Do You Dream of Terra-Two?
The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet meets The 100 in this unforgettable debut by a brilliant new voice.A century ago, scientists theorised that a habitable planet existed in a nearby solar system. Today, ten astronauts will leave a dying Earth to find it. Four are decorated veterans of the 20th century’s space-race. And six are teenagers, graduates of the exclusive Dalton Academy, who’ve been in training for this mission for most of their lives.It will take the team 23 years to reach Terra-Two. Twenty-three years spent in close quarters. Twenty-three years with no one to rely on but each other. Twenty-three years with no rescue possible, should something go wrong. And something always goes wrong.

Do You Dream of Terra-Two? Details

TitleDo You Dream of Terra-Two?
Author
ReleaseMar 7th, 2019
PublisherSimon & Schuster
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction

Do You Dream of Terra-Two? Review

  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
    January 1, 1970
    LOOK
  • Emer
    January 1, 1970
    publishing this weekfrom the blurb...A century ago, scientists theorised that a habitable planet existed in a nearby solar system. Today, ten astronauts will leave a dying Earth to find it. Four are decorated veterans of the 20th century’s space-race. And six are teenagers, graduates of the exclusive Dalton Academy, who’ve been in training for this mission for most of their lives.It will take the team 23 years to reach Terra-Two. Twenty-three years spent in close quarters. Twenty-three years wit publishing this weekfrom the blurb...A century ago, scientists theorised that a habitable planet existed in a nearby solar system. Today, ten astronauts will leave a dying Earth to find it. Four are decorated veterans of the 20th century’s space-race. And six are teenagers, graduates of the exclusive Dalton Academy, who’ve been in training for this mission for most of their lives.It will take the team 23 years to reach Terra-Two. Twenty-three years spent in close quarters. Twenty-three years with no one to rely on but each other. Twenty-three years with no rescue possible, should something go wrong. And something always goes wrong.Do You Dream of Terra-Two? is a sci-fi novel that uses an alternative history to tell the story of how humanity hopes to populate a far-flung habitable planet named Terra-Two because our own earth is slowly dying. The book uses alternate viewpoints of the six youngest crew members of the spaceship Damocles to tell us the story of this space flight to another solar system. These six characters are graduates of a prestigious school that trained only the brightest and the best with one target in mind; that of taking to the skies for the twenty-three year mission to Terra-Two. This is very much a slow burning read that focuses a lot more on character rather than action. In the beginning it's a little difficult to fully engage with each of the six characters because the points of view are never written directly from the first person perspective. However, ultimately I really liked this style of narrative and found that it actually really works to tell this particular story. The slight detachment from the characters really added to the closed atmosphere of the spaceship environment and heightened many of the tensions that came to fruition with living in such close quarters to other people. I very much enjoyed that each of the main characters were quietly flawed and were not always likeable. And I liked how each of the characters had their own story arc relevant to their personalities and how by the end I truly felt like I had been on a journey with them. I did think that perhaps the book was a little too long at times especially as the real action of the book didn't happen until the 70% mark and this is a book with more than 500 pages. However, I wasn't ever bored once and was always 100% invested in the storyline. I'm a big fan of the ending of the book. It leaves room for the reader to imagine endings they might themselves imagine for each of the characters but without leaving the ending too open-ended. I was very moved by some of the actions of the main characters during the last few pages and had to wipe away a few tears as I closed the book. Recommended to those who like slow burning character studies. four stars. *An e-copy of this book was kindly provided to me by the publisher, Simon and Schuster UK Fiction, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    I'm in love with this book.It is a hugely compelling character driven drama, from the feet on the ground to the start of an epic journey through space, by the time you come to the end of this gorgeously immersive debut you will almost certainly be dreaming of Terra-two.Mere children still when they start their training, Harry, Jesse, Juno, Astrid, Aria Eliot and Poppy have different feelings and reasons for their determination to be part of the beta crew who will spend over two decades in space I'm in love with this book.It is a hugely compelling character driven drama, from the feet on the ground to the start of an epic journey through space, by the time you come to the end of this gorgeously immersive debut you will almost certainly be dreaming of Terra-two.Mere children still when they start their training, Harry, Jesse, Juno, Astrid, Aria Eliot and Poppy have different feelings and reasons for their determination to be part of the beta crew who will spend over two decades in space attempted to colonise a new earth. Revered by the nation, thrown into the spotlight, all of this has an affect on their psyche. Temi Oh is a brilliantly descriptive writer when it comes to characterisation and interaction- you will be absorbed into their world, living and dying with them through every up and down.As alliances grow and develop, as actions and consequences abound in various ways, as this small gang of pioneer's go from being classmates among many to only having themselves and each other to rely on, you'll be hooked, emotional and devouring every page. Do You Dream of Terra-two is a very human story, in a lot of ways the fact that it is set in space is almost a secondary concern.What it does is give the author a unique set of challenges and moral dilemma's to throw at her group dynamic and within that explore every aspect of humanity and personality. It is a beautiful, sprawling, literary delight with an unforgettable cast undertaking an unforgettable journey. Completely brilliant, insightful and melancholy, thisis a stunning debut and I adored every damned fine moment of it.Highly Recommended.
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  • Figgy
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come.There were issues, but this was also an advanced proof copy, so maybe these will be fixed in the final copy?There were some problems with pacing around the middle, though the last 100 pages rushed by. Some characters were a lot more well-formed than others, and I did NOT have a clear picture of the ship in my mind. BUT.I will say, this was not what I expected going in, but I am glad to have read it. It's something of a space-romp but with a lot of introspection and character explo Review to come.There were issues, but this was also an advanced proof copy, so maybe these will be fixed in the final copy?There were some problems with pacing around the middle, though the last 100 pages rushed by. Some characters were a lot more well-formed than others, and I did NOT have a clear picture of the ship in my mind. BUT.I will say, this was not what I expected going in, but I am glad to have read it. It's something of a space-romp but with a lot of introspection and character exploration, looking more at the ways in which space might challenge people differently. It's not something I can say I've seen before. Most books in this vein tend to be about the catastrophes and attempting to survive them, and this had some of that, too, for sure. But this seemed to be a more... human exploration of space than we've seen in a lot of books recently.
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  • Jeann (Happy Indulgence)
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this character exploration into a group of young adults who are launched into a space mission to populate a distant planet - covering everything leading up to the point where they form a crew and learn to work with one another. Definitely more character-driven than action-packed and I really enjoyed it!Trigger warnings: anxiety & depression, suicideFull review to come. Check out Happy Indulgence Books for more reviews!
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    There is nothing wrong at all with this book - it just couldn't hold my attention. I read around 20% before calling it quits and those took me months to get through. I found the narrative tone too juvenile; it reads like a YA novel and as such is sure to appeal to lots of other readers. I am not in a good enough reading mood this year and I have too much going on outside of my bookish life to continue reading books I am not enjoying.I received an arc of this book courtesy of NetGalley and Simon There is nothing wrong at all with this book - it just couldn't hold my attention. I read around 20% before calling it quits and those took me months to get through. I found the narrative tone too juvenile; it reads like a YA novel and as such is sure to appeal to lots of other readers. I am not in a good enough reading mood this year and I have too much going on outside of my bookish life to continue reading books I am not enjoying.I received an arc of this book courtesy of NetGalley and Simon and Schuster UK in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tamsien West (Babbling Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Do You Dream of Terra Two? was SO incredibly good. It's a debut character-driven sci-fi novel by a woman of colour that features a diverse cast, and I couldn't get enough. ⠀⠀It's being described by the publisher as "The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet meets The 100", and I couldn't agree more. The characters are all really well developed, and given a share of the focus via switching perspectives.The premise is not particularly unique - a group of teens train in a special academy and become the Do You Dream of Terra Two? was SO incredibly good. It's a debut character-driven sci-fi novel by a woman of colour that features a diverse cast, and I couldn't get enough. ⠀⠀It's being described by the publisher as "The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet meets The 100", and I couldn't agree more. The characters are all really well developed, and given a share of the focus via switching perspectives.The premise is not particularly unique - a group of teens train in a special academy and become the first people to head off into space on an exploration mission to a potentially habitable planet. But the way in which it is executed is so satisfying. The story delves into the ethics of 'grooming' children and teens for positions of responsibility and the potential for this to be considered abuse. It also dives into grief and mental health issues (trigger warning for suicide), navigating friendships, rivalry, love and ambition. It's a powerful debut, and I can't wait to read more of Temi Oh's writing in the future.
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  • ♠️ Tabi ♠️
    January 1, 1970
    oh dear they mentioned two of my favorite things as the influence/comparison for the book I GOTTA HAVE IT NOW
  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: An exhilarating, character-driven debut that touches on such themes as mental illness, the tenuousness of life and death, and the power of true belief. If you’ve ever dreamed of traveling beyond the stars, Do You Dream of Terra-Two? is a must read. It left me breathless. It occurred to Astrid, in a disembodied instant, tha I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: An exhilarating, character-driven debut that touches on such themes as mental illness, the tenuousness of life and death, and the power of true belief. If you’ve ever dreamed of traveling beyond the stars, Do You Dream of Terra-Two? is a must read. It left me breathless. It occurred to Astrid, in a disembodied instant, that already this moment was accelerating away from her. In a second, being young and full of laughter and standing with all her friends on Earth, would be only a memory. Nothing more than a memory ever again. I actually read this book back in September of 2018, because a very kind UK publicist sent me an ARC and asked me to blurb the book. (Which has never happened to me before, so that was fun!) For that reason, I read it six months before publication, which is something I never do. And now I can finally post my review! You guys, I absolutely LOVED Do You Dream of Terra-Two? It’s beautifully written, thoughtful, thrilling and touches on many themes, not the least of which is mental illness. The beginning lulls you into a false sense of ease, a coming-of-age story that imagines a future where the UK has developed a program to establish a colony of humans on the distant planet of Terra-Two, miraculously, a planet that appears to be Earth’s twin. For the past six years, exceptional young people have been studying at the Dalton Academy for Aerospace Science in the hopes of being chosen as one of the Beta, six young astronauts who will take the twenty-three year journey to Terra-Two. The six Beta team members are finally announced, and emotions are running high with those lucky students who were chosen, and those who just missed the cut. Harry, Ara, Poppy, Astrid, Juno and Eliot begin the final preparations for the launch of the Damocles , while Jesse, who was selected as an alternate, mourns the fact that he won’t be going with the others, but must attend the last weeks of training just in case.But right before takeoff, a tragedy occurs that changes everything: Ara, who is having second thoughts after being selected, jumps into the icy Thames and drowns. This opens the door for Jesse to join the crew, although as the mission gets underway, Jesse discovers that most of the other crew members resent him for taking their beloved Ara’s place. And the tension only increases as the Betas, along with the adult crew members, begin to realize just what it means to be cooped up on a ship with the same people for the next twenty-three years. Personality clashes, homesickness, depression, and the ever-present danger of flying through space begin to take their toll, as each of the Betas wonders, Why am I here? What makes me so special? And Am I good enough for this mission?As with most books, it’s best to go into this one with very little information. And so I’ll try not to give too much away, although there are story elements that I must touch on. Do You Dream of Terra-Two? is a most surprising book. If you think you know where the story is going, you just might be wrong. I was. Temi Oh takes her time introducing us to her characters and setting the stage for what’s to come, so if you’re expecting a fast-paced space adventure, you might want to adjust your expectations. And this is by no means a bad thing. Reviewers are comparing this book to A Long Way to a Small Angry Planet for a reason: the characters’ relationships, back-stories and emotional growth are the driving force of everything that happens. And when things take a turn for the worse—and they do—you’ll feel their emotions much more keenly because you know them so well.In addition to the focused, personal aspects of the story, Temi Oh does a great job of showing just how global the “race to space” is. Even though this is alternate history, her comments on the politics of getting people into space and establishing a home on a new planet hit close to home. Oh is a UK author, so of course she’s focusing on the UK space program, but we also get a glimpse of what other countries are doing, especially since the race to get to Terra-Two isn’t limited to the UK. There’s also a Chinese ship called the Shēngmìng that’s also trying to get there (although there is a bit of mystery surrounding that ship!), and I loved the tension this creates with the crew of the Damocles .I want to briefly touch on the way mental illness is portrayed in this story, because it’s a running thread throughout and brings up lots of questions. We already know what happened to Ara, who must have been dealing with depression before the mission even starts. Once the others are in space, the cracks start to show. Eliot “sees” Ara through the windows of the ship, floating in space, and questions whether she’s real or not. Poppy retreats into her cabin after several weeks and is unable to get out of bed. And Juno turns out to have an eating disorder that she tries to hide from the others. The author brings up questions about the pressures of space travel and whether or not the Betas were prepared for the loneliness of space. And I can’t end this review without talking about Astrid. That’s Astrid on the cover, by the way. There is an interesting backstory about the woman behind the founding of the Dalton Academy, a pioneer named Tessa Dalton who had dreams of Terra-Two before anyone even discovered it. She was a prophet of sorts, indirectly responsible for the eventual mission to the planet. Astrid relates to Tessa on an emotional level, so much so that she herself is having dreams about Terra-Two. She’s dreaming impossible things that the scientists insist aren’t real, but could she be a prophet herself? I loved the implications of this idea and the way the author uses this theme as the title of her book.Temi Oh ends her story on a bittersweet note that gave me goosebumps. There are surprises galore in Do You Dream of Terra-Two? , not the least of which is what happens in the last quarter of the story. Ideas and events that popped up in the beginning are brought back at the end to great effect, adding to the “surprise” factor. I know I’m being vague, but honestly, this is a book that needs to be read with as few spoilers as possible. If I’ve convinced you to give it a try, then I’ve done my job. Beautifully written, emotionally resonant and ultimately a story of survival, this book is a must read for all humans.Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy, and additional thanks to the author for hooking me up!Note: This is a review of the UK edition, and for all you U.S. folks out there, the release date of the Saga Press edition was pushed back to Summer 2019.This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy
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  • Bookphenomena (Kindling Micky)
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 - 3 starsThis sci-fi appealed to me on a number of levels. The idea of six young adult astronauts trained from early adolescence for the mission of their lives, alongside seasoned and more mature astronauts really excited me. Add that to a one-way trip to Terra-Two in another star system and I literally asked netgalley to sign me up! The concept was pretty amazing but slow to get off the ground, quite literally. I thought at one point they were never going to leave earth.You’ll be glad to kn 2.5 - 3 starsThis sci-fi appealed to me on a number of levels. The idea of six young adult astronauts trained from early adolescence for the mission of their lives, alongside seasoned and more mature astronauts really excited me. Add that to a one-way trip to Terra-Two in another star system and I literally asked netgalley to sign me up! The concept was pretty amazing but slow to get off the ground, quite literally. I thought at one point they were never going to leave earth.You’ll be glad to know that they did launch. The young astronauts went from interesting to messed up and somewhat annoying. There actually wasn’t one of them I liked. I did like a number of the mature astronauts and craved more focus on them or more focus on the relationship between the two age groups. Unfortunately, that didn’t happen. There was drama, there were unexpected incidents and I just didn’t find it very satisfying. The culmination left me deflated.I really wanted so much from this story but I found it lacked execution with pacing issues throughout. The story had great potential and some parts were interesting but ultimately it wasn’t enough to satisfy my need to enjoy the read.I voluntarily read an early copy of this book.
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  • imyril
    January 1, 1970
    Hmmm. I don’t think the elevator pitch captures this book at all. Those hoping for a Wayfarer vibe are likely to be disappointed. If I’m honest, this didn’t really work for me; I found it a mixed bag of intriguing character drama followed by unconvincing/convenient right turns. I’m conscious I read an early ARC, so possibly some of these things will polish up in a final edit? Even if this isn’t the case, there’s plenty to enjoy along the way, and I’ll keep an eye open for more books by Temi Oh i Hmmm. I don’t think the elevator pitch captures this book at all. Those hoping for a Wayfarer vibe are likely to be disappointed. If I’m honest, this didn’t really work for me; I found it a mixed bag of intriguing character drama followed by unconvincing/convenient right turns. I’m conscious I read an early ARC, so possibly some of these things will polish up in a final edit? Even if this isn’t the case, there’s plenty to enjoy along the way, and I’ll keep an eye open for more books by Temi Oh in future. Full review to follow. I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    This was one of my bookclubs novels this week. I was told by one of the members that it reminded them of Becky Chambers. I can see the similarity in that they both like taking people and putting them through everyday life situations but in a space setting. I think this novel is more lit than scifi. The synopsis and cover misdirect the reader a little as alot of the novel is pre space travel and set on earth. The plot meanders alot but has a satisfying conclusion. Im not sure this would appeal to This was one of my bookclubs novels this week. I was told by one of the members that it reminded them of Becky Chambers. I can see the similarity in that they both like taking people and putting them through everyday life situations but in a space setting. I think this novel is more lit than scifi. The synopsis and cover misdirect the reader a little as alot of the novel is pre space travel and set on earth. The plot meanders alot but has a satisfying conclusion. Im not sure this would appeal to hardcore scifi readers as the scifi element is minimal. To be frank, it could have been set on a cruiseliner with zombies and still could have worked out. 2.5* rounded to 3*
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  • Toya
    January 1, 1970
    Do You Dream of Terra-Two? an outstanding alternative history, YA sci-fi debut where six exceptional teenagers (Jesse, Harry, Astrid, Aria, Poppy, and Juno), alongside four adult experts, are tasked with spending 25 years pioneering the beta colonization of Terra-Two. This story is told from each of their point of views, which allows the reader to become fully immersed into not only the individual characters but their intertwining relationships as well.Don’t expect this to be an action-packed sc Do You Dream of Terra-Two? an outstanding alternative history, YA sci-fi debut where six exceptional teenagers (Jesse, Harry, Astrid, Aria, Poppy, and Juno), alongside four adult experts, are tasked with spending 25 years pioneering the beta colonization of Terra-Two. This story is told from each of their point of views, which allows the reader to become fully immersed into not only the individual characters but their intertwining relationships as well.Don’t expect this to be an action-packed sci-fi featuring aliens and time travel because it’s not. This story is full of beautifully descriptive scenes that focus on developing the relationships of the characters as they make their voyage on Democles to Terra-Two. In the process, we see alliances formed and dissolved, enemies turned to friends, and betrayal between friends. I really enjoyed the natural progression of the character drama because it makes the story even more realistic. If ten people were living in close proximity to one another for two decades, I think the character drama would probably be one of the more important aspects. I enjoyed learning the backstories for each of the crew members. Their stories played an integral role as to their purpose for joining the Terra-Two initiative as well as gave insight to their motivations once they were on board Democles. The author does a fantastic job of kicking up the action towards the end of the book to jolt you out of the character drama that we had become accustomed to. I think the slow build of the plot made this ending even more exciting. Thank you to Simon & Schuster UK for the advanced copy. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own. Rating: 4 stars
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I found this an engrossing read (I read much of it in one sitting) although it wasn't quite what I was expecting. The focus here is very much on the teenage astronauts themselves - their relationships and their extreme stress. I couldn't help but find the premise unlikely (albeit appealing) and the slightly adjusted alternate history a bit under developed, but I did get carried along by its tension and pace and there are moments of real emotion. The character portraits of the teenagers are very I found this an engrossing read (I read much of it in one sitting) although it wasn't quite what I was expecting. The focus here is very much on the teenage astronauts themselves - their relationships and their extreme stress. I couldn't help but find the premise unlikely (albeit appealing) and the slightly adjusted alternate history a bit under developed, but I did get carried along by its tension and pace and there are moments of real emotion. The character portraits of the teenagers are very fine. The adults receive less attention but the author's attention is elsewhere. 3.5 stars rounded up to 4. Review to follow shortly on For Winter Nights.
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  • Lilyn G. | Sci-Fi & Scary
    January 1, 1970
    Not bad, but I definitely was not the target audience for this.I found the younglings to be generally unlikable, and wish there had been a little more time spent on the older members of the crew just to balance out the young and egotistical side of things.The action that happens in space I liked. There wasn't enough of it for me, though.The narrator did a pretty good job. I liked most of her voices.If you like character-driven sci-fi, you'll probably like this.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous and brilliant. Review to come closer to publication.
  • Helena Summers
    January 1, 1970
    "The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet meets The 100" I'M IN
  • c,
    January 1, 1970
    Galley provided by publisher On my blog. Rep: black mcs, South Asian mcActual rating 3.5Do You Dream of Terra-Two? is an alternate history where a planet with life-sustaining capabilities has been discovered and, in 2012, the first expedition is sent out to try and colonise it. It's the story of the six young astronauts who go on that 23-year-long mission, and their journey into space.This isn't an action-packed book, far from it. It's a character-driven novel, where you might start out thinki Galley provided by publisher On my blog. Rep: black mcs, South Asian mcActual rating 3.5Do You Dream of Terra-Two? is an alternate history where a planet with life-sustaining capabilities has been discovered and, in 2012, the first expedition is sent out to try and colonise it. It's the story of the six young astronauts who go on that 23-year-long mission, and their journey into space.This isn't an action-packed book, far from it. It's a character-driven novel, where you might start out thinking you don't really like all of the characters, but most of them grow on you slowly and sneakily. It's a long book (over 500 pages), and you get POVs from every character (though some more than others), so you really get to understand each of them, their worries and their motivations. Which is good, don't get me wrong. I did like that aspect of it. However, for three quarters of the book, there was hardly any conflict (or, what conflict there was happened quickly and ended quickly too) or action. And I was mostly fine with that (for once. You know me and action), but around two thirds through I did start getting a little bored. The last quarter of the book was amazing, because things were happening, but between two thirds through and three quarters, I felt like it drifted a little.Linked to that, the number of POVs was a little overwhelming at times. On the one hand, it was good to see all the characters, but on the other, I wasn't all that interested in one or two of them, so I kind of skimmed their parts. The switches between the POVs sometimes felt really abrupt, almost as if there should have been more to come, which got cut out. That also contributed to the plot occasionally feeling kind of bitty, like getting snapshots of their life instead of a continuous arc. (Which, I get because it covers a whole year in a 23-year mission, but I did feel like maybe it could have been woven together a bit more seamlessly at points.)Because it was so bitty, the conflict that did happen before 75% felt almost like neither it nor the aftermath of it were given time to develop. For the buildup that was less of a problem, because there was always some undercurrent of it running through previous parts, but I definitely thought sometimes the aftermath could have done with being dwelt on a bit longer (or even the conflict itself at points). I had a similar issue with the declaration of love, because that distinctly felt like it came out of nowhere. Although it wasn't underdeveloped, it could have done with even more development.This may all sound somewhat negative, but I did enjoy this book, for sure. Like I said, for most of it I didn't mind the character-driven aspect, and I really loved the last quarter. And the kind of forced found family trope was done pretty well too (so much that I was really sad about the ending). It's just that one twelfth of the story where it started to drag and I got bored that's made me rate this 3.5 stars instead of 4.
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  • Carly ❊ Reading Is My Kind of Thing
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a good standalone scifi book. Don't let my three-star rating disguise my enjoyment for this, I found it really interesting and addictive. I mean I had basically been on a two week reading slump and then read this in 2-3 days (a complete achievement for me!)Review to come!
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  • Maria Hill AKA MH Books
    January 1, 1970
    Up on Book Tube - but will somebody remind me please to write the review here?
  • Eleanor
    January 1, 1970
    A novel set in a sort of parallel-universe Britain where, by 2012, humanity is sending a small group of carefully selected astronauts to colonize a planet just like Earth, found on the other side of Alpha Centauri. The six teenagers chosen for the mission have trained for years and won’t set foot on the planet, nicknamed Terra-Two, until they’re in their forties. Oh narrates her novel through the eyes of each teenager, a number of viewpoints that feels unnecessary and somewhat garbled. Although A novel set in a sort of parallel-universe Britain where, by 2012, humanity is sending a small group of carefully selected astronauts to colonize a planet just like Earth, found on the other side of Alpha Centauri. The six teenagers chosen for the mission have trained for years and won’t set foot on the planet, nicknamed Terra-Two, until they’re in their forties. Oh narrates her novel through the eyes of each teenager, a number of viewpoints that feels unnecessary and somewhat garbled. Although Oh has things to say about the weight of leadership and the emotional disadvantages of privilege, Do You Dream…‘s interest in romance and melodrama feels distinctly YA.
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  • Niamh
    January 1, 1970
    I was very kindly given an E-ARC of this book by Simon & Schuster UK and Netgalley. This book is billed as a mix between The Long Way To A Small Angry Planet and the TV show The 100, but I would suggest it leans more towards the former than the latter. With the exception, I expect (I’ve never watched the show) to melodramatic teenagers who are absolutely no help in a crisis being the main characters. An action-packed humanist-focused science fiction novel, this book follows a group of young I was very kindly given an E-ARC of this book by Simon & Schuster UK and Netgalley. This book is billed as a mix between The Long Way To A Small Angry Planet and the TV show The 100, but I would suggest it leans more towards the former than the latter. With the exception, I expect (I’ve never watched the show) to melodramatic teenagers who are absolutely no help in a crisis being the main characters. An action-packed humanist-focused science fiction novel, this book follows a group of young adults who are sent into space to land on a new planet- Terra-Two. The writing is punchy and occasionally cinematic, particularly in the gorgeous descriptions of space. Temi Oh clearly understands the complex science and physiology, and you never feel belittled in her explanations. Much like Andy Weir did in ‘The Martian’, she expertly balances info-packed descriptions with deep, heavy emotions. So much happens that you find yourself clinging onto every word, wanting to know what happens next, wanting to keep turning the page. It’s a book that would lend itself well to television, perhaps as a new ‘The 100’. I love that it has taken my favourite part of the Wayward Children series, which is the human side to space travel, exploring how human relationships develop and fracture in the strange new environment of the stratosphere. I’ve taken two stars off this of this book because of how much I hated the young adult characters. For one, the girls are written completely helplessly. They’re selfish, immature and often end up just picking fights with other people than helping run a ship. I can understand that for the ‘drama’ and ‘conflict’, it’s better to have clashing personalities but still. They seem like idiots, even though they’re supposed to be the most qualified young people in the universe. Moreover, they are completely and utterly not psychologically prepared to undergo space travel. It’s laughable how quickly the women give up on the jobs they’ve LITERALLY BEEN TRAINING A DECADE FOR in favour of screaming, wailing, crying etc. It is so easy for Oh to fall back onto female stereotypes when she writes here, and it’s at a serious detriment to the novel. A lot happens in this book and yet their responses are those of a thirteen or fourteen-year-old, not someone in their twenties. Had I been working for the space station, I would have laughed these six right back to nursery. Also, suicide is once again used as a plot device, which I absolutely detest. One of the central characters dies in a completely unmotivated manner, and when it’s explained later, it adds nothing but an extra conspiracy. It seems to just be an event that motivates the actions of the other characters, which is abhorrent. Thankfully, it is not grossly over-exaggerated, otherwise I might have stopped reading this book altogether, but seriously? Writers, you can do better than this. This is very clearly a debut novel. The plot is a little convoluted, the drama a little too melodramatic, it’s saccharine with its emotional handling and Oh tends to spin off into a tangent and flashbacks that have little to no impact on the novel’s overall events. The pacing is off and could do with another edit, but otherwise this is a very competent first novel.'Do You Dream of Terra-Two?' by Temi Oh and published by Simon and Schuster will be released on March 7th. The audiobook is currently available on Audible.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    So this is an odd, odd book to classify. It's not a sweeping space adventure in the vein of Interstellar. Nor is it quite the thriller that Gravity is (though there are resemblances in the last 1/4 of the book). And if you ask me what happens in the course of 528 pages, I'd be inclined to answer, "Nothing much."But it's kind of like spending an entire evening plus the early morning hours outside, staring up at the constellations and telling their stories in your head. And next day, when someone So this is an odd, odd book to classify. It's not a sweeping space adventure in the vein of Interstellar. Nor is it quite the thriller that Gravity is (though there are resemblances in the last 1/4 of the book). And if you ask me what happens in the course of 528 pages, I'd be inclined to answer, "Nothing much."But it's kind of like spending an entire evening plus the early morning hours outside, staring up at the constellations and telling their stories in your head. And next day, when someone asks what you did the other night and you answer, "I did some star-gazing." And they say, "Sooo, nothing much?"And you say, "No. Everything. I did everything."That might only make sense to me, so a more straight-forward version: in terms of main plot, not much happens, but beneath that there's a lifetime of stories that are playing out.First of all, the writing is absolutely beautiful. It's the kind of prose that's meant for traversing outer space and cataloguing stars, and it's got depth to it that goes beyond sounding pretty--a feeling of awe that I think is so key for space-faring stories; a commanding sense of the moment so that even small, seemingly inconsequential scenes feel important in the grand scheme of things; and a melancholy and intimacy that makes it seem like you've been with these characters for years when it's only been a handful of pages.It's the kind of prose that teeters between sad and hopeful, and just when you think it's falling into sadness, hope yanks it back up again.As for our characters, their stories range from heartbreaking to relatable: Poppy , the gorgeous linguistics genius who so badly wants to escape the bleakness of her home. The linguistics genius who got into languages in the first place because it was a way to bridge gaps between herself and others--to travel distances with only a few words--and a way to be less lonely in this world (this is a detail I really, really loved). Astrid and Juno , the Kenyan twins. The former an astrobiologist who signed up for the program because the thought of being the first to chart an unknown world was irresistible. The latter a chemist, more serious and pragmatic. Ara , an Indian girl who delights in the delights of the world and delights the world in turn. Eliot , the robotics genius. The only one of the group who was scouted by the Terra-Two project leaders. Jesse , the dreamy boy who weaves broken shells into his hair. The boy who's been told that he would leave this world on his twentieth birthday and is hoping that "leaving the world" literally means leaving the world. On a spaceship, to be exact.Harry, the pilot and commander-in-training. There's zero doubt in his mind that he was born for this role, and for someone whose life has revolved around being good and winning, this might be the biggest prize of them all.For a story that's about heading into the future and opening a new chapter for humanity, it's a story that's also about carrying the past. About sifting through the various events in these characters' lives that led them to stand where they are, as who they are, and the hopes and fears that they carry with them. It reminded me a lot of LOST, in that sense.As wonderful and interesting as the characters are, I did have one big problem with them. When they're in their own heads, being all introspective, these guy brim with complexity and their personalities shine like starlight. When they're outside of their heads, interacting with each other, they feel decidedly less interesting and complex. Dialogues don't quite fit together, some of the interactions are strangely jagged, and I had trouble differentiating one person's voice from another.The good news is that they spend a lot of time in their heads. And when they do, it's mesmerizing, absorbing stuff.And for someone who's never experienced a pioneering space mission (presumably), Oh's depictions of dread and excitement and just the whole range of emotions associated with the process feels remarkably real. She draws out the initial pre-launch tensions beautifully for the first 1/4 of the book, and does the same with the last 1/4. Every part of the experience is detailed and organic.All in all, Terra-Two is a magnificent debut. If you like happy endings and fast-paced space operas and storylines that are neatly wrapped up and handed on a silver platter, it might not be the book for you. But If you want a quiet and provocative character-driven story that muses on destiny and the nature of humans, I wholeheartedly recommend it.~Review copy provided by the publisher via Netgalley. All opinions are my own.
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  • Vicky
    January 1, 1970
    Space. The final frontier?Joking aside, it basically is for the heroes of Temi Oh's new book, Do You Dream of Terra-Two?, which follows the journey of six young would-be astronauts as they look to the skies and look to set off on a 22-year journey to Terra Two, Earth's distant twin, and hopefully the future of the human race.You can see from the start that this book definitely does not skimp on ambition, especially as we actually follow them into space. But rather than being the straightforward Space. The final frontier?Joking aside, it basically is for the heroes of Temi Oh's new book, Do You Dream of Terra-Two?, which follows the journey of six young would-be astronauts as they look to the skies and look to set off on a 22-year journey to Terra Two, Earth's distant twin, and hopefully the future of the human race.You can see from the start that this book definitely does not skimp on ambition, especially as we actually follow them into space. But rather than being the straightforward Star Trek-y space romp that I was expecting, it actually turned out to be something a little bit thoughtful, more melancholy- and a lot more interesting.It's clear from the start that Oh has put a lot of thought into the world that her characters inhabit. We get a low-down of the history of space travel, some visionaries, a specialist academy where the children are grilled and examined to within an inch of their lives, before we really meet any of the other characters. However, when we do, we're quickly immersed in their lives. This is very much a character-driven book and to that end we're given POVs galore, which is great because it lets Oh get down into their psyches and issues in ways you don't often see in YA sci-fi.However, this also has its fair share of problems, pacing being the main one. I did wonder how the book was going to pan out, given that the characters are setting off on a twenty-two year journey to their new planet. Were we going to get massive leaps in time, or just stop before take-off (we don't). I won't spoil it, but I will say that it feels like nothing much happens for the first three quarters of the book- and then right at the end everything suddenly gets shoved in, so fast it made my head spin.The teens we get to know aren't exactly the most likeable bunch either. There's a lot of sulking, some macho jostling for space, and even depression and suicide alongside the angst and romance. All of them seem broken in different ways, and while I applaud Oh for including it, it also makes it hard to really connect with the crew, which is a bit worrying considering that there are six of them, and we get inside basically all of their heads over the course of the book.That's not to say this is a bad book: I did enjoy it. The worldbuilding included here is fascinating, as is Oh's depiction of life in space, and how humans have adjusted to living out there- for instance, orbiting one of Saturn's moons, or living as an independent state on a colony ship originally intended for Terra-Two. Beautifully written, and almost elegiac in its depiction of human life and relationships, it's inspirational to read, and a lovely book to add to my February reading list.
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  • Lucille
    January 1, 1970
    3,5/5This is going to be a hard one to review! It kept me reading, kept me engaged and dying to know what would happen and how it would end. I felt for the character but at the same time I didn't really love them. I guess it's well done that while reading from their point of view I liked them better than from the point of view of others? I'm left a bit disappointed by the end, from the way the story was moving I was starting to wonder if this was actually a series but no, seems to really be a st 3,5/5This is going to be a hard one to review! It kept me reading, kept me engaged and dying to know what would happen and how it would end. I felt for the character but at the same time I didn't really love them. I guess it's well done that while reading from their point of view I liked them better than from the point of view of others? I'm left a bit disappointed by the end, from the way the story was moving I was starting to wonder if this was actually a series but no, seems to really be a stand-alone. It made me think a bit of The Fated Sky by Marie Robinette Kowal on some occasion but without all the science, and I don't much understand the comparison to The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet except from the fact that there are people in space going on a quest toward a new planet.I'm glad I read this thanks to the publisher through netgalley, it was quite an experience, but not a new favourite. I kinda feel drained and sad after this, it was a really heavy read most of the time, while still having themes of hope and characters supporting each other more often than not (but also a lot of "not" as well) Content warnings: suicides, drowning, mention of hanging, dubious consent, eating disorder, mental health issue, sex, vomit, amputation, violent death
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  • Eleanor
    January 1, 1970
    The UK Space Agency sends a group of teenagers on a decades-long mission to Terra-Two, a theoretically habitable planet, with a view to colonising it. The trip involves saying goodbye to their families forever, decades of confinement, never being outside, isolation, not to mention the ever present danger of travelling through space. The group have been rigorously trained since they were children but nothing can prepare them for a life in space. This is a fascinating book, looking at sacrifice, d The UK Space Agency sends a group of teenagers on a decades-long mission to Terra-Two, a theoretically habitable planet, with a view to colonising it. The trip involves saying goodbye to their families forever, decades of confinement, never being outside, isolation, not to mention the ever present danger of travelling through space. The group have been rigorously trained since they were children but nothing can prepare them for a life in space. This is a fascinating book, looking at sacrifice, determination and the complexities of such a life. I enjoyed that this wasn’t set far into the future but recently in a slightly altered timeline. For instance as the astronauts are travelling they’re receiving footage from the 2012 London Olympics. This gave the book some immediacy.The relationships between characters was compelling too. What would it be like to know you were going to spend the rest of your life with only the same small group of people? You would never meet anybody new, you would never see your loved ones again. It raises a lot of questions but I certainly consider it a worthwhile read.
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  • Karsyn
    January 1, 1970
    This book was sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo dull. I don't know why the ratings are so high. I'm tempted to give it a 1 but I didn't loathe it (which is what I save my 1s for) but it was close. The story could have been alright if the characters were likable. Not one of them was. I couldn't have cared less about any. If I had to pick one I liked then it was Jesse, he was the least offensive. Everyone else was horrible, just unlikable characters all.I liked the book for 5% around 70% when it got This book was sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo dull. I don't know why the ratings are so high. I'm tempted to give it a 1 but I didn't loathe it (which is what I save my 1s for) but it was close. The story could have been alright if the characters were likable. Not one of them was. I couldn't have cared less about any. If I had to pick one I liked then it was Jesse, he was the least offensive. Everyone else was horrible, just unlikable characters all.I liked the book for 5% around 70% when it got entertaining for a minute, but then I was bored to pieces again. The ending was REALLY lame. Like that was completely stupid and if I didn't already dislike the book, that would have ruined it for me. Not an enjoyable book, not worth the read.
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  • Ash | EmeraldBookOwl
    January 1, 1970
    OMG OMG OMG! "The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet meets The 100" SHUT THE FRONT DOOR!
  • Jacq
    January 1, 1970
    Well written story of a group of young adults sent on a 23 year journey to populate a distant planet. YA fiction but still a good read.
  • MisterHobgoblin
    January 1, 1970
    Do You Dream of Terra Two follows the fortunes of a cohort of six young people who have volunteered to train for space travel and fly for 23 years to a distant twin of the Planet Earth. Terra Two reads like a Young Adult novel. Let’s get that across up-front. Although not marketed as YS, and although the characters are notionally adult through most of the text, they behave like 14 year olds. For the first third of the novel, the Beta astronauts are in fact 14 year olds at the Space Academy, doin Do You Dream of Terra Two follows the fortunes of a cohort of six young people who have volunteered to train for space travel and fly for 23 years to a distant twin of the Planet Earth. Terra Two reads like a Young Adult novel. Let’s get that across up-front. Although not marketed as YS, and although the characters are notionally adult through most of the text, they behave like 14 year olds. For the first third of the novel, the Beta astronauts are in fact 14 year olds at the Space Academy, doing lessons, having their free time controlled. It’s basically boarding school – Harry Potter for astronauts. Then, as if by magic, they age six chronological years as they step onto their space craft. Psychologically, though, they don’t seem to mature at all. They are in thrall to Commander Solomon (daddy), Doctor Fae (mummy), Igor (grandad) and Cai (the uncle you only see at Christmas and forget he exists for the rest of the year). They jockey with one another, bully one another, have teenage crushes on one another…The novel tries to be character led, but the characters are not well developed. There’s too much tell and not enough show. The novel is actually episodic – with a series of mini-narratives that usually point to some kind of moral or social issue in a heavy handed way. Aside from a couple of uber-traits (Harry is haughty, Astrid is religious, Eliot is nerdy) the characters seem quite mutable – if you need two people to get hit by space dust then you just look up the two that you haven’t seen for a while. Each event seems to have a beginning, middle and end before the next event comes along. This episodic approach makes some of the pacing really clunky. There is way too much time spent on the ground before the space travel. Then, as the 23 year space journey commences it quickly becomes apparent that the remaining pages won’t accommodate the full length of the journey. The ending, when it comes, is abrupt and rushed – a contrast to the languor of the rest of the book. There are also continuity errors in the text. We keep being fed the same information from different perspectives, even after events have moved on. Key plot developments seem to have disappeared – not least of which is that everyone takes Astrid’s fate as read, even though it is never explicitly shared with the reader. Yet, for all these failings, the book does generate enough intrigue to keep the reader on the case, and there is enough to think about to keep ideas popping up even when the book has been put down. The reader does care whether the team make it to Terra Two even if none of the team is terribly engaging on an individual level.And one of the endearing things about Terra Two is how very British it is. All the terminology, the background, the context is British. The young astronauts are representative of multi-cultural Britain; they reference the London Olympics; they watch British TV programs; they talk about the NHS and they drink tea. If the BBC wrote books, this would be one of them.
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