Points of Impact
Humankind may have won the battle, but a new threat looms larger than ever before… Earth’s armed forces have stopped the Lanky advance and chased their ships out of the solar system, but for CDC officer Andrew Grayson, the war feels anything but won. On Mars, the grinding duty of flushing out the twenty-meter-tall alien invaders from their burrows underground is wearing down troops and equipment at an alarming rate. And for the remaining extrasolar colonies, the threat of a Lanky attack is ever present.Earth’s game changer? New advanced ships and weapons, designed to hunt and kill Lankies and place humanity’s militaries on equal footing with their formidable foes. Andrew and his wife, Halley, both now burdened with command responsibilities and in charge of more lives than just their own, are once again in humanity’s vanguard as they prepare for this new phase in the war. But the Lankies have their own agenda…and in war, the enemy doesn’t usually wait until you are prepared. As Andrew is once again plunged into the chaos and violence of war with an unyielding species, he is forced to confront the toll this endless conflict is taking on them all, and the high price of survival…at any cost.

Points of Impact Details

TitlePoints of Impact
Author
ReleaseJan 9th, 2018
Publisher47North
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Military Science Fiction

Points of Impact Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    I am authentically impressed by this series. It's easily some of the very best milSF I've ever read. Why? Because the writing is super clear and manages to be both light and dark at the very same time. I love how humanity is portrayed as being people, with both sexes getting over the baggage we never seem to get over in RL, everyone focused on living amidst horror and devastation and death always being on the doorstep.I appreciate this a lot. It gives us all hope. It gives a very solid reason wh I am authentically impressed by this series. It's easily some of the very best milSF I've ever read. Why? Because the writing is super clear and manages to be both light and dark at the very same time. I love how humanity is portrayed as being people, with both sexes getting over the baggage we never seem to get over in RL, everyone focused on living amidst horror and devastation and death always being on the doorstep.I appreciate this a lot. It gives us all hope. It gives a very solid reason why we ought to survive. That, and competence reigns even if the baddie aliens are bigger than life and they're completely inscrutable and hulking and have always refused to communicate with us.Sure, it's a plot device focused on survival and forcing the rest of us to get over our crap, but again, I like that, too.As for this book, I think it's even better than the battle for Mars. There's something really delicious about the new battlecruiser and rescuing a colony and going all out with the battle sequences is always a winner.I'm surprised I'm actually saying this... but Go Humanity, Go! :)Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC, it's great fun! :)
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  • Robyn Powley
    January 1, 1970
    I've been anxiously awaiting the release of Points of Impact. I did a binge read on the Frontlines series when I got a recommendation. Author Marko Kloos has created a marvelous universe for those addicted to science fiction--it's got everything: a magnetic, but all-too-human protagonist, action, adventure, aliens, love and friendship. What has kept my interest is the growth of the main character, Andrew Grayson. In this book, he's taking up a big leadership role and it feels like a natural prog I've been anxiously awaiting the release of Points of Impact. I did a binge read on the Frontlines series when I got a recommendation. Author Marko Kloos has created a marvelous universe for those addicted to science fiction--it's got everything: a magnetic, but all-too-human protagonist, action, adventure, aliens, love and friendship. What has kept my interest is the growth of the main character, Andrew Grayson. In this book, he's taking up a big leadership role and it feels like a natural progression of a real life. The author has a skillful way of using the science and technology that underlie all sci-fi works, keeping it believable and understandable, but a backdrop to the story itself. In this book, a large part of the tale becomes about new, advanced technology and the hubris that can accompany its development New machines and weapons have been juxtaposed with people and places from past books, in a recombinant DNA that results in a fresh, exciting story. There is a richness and complexity that is as delicious as chocolate layer cake--but without the sugar high.Once again, I am struck with the way the author fashions a society where there is no gender dominance. Heroics and villainy appear in both sexes, and in that, the future feels like one we aspire to--it is Trekian is that way. But every person is multi-dimensional, with shades of grey. I am especially enamored of Grayson's wife Halley, a skilled pilot and leader who outranks her spouse. The starkness of all bad is reserved for the Lankies, but even this formidable enemy is being shown to be more complex than mindless insects. The aliens are still quite a mystery however, and I would like to know more about them...perhaps in the next book?Mr. Kloos writes authentically about combat and its toll. No one comes through a war completely untouched--some are honed and some are shattered. Like all great sagas, it's not the time, place, or technology that enthralls, it is the people who are impacted by the events. Points of Impact is great science fiction... but read the other books first.
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  • Charles Green
    January 1, 1970
    Marko Kloos is yet to write a bad novel. However, Points of Impact, the sixth in his 'Frontlines' series, is not his strongest effort to-date.The problem is that the book feels like padding, with a thin plot stretched out to fill a full novel. With the exception of a short and inconsequential opening on Mars and an equally rushed return to the Formahault System as a denouement, the book features very little military action. Much of its length is filled with introducing the Ottawa, the newest and Marko Kloos is yet to write a bad novel. However, Points of Impact, the sixth in his 'Frontlines' series, is not his strongest effort to-date.The problem is that the book feels like padding, with a thin plot stretched out to fill a full novel. With the exception of a short and inconsequential opening on Mars and an equally rushed return to the Formahault System as a denouement, the book features very little military action. Much of its length is filled with introducing the Ottawa, the newest and most formidable ship in Earth's military fleet, which has been designed specifically to take on and beat the existential threat posed by the Lankies. Add in yet another quick trip to peaceful Vermont for recurring leads Andrew and Halley and some introspection from the former on the personal impact of war & combat, and that's pretty much three quarters of the book's length spoken for.Whilst these sections are well written as always, they're not exactly jam packed with excitement and whilst the Ottawa's appearance evens up the on-going Human vs Lanky war, that conflict doesn't really progress from where it was left at the end of 'Fields of Fire'. The concluding battle, which feels rushed and rather as if it was included to fulfill some-sort-of action quotient, doesn't greatly alter the respective sides positions, and both Andrew and Halley are pretty much where they were when the book opens.The overall result is a book that takes quite a long time to not really go anywhere, leaving the series' wheels spinning without much forward momentum. I wasn't bored by Points of Impact; the chance to spend time with familiar characters in a richly conceived future world and Kloos' ever-accessible prose saw to that. Nor however, was a blown away or genuinely enthused by the book. I'll stick with the series, but the next installment needs to offer more than shiny tech and the odd skirmish to keep me gripped.
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  • Ernest
    January 1, 1970
    Like the book's blurb says, we've beaten the alien Lanky's to a draw on Mars, but once they've dug into a planet they're pretty much impossible to dig out. Andrew Grayson, the main character we've been following since boot camp six books ago, is burned out from garrison duty on Mars as well as having come from a stint working with local forces back in North America getting control of just the sort of ghetto he left to join the military. Earth has finally put together a new class of starship desi Like the book's blurb says, we've beaten the alien Lanky's to a draw on Mars, but once they've dug into a planet they're pretty much impossible to dig out. Andrew Grayson, the main character we've been following since boot camp six books ago, is burned out from garrison duty on Mars as well as having come from a stint working with local forces back in North America getting control of just the sort of ghetto he left to join the military. Earth has finally put together a new class of starship designed to go head to head with the nearly indestructible Lanky "seed" ships, and Andrew, along with his wife Halley, who is a Major to his Captain, are sent along on the Ottowa, first of the class for its shakedown cruise. It won't surprise readers that all too soon they're headed for the real deal, back on the same planet that Andrew helped put down a military takeover attempt in the second book in the series (Lines of Departure). It's a frozen world where the weather is as brutal as the Lankies, and the Ottowa is outnumbered three to one, but that's the job, no matter the cost.. Marko Kloos is one of my "must read" Mil-SF authors, and I look forward to the release of new books in his Frontlines series every year. My only complaint about Points of Impact is that at just shy of 300 pages, it's over to quickly. Note: I'll have a longer review on SFRevu.com in January 2018
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  • Guy Wheatley
    January 1, 1970
    The struggle for survival continues in “Points of Impact.” Kloos once again puts us on the front line with his principal character. We can feel the time that has passed since we first met Andrew in “Terms of Enlistment.” He is now in command and responsible for more lives than his own. At the same time both Andrew and Humanity are wearing down from the struggle, there is an intersecting arc of raising hope as Earth is developing weapons that give Humanity an equal footing in the fight.Kloos’ att The struggle for survival continues in “Points of Impact.” Kloos once again puts us on the front line with his principal character. We can feel the time that has passed since we first met Andrew in “Terms of Enlistment.” He is now in command and responsible for more lives than his own. At the same time both Andrew and Humanity are wearing down from the struggle, there is an intersecting arc of raising hope as Earth is developing weapons that give Humanity an equal footing in the fight.Kloos’ attention to military detail makes the story real. Not just the scenes from the battle field, but those in the barracks. His depiction of garrison life and the rare trips into the civilian world lend authenticity to the tale and make the characters real. Once again the reader finds himself on a dangerous journey with people he cares about. A good read that leaves me breathlessly waitng for the next book.
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  • Jo (Mixed Book Bag)
    January 1, 1970
    Andrew and his wife, Halley, are still doing battle with the Lankys. They have moved the battle from Earth and they have new and better battlecruiser. Other than that this is just more battle with some new characters and some from the past. It is a fun space opera and Andrew and Halley are really great characters. Time will tell if they continue with this fight. Losing someone from the past is giving Andrew pause. This is a series but each book works well as a stand alone.I received a free copy Andrew and his wife, Halley, are still doing battle with the Lankys. They have moved the battle from Earth and they have new and better battlecruiser. Other than that this is just more battle with some new characters and some from the past. It is a fun space opera and Andrew and Halley are really great characters. Time will tell if they continue with this fight. Losing someone from the past is giving Andrew pause. This is a series but each book works well as a stand alone.I received a free copy of the book in return for an honest review.
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  • Craig Pearson
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. Very interesting future war novel. This reads as if it is a continuation of a previously published story but that is not clear. The combat on Mars is well thought out but the author does not seem to take into consideration the variance of gravity and the much lower atmospheric pressure of Mars over Earth. No explanation was given as to where the aliens came from or why they don'r modify their tactics and weaponry while Eart Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. Very interesting future war novel. This reads as if it is a continuation of a previously published story but that is not clear. The combat on Mars is well thought out but the author does not seem to take into consideration the variance of gravity and the much lower atmospheric pressure of Mars over Earth. No explanation was given as to where the aliens came from or why they don'r modify their tactics and weaponry while Earth forces do. All in all a good read if you don't quibble over the details.
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