God Save Texas
With humor and the biting insight of a native, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Looming Tower explores the history, culture, and politics of Texas, while holding the stereotypes up for rigorous scrutiny.God Save Texas is a journey through the most controversial state in America. It is a red state in the heart of Trumpland that hasn't elected a Democrat to a statewide office in more than twenty years; but it is also a state in which minorities already form a majority (including the largest number of Muslims). The cities are blue and among the most diverse in the nation. Oil is still king but Texas now leads California in technology exports. The Texas economic model of low taxes and minimal regulation has produced extraordinary growth but also striking income disparities. Texas looks a lot like the America that Donald Trump wants to create. And Wright's profound portrait of the state not only reflects our country back as it is, but as it was and as it might be.

God Save Texas Details

TitleGod Save Texas
Author
ReleaseApr 17th, 2018
PublisherKnopf Publishing Group
ISBN-139780525520108
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Politics, Travel, The United States Of America, Literature, American

God Save Texas Review

  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Oh boy
  • Chantal Lyons
    January 1, 1970
    If America interests you in any way, you'll almost certainly get something out of "God Save Texas". As an Americanophile who recently visited Dallas and Austin, reading the book was fascinating and enjoyable.I'm afraid I've never heard of Lawrence Wright, but his diverse career and connections afford him the most intimate of insights into the artistic and political worlds of Texas - and beyond, in the case of presidential politics, since Wright has known the Bushes well for all his life. This fa If America interests you in any way, you'll almost certainly get something out of "God Save Texas". As an Americanophile who recently visited Dallas and Austin, reading the book was fascinating and enjoyable.I'm afraid I've never heard of Lawrence Wright, but his diverse career and connections afford him the most intimate of insights into the artistic and political worlds of Texas - and beyond, in the case of presidential politics, since Wright has known the Bushes well for all his life. This familiarity with the Bushes exemplifies Wright's balance in writing about this state he knows, fears and loves - he undoubtedly has fondness for Bush Jnr, for example, but is critical of him too (and still wishes Bush had not invaded Iraq).As the author reveals, Texas is right in the heart of so many of the issues that most polarise American society and draw the eyes of the world: Trump, Mexico, climate change, state vs. federal government, gun rights, the Black Lives Matter movement, the subjugation of women through anti-abortion measures. But Wright also impresses on us Texas's distinct culture when it comes to cooking, music, film, architecture, and friendliness.The book packs so much in, and while I sometimes wished it would linger just a little longer on some issues, the pace also dissuades any boredom. The transitions are kind of fun too - sometimes there was a logic to them but other times the author veered unexpectedly onto something else, which might have annoyed me in a different book, but only adds to the vibrancy of this one. I've given four stars rather than five because of the aforementioned lack of depth for some of the issues that really interested me, and my eyes glazed when Wright plunged deep into the music scene, but that only lasted a few pages or so.Wright claims off the bat that examining Texas could help us foresee, understand, and maybe change the future of America. Having read "God Save Texas", I'm inclined to agree with him.
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  • Joe
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful and at time frustrating journey into what it is to be Texan and what Texas means to the world at large. Part-memoir and part social history, Lawrence Wright has crafted a book that will be referenced for years to come.
  • Sydney Young
    January 1, 1970
    My choice for my April - Paris Life column. Loved it as a Texan, but I think its way bigger than that. Will post my review here after a month or so. In the meantime, just know that it is not to miss. Also, thank you to the publisher's for an ARC so that I could give an honest review of it for the magazine during its publication month.
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  • Bruce Katz
    January 1, 1970
    A lot of fun and, oddly enough, kind of moving. I've read Wright before, most notably Looming Tower and his book on Scientology. God Save Texas shows a very different side of him: playful, musical, sincerely interested in the world around him. And because his subject is Texas, there are anecdotes aplenty, some dark and others amusing. My favorites were about the town that elects goats to be its mayors, and the one about the gentleman who was determined not to show any subordination to the law (d A lot of fun and, oddly enough, kind of moving. I've read Wright before, most notably Looming Tower and his book on Scientology. God Save Texas shows a very different side of him: playful, musical, sincerely interested in the world around him. And because his subject is Texas, there are anecdotes aplenty, some dark and others amusing. My favorites were about the town that elects goats to be its mayors, and the one about the gentleman who was determined not to show any subordination to the law (don't ask: you'll have to read it yourself.)
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