Food
#1 New York Times bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman sorts through the conflicting research on food to give us the skinny on what to eat.Did you know that eating oatmeal actually isn't a healthy way to start the day? That milk doesn't build bones, and eggs aren't the devil?Even the most health conscious among us have a hard time figuring out what to eat in order to lose weight, stay fit, and improve our health. And who can blame us? When it comes to diet, there's so much changing and conflicting information flying around that it's impossible to know where to look for sound advice. And decades of misguided "common sense," food-industry lobbying, bad science, and corrupt food polices and guidelines have only deepened our crisis of nutritional confusion, leaving us overwhelmed and anxious when we head to the grocery store.Thankfully, bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman is here to set the record straight. In Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? -- his most comprehensive book yet -- he takes a close look at every food group and explains what we've gotten wrong, revealing which foods nurture our health and which pose a threat. From grains to legumes, meat to dairy, fats to artificial sweeteners, and beyond, Dr. Hyman debunks misconceptions and breaks down the fascinating science in his signature accessible style. He also explains food's role as powerful medicine capable of reversing chronic disease and shows how our food system and policies impact the environment, the economy, social justice, and personal health, painting a holistic picture of growing, cooking, and eating food in ways that nourish our bodies and the earth while creating a healthy society. With myth-busting insights, easy-to-understand science, and delicious, wholesome recipes, Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? is a no-nonsense guide to achieving optimal weight and lifelong health.

Food Details

TitleFood
Author
ReleaseFeb 27th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316338868
Rating
GenreHealth, Nonfiction, Food and Drink, Food, Nutrition, Science, Cookbooks, Self Help

Food Review

  • Elyse Walters
    January 1, 1970
    About a month ago I read Gary Taubes new book called “The Case Against Sugar”...in where he exposes the facade we have been lead to believe about Sugar. Carbohydrates were increasing - diabetes was increasing- while we went through a the anti-fat period. Sugar-pushing companies were benefitting from the ‘fat-is-bad’ for human consumption....Taubes set the facts straight! His book is the best comprehensive- up-to -date - well respected and documented in “The Case Against Sugar”. .... a very power About a month ago I read Gary Taubes new book called “The Case Against Sugar”...in where he exposes the facade we have been lead to believe about Sugar. Carbohydrates were increasing - diabetes was increasing- while we went through a the anti-fat period. Sugar-pushing companies were benefitting from the ‘fat-is-bad’ for human consumption....Taubes set the facts straight! His book is the best comprehensive- up-to -date - well respected and documented in “The Case Against Sugar”. .... a very powerful addictive drug-like effect for many people. Mark Hyman and Gary Taubes are both - two of the most respected - committed qualified men restoring the health of our nation. To be fair ....I could name at least a dozen other experts in the field ...all on the same team: restoring the health of our nation.....I’ve been following them all - have participated in summit seminars - weekend workshops with these doctors - and nutritionist for approximately 30 years. I already own most of Mark’s books - listen to his audio video’s from time to time -and have cooked literally dozens of his meals ....so often: I forget they are his: they have become my meals. His spiced ground Turkey Wrap with watercress and avocado is a regular favorite comfort meal around here. —-But I’m here to review Dr. Mark Hyman’s NEW BOOK.....”Food”....What The Heck Should I Eat” ..... I’m Soooooo EXCITED ABOUT THIS BOOK....,I HONESTLY BELIEVE ITS THE BEST BOOK OF ITS KIND....THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE UP -TO -DATE USEFUL INFORMATION that EVERY HOUSEHOLD would benefit owing ...reading ... and referring to as a resource. It’s the PERECT COMPANION to Gary Taubes book, “The Case Against Sugar”.Mark Hyman, MD is - a functional medicine doctor - covers FOOD IN THIS BOOK LIKE NOBODIES BUSINESS! He will cover questions you have - that you didn’t know you had. I had already suspected I would buy his hardcopy book - even if I was granted the opportunity to read this book early from Little Brown and Netgalley....but now I’m 100% sure I want to own a physical copy. I’d give this book as a ‘perfect gift’ at a BABY SHOWER! No, kidding...raising kids is no easy task ...the the book is the best FOOD BIBLE ...clearing up misconceptions that we have to date — and who better to have written it - but a qualified medical doctor who has solid reputation in this field. The structure is designed to either read straight through - or jump to a particular food group you want to know more about.For example ....let’s talk about BEANS for a moment. Is there any controversy or concerned about the *bean*? High levels of nutrients - and as far as plants go - unmatched amounts of protein..... a cheap and plentiful source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. As you will continue reading about THE BEAN .....( or substitute other foods in this book: vegetables, fruits, poultry and eggs, meats, grains, nuts and seeds, milk and dairy, fish and seafood, fats and oils, sugars and sweeteners, beverages, the pagan diet, etc. etc.), Mark will show us the the beans on beans — ALTHOUGH HAS BEEN KNOWN TO LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE AND LOWER THE RISK OF CANCER.....is NOT A SIMPLE AND CLEAR POSITIVE FOOD FOR ALL PEOPLE. Yes..... they are packed with a lot of nutrients including potassium, zinc, iron, magnesium full light, and vitamin B6 among others....but they also contain lectins which can damage our intestinal lining and prevent us from absorbing all the nutrients we need. FOOD BEGINS TO GET CONFUSING......However.....Mark clears up the questions-of- concern. .....very easily. By the time you are done reading about a particular food.... YOU WILL BE PRETTY DAMN CERTAIN ....99.9% which foods BEST WORK FOR YOU .....( this book can be validating for things you suspected).Throughout this book ....Mark shares: ....on each food:WHAT THE EXPERTS GOT RIGHT WHAT THEY GOT WRONG WHAT WE STILL DON’T KNOW FOR SURE......( back to beans....)....NINE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BEANS .....GREAT INFORMATION.....There is a great section on GRAINS..... ......with a list of symptoms that ‘some’ people may have. I have 5 of the 7 symptoms listed.... meaning.....I’m not the best candidate for eating grains.....unless I like being depressed, bloated, and gaining weight. OATMEAL....is not a health food... NOT THE BEST CHOICE BREAKFAST....Why? Spikes blood sugar! Egg whites - avoid the yokes? I have friends who have been doing this for years....Mark has not only a lot to say about this .... but I was laughing at the ridiculousness I discovered- through reading the EGG SECTION .... of what different egg cartons say on them in the supermarket. FREE RANGE EGGS.... I started laughing when I learned what it really means. GLUTEN FREE EGGES..... OH MY! Best laugh I had! The packaging of our foods - the “PURE SELLING TEASERS” start to be rather funny....if not scary! MEAT.....the *M* word .....a word MY CHILDREN WERE ASKED NOT TO *SAY* in their 4th grade class because their teacher was a vegetarian—and her daughter a veterinarian. It was the beginning of our daughters eating disorder. She came home from school one day - age 9, and said, “I don’t eat Meat”....”I be nice to animals”. Our pediatrician said to honor her wishes and feed her lots of beans. By age 14 - she had a serious eating disorder weighing 65lbs and was hospitalized.Thankfully our daughter is well today - strong & lean - eats lean proteins ( some meat).Mark doesn’t advocate to be or not to be a vegetarian - meat eater - vegan - or any specific spiritual or personal choice diet .... it’s ALL INCLUDED ....but the myths are exposed. I HAD TO FACE THE FACTS THAT DAIRY IS NOT A GREAT SOURCE OF CALCIUM.... and LOW FAT MILK has almost NO VITAMIN D..........even though my doctor is telling me to eat dairy products since I was diagnosed with osteoporosis this year. I was never much of a dairy girl...and there still seems to be confusing information of how I’m to GAIN *BACK* my bone loss - build new density. Exercise seems to be the only ‘sure’ thing all experts agree on. Keifer which I’m now taking daily is a “WE STILL DON’T KNOW FOR SURE”, of the benefits. THANK GOODNESS I’m eating those little fishies.....sardines, often now. Trying to build back bone density at age 65 is a challenge - but a game worth fighting for. There is a wealth of HEALTHY SCIENCE -BASED INFORMATION IN THIS BOOK. I haven’t even skimmed the surface. ITS REALLY A HUGE GIFT TO ALL OF US!Mark has many videos worth watching - great books - and many ways he offers support. He says “getting healthy is a TEAM SPORT... and unfortunately many of us are lacking the positive encouragement and supportive relationships we need in order to move toward our best selves”. I had read this quote by him ways back. I happen to agree....that one of the biggest challenges for many of us —is feeling alone, stuck in a rut, unmotivated, sometimes like a complete failure because we gave into our junk food craving — wishing ongoing wellness - personal support if needed - to literally everyone! I include myself - with my own challenges - my family - and close friends. This book is a golden ticket for consumers to cut through all the conflicting messages we receive about food....emphasizing that food is our best preventive medicine in avoiding diseases and living a healthier life. A BIG THANK YOU to Netgalley, Little Brown and Company, and Mark HymanNote: To get a food fact and weekly recipe directly from the kitchen....sign up for free at www.foodthebook.com. You’ll also be able to read a sample of this book and pre-order it. This book will be out in stores in Feb 2018
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    This book definitely made an impact. It remains to be seen what effect it will have, if any. Hence, the no-rating.In a nutshell: Beans: not as great for you as we’ve been led to believe; dairy: quite harmful; carbs: not needed. Beef/eggs: necessary. Organic, good quality products: almost always the answer!It’s a quick read, extremely accessible, with lots of thought-provoking nuggets: Dr. Mark Hyman isn’t afraid to get political or environmental, either.I’ve gone ahead and ordered myself a good This book definitely made an impact. It remains to be seen what effect it will have, if any. Hence, the no-rating.In a nutshell: Beans: not as great for you as we’ve been led to believe; dairy: quite harmful; carbs: not needed. Beef/eggs: necessary. Organic, good quality products: almost always the answer!It’s a quick read, extremely accessible, with lots of thought-provoking nuggets: Dr. Mark Hyman isn’t afraid to get political or environmental, either.I’ve gone ahead and ordered myself a good multivitamin, some fish oil, purchased some grass-fed beef, avocado oil, and grass-fed ghee. And some cans of Alaskan-wild caught salmon. I’m going to limit carbs (I’ll never give them up) and quit dairy temporarily, just to see if it’s the culprit to acne at 40, low energy, and stomach issues.We’ll see!
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  • Rhonda
    January 1, 1970
    Contrary to the author's assertion, this is not an impartial and rational approach to food and eating. His all-or-nothing approach contributes to the escalating eating disorder problem. I was disappointed and appalled when the author recommended a "detox" program in the last part of the book. His application of scientific evidence is unevenly applied. Instead of giving us a simpler, sensible approach to improving our nutritional intake and eating habits, this is just one more of the long line of Contrary to the author's assertion, this is not an impartial and rational approach to food and eating. His all-or-nothing approach contributes to the escalating eating disorder problem. I was disappointed and appalled when the author recommended a "detox" program in the last part of the book. His application of scientific evidence is unevenly applied. Instead of giving us a simpler, sensible approach to improving our nutritional intake and eating habits, this is just one more of the long line of unsustainable, finger-pointing harangues about American diets.
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  • Christopher Lawson
    January 1, 1970
    If You Come Across A Strange Sea Vegetable, Eat It!That’s right--it’s important to eat a wide variety of veggies, especially the odd ones! Forgot those common veggies you see at the market. Instead, “Eat all the strange, weird, and unpopular veggies instead of the boring, all-too-common ones.” If you find some strange sea vegetable from Japan, eat it!RESEARCH JUST IN: A study too late for the authors to include: Stanford University/NIH Study of 609 dieters concluded that either a low-fat or a lo If You Come Across A Strange Sea Vegetable, Eat It!That’s right--it’s important to eat a wide variety of veggies, especially the odd ones! Forgot those common veggies you see at the market. Instead, “Eat all the strange, weird, and unpopular veggies instead of the boring, all-too-common ones.” If you find some strange sea vegetable from Japan, eat it!RESEARCH JUST IN: A study too late for the authors to include: Stanford University/NIH Study of 609 dieters concluded that either a low-fat or a low-carb diet has similar benefit—as long as the food is HEALTHY. The head researcher notes: “Eat less sugar, less refined flour and as many vegetables as possible. Go for whole foods, whether that is a wheatberry salad or grass-fed beef.” Wow—these recommendations sound very similar to Dr. Hyman’s recommendations.Practical note: As a result of reading this book, I will be planting a garden full of zany, healthy vegetables. I’m really looking forward to putting the ideas in this book into action! (You don’t have to agree with all his points to realize the value of fresh, wholesome vegetables.)Eating unusual veggies is just one of the fun tips that Dr. Mark Hyman presents in, FOOD: WHAT THE HECK SHOULD I EAT? The author covers some of the hottest topics in diet research, and explains what we’ve gotten wrong. Readers familiar with Dr. Hyman’s work will recognize his passion on overuse of sugar. He notes that many health organizations recommend limiting sugar to 10 percent of the daily calories. Alas, the typical American child eats 3-times that amount. One good change is to limit sugary fruit juice. So, skip the O.J., and “Eat the orange instead.”Dr. Hyman notes that eating meat does not really lead to obesity and heart attacks. One reason studies have claimed that, is that people who eat a lot of eat have OTHER bad habits that do indeed cause health problems. To support his point, Dr. Hyman cites one summary of 53 studies, which found that high-fat diets achieved superior weight loss. Also, a comprehensive study “found no link between saturated fat consumption and heart disease.” Yet another large study found “no difference in mortality between vegetarians, pescatarians, and meat eaters.”At first, I found the conflicting conclusion about meat bewildering, but in turns out that his dietary recommendations are very similar to the “limit meat” camp. The doctor recommends big platefuls of colorful vegetables—with only a little meat: “Vegetables should take center stage, and meat should be the side dish.”Here’s what surprised me--I discovered I was woefully ignorant about modern fruits and vegetables. Modern fruits and veggies do not have great nutritional content, compared to less refined produce. We have “bred our produce to be sweeter, less colorful, and less nutritious. . . We’ve taken our wild plants— vegetables and fruit— and stripped them of their best qualities.” Here is my #1 surprise: A wild crabapple has “100x more cancer- and inflammation-fighting anthocyanins than the Golden Delicious variety found in supermarkets.” What? How did I not know that? Ditto for berries: “Wild blueberries have dozens of times more phytonutrients than domesticated berries.”Okay, I totally confess I had no idea about the nutrition of more wild produce compared to modern produce. I am VERY surprised. So all in all, I found FOOD to be a helpful book, with tons of great ideas. I realize that I am chugging down way too much sugar (I love ice cream and pies!) I found the chapters on veggies and fruit the most helpful, as I just didn’t realize how modern fruits and vegetables have so much less nutrition than less refined varieties. Excellent information!Finally, realize that there is a LOT of material in this book, and it can be a little overwhelming. Fortunately, the doctor writes well, and I found his points easy to follow. After presenting each topic, Dr. Hyman summarizes, ”What The Experts Got Right, ”What They Got Wrong,” and “What We Still Don’t Know For Sure.” I liked his succinct summary of the issues, and especially appreciate the author telling us where the science is not really settled.See also Bassocantor.com/blog/food
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting read!Well-researched and well-written, in an easy-to-understand format. However, I do want to caution that the information Hyman presents is as of right now, and I emphasize RIGHT NOW! Nutrition is a science and science is forever changing! Having said this, Hyman tells us what the researchers / science got right (thus far) about specific groups of foods, what they got wrong, and what they don't know yet. He supports each "argument" with various studies (research) that support his st Interesting read!Well-researched and well-written, in an easy-to-understand format. However, I do want to caution that the information Hyman presents is as of right now, and I emphasize RIGHT NOW! Nutrition is a science and science is forever changing! Having said this, Hyman tells us what the researchers / science got right (thus far) about specific groups of foods, what they got wrong, and what they don't know yet. He supports each "argument" with various studies (research) that support his stance and based on this information, makes recommendations for what we should eat, what we shouldn't eat, what we should stay far away from, and in some cases how to find the "good stuff."Some information that I found particularly intriguing:Current research regarding saturated fat -- not all saturated fat is bad for youThe chapter on nuts and seeds was absorbing.Does meat contribute to global warming? "Globally, one-fifth of all our energy consumption is used for industrial agriculture. That is more than is used for all our transportation - cars, trucks, planes, trains, boats - combined!"Milk increases our risk for cancer. Avocados are almost 80% fat, most of which is monounsaturated - the kind that's been shown to protect against heart disease and strokes. They contain good amounts of fiber, and even more potassium than bananas!A banana is not the best fruit to eat because it is high in sugar.Kidney beans are high in starch and with regards to plant protein, they rank low, meaning you'd have to eat a ton of beans to get the approximately 30 grams of protein you need per meal, and eating a ton of this bean is not good because of all of the starch.Nuts are antioxidant powerhouses. The best nuts are (in order): Pecans, Walnuts, Hazelnuts, Pistachios, AlmondsSeeds recommended by Hyman are: Chia, Ground Flaxseeds, Hemp, and SesameThe section entitled, "There Are Many Ways to Say Sugar" was most enlightening.Another section that was good was the one on things that you can add to your diet, especially with regards to spices and herbs, as well as other condiments.One negative about this book is that it includes some websites for where to find more information, food, etc. Over time, these links will die, thus dating the book and perhaps decreasing its informational value. This book was published this year (2018) and one of the links [that I checked] is already dead. It is a link to the Natural Resources Defense Council for a wallet card that provides info. about mercury levels in fish. The updated web address (I searched the site) is: https://assets.nrdc.org/sites/default...My takeaway is: Take everything you read about this topic with a grain of salt. Scientists are always studying nutrition and how foods affect our bodies. We are all going to die, eventually. Eat in moderation and don't overindulge!
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Good for those that believe in removing sugar and processed foods from their diet but don't want or believe in eliminating entire food groups, this book provides good information on the best choices from an health, economic and environmental consideration.
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  • Vannessa Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Food What the Heck Should I Eat opens with an easy challenge to help readers learn how much they know about food.What I learned1. Pepsi has learned how to grow and harvest human taste buds in the lab.2. The sugar industry drives our obesity epidemic.3. We eat Frankenfoods: factory-made, industrial produced food-like substances that contains transfat, high-fructose corn syrup, monosodium glutamate (MSG), artificial sweeteners and colors, additives, preservatives, pesticides, antibiotics, new-to-m Food What the Heck Should I Eat opens with an easy challenge to help readers learn how much they know about food.What I learned1. Pepsi has learned how to grow and harvest human taste buds in the lab.2. The sugar industry drives our obesity epidemic.3. We eat Frankenfoods: factory-made, industrial produced food-like substances that contains transfat, high-fructose corn syrup, monosodium glutamate (MSG), artificial sweeteners and colors, additives, preservatives, pesticides, antibiotics, new-to-mature proteins, and heightened allergens caused by genetic breeding and engineering a/k/a anti-nutrients4. We should use food as a medicine and cook our way into good health5. We spend more time watching cooking shows on television than cooking6. Processed foods are not our friends7. The American Heart Associates receives $300,000 when a product puts the AHA’s seal of approval on label8. Fat speeds up metabolism and burns fat-carbs slow down9. Gluten-free processed foods are not healthy10. Incredibly ill patients become thriving healthy humans when taking a comprehensive approach to wellness11. Real food is home-cooked food12. Eating real food reduces stress13. Incorporate movement (exercise)14. Mental health activities include activities like TOASTMASTERS, Red Hats Society, volunteering15. Margarine and butter substitutes kill tens of thousands of people a year16. Animal foods are our only source of vitamin B1217. You are not what you eat, you are what your food eats18. The liver does not store toxins19. Farmed Salmon could lead to diabetes20. Oatmeal spikes insulin and blood sugar which makes you hungryWhat I concluded1. Food is Medicine2. We are willing victims to the food industry3. We are so lazy or so poor we don’t or can’t invest in our health4. We don’t love our children enough to the right thing and feed them nutritious meals5. Don’t trust the American Heart Association health claims.Food What the Heck Should I Eat is for readers who are interested in factual information about food and the food industry.Food What the Heck Should I Eat is comprehensive and the information provided will not only help save my life but help me live a longer healthier life. Included are web sites where you can purchase safe foods.My sincere thanks to Dr. Mark Hyman.
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  • Moaning
    January 1, 1970
    The answer to the title question is apparently - nothing you can buy! If you don't make it yourself from produce you've grown your self, fish you've caught in the wild, or chickens or cows you've raised on grass then you probably shouldn't eat it.... that's how bad our food supply has gotten. No grains? No dairy? Are we really eating cows that have been fed rejected Skittles? I appreciated the straight forward way Dr. Hyman approached the question of food. However, sometimes I wasn't sure how mu The answer to the title question is apparently - nothing you can buy! If you don't make it yourself from produce you've grown your self, fish you've caught in the wild, or chickens or cows you've raised on grass then you probably shouldn't eat it.... that's how bad our food supply has gotten. No grains? No dairy? Are we really eating cows that have been fed rejected Skittles? I appreciated the straight forward way Dr. Hyman approached the question of food. However, sometimes I wasn't sure how much of his recommendations were from a medical perspective versus a political perspective. Should we really only eat grass-fed cows because they are that much better for us? Or do we need to choose grass-fed cows to change the way cows are raised? The answer is both I suppose but at some point how does an individual manage to eat healthy on a budget?
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  • Ms. Awai
    January 1, 1970
    This book was awesome! I love how it was set up and how it tackled ethical and sustainable issues with each food in addition to health benefits and pitfalls. It is backed by research, explained in a way that does not require you to have an extensive medical background, leaves the reader with no further questions.
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  • Amy Kreydin
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced review copy of Mark Hyman's forthcoming book Food: What The Heck Should I Eat? which I enjoyed a good deal. Full review: http://www.thebarefootdragonfly.com/b...
  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    This book was recommended to me by a friend who knows what it is like to struggle with intestinal issues and never quite know which food is the culprit. There is a tremendous amount of scientific research that Dr. Hyman has collected regarding which foods we can eat to help us become healthy again. His diet called "Pegan," a cross between the Paleo and Vegan diets, makes perfect sense to me.He writes about so many facts about the food industry that are very disturbing....look at any label on jus This book was recommended to me by a friend who knows what it is like to struggle with intestinal issues and never quite know which food is the culprit. There is a tremendous amount of scientific research that Dr. Hyman has collected regarding which foods we can eat to help us become healthy again. His diet called "Pegan," a cross between the Paleo and Vegan diets, makes perfect sense to me.He writes about so many facts about the food industry that are very disturbing....look at any label on just about any can, bottle, or boxed food item, and you will find sugar as an ingredient among other unhealthy additives. I liked how this book was structured, so I could easily read a chapter or two a day without becoming overwhelmed with the truth about our foods. I acknowledge how difficult it is to change eating habits....I also realize that it is essential to do so unless I want to continue having an upset stomach every few days.Even if you are a person who has been blessed to have an "iron-clad" stomach and has not experienced intestinal problems, I would recommend this book. It is most informative....what could be more important in our lives than to stay as healthy as we possibly can so that we might enjoy life to the fullest?
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  • Ariste Egan
    January 1, 1970
    Already being a fairly healthy eater, I'm not sure what I expected from this book . But I know I didn't expect to come away feeling that nothing is safe to eat! Unless I have access to only grass fed lamb and beef, chickens that run happily around on the farm all day and produce that has never been touched by a chemical, then I'm doomed to eat garbage- literally! I find that what this book suggests is out of the grasp of most people.
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    When he said he worked on the "Fed Up" documentary, I stopped reading. My opinion is based on that.
  • Dramatika
    January 1, 1970
    A very disappointing book, I ended up more confused than ever about the healthy diet. The author keeps reminding us that we are supposed to eat like our ancestors, the hunter gatherers before the invention of the great evil the agriculture. Yet we are not living that lifestyle anymore, spending endless hours siting at our desk or on the way to and from places, no do we have the luxury clean air and long sleep. We freed our time and our bodies with the invention of agriculture and now can enjoy d A very disappointing book, I ended up more confused than ever about the healthy diet. The author keeps reminding us that we are supposed to eat like our ancestors, the hunter gatherers before the invention of the great evil the agriculture. Yet we are not living that lifestyle anymore, spending endless hours siting at our desk or on the way to and from places, no do we have the luxury clean air and long sleep. We freed our time and our bodies with the invention of agriculture and now can enjoy doing other staff rather than chewing tough barely cooked meats or bitter greens. Apparently, the author of this book wants to ignore the reality of our wonderful modern lives and go back to what? Hunting our own prey? Almost, since he thinks we have endless free time to hunt down dubious supposedly healthier variety of wild salmon or grass fed beef. Dubious because the certification of the organic variety is rather haphazard and tough to check on your own (but he provides a handy list for you at the end). Also supply of the wild fish is dwindling down all over the world and unsustainable at the current rates of fishing. Same with the grass fed beef, it is too much strain on the planet as it is as more and more people all over the world eat lots of meat. Regarding meat consumption, the book is structured that way that you get the impression that this is the way to eat, also I doubt our ancestors eat any meat for days or weeks at times, certainly not everyday!I laugh on the advice on dairy, as people do evolved to digest eat quite well even in Asian countries. Antibiotics use is of concern, but we all live with certain restrictions, it is a trade of for convenience, nothing less. GMO is good for the planet and for the future of food, stop with the fear mongering! Soda is not good for you, but diet soda doesn't promote weight gain. Tons of studies on this, juts look it up. As a student I survived for years on my favorite diet coke, yet never gain any weight or had any sugar cravings. Grains are a major staple all over the world, including countries with long longevity rates such as Japan. One has to wonder how they managed to survive this supposedly toxic level of rice consumption and still live into the late 90s or even 100s! Coconut oil is just another hype product, all over the news as healthy alternative to everything bad from yesterday. Wait a little bit, it might soon become the evil bad food again, don't jump on the hype bandwagon too fast. In fact, it seem to be the only valid point in the current overwhelming research on nutrition. So many contradictory new theories ans studies, so many long established facts completely turned upside down that one is at a loss. This book seems to be written for the elusive 1 % of the population with enough resources and time (or the ability to outsource all this hunting for organic everything and long hours cooking it).
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  • Martin Lutonsky
    January 1, 1970
    Doporučuji nečíst!!! Tedy pokud nechcete vážně začít přemýšlet co máte vlastně na talíři. Autor se zde dopodrobna věnuje jednotlivým potravinám a říká na co je dobré si dát pozor a čemu dávat naopak přednost. Zároveň zmiňuje, že každý z nás je jiný a je dobré si najít v jídle takovou cestu, která nám nejlépe sedí. I to jak tu cestu najít zde najdete. A na závěr kvizová otázka: Víte co je hlavní přísadou pro to, aby chovná zvířata rychle přibírala? Nechte se překvapit:-)
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    In “Food: What the Heck Should I Eat?” Dr Mark Hyman expertly guides the reader through the many nutrition pitfalls of modern life. Each chapter goes deep into a food group, starting with meat. Nutritional studies are mentioned and meticulously noted. He is as concerned about the environment as he is about human health, so environmental factors pop up in every food chapter, giving weight to the advice to eat better, not just for ourselves, but also for future generations and the health of the pl In “Food: What the Heck Should I Eat?” Dr Mark Hyman expertly guides the reader through the many nutrition pitfalls of modern life. Each chapter goes deep into a food group, starting with meat. Nutritional studies are mentioned and meticulously noted. He is as concerned about the environment as he is about human health, so environmental factors pop up in every food chapter, giving weight to the advice to eat better, not just for ourselves, but also for future generations and the health of the planet. I have been reading a lot of new books on nutrition recently, so much of the information was not surprising to me. The author advises us to avoid all processed foods and industrial seed oils. He suggests to be wary of dairy, sugar and grains but to eat lots and lots of vegetables with grass fed meat, sustainable seafood and pasture-raised chicken & eggs. Even though I agree wholeheartedly with his advice, I don’t know if I can stop eating bread, or if I’ll ever have the willpower to give up dairy. I like vegetables but eating them three times a day is not going to be easy. I already cook most of my own food and avoid processed junk, I’m not sure how someone eating the standard American diet would manage to make such sweeping changes. This advice is also going to be tough for people on a strict budget. Veggies are affordable but high quality oils and fats are not, and grass fed meat is very expensive. It would be wonderful if we could all eat this way, but can we? Regardless of the difficulties in implementing the nutrition advice in the book, it is still one of best I’ve found on the subject. It’s straightforward, easy to read, well-organized and meticulously researched. If you read one book about nutrition this year, make it this one.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    If you are confused by all the conflicting information about food and what we should eat, then read this. I heard Dr. Hyman on a podcast and decided to read this book and I am so glad I did. He has done an insane amount of research and his advice and guidelines make total sense. The government really did us dirty by promoting a low fat diet back in the 90s and 2000s, telling us that fat and saturated fat and meat would cause heart disease. Guess what? It doesn't. Know what's making America fatte If you are confused by all the conflicting information about food and what we should eat, then read this. I heard Dr. Hyman on a podcast and decided to read this book and I am so glad I did. He has done an insane amount of research and his advice and guidelines make total sense. The government really did us dirty by promoting a low fat diet back in the 90s and 2000s, telling us that fat and saturated fat and meat would cause heart disease. Guess what? It doesn't. Know what's making America fatter and sicker? SUGAR. By telling us to eat low fat, companies produce all kinds of processed low fat junk that's augmented with sugar, chemicals, and all kinds of stuff that we can't pronounce.Dr. Hyman's approach is a cross between Paleo and vegan which he calls Pegan. Basically it's eating real, high quality food. I have already made changes in my kitchen and will continue to implement this approach. Makes total sense and I am so glad I read this.
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  • Donna Markussen
    January 1, 1970
    This is an exceptional book. Everything you want to know about food, our Food Industry, the way food is grown, the things we should become aware of that may be harming us, even though the label may say "all natural" and other names disguising a food product as healthy. Dr. Hyman breaks it down to a simple science and has plenty of studies to back this information up. Everyone should have this book, and should also be included in nutrition education, as well as medical education. It's time to kno This is an exceptional book. Everything you want to know about food, our Food Industry, the way food is grown, the things we should become aware of that may be harming us, even though the label may say "all natural" and other names disguising a food product as healthy. Dr. Hyman breaks it down to a simple science and has plenty of studies to back this information up. Everyone should have this book, and should also be included in nutrition education, as well as medical education. It's time to know that "Food is the Best Medicine" and stop reaching for the foods that will cause chronic inflammation, which in turn leads to chronic disease. There is a way out of the epidemic of obesity, diabesity and auto-immune disease. Change the way we grow, farm, and produce our food supply, is the first step in combating chronic disease.
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  • Scott County Library System
    January 1, 1970
    "The choice of nutritional philosophies is endless these days: we can go vegan; vegetarian; ketogenic; Paleo; fleixarian; pescatarian; Mediterranean; high-fat low-carb; high-carb low-fat; raw; and on and on. Trying to find the best one can be overwhelming." (page 288 Food by Mark Hyman, 2018)In his new book titled simply Food, Mark Hyman summarizes conflicting diet research from the past few decades and makes recommendations on what you should actually eat. Hyman uses clear language to explain d "The choice of nutritional philosophies is endless these days: we can go vegan; vegetarian; ketogenic; Paleo; fleixarian; pescatarian; Mediterranean; high-fat low-carb; high-carb low-fat; raw; and on and on. Trying to find the best one can be overwhelming." (page 288 Food by Mark Hyman, 2018)In his new book titled simply Food, Mark Hyman summarizes conflicting diet research from the past few decades and makes recommendations on what you should actually eat. Hyman uses clear language to explain differing opinions and debunk common myths. Hyman is not selling a system or a method, he's simply talking about food and how to eat healthier.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate to receive a free copy of this book. I have followed Dr. Hyman's PBS programs in the past and I like his basics for healthy eating. I read the book and enjoyed it. It is very easy to follow.He lays out the simple basics of healthy eating,just eat nature made foods,not man made. He even lists the do not eat foods.His other list and suggestions for the good foods are laid out in order of best choices as well. This is really common sense basics for food choices. Well written,easy to I was fortunate to receive a free copy of this book. I have followed Dr. Hyman's PBS programs in the past and I like his basics for healthy eating. I read the book and enjoyed it. It is very easy to follow.He lays out the simple basics of healthy eating,just eat nature made foods,not man made. He even lists the do not eat foods.His other list and suggestions for the good foods are laid out in order of best choices as well. This is really common sense basics for food choices. Well written,easy to read. Takes the guesswork out.
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  • Kay Vanatta
    January 1, 1970
    This book contains fairly clear explanations of the types of food we should include in our diets. It's a pretty common sense approach espousing whole real foods. I like that he doesn't exclude whole categories - like dairy or wheat -but explains why one should limit them - and which varieties are easier for our bodies to handle. It's an easy book to read and backs up much of the current real food philosophies.... I gave it a 3 because there isn't much new in it - I kind of felt like it was more This book contains fairly clear explanations of the types of food we should include in our diets. It's a pretty common sense approach espousing whole real foods. I like that he doesn't exclude whole categories - like dairy or wheat -but explains why one should limit them - and which varieties are easier for our bodies to handle. It's an easy book to read and backs up much of the current real food philosophies.... I gave it a 3 because there isn't much new in it - I kind of felt like it was more of the usual..
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  • Gloria Zak
    January 1, 1970
    I like the way the book is written: things you should know, what experts got right/got wrong, what are the good foods in a category, which are not so good. My biggest issue is the stress on meat, and no bread/potatoes, etc. I don’t think most people can live on a diet like this for an extended length of time
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  • Missy
    January 1, 1970
    If you’re someone who wants the WHY behind your nutrition choices - this is the book for you. Dr. Hyman breaks down the science, the research and the business behind what we eat and what’s being sold to us - to help give you a clear picture of what you want to eat to be your healthiest and WHY. I listened to this on audiobook and I’ll be picking up a hard copy so I can refer back to it often.
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  • Gabriel Perera
    January 1, 1970
    Author: Mark HymanEntertainment Value: 6/10Life Value: 9/10This Book is For: de-mystifying the current research and information around diet, nutrition and lifestyle. Mark Hyman is an OG in the functional medicine space and a genuine pioneer in the field of optimal nutrition. I’m personally a massive fan - I find his writing down to earth, pretty easy to follow and most importantly of all, downright practical.Hyman is no talking head - he is a clinician in practice and actively involved in the sc Author: Mark HymanEntertainment Value: 6/10Life Value: 9/10This Book is For: de-mystifying the current research and information around diet, nutrition and lifestyle. Mark Hyman is an OG in the functional medicine space and a genuine pioneer in the field of optimal nutrition. I’m personally a massive fan - I find his writing down to earth, pretty easy to follow and most importantly of all, downright practical.Hyman is no talking head - he is a clinician in practice and actively involved in the science of functional medicine. The book is incredibly well researched, extensively referenced and supported by the latest thinking in the various areas of food and nutrition. Pleasingly, he tackles the pros and cons of the paleo diet, Atkins and even the current craze the ketogenic diet and presents a compelling case for why none of them, including the previous darling the low-fat, vegetarian diet represent a complete solution for health - however, he does advocate the ketogenic diet for individuals with diabetes and severe auto-immune disease.I highly recommend this book and have done so to friends and family members - I’ve even gifted it to a few people to encourage them to read it! I would note, like all health books, this book will definitely not be readily accepted by close-minded individuals who love their flour and sugar or perhaps their French fries. That being said, they may or may not come to the book and the science if and when a health crisis impacts them or a loved one.Things I Learned or Found Really Valuable:“Whole food is the answer to many of our world’s problems. How we grow it, produce it, and eat it affects almost every aspect of our lives and our society… Food literally controls almost every function of your body and mind. And it connects almost everything that matters in our lives.”This centrality of food to our existence as humans was really powerful for me - not a new idea of course, and for centuries ancient medical traditions have taught that Food is Medicine, but overlaying the role of food in culture, and in creating meaning and belonging for me was again not new, but a neat thread to join with the medicinal and health elements or even the functional benefits of food as macro and micro nutrients.Finally, appreciation of food and food purchase and consumption as an environmental decision is another area that I’m passionate about personally - how we essentially in a “rigged” political system can vote with our consumption dollars to improve the economy and the environment, reduce pollution and in doing so support and develop industries that make the world a better place for ourselves, our kids and the generations that follow. That is bloody powerful stuff.As a natural medicine practitioner, I am well aware of the role that food can play in enhancing health, alleviating symptoms and in restoring health but also it’s potential role in consolidation of disease, and indeed as a poison for the body and mind.“…Food is the doorway to living well and loving well - and to fixing much of what’s wrong with our world.”“Food exists specifically to energise, heal, repair, and uplift us. Every bite you take is a powerful opportunity to create health or promote disease. When I say it’s miraculous, I’m talking about real food, the kind that comes from the Earth and fuels and sustains us, not the industrialised, hyperprocessed, hyper palatable junk that degrades us and makes us sick. Which kind will you allow into your body?”Defining Functional Medicine - the best model we have for addressing our chronic illness epidemic - the medicine of why, not the medicine of what (holism vs. symptomatic relief). It is about why you have a disease, not just naming a symptom or cluster of symptoms and then prescribing something to perhaps temporarily reduce those symptoms - a massively reductionist and flawed approach that propigates, rather than fixes root causation.Key Concept: Cook for yourself (and family) more often and as often as you can - As Michael Pollan, another literary inspiration says in Cooked - “the decline of everyday home cooking doesn’t only damage the health of our bodies and our land but also our families, our communities and our sense of how our eating connects us to the world.”Hyman shares my own caution around the role of food regulators and the influence direct or otherwise that “Big Food” and “Big Pharma” have at a population health level through government, policy maker and academic influence models, whether at a research funding or political lobbyist level. “Our nation’s and the world’s health crises are not driven by medical issues, but rather by social, economic and political issues that conspire to drive disease - or as, the physician and global health activist Paul Farmer calls it “structural violence… our food system is at the nexus of where our current crisis comes together.”Things that poor food choices and consumption is directly linked to (at a global population level - question is this more pronounced in the developed world - my gut says more than likely yes, although the developing world has many other issues related to nutrition that may overlap):* Health care crisis that results from lifestyle and food-driven chronic disease affecting >50% of all Americans - I’m guessing this statistic holds true for other developed world nations;* Escalating federal debt due mostly to the fiscal burden of chronic disease on government medical programs like Medicare and Medicaid;* An “achievement gap” due to childhood obesity and food-related illnesses the drives poor school performance, resulting in diminished global economic competitiveness;* Environmental degradation and climate change from petrochemical based agriculture and concentrated (factory) animal feeding operations - e.g. concentration of methane and other animal by-products* Poverty, violence, mental health issues and social injustice due to the effects of a poor diet on behaviour - generational issues at an epigenetic level whereby gene expression due to crappy diet and lifestyle is passed down inter-generationally from one to the next“What you put on your fork is more important than the car you drive, for both your health and the environment”OK, to summarise Hyman’s recommendations by key food group:Meat - vegetarian or vegan diets are simply too challenging to fulfil an adult or child’s protein requirements effectively either at a macro-nutrient level or in terms of essential amino acids. Recent and no-so-recent scares around the consumption of meat being linked to an increased risk of cancer and heart disease, Hyman says are flawed and based on key researchers in influential studies and meta analyses cherry picking the data. In fact, the foods found to be the biggest drivers of disease in these studies were high glycemic-index carbohydrates like potatoes, bread, and cereal.“…In 2017… the president of the World Heart Foundation…a world-renowned cardiologist (said) … Contrary to common beliefs, the current recommendations to reduce saturated fat have no scientific basis… Carbohydrates are probably your biggest culprit. So when you eat a hamburger, throw away the bun, and eat the meat!”We are what our meat eats - factory farmed animals are fed cheap, mass-produced grains because it fattens them up quickly at lower cost. That means that they are inevitably eating GMOs and pesticides (as well as the other non-traditional foods that factory farmers seem to think are appropriate to feed livestock - stuff that you would never ever want them to eat - like feathers, animal poop, plastic, bacteria). They’re also pumped full of hormones and antibiotics because that makes them bigger and fatter too.Grass-fed is the best option. Cattle in particular are not designed anatomically to eat grain and when forced to do so, can develop bloating, liver disease and other conditions. They are also more susceptible to infections that can linger on in their meat and pass into our bodies through consumption.Grass-fed meat also contains conjugated linoleic acid or CLA - a highly beneficial fatty acid, that serves as an antioxidant that can slow the progression of some cancers, reduce plaque formation in the arteries as well as reduce risk of diabetes and heart disease and help with weight control and metabolism.Include organ meats (from grass-fed sources).Use low-temperature cooking methods - grilling and frying are generally hazardous when applied to meat - unfortunately particularly so when the meat is charred or barbecued.Meat as a condiment, not as the main event on your plate.Limit processed meats - think of bacon and sausage as a treat food, not an everyday food staple.Buy local wherever possible. Buy organic and/or pasture-raised chicken, duck, or turkey and pasture-raised, organic or omega-3 whole eggs.Eat egg yolks - but clean the eggs before eating them.Bake, don’t fry or grill your chicken. Wash it thoroughly before eating it.Milk and Dairy“If someone handed you a beverage that you know would cause you weight gain, bloating, acne, gas, allergies, eczema, brittle bones, and possibly even cancer, would you drink it? Would you chug 3 cups of it daily and give it to your children?”Today’s cow’s milk contains dozens of reproductive hormones, allergenic proteins, antibiotics, and growth factors, some of which are known to promote cancer, such as IGF-1. Dairy causes problems in people who have leaky gut and IBS - most people can’t actually stomach milk - around 70% of the world’s population suffers from milk-induced digestive distress because of lactose intolerance. All the pro-milk advice from the “experts” was based on dairy industry promotional activity.Milk is not good for our bones. Low-fat milk is not good for you. In fact, countries with the lowest milk consumption have the lowest rates of osteoporosis and fractures - while those with the highest consumption have the highest rates of fractures (WTF?!?) - bone mineral density is actually produced by physical activity, not by dietary sources of calcium.Other non-dairy sources of calcium include - sesame seeds, sardines (with bones), collard greens, spinach, cheese, Bok Choy, almonds.Milk is shown to increase our risk for Cancer. Limited quantities of grass-fed butter is ok.If you are lactose intolerant or sensitive to dairy - avoid it at all costs. Even if you’re not, milk should not be a big part of your diet. If you have digestive issues, auto-immune disease, weight gain, type 2 diabetes, PMS, infertility, skin disorders like acne, eczema or psoriasis, allergies of any kind - you should avoid dairy.It is ok (if none of the above apply) to have a little bit of grass-fed milk, cheese and butter from time to time - provided that they are full-fat, free of additives and ethically and sustainably produced.Fish and SeafoodWe should be eating seafood at least three times a week - the best sources are sustainably sourced fish - stay away completely from farmed seafood *unless it is organic and from wild fish with a lot of toxins. Smaller fish are better than bigger fish as the larger fish accumulate more mercury.Eat the following - wild salmon canned or fresh, small toxin-free fish like sardines, anchovies, herring and mackerel, clams, scallops, mussels and oysters. Avoid big fish, farmed fish, tuna, sushi and imported shrimp.VegetablesThings we need to know - eat the rainbow - a variety of coloured mainly vegetables and fruits. Eat organic wherever possible and especially - celery, spinach, tomatoes, bell peppers, cherry tomatos, cucumbers, kale, collard greens, leafy greens and hot peppers.Some ground rules - always wash produce throughly - scrub them with a vegetable brush. Some people also suggest washing with a dilute solution of 3% hydrogen peroxide.Frozen vegetables are about as nutritious as fresh and sometimes more so. Buy organic frozen veggies! The best way to cook (all) vegetables is to steam them for no more than 4 minutes - they should still be bright and crunchy when eaten. Don’t deep fry or microwave your vegetables.Eat locally grown, organic vegetables wherever and whenever possible. Eat a load of broccoli, kale, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and other members of the cruciferous vegetable family. Eat a load of dark leafy greens, spinach, Swiss chard and collard greens (also crucifers), eat alliums such as garlic, shallots and onions.Eat sweet potatoes and winter squash sometimes - don’t binge.Avoid - iceberg lettuce, white potatoes, raw button mushrooms, alfalfa sprouts, most supermarket tomatoes, peppers, egg plants and other nightshades.FruitsFocus on lower sugar fruits - berries, apples and pears - use all the others are treats in smaller quantities. If you’re overweight, diabetic or have other blood sugar issues, then be more careful - limit fruit intake to 1/2 cup of berries or one piece of fruit per day.Eat the following - wild, organic, fresh blueberries, cherries, blackberries, and raspberries. Frozen organic berries either thawed or in shakes or frozen desserts. Organic stone fruits, organic citrus fruits, pomegranates, kiwis and papayas, goji, açai, gooseberries, mangosteens. Focus also on the “fat” fruits like avocados, coconut, and olives. Use lemons and limes liberally to flavour food and drinking water.Avoid and limit grapes, bananas, pineapples - avoid conventionally grown apples and strawberries - they are among the worst offenders when it comes to pesticides - buy organic.Avoid any and all fruit juice - especially when you didn’t squeeze it yourself.Fats and OilsMust know: consuming lots of natural whole-food based healthy fats, including saturated fats, is absolutely critical for your health. Focus on eating the fats and oils that our ancestors ate and banish the industrially produced, highly processed ones from your kitchen.To keep it simple - limit yourself to two - organic, cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil and organic virgin coconut oil. Use olive oil liberally on your food, but don’t overheat it, use coconut oil for cooking at higher temperatures. Use both orally and topically and on your hair.Remember - fats combined with starch or sugar are like rocket fuel for weight gain.GrainsYou actually don’t need to eat them at all. Any vitamins or nutrition you can get from grains, you can get from a variety of other sources - vegetables, fruit, nuts, seeds and other foods that don’t have the baggage that comes from grains. We don’t actually need to eat carbs! At all! For nearly all of our history, humans consumed no grains and our bodies are designed to work very well without them.Flour = sugar. When you eat something containing wheat flour, you may as well be eating sugar. Gluten is not our friend - our bodies don’t know how to process it and in some cases, it is a poison. Grains these days are not the same as the ancient grains our ancestors may have eaten - super starches, chemical herbicides used in production all contribute to the harmful and as a minimum the immune impact of grain consumption.Cereal and oatmeal are not health foods - like all other grains, oats spike your blood sugar and make you hungrier.Treat grains as treats or sometimes food. Think of them the same way as you think of alcohol. But only eat them if they are whole-grains, organic and gluten-free. No more than once a day and no more than 1/2 cup serving max.Do not eat grains if you’re type-2 diabetic, have issues with weight control or cravings, have food sensitivities, IBS or acid reflux, if you have any auto-immune disease or you feel bloated after eating. Nuts and SeedsEat almonds, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, cashews, pumpkin seeds. Don’t eat chocolate nuts, peanuts, and nut butters with trans fats added.Sugar and SweetenersSugar, not (healthy) fat was the enemy all along. “If only a small fraction of what is already known about the effects of sugar were revealed in relation to any other material used as a food additive…that material would promptly be banned”Sugar is damn addictive and can dramatically alter your metabolism and brain chemistry causing you to suffer intense cravings. Quitting sugar, like quitting cigarettes, improves your health massively and rapidly - blood pressure falls, LDL cholesterol drops, triglycerides drop, fasting blood sugar and insulin levels improve significantly. Sugar (and fructose without fibre) is highly toxic.Key concepts: get off sweeteners as much as possible - they are addictive and blunt our receptors of other tastes and flavours. If you are cooking with a sweetener, use fresh pureed fruit, molasses, organic palm sugar, date sugar, coconut sugar, monk fruit, organic maple syrup, honey (ethically sourced), stevia sparingly. Avoid all artificial sweeteners, sugary beverages, high-fructose corn syrup, agave, brown rice syrup - basically all packaged foods.DrinksWater as pure as possible RO filtered. Green tea, brewed at home, coffee in moderation, wine in moderation (1 glass a day), spirits in moderation (1 glass a day), homemade green juices, shakes and smoothies without high-sugar fruits, coconut water and watermelon water. Avoid all bottled water, fruit juices, any fruit juice or smoothie you didn’t make yourself, sweetened coffee drinks, milk, beer and of course any and all sodas.Summarising the “Pegan” Diet1. Stay away from sugar (and sugar like substances like flour, sweeteners) - treat it like a recreational drug - use it for fun occasionally, but never as a staple2. Eat mostly plants - the deeper the colour the better - no more than 1/2 cup of sweet potatoes or squash daily3. Go easy on fruits - stick with berries, kiwis - think of dried fruit as candy and follow rule 14. Stay away from pesticides, antibiotics, hormones, and GMO foods 5. Eat foods with healthy fats6. Stay away from most vegetable oils7. Avoid or limit dairy - if you eat it, minimise it and always go organic and grass-fed8. Think of meat and animal products as condiments - 4-6 ounces per meal from grass-fed, sustainably raised sources9. Eat sustainably raised or harvested low mercury fish - smaller fish 10. Avoid gluten11. Eat gluten-free grains sparingly - very small portions only 1/2 cup per meal of low GI grains. If you have auto-immune disease or digestive disorders just dump grains and beans - stick to a ketogenic diet if you have diabetes12. Avoid beans or eat them rarely
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  • Debbie Boucher
    January 1, 1970
    I make it a point to read one health-related book a year, so when a friend recommended this one, I figured, Why not? My diet could probably use some tweaking. I ordered it through our library's zip books program, and I liked it well enough to order a copy for myself. I plan to do the 10 day detox diet because I feel certain that I eat too much sugar. My favorite snack is a banana and two Ghirardelli 60% dark chocolate pieces. And while this is under 200 calories, it doesn't make a lot of sense a I make it a point to read one health-related book a year, so when a friend recommended this one, I figured, Why not? My diet could probably use some tweaking. I ordered it through our library's zip books program, and I liked it well enough to order a copy for myself. I plan to do the 10 day detox diet because I feel certain that I eat too much sugar. My favorite snack is a banana and two Ghirardelli 60% dark chocolate pieces. And while this is under 200 calories, it doesn't make a lot of sense after reading this book. I am ready to "eat clean" as many people are inclined to say these days, and this book will help me do that. The most interesting part was the author's belief that as we age, it is more difficult to get all the protein we need from plants alone. He calls his approach to eating "Pegan," as in Paleo and Vegan. I am inspired to try it, and maybe this book will inspire you to look more carefully at what you eat and why.
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  • Tree
    January 1, 1970
    This is probably silly but I judge most of the diets out there based on how healthy the author looks. Hymen looks pretty healthy so I read the book. It's definitely comprehensive and is one of those low carb kind of diets with a twist. Hymen says pretty much in a nutshell eat lots of veggies, organic preferably, and use animal as condiments. However when you get to the back of the book where you want to try recipes out, they are mostly meat-based. After reading the book I was expecting to have l This is probably silly but I judge most of the diets out there based on how healthy the author looks. Hymen looks pretty healthy so I read the book. It's definitely comprehensive and is one of those low carb kind of diets with a twist. Hymen says pretty much in a nutshell eat lots of veggies, organic preferably, and use animal as condiments. However when you get to the back of the book where you want to try recipes out, they are mostly meat-based. After reading the book I was expecting to have lots of stir fry and salad recipes with just a touch of meat added every once in awhile. So that was a disappointment. But, the book has motivated me to reduce or eliminate sugars and increase vegetable intake.
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  • Jeanne-Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Dr. Mark Hyman has been my go-to Functional Medicine nutritionalist for a few years, ever since I studied The Daniel Plan to healthy living. Dr. Hymen has such great knowledge and such a balanced approach to healthy eating and his recipies are great.
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  • Jessica Romrell
    January 1, 1970
    An insightful blend of both "sides" in the great nutritional debateTakes the best from every side and blends it into the best supported and most compelling scientific argument. Go pegan!
  • Mary Lou
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing new. Redundant.
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    I appreciated how this book broke down various types of foods by chapter. Hyman shared the good, bad and the ugly about the food business and the nutrients your body needs. This is certainly a book I will purchase.
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