The Night Diary
It's 1947, and India, newly independent of British rule, has been separated into two countries: Pakistan and India. The divide has created much tension between Hindus and Muslims, and hundreds of thousands are killed crossing borders. Half-Muslim, half-Hindu twelve-year-old Nisha doesn't know where she belongs, or what her country is anymore. When Papa decides it's too dangerous to stay in what is now Pakistan, Nisha and her family become refugees and embark first by train but later on foot to reach her new home. The journey is long, difficult, and dangerous, and after losing her mother as a baby, Nisha can't imagine losing her homeland, too. But even if her country has been ripped apart, Nisha still believes in the possibility of putting herself back together.

The Night Diary Details

TitleThe Night Diary
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 6th, 2018
PublisherDial Books
ISBN-139780735228511
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Childrens, Middle Grade, Young Adult

The Night Diary Review

  • Hannah Greendale
    January 1, 1970
    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. The year is 1947 and India, now free of British rule, has been split into two countries: India and Pakistan. Because of the divide, tension has erupted between Hindus and Muslims. Twelve-year-old Nisha and her family are Hindu, but her deceased mother was Muslim; Nisha is uncertain where she belongs. When Nisha and her family become refugees, forced to journey alongside thousands of others to a new home, sh Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. The year is 1947 and India, now free of British rule, has been split into two countries: India and Pakistan. Because of the divide, tension has erupted between Hindus and Muslims. Twelve-year-old Nisha and her family are Hindu, but her deceased mother was Muslim; Nisha is uncertain where she belongs. When Nisha and her family become refugees, forced to journey alongside thousands of others to a new home, she charts her arduous trek via letters written every night in her journal – beginning each one, Dear Mama.I’ve never had a diary before. When Kazi gave it to me, he said it was time to start writing things down, and that I was the one to do it. He said someone needs to make a record of the things that will happen because the grown-ups will be too busy.* The cultural significance of Nisha’s story is not limited to her record of historical events. While recording her thoughts, Nisha reveals to young readers the many ways in which her life differs from other children around the world. “Not all girls go to school,”* she explains, and everyone’s varied religions – Muslim, Hindu, or Sikh – are evident “by the clothes they [wear] or the names they [have.]”* On Nisha’s birthday, she receives the diary as a gift “wrapped in brown paper, tied with a piece of dried grass.”* In reflecting on the extravagant nature of this gift, the simplicity of her life is most evident. I once read an English story where a little girl got a big pink cake and presents wrapped in shiny paper and bows for her birthday. I thought about the little gifts Kazi gives us all the time – a piece of candy under our pillows or a ripe tomato from the garden, sliced, salted, and sprinkled with chili pepper on a plate. Cake and bows must be nice, but is anything better than a perfect tomato?* Food is central to Nisha’s story. Hiranandani’s descriptions of warm unleavened bread (chapatti), spiced split pea and lentil soup (dal), and potatoes and vegetables deep fried in a seasoned batter (pakoras) are liable to make anyone hungry. For Nisha, cooking is a source of comfort; the kitchen is a place where family comes together. When her family has walked for days and faces death by starvation, a simple bowl of rice and lentils is a saving grace – unseasoned food becomes the most wonderful thing she’s ever tasted. Comfort found in preparing and eating food sustains Nisha, but it cannot quell her confusion about what’s happening around her. In contemplating her country’s upheaval and the way it has affected her family as well as everyone around her, Nisha explores weighty themes and, through questioning her situation, inadvertently makes powerful assertions. [Papa] says that when you separate people into groups, they start to believe that one group is better than another. I think about Papa’s medical books and how we all have the same blood, and organs, and bones inside us, no matter what religion we’re supposed to be.* So a Hindu family kills a Muslim family, who kills a Hindu family, who kills a Muslim family. It would never end unless someone ended it. But who was going to do that?*I don’t want to think about the answer, but my pencil needs to write it anyway: If you were alive, would we have to leave you because you are Muslim? Would they have drawn a line right through us, Mama?*Though Nisha’s story is moving, the narrative is limited by the constraints of its epistolary format. As a first-person narrator, Nisha’s voice is occasionally dull and the prose often lacks sparkle. Making up for this are the moments when Nisha’s longing for her mother saturates her letters, making for a sentimental read that will force some readers to reach for a box of tissues. Sometimes I hear you talking to me. You have a sweet, low voice. “Nisha, just one more step,” you say. And I take it. You said to me when we were so thirsty, “Pretend the air is water. Drink it in.” I did, Mama, I wouldn’t ever say this to anyone else but if we died, would that mean we could be with you?* Violent content bears mentioning, given the age group of the book’s intended audience (ages 8 to 12). At one point, Nisha is held captive with a knife at her throat. Nisha encounters a man who says, “Hindus killed my family [. . .] Sliced their throats as I watched. And then I escaped, but I should have let them kill me, too.”* Also, Nisha witnesses several men fighting and describes violent images such as blood, a man with a slashed leg, a man with a gun, a man being stabbed in the chest, a man getting his throat slashed, and people dying. The Night Diary is a moving story of a refugee girl’s search for home, identity, and family in a divided country; however, parents are well advised to be mindful of the book’s content before handing it to young readers. -Special thanks to Dial Books for Young Readers for providing a free copy of The Night Diary in exchange for an honest review. *Note: All quotes are provided from an uncorrected proof.
    more
  • Donalyn
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful and heartbreaking. A treasure.
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusOn the eve of the Partitioning of India in 1947, Nisha is struggling to understand the implications of the end of British rule on her half-Hindu, half-Muslim family, and writes diary entries to the mother who passed away when she and her twin brother Amil were born in order to process events. Her father, a Hindu doctor, feels that the family must leave their town, which has ended up as an area designated to be Muslim. Long time family cook Kazi is Muslim (as was Nisha's E ARC from Edelweiss PlusOn the eve of the Partitioning of India in 1947, Nisha is struggling to understand the implications of the end of British rule on her half-Hindu, half-Muslim family, and writes diary entries to the mother who passed away when she and her twin brother Amil were born in order to process events. Her father, a Hindu doctor, feels that the family must leave their town, which has ended up as an area designated to be Muslim. Long time family cook Kazi is Muslim (as was Nisha's mother), so he will remain behind. Accompanied by their grandmother, the group sets out on foot to walk about 100 miles to the house of the mother's brother. Conditions are horrible, with fighting and violence all around, as well as very little food and water. Amil falls ill, the group is attacked by a man who has lost his family, but they eventually arrive. Nisha is glad to meet her uncle, who looks a bit like pictures of her mother, although he has a cleft palate and does not speak. Once the family is able to settle in Hindu territory, they have a small apartment but are glad to have made it to safety. Strengths: This is loosely based on some of the author's family's experiences, which makes it more interesting to me. I find the Partition to be my second favorite horrible historical event (the first being the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire), and this gave a good overview of the politics, but concentrated on Nisha's experience. There are good descriptions of what it is like to have to walk long distances and survive under horrible circumstances, and the connection with Kazi is sweet. Weaknesses: I can understand why the diary form was employed, but Nisha's longing for her mother slowed the story down. When losing a mother in child birth was fairly common, I don't know that children really dwelt on their loss this much. What I really think: There are a few other middle grade novels that touch on the Partition: Kelkar's Ahimsa, Bradbury's A Moment Comes and Outside In, Senzai's Ticket to India and Venkatraman's Climbing the Stairs. While these don't circulate terribly well, I'm always glad when I can get children to read them, so I will probably buy this one.
    more
  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this historical novel about a young girl and her family forced to leave their home after the partition of India creates the country of Pakistan. It reminded me a lot of Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl in the style of writing and I would hand it to kids who are interested in historical fiction or stories of refugees like The Red Pencil by Andrea Davis Pinkney.
    more
  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    I cried so much...Definitely Ruta Sepetys for middle grade!
  • Nicole Means
    January 1, 1970
    (Review for advanced copy) Middle school appropriate book dealing with India’s Partition in 1947. I appreciated that the story delved into the historical context but through the eyes of a confused 12 year old girl. I would recommend this book to anyone who teaches about this complicated subject as well as those who teach about the complexities of the worldwide refugee crisis. Accepting differenceshas always been a great challenge for humanity and the partition of India in 1947 is just another ex (Review for advanced copy) Middle school appropriate book dealing with India’s Partition in 1947. I appreciated that the story delved into the historical context but through the eyes of a confused 12 year old girl. I would recommend this book to anyone who teaches about this complicated subject as well as those who teach about the complexities of the worldwide refugee crisis. Accepting differenceshas always been a great challenge for humanity and the partition of India in 1947 is just another example of how neighbors can turn against one another overnight.
    more
  • Adiba Jaigirdar
    January 1, 1970
    I was super excited about this book but it wasn't as amazing as I had hoped it would be. The format didn't really work for me. The epistolary format just made everything feel a bit distant. There were some really great things about the book as well though - I really liked the concept and most of the characters, and there were some really, really moving and well-written scenes. Full review coming soon!
    more
  • Amy Richau
    January 1, 1970
    From an advanced readers copy.
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Nisha and her family are forced to leave their home because of conflict as India splits into two countries, India and Pakistan, after gaining its independence from Britain. The story is told by Nisha as she writes letters to her mother who died giving birth to her and her twin brother. Nisha's letters show her confusion about what is happening in her country, her wish for things to stay as they are, and her longing for her mother. My heart broke in places and I was moved in others. The author gi Nisha and her family are forced to leave their home because of conflict as India splits into two countries, India and Pakistan, after gaining its independence from Britain. The story is told by Nisha as she writes letters to her mother who died giving birth to her and her twin brother. Nisha's letters show her confusion about what is happening in her country, her wish for things to stay as they are, and her longing for her mother. My heart broke in places and I was moved in others. The author gives some background information about this time period in history in her note at the end of the book. I received an advanced reader's copy of this book at NCTE thanks to the publisher, Penguin Young Readers.
    more
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    In this epistolary novel, India's partition is poignantly evoked through young Nisha's eyes. Hiranandani's prose brings Nisha's world to life, rich in sense and emotion. THE NIGHT DIARY is perfect for readers who love immersive historical fiction and anyone who has ever felt unsure of where they fit in a topsy-turvy world.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    1947 partition of India, bireligious family, Muslim, Hindu, diary, twin siblings, refugee, diary-form minimizes character development, basic prose that sweet but missing passion/urgency, accessible to middle school readers without being graphic
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsReview based on a digital ARC provided by Edelweiss.This heart wrenching, yet ultimately uplifting, story centers on Nisha, a 12-year-old girl living in India in 1947. Her life is by no means perfect. She lives with her twin brother, father and grandmother in a town that is soon ripped apart as India gains its independence from Great Britain and is partitioned into India and Pakistan. Being part Muslim and part Hindu, she is unsure where she fits within this new scheme, which pits neigh 4.5 starsReview based on a digital ARC provided by Edelweiss.This heart wrenching, yet ultimately uplifting, story centers on Nisha, a 12-year-old girl living in India in 1947. Her life is by no means perfect. She lives with her twin brother, father and grandmother in a town that is soon ripped apart as India gains its independence from Great Britain and is partitioned into India and Pakistan. Being part Muslim and part Hindu, she is unsure where she fits within this new scheme, which pits neighbor against neighbor. Her mother was Muslim and died giving birth to Nisha and Amil. Her father is Hindu, so without their mother, they must leave what will become Pakistan to make their way to the new India, leaving behind beloved friends, not the least of whom is Kazi, their cook, who is Muslim and feels like part of the family. All of this is complicated by the fact that Nisha does not really speak much, her words locked inside her, only daring to come out on occasion. The story is revealed through letters written to her mother in a notebook given to her by Kazi. Although she has never known her mother, she longs to be close to her. Writing the letters helps Nisha to understand what is happening, as she writes down her thoughts, both as a record of events and as a personal narrative and commentary. The family’s journey to India is harrowing, but is told in a way that children can understand and to which they will be able to relate. While the journey is scary and Nisha does not shy away from this in her letters, it is obvious that there is love and hope, as well. At its core, this book discusses what it means to live in a world filled with meaningless hate and how one might respond to that with kindness and hope. Religious traditions themselves are not specifically referenced; rather, Nisha brings up questions about religious intolerance and intolerance in general through her letters, written in language natural to a child. These letters give her fears and feelings a voice – until she is able to find that voice within herself to share with the world. Highly recommended.
    more
  • Will Read Anything
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to be honest, I'm not really a fan of historical fiction. It's mostly because these novels usually have the same narrative over and over again, even if it is heartwarming. When I won this novel through a Goodreads giveaway, I was excited because it was an event I didn't know much about, but also reluctant because it was historical fiction. The partition was an extremely violent time in history so it was interesting to see a middle grade novel written about it. The main issues were disc I'm going to be honest, I'm not really a fan of historical fiction. It's mostly because these novels usually have the same narrative over and over again, even if it is heartwarming. When I won this novel through a Goodreads giveaway, I was excited because it was an event I didn't know much about, but also reluctant because it was historical fiction. The partition was an extremely violent time in history so it was interesting to see a middle grade novel written about it. The main issues were discussed at their core, people wants to draw lines. Though the circumstances surrounding the partition were complex, this novel was more about the effects of it and did a very good job at describing them. From the disunity in towns, to the fear that went through the streets, I felt all the complexity of the emotions of the people living there. Nisha was an amazing character. She is both relatable but also thought provoking. She has the characteristic of a young girl but also the experience of someone much older. The rest of the characters in the novel were distinct and unique. This book also explored complex relationships and how "love" can be shown in more ways than one.The prose was beautiful. It was simple, but also very easy to read. It made me think and the descriptions were amazing. Final thoughts: A great novel for middle schoolers interested in history around the world.
    more
  • Sophia Jones
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this one and I'm not the biggest fan of middle grade. I think it was partially due to the fact that I know very little about Partition-era India, so I learned a lot while reading this. The author's note and glossary in the back will help clear up cultural confusions for American readers. I felt that it handled difficult issues like religion, revolution and death in a serious way but still made it accessible for younger readers. I also really enjoyed that Nisha struggled with shy I really enjoyed this one and I'm not the biggest fan of middle grade. I think it was partially due to the fact that I know very little about Partition-era India, so I learned a lot while reading this. The author's note and glossary in the back will help clear up cultural confusions for American readers. I felt that it handled difficult issues like religion, revolution and death in a serious way but still made it accessible for younger readers. I also really enjoyed that Nisha struggled with shyness and her brother has dyslexia (thought it isn't called that at that time). The plot was fairly fast moving, but one section closer to the end seemed to drag a little bit. This is still a very quick read and could probably be finished in a day (or even a sitting). This book has made me want to pick up some adult books talking about this period because now I really want to learn more. This is definitely a solid read for any middle-grade reader who is interested in historical fiction or Indian culture.
    more
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Such a beautiful story about India's break from British rule and then partition describing through a pre-teens eyes, the tragedy of not being able to love and befriend who you like simply because of their religion. It's a cross between Khaled Hosseini, Ruta Sepetys, The Diary of Anne Frank as Nisha writes in a diary given to her by the Muslim man who cooks for them. Nisha just had a birthday along with her twin brother and is feeling the stress and strain of losing her mother years ago, her fath Such a beautiful story about India's break from British rule and then partition describing through a pre-teens eyes, the tragedy of not being able to love and befriend who you like simply because of their religion. It's a cross between Khaled Hosseini, Ruta Sepetys, The Diary of Anne Frank as Nisha writes in a diary given to her by the Muslim man who cooks for them. Nisha just had a birthday along with her twin brother and is feeling the stress and strain of losing her mother years ago, her father's sadness, and the new world that is being forged underneath her feet as a Hindu. She sees inequality in treatment and is saddened by the changes her family has undergone including her doctor father and grandmother because they are likely needing to move for fear. But the fear has always been there when Nisha's mother and father decided to marry-- a Hindu and a Muslim. It is quietly sweet and brings history to life in the epistolary style that immediately reminded me of Anne Frank as Nisha explains that she doesn't know how the whole thing will end up.
    more
  • Yapha
    January 1, 1970
    Nisha's mother died when she and her twin brother Amil were born. They live with their father, a doctor at the local clinic, their grandmother Dadi, and their cook Kazi. They know there have always been tensions between Muslims and Hindus in their town in India, their own mother was Muslim and disowned by her family for marrying their Hindu father. It's never been worse than it is now, though, with India on the verge of independence. Their area will be free of British rule, but no longer India. Nisha's mother died when she and her twin brother Amil were born. They live with their father, a doctor at the local clinic, their grandmother Dadi, and their cook Kazi. They know there have always been tensions between Muslims and Hindus in their town in India, their own mother was Muslim and disowned by her family for marrying their Hindu father. It's never been worse than it is now, though, with India on the verge of independence. Their area will be free of British rule, but no longer India. Instead it will become Pakistan, and they and the other Hindus living there are forced to leave. Muslims in the area remaining India are forced out as well. The trip to the border is fraught with danger, however, and many do not make it. Told in diary format, Nisha's longing for her mother and her home are palpable. Readers will be able to relate to Nisha's plight and hopefully gain compassion for refugees today. Recommended for grades 5 & up.ARC provided by publisher
    more
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)This is an intensely emotional story about family, bravery, and migration. Not only are characters touching, but the format of the book is stunning. Nisha is writing letters to her mother who is no longer with their family. Because of this, there is a hopefulness, a vulnerability, and a fierce love that shine through her words. We see this tumultuous and dangerous time in hist (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)This is an intensely emotional story about family, bravery, and migration. Not only are characters touching, but the format of the book is stunning. Nisha is writing letters to her mother who is no longer with their family. Because of this, there is a hopefulness, a vulnerability, and a fierce love that shine through her words. We see this tumultuous and dangerous time in history through the eyes of a child and between each entry our heart stops for a moment.This is a story about bravery, adversity, fear, and confusion. But it's poignant and deep in a way that is wonderful and absolutely necessary. It feels timely about the dangers of forgetting our humanity in the face of uncertainty of borders and identities.
    more
  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book and couldn't put it down. Like others said, it was so interesting to read about an event in history that I knew little about. The book describes in vivid detail the family's flight through what becomes Pakistan to reach India. You can taste all the foods, smell the aromas, see the dust and feel thirsty right along with Nisha and her family. You care deeply about Nisha and her brother and family and pray they make it through safely. This book has prompted me to I received an ARC copy of this book and couldn't put it down. Like others said, it was so interesting to read about an event in history that I knew little about. The book describes in vivid detail the family's flight through what becomes Pakistan to reach India. You can taste all the foods, smell the aromas, see the dust and feel thirsty right along with Nisha and her family. You care deeply about Nisha and her brother and family and pray they make it through safely. This book has prompted me to read and learn more about the Indian partition and the hope is that young readers will too. That is the most important thing about historical fiction for children and youth. This may be the only thing they learn about this event, but someday when they are older and hear a reference to the Indian Partition, they will think, "I know something about that".
    more
  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    5th&up, 4.5 starsA gorgeous, moving account of one girls view of the heartache & turmoil connected w/India's independence from Britain in 1947 and the resulting split that separated the land into India and Pakistan. Unwelcome in their hometown because their religious beliefs no longer matched the new political dictates, Nisha and her family are forced to leave almost everything and everyone behind and make a deadly trek towards a new life. This historical fiction book is raw, emotional, 5th&up, 4.5 starsA gorgeous, moving account of one girls view of the heartache & turmoil connected w/India's independence from Britain in 1947 and the resulting split that separated the land into India and Pakistan. Unwelcome in their hometown because their religious beliefs no longer matched the new political dictates, Nisha and her family are forced to leave almost everything and everyone behind and make a deadly trek towards a new life. This historical fiction book is raw, emotional, rich in personal and historical detail, and is incredibly suspenseful. I highly recommend it for middle school readers- just make sure to hand out a tissue or two along with the book.This ARC was provided by Dial Books for Young Readers/Penguin Young Readers Group in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Tricia
    January 1, 1970
    It’s the tumultuous summer of 1947, and India, having at last obtained its freedom from England, is being divided into two countries. Shy, studious Nisha, whose father is Hindu, keeps a diary addressed to her mother, who was Muslim and died giving birth to her and her twin brother. As confusion and violence mount, the family begins its harrowing journey to the “new India”. Nisha has read stories about refugees who flee their homes “with nothing but the clothes and food on their backs. Now that’s It’s the tumultuous summer of 1947, and India, having at last obtained its freedom from England, is being divided into two countries. Shy, studious Nisha, whose father is Hindu, keeps a diary addressed to her mother, who was Muslim and died giving birth to her and her twin brother. As confusion and violence mount, the family begins its harrowing journey to the “new India”. Nisha has read stories about refugees who flee their homes “with nothing but the clothes and food on their backs. Now that’s who we are.” This affecting, accessible and compelling novel is based on the experience of Hiranandani’s father; its contemporary relevance, as religious groups across the world continue to war, is painful.
    more
  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely amazing. Nisha is so perfectly twelve that she made me homesick for being twelve and reminded me of how much I loved diaries (fictional, nonfictional and keeping my own) when I was that age. I loved her relationships with her family, especially Amil, her introspection, her wistfulness, and her love of cooking. I loved the other characters, particularly Rashid Uncle. My only quibble is that the ending wrapped up a little too quickly and neatly to feel realistic after everything that ha Absolutely amazing. Nisha is so perfectly twelve that she made me homesick for being twelve and reminded me of how much I loved diaries (fictional, nonfictional and keeping my own) when I was that age. I loved her relationships with her family, especially Amil, her introspection, her wistfulness, and her love of cooking. I loved the other characters, particularly Rashid Uncle. My only quibble is that the ending wrapped up a little too quickly and neatly to feel realistic after everything that had happened [spoiler] particularly re: Kazi[/spoiler]. But I loved Nisha and her family so much that I didn't really mind.
    more
  • Noreen
    January 1, 1970
    A heartfelt book about a young girl, Nisha, and her family during the time India was split in two. The story is told through Nisha's writings in her diary to her deceased mother whom she never knew.The family is half Hindu and half Muslim and they flee their home during a time when constant fighting was taking place between the Hindu's, Muslims and Sikhs. It's hard for Nisha and her brother, Amil, to understand why they need to leave and why the grownups can't just get along without fighting and A heartfelt book about a young girl, Nisha, and her family during the time India was split in two. The story is told through Nisha's writings in her diary to her deceased mother whom she never knew.The family is half Hindu and half Muslim and they flee their home during a time when constant fighting was taking place between the Hindu's, Muslims and Sikhs. It's hard for Nisha and her brother, Amil, to understand why they need to leave and why the grownups can't just get along without fighting and live peacefully together.A well-written book about a dark time in India's history, this book helped me understand the history of India & Pakistan.
    more
  • Viva
    January 1, 1970
    2 stars = "it was ok" by GR's rating system. The story of a child's view of the breakup of British India is actually something I wanted to read about, however I didn't like the format. The format is a series of letters from the child to her mother. I found this format needlessly artificial and took away from the story. As you got deeper into the story, it basically became a first person narrative where each section started with "Dear Mama". I think this book would have worked best from a 3rd per 2 stars = "it was ok" by GR's rating system. The story of a child's view of the breakup of British India is actually something I wanted to read about, however I didn't like the format. The format is a series of letters from the child to her mother. I found this format needlessly artificial and took away from the story. As you got deeper into the story, it basically became a first person narrative where each section started with "Dear Mama". I think this book would have worked best from a 3rd person point of view.I got this as a free ARC.
    more
  • JoEllen
    January 1, 1970
    #TheNightDiary will invite conversations around the difficult experience of many refugees, immigration, identity and hope for a better future. I learned a lot about India's partition over tensions between Muslims and Hindus. This #heartprintbook MG HF will be a powerful addition to classrooms discussing tolerance, acceptance, bravery, injustice and more. ‪#TheNightDiary will invite conversations around the difficult experience of many refugees, immigration, identity and hope for a better future. I learned a lot about India's partition over tensions between Muslims and Hindus. This #heartprintbook MG HF will be a powerful addition to classrooms discussing tolerance, acceptance, bravery, injustice and more.
    more
  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely adored this book. It was a true treasure, and even though Nisha is forced to leave her home, I could still relate to the way she faces her obstacles. It's perfect that the book is titled, The Night Diary, and Nisha's name means night. I am in love with the family theme, and as I was reading it my eyes hung off every word. Definitely an amazing read.
    more
  • Red Book Buyer
    January 1, 1970
    Always refreshing to read a MG about a topic I haven't read before or don't know much about.
  • Michelle Ann
    January 1, 1970
    More like 4.5 stars.
  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    I thought that the night diary was a really good book. I really liked how the journey was described and how the peace between the Hindu's and the Muslim's changed overnight. I could really picture how the moment the two religions were declared different, there was a lot of tension that came out of nowhere. However, I thought the part about Gandhi fasting was a little unnecessary could have been omited. I also thought that the cover was a really symbolic way to show the division between the Hindu I thought that the night diary was a really good book. I really liked how the journey was described and how the peace between the Hindu's and the Muslim's changed overnight. I could really picture how the moment the two religions were declared different, there was a lot of tension that came out of nowhere. However, I thought the part about Gandhi fasting was a little unnecessary could have been omited. I also thought that the cover was a really symbolic way to show the division between the Hindu's and the Muslims.
    more
  • Jenny Chou
    January 1, 1970
    In 1947, India is newly independent of British rule and has been separated into two countries: Pakistan and India. The divide has created tension between Hindus and Muslims, and hundreds of thousands are killed crossing borders. Nisha is a twelve-years-old half-Muslim, half-Hindu girl who doesn’t know where she belongs. When her father decides it’s too dangerous to stay in what is now Pakistan, Nisha and her twin brother become refugees and embark first on foot and later by train to reach the ne In 1947, India is newly independent of British rule and has been separated into two countries: Pakistan and India. The divide has created tension between Hindus and Muslims, and hundreds of thousands are killed crossing borders. Nisha is a twelve-years-old half-Muslim, half-Hindu girl who doesn’t know where she belongs. When her father decides it’s too dangerous to stay in what is now Pakistan, Nisha and her twin brother become refugees and embark first on foot and later by train to reach the new India.While the historical aspect is fascinating, the strength of the story comes from Nisha’s voice, both through her descriptions of the flavors and spices of Indian cooking as well as her narration of the harrowing journey across Pakistan to reach safety.
    more
Write a review