The Little Book of Feminist Saints
This inspiring, beautifully illustrated collection honors one hundred exceptional women throughout history and around the world.A Stylist Must-read Book of 2018In this luminous volume, New York Times bestselling writer Julia Pierpont and artist Manjit Thapp match short, vibrant, and surprising biographies with stunning full-color portraits of secular female "saints" champions of strength and progress. These women broke ground, broke ceilings, and broke molds--includingMaya Angelou - Jane Austen - Ruby Bridges - Rachel Carson - Shirley Chisholm - Marie Curie & Irene Joliot Curie - Isadora Duncan - Amelia Earhart - Artemisia Gentileschi - Grace Hopper - Dolores Huerta - Frida Kahlo - Billie Jean King - Audre Lorde - Wilma Mankiller - Toni Morrison - Michelle Obama - Sandra Day O'Connor - Sally Ride - Eleanor Roosevelt - Margaret Sanger - Sappho - Nina Simone - Gloria Steinem - Kanno Sugako - Harriet Tubman - Mae West - Virginia Woolf - Malala YousafzaiOpen to any page and find daily inspiration and lasting delight.Praise for The Little Book of Feminist Saints "An enticing collection of biographical portraits of extraordinary women . . . Pierpont's pithy write-ups are accompanied by Thapp's funky, wonderfully expressive color illustrations, making for an engaging picture-book experience for adults. . . . Bold and sassy, [this] 'little' collection of secular 'saints' stands tall: required reading for any seeking to broaden their historical knowledge."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review)"A gloriously diverse, edifying, and curiosity-inspiring collection."--Booklist

The Little Book of Feminist Saints Details

TitleThe Little Book of Feminist Saints
Author
ReleaseMar 6th, 2018
PublisherRandom House
ISBN-139780399592744
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, History, Biography

The Little Book of Feminist Saints Review

  • Nat
    January 1, 1970
    This is EXACTLY what I’ve been looking for in terms of feminist collections. I mentioned before in my reviews for equally striking books (Bad Girls Throughout History & Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls) how I’m not keen on Wikipedia-esque entries, instead, I prefer anecdotes that bring the women back to life through words. And oh, how Julia Pierpont delivered with The Little Book of Feminist Saints.“These entries are not meant to serve as short biographies, summaries of each woman’s life t This is EXACTLY what I’ve been looking for in terms of feminist collections. I mentioned before in my reviews for equally striking books (Bad Girls Throughout History & Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls) how I’m not keen on Wikipedia-esque entries, instead, I prefer anecdotes that bring the women back to life through words. And oh, how Julia Pierpont delivered with The Little Book of Feminist Saints.“These entries are not meant to serve as short biographies, summaries of each woman’s life that could just as easily be found online. I tried, instead, in my daily research, to zero in on the colorful, the anecdotes I would find myself repeating to a friend that night.”My most important thing with these collections is that I want to educated myself on something new in an engaging way, without feeling like I'm reading a textbook. And because The Little Book of Feminist Saints focused on telling witty stories that captured the spirit of each woman, there wasn’t ever a case of reading the same repeated history lesson, especially with the more well-known personalities. I got enlightened on so many phenomenal sheroes over the course of the book, and I had the most fun doing so.This read also managed to pack many experiences into a short amount of pages. Ranging from leading ladies, philosophers, readers, dreamers, travelers, athletes, students, and rebels.Speaking of which, here were some of the noteworthy women I was very in tune with that I'd like to highlight:1. Oprah: Matron Saint of Every Home. “She connected with audiences because she knew people, and she let them know her.”2. Yayoi Kusama: Matron Saint of Visionaries “The visions started in childhood—flowers would talk to her; the floor would disappear.”3. Gloria Steinem: Matron Saint of Sisterhood “There was something,” she remarked, “about seeing women tell the truth about their lives in public, and seeing women take seriously something that only happens to women. In my experience, things were only taken seriously if they also happened to men.”4. Maya Angelou: Matron Saint of Storytellers “In times of strife and extreme stress, I was likely to retreat to mutism. Mutism is so addictive. And I don’t think its powers ever go away.”5. Rachel Carson: Matron Saint of Future Generations “The threat is infinitely greater to the generations unborn; to those who have no voice in the decisions of today, and that fact alone makes our responsibility a heavy one.”6. Katharine Hepburn: Matron Saint of Leading Ladies “As one goes through life,” she wrote in her memoirs, “one learns that if you don’t paddle your own canoe, you don’t move.”7. Anne Frank: Matron Saint of Diariest 8. Frida Kahlo: Matron Saint of Color The Little Book of Feminist Saints exceeded all my expectations, thanks to both the striking illustrations by Manjit Thapp that set the tone for what to expect, and the accompanying anecdotes written to the strengths of our leading ladies.ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Publication Date: March 6th 2018 Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying The Little Book of Feminist Saints, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! This review and more can be found on my blog.
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  • Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestWow! This has been a fantastic month for feminist reads for me. I read about five times more than normal and all of them, with one glaring exception, have been excellent. THE LITTLE BOOK OF FEMINIST SAINTS is a fun little book packing a surprising amount of feminists and strong/progressive women. Each woman gets her own mini section, with an abbreviated bio presented vignette-style, and, of course, a stylized portrait.THE LITTLE BOOK OF FEM Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestWow! This has been a fantastic month for feminist reads for me. I read about five times more than normal and all of them, with one glaring exception, have been excellent. THE LITTLE BOOK OF FEMINIST SAINTS is a fun little book packing a surprising amount of feminists and strong/progressive women. Each woman gets her own mini section, with an abbreviated bio presented vignette-style, and, of course, a stylized portrait.THE LITTLE BOOK OF FEMINIST SAINTS is actually a very similar concept to this other book I literally just read called DEAD FEMINISTS: HISTORIC HEROINES IN LIVING COLOR. Like LITTLE BOOK, DEAD FEMINIST also features a number of women, divided into sections, with mini bios and stylized art. The art style and presentation are different but there is a lot of overlap - Frida Kahlo, Virginia Woolf, Rachel Carson, Shirley Chisholm, and Sappho to name a few.THE LITTLE BOOK OF FEMINIST SAINTS features many more women, however. Some of my favorites were Venus and Serena Williams, Anne Frank, the Bronte sisters, Jane Austen, Michelle Obama, Oprah, and Hillary Clinton (obviously). I learned about a few new women, too, like the artist Yayoi Kusama (her aesthetic is amazing and now I'm dying to see one of her exhibits, because it is so insta-worthy) and the performer and French resistance agent, Josephine Baker.This is a great book with some unexpected additions. Perfect for the modern feminist's coffee table.Thanks to Netgalley/the publisher for the review copy! 3.5 to 4 stars
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  • Rebecca Foster
    January 1, 1970
    Like A Glorious Freedom, this is a celebration of women’s achievements, especially those that have been overlooked. Each “matron saint,” presented in chronological order by birthday, gets a two-page spread, with a full-color portrait on the left (by Manjitt Thapp, a young British artist) and a very short biographical essay on the right that highlights the saint’s background and her contribution towards greater opportunities for women. The first two subjects give you a sense of the range covered: Like A Glorious Freedom, this is a celebration of women’s achievements, especially those that have been overlooked. Each “matron saint,” presented in chronological order by birthday, gets a two-page spread, with a full-color portrait on the left (by Manjitt Thapp, a young British artist) and a very short biographical essay on the right that highlights the saint’s background and her contribution towards greater opportunities for women. The first two subjects give you a sense of the range covered: Artemisia Gentileschi and Michelle Obama. There are about 90 profiles here, and while I recognized most of the figures, a number of the mathematical/scientific pioneers and civil rights activists were new to me. A perfect coffee table book to gift to the women in your life this year. Out on March 6th.
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  • Krystal
    January 1, 1970
    This captivating book brought a diverse collection of both renowned and lesser known feminist trailblazers to life with vivid illustrations and meaningful details about why they should be remembered!
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    If I could give this book a million stars, I would. I cannot say enough good things about this book. This book is like chicken soup and some sort of massive energy drink for my inner beast mode feminine soul.Celebrating women such as Ada Lovelace, Wilma Mankiller, Sojourner Truth, Sally Ride, Malala Yousafzai, and so much more, and modeled after the "Saint of the Day" books, Pierpont looks at a diverse cross section of women throughout history. Casting them as "Matron Saints" of various endeavor If I could give this book a million stars, I would. I cannot say enough good things about this book. This book is like chicken soup and some sort of massive energy drink for my inner beast mode feminine soul.Celebrating women such as Ada Lovelace, Wilma Mankiller, Sojourner Truth, Sally Ride, Malala Yousafzai, and so much more, and modeled after the "Saint of the Day" books, Pierpont looks at a diverse cross section of women throughout history. Casting them as "Matron Saints" of various endeavors and granting them their own feast days, she brilliantly devises portraits of them which allow their inspiring accomplishments to sing. The illustrations are charming and fit well with the book. If you are a fan of Amy Poehler's "Smart Girls" movement or stories from the Facebook Page, or wished Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls had a counterpart for adults, this is your book. You will also like it if you are just a human who likes to read about cool things other humans do. I DEVOURED this book and will certainly go back to these Matron Saints when I need inspiration in my own life!Thank you so much, NetGalley and RandomHouse for granting me an ARC - in return I am honestly reviewing and I can honestly say I ADORE THIS BOOK.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Lots of inspiring women’s stories here! I just wished that each mini biography was a bit longer. Some felt rushed while others went into more detail. But overall I would definitely recommend it to anyone looking to add more feminist books to their library. Thank you, Random House, for sending me an ebook ARC in exchange for an honest review. I can imagine the illustrations are really beautiful in print!
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  • Jessica T.
    January 1, 1970
    Oh boy. I loved this. This book is set up as a Catholic saint of the day book with feast days and beautiful art. It's a diverse selection of feminist icons. There were several times i had to go look up someone because i had never heard of them before. This is perfect for an adult or your little feminist at home.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    When I first picked this book, I thought, oh another book about famous women. Wonder if I'll learn anything new.Answer, yes, yes, I did.This is more than just short histories of famous women. This is a collection that calls out why these women are famous and should be known about, and what they were known about. Yes, it is odd to make it out to be saint days, but why not? And these are not light little nothings about famous women. These are all statements of why we should honor and listen to the When I first picked this book, I thought, oh another book about famous women. Wonder if I'll learn anything new.Answer, yes, yes, I did.This is more than just short histories of famous women. This is a collection that calls out why these women are famous and should be known about, and what they were known about. Yes, it is odd to make it out to be saint days, but why not? And these are not light little nothings about famous women. These are all statements of why we should honor and listen to these women from the past and present.For example, here is the excerpt about Rachel Carson, whose feast day is April 14:The cancer had metastasized and her body had burns fromt he radiation. Even the wig she wore when she went out was hot and itchy. And no one-her critis in particular-could k now of her condition, for fear it might be used to call her objectivity into question:Silent Spring's unprecedented claim was that petrochemicals were linked to human cancer. That day in San Franscico, she emphasized the urgency of her findings. "We behave, not like people guided by scientific knowledge, but more like the poverbial bad housekeeper who sweeps dirt under the rug in the hope of getting it out of site." "The Pollution of Our Environment" would be her last speech: she died six months later.And here is part of the excerpt about Nina Simone, the matron saint of soul:"When I heard about the bombing of the church in which the four little balck girsl were killed in Alabama," she said, "I shut myself up in a room and that song happened." The result was "Missisippi Goddam," a rallying cry for the movement and one of Simone's most famous protest songs.Everybody knows about Missisippi-goddam.And while I had heard and knew of Nellie Bly, the famous female journalist, I had not considered how important her story on the Insane Asylum was. And although I knew that Frances Perkins was the first female member of a U.S. president's cabinate, I was not aware of how much work she did to make the Social Security Act be established, or minimum wages, or the forty-hour work week, and the banning of child labour.This is a great book to get people to read, and realize how many great women are out there that we should know more about.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
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  • Geoffrey
    January 1, 1970
    (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)To try and sum this up as succinctly as this work’s various entries, “The Little Book of Feminist Saints” does two things incredibly well. The first is how it educates. Yes, it mentions many of the prominent women that one would expect, such as Oprah, Hillary Clinton, Amelia Earhart, etc. However, it also provides more exposure to many of the great women that we may know only by name or face, but don’t necessarily k (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)To try and sum this up as succinctly as this work’s various entries, “The Little Book of Feminist Saints” does two things incredibly well. The first is how it educates. Yes, it mentions many of the prominent women that one would expect, such as Oprah, Hillary Clinton, Amelia Earhart, etc. However, it also provides more exposure to many of the great women that we may know only by name or face, but don’t necessarily know what made them such grad figures of worthy note (Frida Kahlo, Josephine Baker, to name just two who jumped out to this particular reader). Then of course there are the scores of women who many of use have unfortunately have probably never heard of before opening this book, like Kara Walker, Junko Tabei, Mary Edwards Walker, Jin Xing, Juana Ines de la Cruz….all extraordinary figures whose entries will leave one wondering, “Wait, I haven’t heard of her yet HOW?” Secondly, and although this is only stating the obvious, but “The Little Book of Feminist Saints” inspires. Thanks to the entries that successfully capture the essence of every extraordinary woman and their varied accomplishments in only a few paragraphs each, this book is perfectly formatted so that after the first read, one can come back again and again and again to read a section or several if they need to be inspirited, and quickly so. Julia Pierpont, simply put, has crafted a marvelous compilation of amazing figures that one should not hesitate to pick up if provided with the opportunity.
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  • Jesica DeHart
    January 1, 1970
    When a book inspires you to learn more, to strive and imbues you with awe then it settles into your heart. I will take the lives introduced in this book with me to challenge me going forward in life!
  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Won from a Goodreads' giveawayA short, informative read about a variety of feminists, past & present, from all around the world and all walks of life.Rather than bombarding you with a Wikipedia article's worth of information, Julia Pierpont picks a choice bit about each of the women she writes about that gives you a clear idea of who they are, and why they belong in The Little Book of Feminist Saints. Simple yet charming portraits by Manjit Thapp accompany each entry, along with each woman h Won from a Goodreads' giveawayA short, informative read about a variety of feminists, past & present, from all around the world and all walks of life.Rather than bombarding you with a Wikipedia article's worth of information, Julia Pierpont picks a choice bit about each of the women she writes about that gives you a clear idea of who they are, and why they belong in The Little Book of Feminist Saints. Simple yet charming portraits by Manjit Thapp accompany each entry, along with each woman having a title(Matron Saint of...) and all the entries being ordered by the women's feast days(based on various important days in their lives). While there were many women I knew of, there were many others I had never heard of but will certainly be researching further.One nice little touch you'll find at the end, is an image of an empty frame, accompanied by a form on the next page where you can add your own feminist saint. This would certainly be a good gift for any feminist, but I think it would be especially appropriate for the teenage and young adult crowd.
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  • Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob)
    January 1, 1970
    This is not one of those books that you just pick up and read straight through. It is supposed to resemble the format of some of those religious saints books, in other words, you open it once a day or so and read the mini bio for that day. It did seem like it occasionally skipped a day, however, I was reading an ARC from Netgalley so there's a chance they were adding more. However, that may also have been the way those religious books were. If you are expecting a typical bio, who they were marri This is not one of those books that you just pick up and read straight through. It is supposed to resemble the format of some of those religious saints books, in other words, you open it once a day or so and read the mini bio for that day. It did seem like it occasionally skipped a day, however, I was reading an ARC from Netgalley so there's a chance they were adding more. However, that may also have been the way those religious books were. If you are expecting a typical bio, who they were married to, how many children they had and so on; well, that's not this book. This one is more of a paragraph or two of the fun stuff about these women. I really appreciated the illustrations throughout, they were fun and vivid. The people you expect are in there, but, there were also quite a few I hadn't heard of. This is perfect for anyone who likes the format, but, also good for people like me who aren't 100% on the format but need to brush up on who's who. :)
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    This is the book I didn't know I needed but will be buying for many of the women (young and old) in my life in 2018. What's not to love about a book that follows the Catholic Church's saint-of-the day format to provide Feminist inspiration and education throughout the calendar year? Pierpont assigns each "saint" her own feast day and provides an evocative illustration of the saint and a short biography about her life and accomplishments. From Michelle Obama to Hypatia of Alexandria, Sojourner Tr This is the book I didn't know I needed but will be buying for many of the women (young and old) in my life in 2018. What's not to love about a book that follows the Catholic Church's saint-of-the day format to provide Feminist inspiration and education throughout the calendar year? Pierpont assigns each "saint" her own feast day and provides an evocative illustration of the saint and a short biography about her life and accomplishments. From Michelle Obama to Hypatia of Alexandria, Sojourner Truth to Bea Arthur, Ruby Bridges, Jin Xing, Benazir Bhutto, Junko Tabei, and many more. This is a gorgeous collaboration that speaks to the truth and power in these historical and contemporary women's lives that is available and inspirational for every person.
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  • mia ☆
    January 1, 1970
    This book was such a fun and educational read for me. I learned a lot about women whose stories I had never heard before and it was absolutely wonderful. I even learned things about women who I had already known about. The illustrations were lovely and definitely added a nice touch to the book itself. If you’re looking for a quick and easy read about important feminists throughout history then you have to check this book out!Thank you NetGalley/Random House publishing for providing me with an AR This book was such a fun and educational read for me. I learned a lot about women whose stories I had never heard before and it was absolutely wonderful. I even learned things about women who I had already known about. The illustrations were lovely and definitely added a nice touch to the book itself. If you’re looking for a quick and easy read about important feminists throughout history then you have to check this book out!Thank you NetGalley/Random House publishing for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting, easy-to-read batch of mini-bios of 100 interesting "matron saints" (independent, intelligent, inspiring women) throughout world history. This book didn't really break any new ground and there have been a handful of similar books coming out recently, but it was still a fun read.*Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lorri Steinbacher
    January 1, 1970
    Read in prepub. Due out March 2018. I loved this book so much. I want to put this into the hands of every woman and girl I meet. It was inspirational, even for women's studies loving, hardcore feminist like myself. While the "usual subjects" are included, I was introduced to lesser known icons. It is also just a beautiful physical object. I read it digitally, but immediately placed my order for the book.
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  • Rachel- Goodbye Borders
    January 1, 1970
    eARC courtesy of Random House and NetGalley.Publishes on March 6, 2018
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    This book was amazing! I loved how each blurb about the particular women read as though it was in a story context....not just random facts thrown together. I learned so much from this gem of a book; there were even some people in here that I had never heard of. In short, this book is going to stay on my bookshelf and I will pass it down to my daughter!Thanks to Random House for the ARC!
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book, it’s such a lovely little introduction to so many wonderful historical figures who have done great things to forge the way for women. I especially appreciated the inclusion of modern women (ex. Hilary Clinton and Oprah), and really enjoyed how a range of professions (surgeon, lawyer, scientist, etc.) and cultures (European, American, Japanese, South American, etc.) were represented. I definitely learned a thing or two! Thanks NetGalley and Random House for the ARC.
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  • Christina Cathcart
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully illustrated guidebook to some of the strongest women in herstory.
  • Melissa Rochelle
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful illustrations & fascinating women make up this little gem of a read. It is a great intro to many feminist icons and will make you want to go out and read more about each of the women mentioned.
  • ankita
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced digital copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The Little Book of Feminist Saints took a different approach to the biographical anthologies that are out there. It was refreshing to read about these influential women, with many women that haven't been mentioned in other similar works, and their own words or anecdotes. Reading not just what these women contributed to the world but also their motivations and thoughts behind their actions made this anthology spec I received an advanced digital copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The Little Book of Feminist Saints took a different approach to the biographical anthologies that are out there. It was refreshing to read about these influential women, with many women that haven't been mentioned in other similar works, and their own words or anecdotes. Reading not just what these women contributed to the world but also their motivations and thoughts behind their actions made this anthology special. Highly recommend this book!
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  • Jade
    January 1, 1970
    Created and written by Julia Pierpoint and with illustrations by Manjit Thapp, this little book is compiled in the same manner as a little book of Catholic saints is: each “saint” is a woman (or two, or even a group of women) who made a difference, stood out, inspired us, and still continue to inspire us. Each icon contains a feast date, and a picture where they are portrayed in “saint-like” fashion (if you have ever seen a Catholic prayer card you will know what I mean). There is also a short s Created and written by Julia Pierpoint and with illustrations by Manjit Thapp, this little book is compiled in the same manner as a little book of Catholic saints is: each “saint” is a woman (or two, or even a group of women) who made a difference, stood out, inspired us, and still continue to inspire us. Each icon contains a feast date, and a picture where they are portrayed in “saint-like” fashion (if you have ever seen a Catholic prayer card you will know what I mean). There is also a short summary of each woman’s life alongside each entry.What I really loved about the summaries is that they are never a standard biography, something that one could find with a few clicks on the internet. Instead they are real anecdotes, snippets of a conversation, an extraordinary accomplishment accompanied by a tiny detail of significant importance, or just some information that isn’t readily known about the person. It really made me want to actually go out and get to know more about quite a few of the women depicted in the book!The list of women chosen is very interesting. The book includes women from around the world but the focus is mainly US-centric. I felt like I learnt about some personalities that I had never heard of before which was pretty cool. The usual suspects can be found (Frida Kahlo, Marie Curie, Maya Angelou etc), but other lesser celebrated but equally important women are also featured, such as Junko Tabei, Grace Hopper, the Grimké Sisters,. I didn’t realize that Delores Huerta, and not her union co-founder Cesar Chavez, was the one who coined the phrase “Si, se puede!”! I did find that there were some figures that I would not have typically thought of as feminist icons, and some that were missing. There is a page at the end of the book where you can add your own personal “matron saint” which I thought was a nice touch. This is a well thought-out book, a collection of amazing women who should all have their own special places in history. I’m going to enjoy reading pages to my kids when they get a little older. I LOVE that it includes ALL women, diverse and inclusive. I think I would have just liked to have seen more information in the summaries, but if that had been the case it probably wouldn’t really have fitted into the whole “book of saints” idea. I would have liked to see some mention of British Suffragettes, or Alice Paul for example. The illustrations are beautiful - each picture bears a good likeness to the character they are portraying while conveying strength and resilience. You can also see each woman’s personality shine through the illustrations, something that takes a ton of talent and imagination to do!The Little Book of Feminist Saints will be published by Random House on March 6, 2018.Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    This is the kind of book you want to gift to all your friends, and bonus, it comes with an important theme!I enjoyed this little book a lot, but it’s so difficult for me not to compare this to Rejected Princesses: Tales of History's Boldest Heroines, Hellions, and Heretics by Jason Porath. Rejected Princesses was published just a few years ago but communicates the same theme (plus more) in a much larger volume. I kept trying to remind myself that these two books serve different purposes… but the This is the kind of book you want to gift to all your friends, and bonus, it comes with an important theme!I enjoyed this little book a lot, but it’s so difficult for me not to compare this to Rejected Princesses: Tales of History's Boldest Heroines, Hellions, and Heretics by Jason Porath. Rejected Princesses was published just a few years ago but communicates the same theme (plus more) in a much larger volume. I kept trying to remind myself that these two books serve different purposes… but there’s so much crossover. If I hadn’t read Porath’s work first, I would have given this 4 stars.What this collection does well is give you bite-sized information on a bunch of important ladies and why they’re so inspiring. It’s the perfect coffee table book. It also includes a diverse assortment of women, many of whom are still living today—which I think is especially significant because it reinforces the message that we have role models all around us.One big issue I have with this book (aside from my early disclaimer), is that many of the entries don’t include dates of events. You get the birth year of the woman on each entry, but often the defining moment that is presented has no timeline; Frida Kahlo’s entry begins with a traffic collision which changes her life; Marsha Johnson’s entry begins with the Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village. Maybe I’m an outlier here, but I had no idea what year these things happened, and I took to assuming for most of these women that the events were 20-30 years after they were born, but it’s frustrating not to have that small piece of information in front of you.Lastly, I wish the title were something like The Little Book of Feminist Leaders, or Idols, or Role Models, or honestly just anything else. I feel strange about considering Madonna, Elizabeth I, Hillary Clinton, and Pussy Riot as “saints.” Applying that word to anyone in this book is just weird. I get that it was inspired by the saint of the day book, but that antiquated classification on such a modern title twangs in my head like an untuned instrument.I received an advance copy of this book from Netgalley.See more of my reviews: Blog // Instagram
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    I think this book could be good or incredibly disappointing, depending up what you're looking to get out of it.  Speaking for myself, I wanted another Rejected Princesses.  I wanted a book with the stories of powerful women and all their contributions.  That is not quite what I got, so I was understandably disappointed.Here is where The Little Book of Feminist Saints excels:- It highlights 100+ women from different time periods and different walks of life and the contributions they have made.- I I think this book could be good or incredibly disappointing, depending up what you're looking to get out of it.  Speaking for myself, I wanted another Rejected Princesses.  I wanted a book with the stories of powerful women and all their contributions.  That is not quite what I got, so I was understandably disappointed.Here is where The Little Book of Feminist Saints excels:- It highlights 100+ women from different time periods and different walks of life and the contributions they have made.- It's light and easy reading.- It's illustrated, which is always fun.Here is where it fell short for me:- The entries are organized by "feast day", so you're jumping all over the globe and across time to very different women who have done very different things.  The flow is really broken in that way.- Some of the entries are well done, but others are less focused on the women in question and more focused on an event surrounding them.  Personally, I'd've preferred information on the women.- In entries where more than one woman was represented, the blurb tended to focus on one or the other.- In Josephine Baker's entry, an anonymous YouTube comment is quoted?  That really bugged me.Overall, I don't feel like I really learned anything from this book and ended up skimming a lot, trying to find portions that talked about the women themselves instead of random things (Anne Frank's entry was largely about a tree).  I believe The Little Book of Feminist Saints would serve well as a pocket guide or daily calendar, but doesn't really suit this book format.  It could be used as a launching board to find incredible women, then research and learn about them elsewhere.
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  • sleepywriter
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Welp. The title of this book doesn't lie - it is a very little book. Which perhaps leads to my 3 star review... Pierpont did a great job giving us quick little stories about a lot of women who have done amazing stuff. However, sometimes her reason for including the women in this collection didn't come across very well. Sometimes, the story she told about the feminist was more about people in the feminist's life instead of the a I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Welp. The title of this book doesn't lie - it is a very little book. Which perhaps leads to my 3 star review... Pierpont did a great job giving us quick little stories about a lot of women who have done amazing stuff. However, sometimes her reason for including the women in this collection didn't come across very well. Sometimes, the story she told about the feminist was more about people in the feminist's life instead of the actual feminist. For the women I did know about, I wasn't sure why she picked the stories she did. It was kind of odd. It's definitely a quick read, which was nice. And the information provided seemed well-researched and interesting and I did learn some interesting info on women I didn't even know existed. I don't know how to phrase it... the book just seemed to be lacking something to me.
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  • Lili
    January 1, 1970
    From Netgalley for review:I loved this book, a wonderful collection of brief stories of amazing women who bettered the world not just for other ladies but for the human race. Each entry is accompanied by a really nice portrait of each of the women. My only complaint was that each snippet was so short, I wish they were longer!
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  • E Vikander
    January 1, 1970
    I like the premise of this collection, but was disappointed in the execution. The selections had variety in race, nationality, and time. However, some seemed frivolous, such as Bea Arthur, Madonna, and Mae West – to name a few. The content and writing style was average and most of the illustrations were unrecognizable. I really wanted to like this book, but did not.
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  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! Little bite-sized stories of powerful and inspiring women of diverse cultures, ethnicities, and sexual/gender orientations. The illustrations for each saint were also wonderful. I loved the art style. This book is very similar to another I just read, Brazen by Pénélope Bagieu. Both books highlighted a variety of feminist figures. The main difference between the two is that Brazen basically gives an overview of the person's life, while Little Book focuses primarily on anecdotes I loved this book! Little bite-sized stories of powerful and inspiring women of diverse cultures, ethnicities, and sexual/gender orientations. The illustrations for each saint were also wonderful. I loved the art style. This book is very similar to another I just read, Brazen by Pénélope Bagieu. Both books highlighted a variety of feminist figures. The main difference between the two is that Brazen basically gives an overview of the person's life, while Little Book focuses primarily on anecdotes about the person. Pierpont says that is her goal for Little Book, and I'm glad she did it. We need more humanizing stories like this. But if you're looking for a biography of these saints, you'll need something much more thorough. This would be a great place to start if you're looking for someone a bit under-known. Thanks to Edelweiss+ for the ARC.
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  • Helen Power
    January 1, 1970
    Review coming soon!
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