Other Words for Home
I am learning how to besadand happyat the same time.Jude never thought she’d be leaving her beloved older brother and father behind, all the way across the ocean in Syria. But when things in her hometown start becoming volatile, Jude and her mother are sent to live in Cincinnati with relatives.At first, everything in America seems too fast and too loud. The American movies that Jude has always loved haven’t quite prepared her for starting school in the US—and her new label of “Middle Eastern,” an identity she’s never known before. But this life also brings unexpected surprises—there are new friends, a whole new family, and a school musical that Jude might just try out for. Maybe America, too, is a place where Jude can be seen as she really is.

Other Words for Home Details

TitleOther Words for Home
Author
ReleaseMay 7th, 2019
PublisherBalzer + Bray
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Contemporary, Fiction

Other Words for Home Review

  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    Another character named JUDE!I was just commenting on this the other day. There are so many characters lately with the name Jude. I have never, ever in my life, met someone with that name!What gives?!
  • Shehzeen Muzaffar
    January 1, 1970
    More hijabi girls on the cover? Hell yeah
  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Other words for home:domesticcentralfamiliarfamilyhouseholdlocalnationalnativeat easeat restdown homehomelyhomeyin one's elementin the bosominlandinternal
  • Laura (bbliophile)
    January 1, 1970
    I guess dinner tonight will be seasoned with my tears
  • Sarah Ressler Wright
    January 1, 1970
    Sooo good. Although labeled MG, it reads for YA as well and especially as it’s written in verse, students will love it. The descriptions of food-fabulous! The metaphors and turns of phrase are fantastic and the themes of resilience and surviving to thriving so well done. Phenomenal a must read for everyone!
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  • Casey Lyall
    January 1, 1970
    So beautiful. This novel is an immersive, emotional experience. One of my favourite passages:"There is an Arabic proverb that says:She makes you feel like a loaf of freshlybaked bread.It is said aboutthe nicestkindestpeople.The type of peoplewho help yourise."100% recommend it for any collection.Thank you to the publisher for sending a copy for review.
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  • Elysse
    January 1, 1970
    Other Words for Home is one of those books that you read and know will go down in history. Much like The Hate U Give, this brilliant middle grade novel from writer Jasmine Warga touches on racism in America and the stigma surrounding being “other”.Jude, a 12 year old girl from Syria, comes to America and has to learn what “home” is, and how to feel comfortable in this seemingly new world that she has inhabited. Her story, gut-wrenching and heartbreaking at times, is one that is utterly real and Other Words for Home is one of those books that you read and know will go down in history. Much like The Hate U Give, this brilliant middle grade novel from writer Jasmine Warga touches on racism in America and the stigma surrounding being “other”.Jude, a 12 year old girl from Syria, comes to America and has to learn what “home” is, and how to feel comfortable in this seemingly new world that she has inhabited. Her story, gut-wrenching and heartbreaking at times, is one that is utterly real and remarkably untold.Warga created this novel in hopes that brown girls would resonate, and to give them a voice in the oppressive culture they’ve been (un)welcomed into. As a white girl, the novel was one that educated me on what it is like to come from another country, especially a country that is experiencing violence and oppression of its own, and enter into a new country that is afraid of you and makes unfair judgments based on appearances.The novel also resonated because my fiance’s family is from Syria. I loved when she filtered Arabic into the story, and I saw words that I’ve heard spoken by our Situ, and I just found it to be so comforting and authentic.The story may be middle-grade and intended for younger audiences, but as an adult, I found the poetic structured paired with simplistic word choice to be hauntingly beautiful. I highly recommend you check out this book when it comes out in the spring!
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  • Rachel Strolle
    January 1, 1970
    brb sobbing
  • theresa 🌸🥑
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone needs to read Judes story 💜
  • Adiba Jaigirdar
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly, books like this shouldn't be allowed to exist because they break my heart and make me cry a lot. Ugh.
  • Mandi
    January 1, 1970
    This book is written in verse. The portagnast is a 12 year old girl from Syria who flees from her war torn country to America with her mother leaving behind her father and her brother. This book deals with the struggles and the heart ache of leaving everything you know behind and starting something knew and foreign in your life. 5⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
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  • Kaitlyn
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a beautiful, immersive and emotional experience. I don't remember the last book I've read that was written in verse, but Other Words for Home really inspired me to look for more books written like it. I've read so many different stories related to migration and important social causes, and this is definitely one of the best. Full review coming closer to release date on my blog!
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  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic. I love the decision to make this a novel in verse. It felt so right as Jude tells her immigration story.
  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    I've been excited to read Jasmine Warga's debut middle grade, OTHER WORDS FOR HOME, ever since I first began seeing things about it. So many of my favorite things are wrapped together in this book: wrestles with identity, tight-knit family structures, a poignant examination of big issues, and a child who slowly flourishes as she finds her place in the community around her. And to top it all off, it's told in verse, one of my favorite formats! Warga's poetry is spare and beautiful, capturing perf I've been excited to read Jasmine Warga's debut middle grade, OTHER WORDS FOR HOME, ever since I first began seeing things about it. So many of my favorite things are wrapped together in this book: wrestles with identity, tight-knit family structures, a poignant examination of big issues, and a child who slowly flourishes as she finds her place in the community around her. And to top it all off, it's told in verse, one of my favorite formats! Warga's poetry is spare and beautiful, capturing perfectly both Jude's hopeful, courageous voice and the details of the world around her, in both Syria and the United States—as well as in the liminal space between them, as Jude searches for what it means to consider a place "home."Warga balances disparate plotlines expertly, showing us all the facets of Jude's life from her and her mother's sudden immigration, to Jude's determination to shine in the middle school musical, despite her Arabic accent and the way other students look askance at her headscarf. Jude navigates her world with vulnerability and spunk, coming through the course of the novel to recognize the complex humanity in the people around her, and beginning to understand the quiet pain carried in the hearts of many people she knows. The book ends on a bittersweet but strongly hopeful note, perfect for such a wise and nuanced novel.Jude and her story will stay with me for a long time to come, and I can't wait to see further middle grade offerings from Jasmine Warga!
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    Jude and her family stuck with me long after reading - I am still rooting for her! Beautifully written in verse, Other Words for Home is a story that is powerful and enjoyable for children and adults alike. Simply put - a must read! Other Words for Home
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  • Raven Black
    January 1, 1970
    While I immensely enjoyed this book it did not "hit me in the face, turned me around and kick me in the butt." I think what I was looking for was more of the current events mentioned (which attack was Jude mentioning, etc.) and maybe more interacting with her cousin. Perhaps a sequel might be nice that covers Jude's cousin viewpoint, or Jude's friend Layla. Perhaps even one from her parents point of view (a dual story) and possibly even one told from her brothers point of view. Great for ages 10 While I immensely enjoyed this book it did not "hit me in the face, turned me around and kick me in the butt." I think what I was looking for was more of the current events mentioned (which attack was Jude mentioning, etc.) and maybe more interacting with her cousin. Perhaps a sequel might be nice that covers Jude's cousin viewpoint, or Jude's friend Layla. Perhaps even one from her parents point of view (a dual story) and possibly even one told from her brothers point of view. Great for ages 10 to 14 (even younger 15 and up to adult). Also if looking for a diverse character. What is my favorite part is that Jude is a girl trying to fit in, like anyone is. And she just *happens* to be Muslin.
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  • Kiki Cole
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my goodness, this is a book that I never knew I needed so much at this moment in time. I am so thankful to have had the chance to read this beautiful and riveting novel in verse about a Syrian girl who goes to America. I was flying through this novel and it only took me a few hours. For anyone that has ever been beat down and told they can’t, this book gives readers their can. Please get your hands on this novel ASAP!!
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  • Shannon Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get an arc of this brilliant middle grade novel, and I can't wait to see it release to the world. OTHER WORDS FOR HOME is an emotional, beautiful story about family, identity, and humanity. Jude is a protagonist everyone can learn from and love, and her story is an important one. "Other Words for Home" is also written in verse. Definitely recommended. I know this read will be a favorite at our library and local schools.
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  • katayoun Masoodi
    January 1, 1970
    Lucky. I am learning how to say itover and over again in English.I am learning how it tastes—sweet with promiseand bitter with responsibility.loved every moment of reading this book. can't recommend it enough.
  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    What a lovely, lovely book. Just wonderful.
  • Kelsey!
    January 1, 1970
    Review based on an ARC from Edelweiss Plus.Oh MAN I needed this book right now.It’s a heartfelt story about Jude, a Syrian girl who struggles to figure out her identity in America, as she feels torn between her new life and her old. Jude and her mother fled war-torn Syria while leaving behind her father and older brother, the latter of whom has disappeared to help empower the Syrian people and fight the corrupt government.It’s a humanizing portrait for a group of people white America frequently Review based on an ARC from Edelweiss Plus.Oh MAN I needed this book right now.It’s a heartfelt story about Jude, a Syrian girl who struggles to figure out her identity in America, as she feels torn between her new life and her old. Jude and her mother fled war-torn Syria while leaving behind her father and older brother, the latter of whom has disappeared to help empower the Syrian people and fight the corrupt government.It’s a humanizing portrait for a group of people white America frequently villianizes; it educates about life in Syria while refusing to shy away from the horror that is racism in the U.S., particularly as it affects people of Middle Eastern descent— but it’s ultimately brimming with courage, love, and hope. Jude is a character you can’t help but root for, as she shines so brightly and helps bridge the gap between the Midwest and the Middle East.Books written in verse are very hit-or-miss with me— in this case, it was absolutely perfect. My ARC is filled with highlighted passages that deeply resonated with me, that literally made me stop to admire the lyricism of the text. I especially enjoyed learning the various Arabic words and proverbs.I want to shout this story from the rooftops and put it in the hands of every child and adult— it’s THAT important and meaningful, especially right now. Plus, it’s just SO WELL DONE.
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  • Jeanie Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely adored this middle grades novel written in verse.When Jude's seaside town becomes unsafe, she and her mother flee Syria for the United States. Jude has to figure out how to be at home so far away from home, how to be true to herself while finding her place in America. Jude's nature is both reflective and spunky! I love how she sprinkles Arabic proverbs throughout, thinks critically about belonging, and extends empathy to even those it is hard to like. Warga has written the perfect n I absolutely adored this middle grades novel written in verse.When Jude's seaside town becomes unsafe, she and her mother flee Syria for the United States. Jude has to figure out how to be at home so far away from home, how to be true to herself while finding her place in America. Jude's nature is both reflective and spunky! I love how she sprinkles Arabic proverbs throughout, thinks critically about belonging, and extends empathy to even those it is hard to like. Warga has written the perfect novel for this moment in time. If you want your students to better understand the refugee crisis, share this book with them! Along the way, they just might appreciate our common humanity a little bit more. I know I did!
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    When I finished I wanted more but then I didn't. I was content with Jude's story. What a beautiful story it is. I cannot wait for it to come out into the wild and be shared with students and readers.
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Jude is a Syrian girl who travels to the U.S. with her mother to escape the war in their country. They have left family members behind and come to live with family Jude doesn't know, including a cousin who shares Jude's heritage but not her language or experiences. Warga shows how difficult it can be for Middle Eastern immigrants in the U.S. Not only are there language barriers and cultural differences with Americans, but often within their own circle too. Jude is a brave character, but she has Jude is a Syrian girl who travels to the U.S. with her mother to escape the war in their country. They have left family members behind and come to live with family Jude doesn't know, including a cousin who shares Jude's heritage but not her language or experiences. Warga shows how difficult it can be for Middle Eastern immigrants in the U.S. Not only are there language barriers and cultural differences with Americans, but often within their own circle too. Jude is a brave character, but she has too many obstacles that she has to be brave about, and she and her family just want what every family wants: the ability to be safe and happy. I think Jude is a character that many readers will relate to and hopefully she will get them thinking about members of their own community in a compassionate way. Review from e-galley.
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  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Jude always dreamed of America, but her dream was becoming a famous movie star just like in the American movies she and her best friend watched from their seaside town in Syria. It was nothing like what actually happened - leaving her father and brother to travel to stay with family in Cincinnati as things grow more and more volatile in Syria. Actually living in America is way different than the movies. In America, Jude is "Middle Eastern". She gets looks from people and realizes that they assum Jude always dreamed of America, but her dream was becoming a famous movie star just like in the American movies she and her best friend watched from their seaside town in Syria. It was nothing like what actually happened - leaving her father and brother to travel to stay with family in Cincinnati as things grow more and more volatile in Syria. Actually living in America is way different than the movies. In America, Jude is "Middle Eastern". She gets looks from people and realizes that they assume that she has come from violence. She struggles to learn English and to make friends at her new school where her American cousin wants nothing to do with her. When she wants to try out for the school play, her cousin and her friends frown on it, assuming that someone with an accent will never get cast. Can this place ever feel like home? Will she ever be reunited with the other half of her family? There were so many details that struck me throughout this story - like the reaction that Jude gets when she starts wearing hijab. Strangers approach her to tell her that she doesn't have to cover herself in America, but Jude has never seen hijab as anything but a joyous symbol of growing up. And the moment when Jude realizes that everyone here assumes that her country is violent and wartorn, when in fact Syria was peaceful for most of her life and she believes it will be again. Reading this book as a white woman, it shone a light on a lot of assumptions that American make about Muslim people and Middle Eastern countries. Jude learns what it's like to see her country through the eyes of others and it's much different than how she views her own home.
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  • Laura Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟/5 for this stunning #novelinverse by @jassiewarga; thanks to @brazerandbray and #kidlitexchange for this ARC..〰〰I cannot WAIT for this free verse #mglit book to come out on May 28. The #novelinverse section of my library is one of the most popular parts of our library (#graphicnovels are number one!). Our students can't get enough of these lyrical, less intimidating books. Other Words for Home is a beautifully written book about the #immigrant experience of a young girl who comes to Americ 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟/5 for this stunning #novelinverse by @jassiewarga; thanks to @brazerandbray and #kidlitexchange for this ARC..〰️〰️I cannot WAIT for this free verse #mglit book to come out on May 28. The #novelinverse section of my library is one of the most popular parts of our library (#graphicnovels are number one!). Our students can't get enough of these lyrical, less intimidating books. Other Words for Home is a beautifully written book about the #immigrant experience of a young girl who comes to America from war-torn Syria. It is full of hope, beautifully written AND a critically important book to be available in every elementary and middle school library in America. I hope all my librarian friends will agree! .〰️〰️One of the most stunning sections of this book occurs when Jude becomes a young woman and decides to start wearing a headscarf like her mother. She must deal with prejudice from strangers, friends and family who don't understand her decision. "I want women like Aunt Michelle / to understand / that it is not only women who look like them / who are free / who think / and care about other women. / ...That I cover my head / not because I am ashamed / forced / or hiding. / But because I am / proud / and want to be seen / as I am." Here's to books like Other Words for Home that help our students see themselves and understand each other. .〰️〰️#otherwordsforhome #jasminewarga #mgbooks #iloveMG #bookreview #librariansofinstagram
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  • Jayme Carruthers
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partner .Thank you to the #KidLitExchange network for the review copy of #OtherWordsForHome. All opinions are my own. ..Wow!! As someone who spent years teaching ELL, this story is close to my heart. .Jude and her mom travel to the United States to get away from the violence going on in Syria. This leads to a whole new country, new culture, new language, new foods, new school, new friends...The list goes on. .Everyone keeps telling Jude she's "lucky", but how is Jude so lucky wh @kidlitexchange #partner .Thank you to the #KidLitExchange network for the review copy of #OtherWordsForHome. All opinions are my own. ..Wow!! As someone who spent years teaching ELL, this story is close to my heart. .Jude and her mom travel to the United States to get away from the violence going on in Syria. This leads to a whole new country, new culture, new language, new foods, new school, new friends...The list goes on. .Everyone keeps telling Jude she's "lucky", but how is Jude so lucky when she doesn't fit in and half her family is still at home?.Written in beautiful poetry, Other Words For Home is a wonderful look inside the reality that many people face every day. .I would highly recommend this book to middle/high school readers. 💜☕☕☕☕☕.This title came out on May 19th, 2019..#books #bookstagram #bibliophile #bibliophilebesties #IGreads #ireadtoo #teacherreads #YA #ARC #reviewer
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful and important book! I think the impact was probably heightened by reading it along side WE CROSSED A BRIDGE AND IT TREMBLED, a nonfiction collection of Syrian refugee narratives, but even without that added context this book is so necessary - we need books that celebrate Syrians as real people with real dreams and allow brown girls to find themselves. But even if there weren't such a dearth of books on the subject, this would be a great one: beautiful, lyrical verse, authentic c What a beautiful and important book! I think the impact was probably heightened by reading it along side WE CROSSED A BRIDGE AND IT TREMBLED, a nonfiction collection of Syrian refugee narratives, but even without that added context this book is so necessary - we need books that celebrate Syrians as real people with real dreams and allow brown girls to find themselves. But even if there weren't such a dearth of books on the subject, this would be a great one: beautiful, lyrical verse, authentic characters with well-paced arcs, a protagonist who just makes you root for her, and honest but gentle confrontation of serious issues without being "an issues book." I cannot wait to push this into the hands of my coworkers, my library kiddos, my parents... so on and so forth. Pick this one up, y'all, it's worth it.
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  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't stop reading this book! I immediately loved Jude and, at the same time, felt so awful for her. (She and her mom go to America to live with family while her dad and brother stay behind in Syria. Obviously the region is really volatile and she's concerned about their safety---moreso her brother---and also trying to fit in when she looks different and speaks English with an accent. You can imagine how well that goes over with some people.)Ultimately, this is a story about resilience. Jud I couldn't stop reading this book! I immediately loved Jude and, at the same time, felt so awful for her. (She and her mom go to America to live with family while her dad and brother stay behind in Syria. Obviously the region is really volatile and she's concerned about their safety---moreso her brother---and also trying to fit in when she looks different and speaks English with an accent. You can imagine how well that goes over with some people.)Ultimately, this is a story about resilience. Jude overcomes nervousness and the horrible attitudes of other people and does things the way she wants to do them. (I may have actually cheered at the ending.)I think this is Jasmine Warga's best book yet and that's saying a lot. Highly recommended.
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  • Karen McKenna
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful novel-in-verse that will stay with me for a very long time. It is a must read for anyone middle grade or older.What I loved:- The Poetry- intriguing similes and metaphors, emotions captured on the page, powerful language- The Perspective- I appreciated that the protagonist was not from Aleppo, but from a vacation town on the sea in Syria. This shows a different perspective than I have seen, but one that is equally as important. Jude and her mother then come to stay with her u This is a beautiful novel-in-verse that will stay with me for a very long time. It is a must read for anyone middle grade or older.What I loved:- The Poetry- intriguing similes and metaphors, emotions captured on the page, powerful language- The Perspective- I appreciated that the protagonist was not from Aleppo, but from a vacation town on the sea in Syria. This shows a different perspective than I have seen, but one that is equally as important. Jude and her mother then come to stay with her uncle in America, and again, the perspective was different than other "refugee" stories but equally powerful.- The People- Jude is protagonist to cheer for, however, there are so many dynamic, diverse characters in this story.#LitReviewCrew
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