The Little Queen
When her mother and father pass away, the little queen must figure out how to be a little queen. And so she begins her adventures, journeying away from her palace and into the world to determine how she should go about going on. The little queen soon encounters numerous folks who teach her a thing or two: the book sniffer, the dream writer, and the architect of silence are just a few. Along the way, the little queen finds friendship, love, and meaning in being a leader in her world. The Little Queen is a magical exploration of self-discovery, vocation, community, and home.

The Little Queen Details

TitleThe Little Queen
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 1st, 2017
PublisherPoetose Press
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, Glbt, Fiction

The Little Queen Review

  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    The Little Queen by Meia Geddes is the author’s second book. Geddes is also an artist, folding intricate paper cranes. She sometimes binds her own little booklets complete with her own watercolor birds. Her previous book Love Letters to the World is a collection of lyrical letters written as poetry. Geddes is also working her her way to becoming a world-class librarian.I usually don’t read contemporary fiction, especially if it is written as a fable (think children’s story). Fables seemed to be The Little Queen by Meia Geddes is the author’s second book. Geddes is also an artist, folding intricate paper cranes. She sometimes binds her own little booklets complete with her own watercolor birds. Her previous book Love Letters to the World is a collection of lyrical letters written as poetry. Geddes is also working her her way to becoming a world-class librarian.I usually don’t read contemporary fiction, especially if it is written as a fable (think children’s story). Fables seemed to be a major source of the stories I heard when I was growing up. These relatively short stories held the reader’s (or more importantly the read to’s) attention and presented a moral or lesson at the end of the story. I haven’t seen many new versions of these stories since my childhood. They seem to have fallen out of favor to video and interactive media.Geddes brings back the magic of storytelling with The Little Queen. A young princess suddenly finds herself ascended to the rank of queen after losing her parents. In an attempt to find herself, or trade her position of queen for something she can understand, she goes on a journey. Her journey introduces her a variety of people who would have typically have been wood cutters and candle makers in the past. The people she meets have received creative updates in job titles and descriptions. Each offers a bit of advice or discovery to the Little Queen and as in all fables, the young queen also finds love which develops in a very innocent manner.The Little Queen is a charming and likable story. It is well written, and Geddes shows her cleverness and imagination in the storytelling. This fable is also wonderfully illustrated by Sara Zieve Miller. Although it is not my usual reading, I enjoyed it very much. It is rare that something outside of my normal reading holds my attention like The Little Queen. Extremely well done.Available August 1, 2017
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  • Liv (Olivia Chanel's Galaxy of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Poetose Press and NetGalley, for my eARC of The Little Queen. I really appreciate the chance to read and review it early.The Little Queen by Meia Geddes starts with two simple sentences that lay the basis for the entire story: "On a little world, upon a little hill, a little tear fell down a little face. A little girl was now a little queen." The story follows a little queen who lost her parents and is now trying to figure out how she can be a little queen, and if it’s something she c Thank you, Poetose Press and NetGalley, for my eARC of The Little Queen. I really appreciate the chance to read and review it early.The Little Queen by Meia Geddes starts with two simple sentences that lay the basis for the entire story: "On a little world, upon a little hill, a little tear fell down a little face. A little girl was now a little queen." The story follows a little queen who lost her parents and is now trying to figure out how she can be a little queen, and if it’s something she can be. She is filled with insecurities and a bit of sadness too. To figure it all out, the little queen goes on several adventures and meets a lot of different women that teach her lessons about life and about who she is. Along the way, she even falls in love with a girl."Each of them admired the other’s ears and eyes and smiles, and in that moment both of them knew that they had fallen in love."The Little Queen is a book I truly want everyone to read. It is basically the sapphic fairytale everyone deserves in their life. Not only is the story suitable for everyone, both young people and the old, it is also a story I feel will bring light and warmth to everyone who reads it. The story is simple, pure and just beautiful. The Little Queen is a novella, unlike anything I have read before which is also why I fell in love with it. I can with confidence recommend it to everyone who likes fantasy books, to people who love it when a book reads like a fairytale and to everyone who loves a story that is both unique and adorable. The Little Queen is the fairytale we all deserve, one written by a woman of color and is about girls loving other girls. Meia Geddes is definitely on my radar from now on. I want to buy a physical copy of this book just so that I can read it to my children one day if I were to have them."When the little queen moved her hands through air and earth and swung her legs forward in long, steady strides, she felt a tingling. Lying in fields, she looked up at the sky and thought how the clouds looked like clusters of stars and how the stars looked like tiny suns."I love The Little Queen, the writing is both beautiful and lyrical and the book itself explores topics revolving who and what we are, where we belong in the world, and where we want to go. Moreover, when The Little Queen goes on a journey of self-discovery and love, you find yourself doing the same. The book is feminist and filled with strong women so sure of themselves and I think no matter your age or preferred genre, this book has something to give to everyone. Don’t miss it when The Little Queen by Meia Geddes comes out August 1, 2017.
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  • Silvana [The Book Voyagers]
    January 1, 1970
    I was really intrigued by this though Netgalley marketed it as poetry which technically it is not? Still the writing is lyrical and has so many metas you will fall in love. The Little Queen is about the little queen thinking she doesn't know how to be a queen in her kingdom, so she sets on an adventure throughout the world to meet new people. She grows from these encounters and learns so many new things. She finds many friendships and even love. I want to shout because I didn't know this was F/F I was really intrigued by this though Netgalley marketed it as poetry which technically it is not? Still the writing is lyrical and has so many metas you will fall in love. The Little Queen is about the little queen thinking she doesn't know how to be a queen in her kingdom, so she sets on an adventure throughout the world to meet new people. She grows from these encounters and learns so many new things. She finds many friendships and even love. I want to shout because I didn't know this was F/F? And IT'S AMAZING. The relationship is so cute and simple and just *sighs in love* you all. Written by an author of color, I will recommend you all to support Meia! It's a short story where you will find that your time spent on this will be so worth it. You'll find beautiful art inside that will help you see how the little queen sees around herself. Plus I love the fact that throughout all her journey, the little queen meets female characters so I would like to think that it's a world where only-woman kingdoms exist and that's fabulous.
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  • Madalyn (Novel Ink)
    January 1, 1970
    This review originally appeared on Novel Ink.I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.I hadn’t previously heard much about The Little Queen, but I stumbled across it during one of my Netgalley requesting sprees recently (come on, you know you’ve gone on those) and saw that many of my friends had read it. I discovered an adorable, fluffy novella that also wove in some deeper themes. Head up, this is pro This review originally appeared on Novel Ink.I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.I hadn’t previously heard much about The Little Queen, but I stumbled across it during one of my Netgalley requesting sprees recently (come on, you know you’ve gone on those) and saw that many of my friends had read it. I discovered an adorable, fluffy novella that also wove in some deeper themes. Head up, this is probably going to be a short review, because 1.) it’s a short book (~100 pages), and 2.) this book is whimsical to the point that it makes it almost impossible to describe.Netgalley classifies The Little Queen as poetry, which I…. don’t understand. While the prose is incredibly lyrical and lovely, it’s decidedly still prose. Also, I’m having a crisis trying to classify the age range of this book. I believe both Goodreads and Netgalley list it as YA, but it reads in the style of a children’s fairytale and contains the whimsy of a middle grade novel. Regardless, I think it does have some crossover appeal for YA readers who don’t normally pick up middle grade books, and vice versa.The story follows the titular character, the little queen, immediately following the death of her parents (it wouldn’t be a fairytale without dead parents. sigh.). She sets out to see the world, get to know people who live differently than she does, and hopefully find her purpose in the process. She meets a fascinating array of characters throughout her journey, each of whom teaches her something she takes back to her kingdom with her. She also finds love along the way– The Little Queen features an adorable, innocent f/f romance, which, as you can imagine, warmed my lil queer heart. Though on a surface level this book reads like a children’s story, it deals with some heavier topics like processing grief, becoming your own person, and the way that the people we meet throughout our lives shape us irrevocably as people. These themes were subtly woven into the narrative. Overall, I think this was a cleverly written book.Another thing I enjoyed: in addition to the f/f romance, all of the characters the little queen meets are women! Literally, every single one of them (except the little queen’s father, who is only briefly mentioned). I also loved the illustrations, done by Sara Zieve Miller– the writing conjures vivid imagery, so I enjoyed seeing these images on the page in illustration form.Ultimately, though I found The Little Queen enjoyable, I think it just didn’t explore the deeper themes that were touched on thoroughly enough. It felt pretty frivolous at times. I also don’t do well with ultra-whimsical books like this one, which is not this book’s fault. Just a personal preference.Overall, though, I’d recommend this novella to anyone looking for a quick, fairytale-like read that incorporates lots of diversity!
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  • Catherine ♡
    January 1, 1970
    *Thank you to Poetose Press and NetGalley for an eARC of this book. This review is my full and honest opinion.*Actual Rating: 4This book was so precious.Growing up, I listened to the same fairy tales as everyone else - Cinderella and Aladdin and The Sleeping Beauty - but they were never my favorites. My favorite was The Light Princess, a Scottish story about a princess who was cursed to be unaffected by gravity.For some reason, this book brought me back - way back - to my childhood days, and The *Thank you to Poetose Press and NetGalley for an eARC of this book. This review is my full and honest opinion.*Actual Rating: 4This book was so precious.Growing up, I listened to the same fairy tales as everyone else - Cinderella and Aladdin and The Sleeping Beauty - but they were never my favorites. My favorite was The Light Princess, a Scottish story about a princess who was cursed to be unaffected by gravity.For some reason, this book brought me back - way back - to my childhood days, and The Little Queen had the same sort of nostalgia and sparkling innocence that fairy tales typically have. But it did feel more than that.Something about this book also reminded me a bit of The Little Prince (and I'm sure it's not just the title). But both stories had a main character who looked at the world with a wondrous curiosity, and as a reader it was impossible to not feel the same warmth.The writing was lyrical and beautiful, and the sketches in the book definitely added to the cozy atmosphere. This is definitely a book I think people of all ages could enjoy. I'll remember to read it to my own children fifteen years from now - and maybe it'll become their favorite.
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  • Maé (readwithmae)
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided a copy through Net Galley in exchange of an honest review.This was a quick and absolutely delightful read. We follow the adventures of a little queen who just lost her parents and don't know how to be a little queen. This is a story about self-discovery, friendship, grief, love, and everything that makes us human. The poetic writing kind of reminded me of The Little Prince, stating deep thoughts about humans, relationship, life etc through simple sentences. The writing was absolut I was provided a copy through Net Galley in exchange of an honest review.This was a quick and absolutely delightful read. We follow the adventures of a little queen who just lost her parents and don't know how to be a little queen. This is a story about self-discovery, friendship, grief, love, and everything that makes us human. The poetic writing kind of reminded me of The Little Prince, stating deep thoughts about humans, relationship, life etc through simple sentences. The writing was absolutely amazing. This is the kind of book that sets you in a good and philosophical mood.Also I was greatly surprised to find an f/f romance! It is finally time that we include queer relationships in children books.I highly recommend this book.
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  • Thai (ReadBreatheRepeat)
    January 1, 1970
    Bless this cute f/f fairytale with incredible writing, so light and too adorable to handle. The world needs more books like this.The Little Queen follows the little queen after she loses her parents and finds herself as the new queen of her kingdom. But she's unsure of herself, not confident she can fill that position, so she starts a journey to help her be a better little queen. In the road she finds more than what she wished for; new friends, love, cultures... it's enchanting to read. This sto Bless this cute f/f fairytale with incredible writing, so light and too adorable to handle. The world needs more books like this.The Little Queen follows the little queen after she loses her parents and finds herself as the new queen of her kingdom. But she's unsure of herself, not confident she can fill that position, so she starts a journey to help her be a better little queen. In the road she finds more than what she wished for; new friends, love, cultures... it's enchanting to read. This storytelling is so lyric and beautiful. It has that fable feel that I haven't read in a really long time, plus with some adorable art to illustrate the little queen's adventures. It's different from what I was expecting but that just made me enjoy it that much more.I received this book via NetGalley in return for an honest review.
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  • Lucille
    January 1, 1970
    [4,5/5 That was wonderful!!!]
  • The Night Reader
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved this book! It's a very quick read but so beautifully written. I'll write a more detailed review on my blog very soon!
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 44%.Once upon a time there was a little princess who became a little queen when both her parents died unexpectedly. Grieving, lost, and confused, the little queen decides to embark upon a great adventure, traveling the world to learn more about her subjects - and perhaps persuade one of them to take her place. She is not quite sure what a queen does, but whatever it is, she does not think it for her. And so she comes to meet the book sniffer, the dream writer, the sawyer, and the foreshad DNF at 44%.Once upon a time there was a little princess who became a little queen when both her parents died unexpectedly. Grieving, lost, and confused, the little queen decides to embark upon a great adventure, traveling the world to learn more about her subjects - and perhaps persuade one of them to take her place. She is not quite sure what a queen does, but whatever it is, she does not think it for her. And so she comes to meet the book sniffer, the dream writer, the sawyer, and the foreshadowing artist, and ... well, I'm not sure what happens next, because I gave up right around this point.It's not that The Little Queen is a bad book. The writing is lyrical and whimsical and has a dreamlike quality to it. I like the idea of a little queen getting out there and doing her thing, and I love that all the people she meets - from architects to librarians to artists - are women. And the various occupations are pretty darned creative. But.I had a hard time determining the intended audience for this book. The style of writing makes it feel like a kids' fairy tale, yet there are a fair number of Jeopardy words sprinkled throughout. It feels quite young, until it doesn't. Perhaps more importantly, I simply couldn't get invested in the story. There isn't much plot to speak of, and the little queen as a character is one-dimensional. I just didn't care about her much, one way or the other. That said, I notice that several reviewers have marked this as a f/f fairy tale, so perhaps it's worth a second look.(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through NetGalley.)http://www.easyvegan.info/2017/08/07/...
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  • Rie
    January 1, 1970
    The Little Queen is one of the most beautiful books I have read this year. It also has a half-chapter turn on a poop joke. This dichotomy is one of the reasons I love it so much.To start, we have a little queen, who loses her parents and sets out to find out who she is, what she's about, and how, in fact, to be a little queen. She learns much about being just about everyone else in the world--book sniffers, season painters, animal singers and other curious folks--but still, in the end, does not The Little Queen is one of the most beautiful books I have read this year. It also has a half-chapter turn on a poop joke. This dichotomy is one of the reasons I love it so much.To start, we have a little queen, who loses her parents and sets out to find out who she is, what she's about, and how, in fact, to be a little queen. She learns much about being just about everyone else in the world--book sniffers, season painters, animal singers and other curious folks--but still, in the end, does not know how to be a little queen. Along the way, she circles the world, falls in love, and discovers, in fact, what all the folk of her little world are meant to do.Geddes has such an original, poetic way of writing--phrases and ideas circle back on each others, weaving like song, and full of wistful ideas that unfold in second and third readings. The story is a poetic fairy tale for the ageless, in the tradition of The Man With The Dancing EyesThe Man with Dancing Eyes and The Size of the WorldThe Size of the World, and ends with two women in love and making the little world a better place--what could be more delightful? With heart and soul, in a whimsical world come alive with art and philosophy (and with beautiful airy illustrations by Sara Zieve Miller), The Little Queen is a gorgeous read.ARC received from NetGalley in return for an honest review. Review also appears on my blog, : Friend of Dorothy Wilde
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  • Lauren Aquino
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC courtesy of Net Galley. Make sure to get your copy when it comes out tomorrow, August 1st!The Little Queen was a lovely, unique bit of lyrical prose. The plot was simplistic but powerful–it was reminiscent of a childhood fairy tale in the best possible way. Although it was almost too adorable to handle at times, the theme of self-discovery was quite mature and thought-provoking. I thoroughly enjoyed the Little Queen’s journey and the cast of diverse characters she interacted I received this ARC courtesy of Net Galley. Make sure to get your copy when it comes out tomorrow, August 1st!The Little Queen was a lovely, unique bit of lyrical prose. The plot was simplistic but powerful–it was reminiscent of a childhood fairy tale in the best possible way. Although it was almost too adorable to handle at times, the theme of self-discovery was quite mature and thought-provoking. I thoroughly enjoyed the Little Queen’s journey and the cast of diverse characters she interacted with along the way.The reason I give this four instead of five stars is that even though the book was short and sweet and simple, there were parts that seemed meandering and unnecessary, or where the prose fell short. I would have liked to see a bit more consistency in the eloquence of the novel. Other than the few lapses, though, the writing style was gorgeous. Some of my favorite lines included:“The little queen had the frighteningly ecstatic realization that she was there for herself”“The rain fell against the tent in a rough rhythm that made her heart feel like resting”I would compare this to the game to Monument Valley (if you haven’t played it, go check it out and you’ll see what I mean)–it is minimalist, elegant, and, for lack of a better word, aesthetic. I’d definitely recommend The Little Queen for those looking for a light, nostalgic, and heart-warming read.
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  • Amy Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very odd novella. It starts out with beautiful wording about a princess who loses her parents and becomes the little queen. It's hard to understand or get to know the little queen and she goes on odd "adventures" meeting a book sniffer, wall sawyer, leaf gluer, seasons painter, fish talker, dream writer, Dream counter, window builder, the lotioner, plant whisperer, perfumer, sleep soother, poop encourager among others. There isn't much depth given to the main character and she tries to This is a very odd novella. It starts out with beautiful wording about a princess who loses her parents and becomes the little queen. It's hard to understand or get to know the little queen and she goes on odd "adventures" meeting a book sniffer, wall sawyer, leaf gluer, seasons painter, fish talker, dream writer, Dream counter, window builder, the lotioner, plant whisperer, perfumer, sleep soother, poop encourager among others. There isn't much depth given to the main character and she tries to pass off her title to anyone before deciding she doesn't want to. Then she gets married as a very young child. I truly didn't see this as poetry or a children's book and I didn't enjoy it. Govern free copy by NetGalley and publisher for a fair & honest review.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    The Little Queen has lost her parents and left to be Queen. She does not want to be Queen so she goes on a series of journies to find someone to take her place. She meets lots of interesting characters and learns more about the world outside of her walls.In an Oyster Shell - I didn't understand the purpose of the book and it was inconsistent in the message.The Pearls - The Little Queen is lyrical and imaginative. It's short so can easily be read in one sitting.Full Review: Writing Pearls
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  • Sarah Hurley
    January 1, 1970
    A really unusual and charming book, this feels older than it is if that makes sense, very classic and with lots of meaning and messages throughout. It's a hard one to put into words, but a definite must read. A really beautiful book!
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very strange book and I honestly didn't get the jist of it. There were some little details that I did like but the majority of the time it just felt like some weird philosophical writing. All I could keep thinking is what the hell is this...
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  • Yaiza
    January 1, 1970
    This was a cute story that read as a fairytale. I loved how it was narrated and that it was a trip of self discovery but it felt too bizarre at points. The fact that it had such a sweer f/f romance was a welcome surprise as well!
  • Randy Ross
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written, quirky, moving, and fun. The illustrations are gorgeous. I read it in one sitting. The book reminded me of Shel Silverstein's famous quest story "The Missing Piece."
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    This story is beyond precious. It is lyrical, sweet, and amazingly affirmative. It is everything I wish I was read as a child, and everything I can read to my future, way in the future, children. There is a f/f relationship in it, there are people embodying their own choices, and the acceptance of those living in their own skin. Topping it all off is the absolutely wonderful way it is written, and the voice within. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from This story is beyond precious. It is lyrical, sweet, and amazingly affirmative. It is everything I wish I was read as a child, and everything I can read to my future, way in the future, children. There is a f/f relationship in it, there are people embodying their own choices, and the acceptance of those living in their own skin. Topping it all off is the absolutely wonderful way it is written, and the voice within. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Maygin Reads
    January 1, 1970
    The Little Queen is a beautiful children’s story about a girl who becomes a little queen upon the death of her parents. She does not want to be a little queen and sets out on an adventure to try to find someone who would like to be a little queen. Along the way, she meets many characters whose names define what they do, but it is rude in the kingdom to ask someone what they do. The explanation is one of my favorite lines:“Asking what one did was like asking who they were, and that was too simple The Little Queen is a beautiful children’s story about a girl who becomes a little queen upon the death of her parents. She does not want to be a little queen and sets out on an adventure to try to find someone who would like to be a little queen. Along the way, she meets many characters whose names define what they do, but it is rude in the kingdom to ask someone what they do. The explanation is one of my favorite lines:“Asking what one did was like asking who they were, and that was too simple a question for a very complex answer."There are many other beautiful lines that convey much depth and insight. For example:“‘You must pay attention to your obsessions, where life and love intersect...’"“...in the early morning there came a sliver of time in which everything was a beginning, a rebirth of dreams.”“Walking and writing and running are very purposeful activities, but living we just happen to do regardless, … But most of us cannot not live and live, at least that I know of, so maybe the next best thing is to ponder not living and then to live.”The Little Queen is part adventure, part philosophy, and part a reminder of embracing who we are. This makes it a wonderful children’s book, while also being an engaging and thought-provoking book for adults. It reminded me a bit of the Fairlyland series which starts with The Girl who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of her Own Making. I would love to see more of the little queen.There is a bit of lesbian instalove, but it is sweet and enduring in a way which makes it not feel like instalove. But this book is not really about romance or this love - the love story is another small piece of a book which provides so much more to its readers.It is a bit hard to describe this book without giving away much of the story and likely ruining the joy of discovering its beauty for oneself. It is a book everyone should read, young and old, as a fun, whimsical, thoughtful change of pace. It is a very quick read, with beautiful illustrations and language. You will not be disappointed if you read it. I cannot wait to see what else Meia Geddes writes.I received this ebook free from Netgalley and publisher Poetose Press in exchange for an honest review.This review originally posted on my blog. Please consider checking it out!
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  • Alyssa Marie
    January 1, 1970
    I received an eARC of this from netgalley in exchange for an honest reviewOkay so in all honesty, I just couldn't finish this. It just got boring and confusing. At first it seemed cute and kinda whimsical, but then it just fell so flat I stopped caring. I'm not going to rate this because I came nowhere close to finishing it was couldn't give it an honest rating.
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  • vvb
    January 1, 1970
    This sweet whimsical-like book is a story of a journey where nuggets of wisdom are found with each person met.
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