley and Publishers for an advanced copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Regina
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book in a new series by Barbour. I had high hopes for this first book. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying it was horrible but it lacked firepower. Mary Elizabeth and her family leave everything they know behind to sail to the New World. Mary Elizabeth hates leaving her mothers grave. While sailing on the Speedwell, the Saints go through many trials. They eventually join the Mayflower. Again, they go through many trials but their faith remains strong. William Lytton is a carpent This is the first book in a new series by Barbour. I had high hopes for this first book. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying it was horrible but it lacked firepower. Mary Elizabeth and her family leave everything they know behind to sail to the New World. Mary Elizabeth hates leaving her mothers grave. While sailing on the Speedwell, the Saints go through many trials. They eventually join the Mayflower. Again, they go through many trials but their faith remains strong. William Lytton is a carpenter seeking to make a new start in the New World. Both Mary Elizabeth and William discover more to life, themselves and God as they make their way to a new life in the New World. Disclosure statement:I receive complimentary books for review from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including Netgalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.
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  • Sarah Bowe
    January 1, 1970
    From the title you know it's about the Mayflower. How hard and tragic that crossing was! I really enjoyed how William and Mary's relationship developed in sore of such loss for her. I loved her brother. Such a young boy going through grown up aches.*Thanks to NetGalley for letting me read the ARC*
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    The Mayflower Bride is the beginning of the new series, Daughters of the Mayflower. I thought it was a great start to this series and look forward to the others when they release. I give this one 4 stars.
  • Kelly Tyree
    January 1, 1970
    The Mayflower Bride is a book that takes you into the journey of the Separatists to Virginia in 1620. The story is told from the viewpoint of Mary Elizabeth Chapman, her young brother, and William Lytton, a carpenter. Mary Elizabeth has lost her mother and now she, her younger brother and her father are going to board the Speedwell and head to the America. Mary Elizabeth gains courage to take the trip from the Lord and from her best friend who is also making the trip. But the Speedwell begins to The Mayflower Bride is a book that takes you into the journey of the Separatists to Virginia in 1620. The story is told from the viewpoint of Mary Elizabeth Chapman, her young brother, and William Lytton, a carpenter. Mary Elizabeth has lost her mother and now she, her younger brother and her father are going to board the Speedwell and head to the America. Mary Elizabeth gains courage to take the trip from the Lord and from her best friend who is also making the trip. But the Speedwell begins to have trouble with repeated leaks and despite several attempts to fix the ship, they find themselves boarding the Mayflower to make the long trip. The conditions in the Mayflower are overcrowded and the trip is plagued with bad weather and rough seas. Before long sickness sets in and one by one passengers become very ill. Mary Elizabeth finds herself taking care of the sick and meeting the needs of her fellow passengers on the ship. David, Mary Elizabeth's younger brother, also tends to the sick. He does what ever is asked of him and some of those duties are not pleasant yet he does it any way. The strong faith in God that the Separatist have helps them to endure the long and unpleasant trip. William Lytton is a carpenter that is hoping for a new life in the Virginia. He is a former orphan who lost his caregiver recently. But during the trip to the Virginia, William finds two things: faith in God and a bride. He meets Mary Elizabeth and the two are instantly smitten with one another. As William grows in his relationship with God, he accepts the ways of the Separatists. As passengers begin to die, William finds himself comforting Mary Elizabeth. He forms a relationship with Mr. Chapman and makes promises to him. As the passengers begin to succumb to illness and die, faith is all that get them through. As they approach land, the find they are further north than they anticipated. They begin the task of writing a charter, finding acceptable land and then building homes for the passengers. The Mayflower Bride really takes you into the journey of 1620 and how challenging it was for the Separatist to settle in Plimouth. I really enjoyed the book and found it to be very well written. There is underlying drama that comes to light in the later part of the book and that adds an interesting element to the story.
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  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book in the new daughters of the Mayflower series. In beginning of the book, Kimberley Woodhouse added a letter to the readers explaining the work involved in writing this book. She said that she carefully researched historical documents and journals to keep the book as accurate as possible. I never realized that that the English of the day didn’t have common spelling, a lot of it was phonetic. If you’ve ever struggled to read children’s phonetic first papers, you will realize This is the first book in the new daughters of the Mayflower series. In beginning of the book, Kimberley Woodhouse added a letter to the readers explaining the work involved in writing this book. She said that she carefully researched historical documents and journals to keep the book as accurate as possible. I never realized that that the English of the day didn’t have common spelling, a lot of it was phonetic. If you’ve ever struggled to read children’s phonetic first papers, you will realize how difficult this task actually was. For this story, Woodhouse included some people who actually lived during this time, while making other characters fictional. This a Christian book, and the author doesn’t only pepper it with a small amount of Christianity, like too many Christian authors do, instead she saturates the pages. You know right from the beginning the characters live devout and pious lives filled with respect, caring and prayer for each other. They are very well portrayed by their actions and words, and I got a real sense of how important their religion was to them.I will admit that I really disliked history in school. Having to read about past times, that I felt had no relevance to my life, was so boring. The textbooks dull. Books like this have brought the past alive for me in ways that I never before imagined, and I’ve actually become a huge fan of historical fiction, much to own surprise.Whether you are like me, and hated learning about history in school, or a fan of this genre, I wholeheartedly recommend this book.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    “It wasn’t Mother, or Father, Dorothy, or David who had been her strength—had kept her going. It had been God working in her life through those people.” The Mayflower Bride begins a new series where each book is written by a different author. This first story is a fictional account based on true historical facts of the crossing of the Mayflower and their landing at Plymouth in the New World. The tale focuses predominantly on two individuals, William Lytton and Mary Elizabeth Chapman, who set out “It wasn’t Mother, or Father, Dorothy, or David who had been her strength—had kept her going. It had been God working in her life through those people.” The Mayflower Bride begins a new series where each book is written by a different author. This first story is a fictional account based on true historical facts of the crossing of the Mayflower and their landing at Plymouth in the New World. The tale focuses predominantly on two individuals, William Lytton and Mary Elizabeth Chapman, who set out on a journey to the Virginia Colony for two very different reasons. William is an accomplished carpenter, anxious to make his way in the new world and become successful financially, and Mary Elizabeth is a member of the Separatist congregation leaving Holland to seek religious freedom. As the difficult journey unfolds, the two young people explore the possibility of their separate paths becoming one. The story is rich in historical detail and faith inspired characters. The narration is too matter of fact and does not contain enough emotion for a novel. The book will appeal to some readers of inspirational historical fiction who enjoy very detailed historical novels. This ARC copy was received from Barbour Books and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own. ***
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  • Anne Rightler
    January 1, 1970
    Having been to Plimouth Plantation and seen the replica of the Mayflower II, I was quite interested in reading The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse. Woodhouse has done a great job with the history and setting of this story. The reader feels like they are right there in the middle of the scenes. The mix of fictional characters with historical figures makes the story interesting and authentic. The sweet romance between Mary Elizabeth and William is engaging and delightful to watch unfold des Having been to Plimouth Plantation and seen the replica of the Mayflower II, I was quite interested in reading The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse. Woodhouse has done a great job with the history and setting of this story. The reader feels like they are right there in the middle of the scenes. The mix of fictional characters with historical figures makes the story interesting and authentic. The sweet romance between Mary Elizabeth and William is engaging and delightful to watch unfold despite secrets and differences. The characters are vivid and lovable and their growth and maturity throughout the story is realistic. The Mayflower Bride is replete with information about the history of our nation and the struggles the passengers of the Mayflower endured. The author makes the story intriguing with some suspense as to the outcome of the passengers and to William in particular. And with a strong thread of faith in God throughout, the book is also inspirational as the reader can see how God's hand is at work in the lives of the individuals. I'm looking forward to reading more in this Daughters of the Mayflower series.I received a complimentary copy of the book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review. The opinions are my own.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Sadly, this is a book that did not live up to the great hype that preceded it. I am usually a fan of prologues and glossaries and such in the front of a book, but I thought this book was never going to start. There was just too much extraneous information, and I was tired  before it began.Mary Elizabeth Chapman,17, travels across the ocean with her father and her younger brother, David. She is fortunate enough to have her good friend, Dorothy along on the adventure as well.Mary Elizabeth finds h Sadly, this is a book that did not live up to the great hype that preceded it. I am usually a fan of prologues and glossaries and such in the front of a book, but I thought this book was never going to start. There was just too much extraneous information, and I was tired  before it began.Mary Elizabeth Chapman,17, travels across the ocean with her father and her younger brother, David. She is fortunate enough to have her good friend, Dorothy along on the adventure as well.Mary Elizabeth finds herself attracted to William Lytton,well-known for his carpentry skills. Unfortunately, Lytton is a Stranger. Thus we have a romance with obstacles. Many trials await the Mayflower travelers. These were portrayed accurately if not compellingly. Woodhouse goes to great lengths to be sure her account is factual. She has done extensive research and it shows.Surprisingly, there was more  added material at the end. By this time, I felt like I had read a thinly disguised textbook. I received a copy of this book from Netgalley. I also bought a copy. All opinions are solely my own and no positive review was required.
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  • Christie
    January 1, 1970
    The Mayflower Bride intrigued me as it references a time in history that I haven't read much about (other than basic historical knowledge). It is easy to assume that it would be a hard journey to travel by boat across the ocean to a new, and barely charted, territory. Being cooped up in tight quarters with limited resources is a recipe for much illness, and in times when medicine was not what it is now, it is a lethal combination.While the characters draw you into the story, it all felt a little The Mayflower Bride intrigued me as it references a time in history that I haven't read much about (other than basic historical knowledge). It is easy to assume that it would be a hard journey to travel by boat across the ocean to a new, and barely charted, territory. Being cooped up in tight quarters with limited resources is a recipe for much illness, and in times when medicine was not what it is now, it is a lethal combination.While the characters draw you into the story, it all felt a little too superficially depicted to me- you didn't really feel that involved in the characters or story because the plot felt too even-keeled. Yes, there was some drama to the trail of illness and death but there was no real climax to the story.Overall a quick read; I got more out of the afterward than the actual story because there at least there you got more historical reference. I just wish there had been a bit more meat to the story. I may not enjoy reading historical non-fiction, but I do like more history to my historical fiction.I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    When I first saw The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse I knew I wanted to read it. There are so few books about the time on the Mayflower I was instantly intrigued. It was interesting to read familiar names from history thrown in with the fictional characters. The trials and tribulations that were encountered on their journey were brought to life in a way that had me cringing at the thought of what people went through to make a new life in America. I also understand the struggles of the "Se When I first saw The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse I knew I wanted to read it. There are so few books about the time on the Mayflower I was instantly intrigued. It was interesting to read familiar names from history thrown in with the fictional characters. The trials and tribulations that were encountered on their journey were brought to life in a way that had me cringing at the thought of what people went through to make a new life in America. I also understand the struggles of the "Separatist" a little better. We tend to forget what it must have been like for people to make that journey in the 1600's and then to realize when they got here, there was basically nothing. It's not like they could run down to the corner store for a bag of flour. It took a lot of courage and an enormous amount of faith to leave everything and start completely over. I'm interested to see what comes next in the Daughters of the Mayflower series.I received a copy from the publisher via NetGalley. These are my own honest opinions.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    When I first heard about this series, I was super excited! Over the past year, I have researched my family history, and I discovered that I am a descendant of several passengers of The Mayflower.We all know that the voyage of The Mayflower was horrible for the passengers. I feel that Kimberley Woodhouse did a wonderful job portraying what it would have been like on that voyage. The true story is compelling, and this book brought the story to life for me, though the main characters are fictional. When I first heard about this series, I was super excited! Over the past year, I have researched my family history, and I discovered that I am a descendant of several passengers of The Mayflower.We all know that the voyage of The Mayflower was horrible for the passengers. I feel that Kimberley Woodhouse did a wonderful job portraying what it would have been like on that voyage. The true story is compelling, and this book brought the story to life for me, though the main characters are fictional.I enjoyed reading Mary Elizabeth and William's story. There was much for these characters to struggle through, but their love story was sweet and believable. I did, however, feel that the character of Peter and the problems that came along with him were not particularly necessary to move the story forward. There were enough challenges for the characters to overcome without him.Overall, I greatly enjoyed this book, and I look forward to the rest of the series.* Thanks to Netgalley for providing me a copy of this book for review.
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