Caddyshack
“This is a tough, sharp history of comedy and competitiveness, of rising stars and brilliant upstarts. Of difficult egos, awful behavior, fragile friendships, bursts of inspiration, and blizzards of cocaine―told by the survivors and shaped by Chris Nashawaty's welcome insight and perspective.”― Mark Harris, New York Times bestselling author of Pictures at a Revolution and Five Came BackCaddyshack is one of the most beloved comedies of all time, a classic snobs vs. slobs story of working class kids and the white collar buffoons that make them haul their golf bags in the hot summer sun. It has sex, drugs and one very memorable candy bar, but the movie we all know and love didn’t start out that way, and everyone who made it certainly didn’t have the word “classic” in mind as the cameras were rolling.In Caddyshack:The Making of a Hollywood Cinderella Story film critic for Entertainment Weekly Chris Nashawaty goes behind the scenes of the iconic film, chronicling the rise of comedy’s greatest deranged minds as they form The National Lampoon, turn the entertainment industry on its head, and ultimately blow up both a golf course and popular culture as we know it. Caddyshack is at once an eye-opening narrative about one of the most interesting, surreal, and dramatic film productions there’s ever been, and a rich portrait of the biggest, and most revolutionary names in Hollywood. So, it’s got that going for it…which is nice.

Caddyshack Details

TitleCaddyshack
Author
ReleaseApr 24th, 2018
PublisherFlatiron Books
ISBN-139781250105950
Rating
GenreNonfiction

Caddyshack Review

  • Joseph Carano
    January 1, 1970
    I won a ARC on Goodreads. I never really thought about how a movie is actually made. The everyday problems with everything from casting, locations, scripts, politics etc... This book has it all, including the fact that it was made in the 70's, when the culture was everything and anything was go. Great stories are included about the actors, actresses, producers, directors, writers, etc... Learned more reading this book than most others. This offering will sell quite a few books.
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  • Mike LaRosa
    January 1, 1970
    This is an interesting and thorough enough read that you don't necessarily have to be a huge fan of the movie to both enjoy reading about its history and effectively follow the series of events. Nashawaty does a great job giving necessary context, starting all the way back at the Harvard Lampoon, moving on to how things like National Lampoon, Saturday Night Live, and Animal House played into the process of Caddyshack coming to be. With all the drugs, infighting, inexperience, and studio pressure This is an interesting and thorough enough read that you don't necessarily have to be a huge fan of the movie to both enjoy reading about its history and effectively follow the series of events. Nashawaty does a great job giving necessary context, starting all the way back at the Harvard Lampoon, moving on to how things like National Lampoon, Saturday Night Live, and Animal House played into the process of Caddyshack coming to be. With all the drugs, infighting, inexperience, and studio pressures, if nothing else you get a sense of appreciation for the fact that the movie came together at all.
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  • Danny Cerullo
    January 1, 1970
    If you are between the ages of 30 and 50 Caddyshack probably had a major part in shaping your sense of humor. It's a glorious mess of big comedy stars improvising hilarious scenes that don't really add up to much of a plot. In the book Caddyshack, Chris Nashawaty tells the entire story of how this movie came together, starting with the formation of the National Lampoon and culminating in writer/producer Doug Kenney's untimely death. Kenney's rise and fall is the through-line throughout the book If you are between the ages of 30 and 50 Caddyshack probably had a major part in shaping your sense of humor. It's a glorious mess of big comedy stars improvising hilarious scenes that don't really add up to much of a plot. In the book Caddyshack, Chris Nashawaty tells the entire story of how this movie came together, starting with the formation of the National Lampoon and culminating in writer/producer Doug Kenney's untimely death. Kenney's rise and fall is the through-line throughout the book and his self-destruction is a dark shadow that hangs over the entire narrative and the great tragedy is that he died thinking the movie was a bomb and didn't live to see it become the cultural icon that it would ultimately become.
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    In depth telling of how Caddyshack came to be. From the beginnings with National Lampoon and Second City through to the aftermath of the movie's release. It's amazing to see how all those comedic geniuses gravitated together to create some of the greatest movies of a generation. Yes, this book is about more than just Caddyshack. Mr. Nashawaty weaves together the stories of the actors and writers who came together to create this wonderful movie. For anyone who is a fan of National Lampoon, Saturd In depth telling of how Caddyshack came to be. From the beginnings with National Lampoon and Second City through to the aftermath of the movie's release. It's amazing to see how all those comedic geniuses gravitated together to create some of the greatest movies of a generation. Yes, this book is about more than just Caddyshack. Mr. Nashawaty weaves together the stories of the actors and writers who came together to create this wonderful movie. For anyone who is a fan of National Lampoon, Saturday Night Live, Second City, and/or a fan of 70s and 80s comedy, this is a must read.
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  • Joann
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I got this for free from the publisher through a Goodreads giveaway, but I'd still say if I hated it. In fact, I found it engrossing, hilarious, and very hard to put down. And that isn't because I'm a diehard fan of Caddyshack. I like it a lot, but I don't worship it or quote it everyday. Chris Nashawaty's Caddyshack is about a lot more than just the making of the titular film. In fact, that aspect is arguably the least intriguing part of the story. The book's subtitle, "The Making of First off, I got this for free from the publisher through a Goodreads giveaway, but I'd still say if I hated it. In fact, I found it engrossing, hilarious, and very hard to put down. And that isn't because I'm a diehard fan of Caddyshack. I like it a lot, but I don't worship it or quote it everyday. Chris Nashawaty's Caddyshack is about a lot more than just the making of the titular film. In fact, that aspect is arguably the least intriguing part of the story. The book's subtitle, "The Making of a Hollywood Cinderella Story" actually has a second half that's only used on the interior title page, "and the Remaking of American Comedy." One of Nashawaty's main purposes is to examine the development of the radical new style of comedy from the late seventies that Caddyshack belongs to.The book is also an unofficial biography of Caddyshack's producer/co-writer Doug Kenney, a fascinating guy who seems to have always been at the epicenter or on the fringes of every big development in American comedy at the time. We follow Kenney as the Harvard Lampoon begats the National Lampoon, which helps begat Saturday Night Live which begats Animal House, all of which leads to... Caddyshack. Structuring the book this way also unfortunately gives Nashawaty a clear point in time to end on, for reasons I won't spoil any further.All of this isn't to say that the reader doesn't learn plenty about everyone else involved in the making of the film. We get mini life stories on almost anyone even tangentially related to the subject, including John Belushi who wasn't even in the film.Nashawaty's writing style is delightfully witty and effective at conveying character and detail. The book's prologue recounts a disastrous press meeting for the film following an equally disastrous screening and Nashawatty really makes the reader feel like they are there in Rodney Dangerfield's slightly scuzzy comedy club with all of the incredibly bombed and/or hungover cast and crew.One of the real coups of the book is that Nashawatty got candid, in-depth interviews with just everyone who was still alive when he was writing this. Everyone is also incredibly, almost mind-blowingly honest, too. No empty fluff here. The interviews and others sources are well documented in the voluminous footnotes at the back of the book. Seriously, you could use this as a source for a college thesis.The only real negatives are of the kind that always pop up in this type of work. I didn't always agree with Nashawaty's opinion of the relative merit or lack thereof of various pop culture figures and works, but I can respect his opinion. Also, I wasn't very familiar with this topic beforehand, so I can't say how much new information there would be for someone who lives and breathes this movie or these actors. But overall, I would highly recommend Caddyshack who loves comedy, movies or just amusingly told stories about loveable but deeply flawed individuals.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I entered to win this in a Goodreads giveaway because I've always been a fan of the movie. At first I figured the bulk of the book would re-tell a lot of stuff I had already learned about the film when watching a documentary on A&E. I'm happy to say though that I learned a whole lot that wasn't in the doc I saw. It's very informative and entertaining which, for me, usually boils down to a very fast read. If you're a fan of the film, you'll definitely want to check this book out!
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    I won an ARC through Goodreads. I enjoyed reading about how the movie Caddyshack came to be. The book follows the development of National Lampoon, its publications, and then its first movie Animal House. From there, we follow the story of the actual development and shooting for Caddyshack. The brief summary is that there were lots of drugs, before drugs were bad.For me, the book contrasts with one other making of works, As You Wish. In that work, the author is one of the lead actors, and so ther I won an ARC through Goodreads. I enjoyed reading about how the movie Caddyshack came to be. The book follows the development of National Lampoon, its publications, and then its first movie Animal House. From there, we follow the story of the actual development and shooting for Caddyshack. The brief summary is that there were lots of drugs, before drugs were bad.For me, the book contrasts with one other making of works, As You Wish. In that work, the author is one of the lead actors, and so there is a significantly greater emphasis on the crafting of the movie itself. And while I enjoyed reading this book, it was just not as personal and engaging as I had hoped. Read it? Sure. Want to watch the movie and see the scenes in a new light? Not so much.
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  • Fred
    January 1, 1970
    A behind-the-scenes look at one of the most iconic cult comedies in modern times. If you're a die-hard fan of Bill Murray, the movie, or Hollywood, and must know how this movie got made, this is a great book. It's real inside-baseball for movie production, focusing on stars' egos and personalities, the realities of making a movie, and how the movie became so iconic.
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  • Sara Vilkomerson
    January 1, 1970
    I fell very much in love with this book and all the oddball characters at its center (except for one, and when you read this book you'll know who I mean). I have always been a fan of Caddyshack, and while it's very fun and informative about the making of the movie, the book is also an examination of a time period and a cultural shift in comedy that is downright fascinating. (I ended up on the couch reading past midnight because I could not put it down.)
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book through the Goodread's Giveaway Program. As one not familiar with the origins of National Lampoons, Saturday Night Live, SCTV, I found these segments, which cover a good part of the first half of the book interesting and informative. I found the part relating to movie production and distribution less interesting. Overall,it appears to be a well written book, and for an advance copy did not possess any errors that I could see. The author definitely did his research. I believe I received this book through the Goodread's Giveaway Program. As one not familiar with the origins of National Lampoons, Saturday Night Live, SCTV, I found these segments, which cover a good part of the first half of the book interesting and informative. I found the part relating to movie production and distribution less interesting. Overall,it appears to be a well written book, and for an advance copy did not possess any errors that I could see. The author definitely did his research. I believe that my expectations of what the book would deliver were off.
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  • M.
    January 1, 1970
    A Fun read on a movie classic.
  • Donkey21
    January 1, 1970
    I liked it, but I already knew a lot about the movie. If there was newer material, I probably would have bumped it up a star. I did, however, not realize how much the critics had eviscerated it when it came out.
  • Andy N
    January 1, 1970
    A comprehensive and highly entertaining look at the making of an American movie classic. Film critic Nashawaty does a marvelous job bringing the larger-than-life characters—Doug Kenney, Chevy Chase, Bill Murray, Rodney Dangerfield, etc.—to life while also highlighting the lesser known but equally important players—writers, producers, set designers, character actors, and so on. And like any great book about a movie, it's a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the movie making process. Some reade A comprehensive and highly entertaining look at the making of an American movie classic. Film critic Nashawaty does a marvelous job bringing the larger-than-life characters—Doug Kenney, Chevy Chase, Bill Murray, Rodney Dangerfield, etc.—to life while also highlighting the lesser known but equally important players—writers, producers, set designers, character actors, and so on. And like any great book about a movie, it's a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the movie making process. Some readers should be aware that the book is a slowwwww burn. It doesn't really get into the making of Caddyshack until near the halfway point. Before that Nashawaty does a deep dive into the history of National Lampoon and its first foray into filmmaking with the wildly successful Animal House. Not a bad thing by any means. But anyone knowledgeable of that era, or anyone who's seen or read A Futile and Stupid Gesture will find a lot of familiar ground. That's really my only caveat in recommending this overall excellent book.
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  • Steve Peifer
    January 1, 1970
    The only funny part of the movie was Bill Murray, and his scenes still hold up. The rest of the movie and book is about people using a lot of drugs and thinking they are funny. Drunk people are usually not very funny, and that is true in spades here. But Murray is so great that I had to rewatch this scene again and again: https://youtu.be/zbQTXFJL8lo
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  • Patrick Schultheis
    January 1, 1970
    A good, quick read. Just what I wanted - a behind the scenes look at the making of one of the best films ever made.
  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite comedies. Very insightful and interesting.
  • Matthew Fitch
    January 1, 1970
    Not only goes into detail about the making of Caddyshack but also offers in a glimpse into the comedy world of 1970’s. Not only informative but very funny as well.
  • Tena
    January 1, 1970
    An entertaining read. I won an ARC in a GOODREADS giveaway! #GoodreadsGiveaway
  • Michelle Olms
    January 1, 1970
    Great book
  • Misty
    January 1, 1970
    I love Caddyshack this book was a must.
  • Terry
    January 1, 1970
    Nashawaty (Crab Monsters, Teenage Cavemen, and Candy Stripe Nurses: Roger Corman, King of the B Movie) provides a thorough look at the 1980 golfing comedy classic and the sex, drugs, and Kenny Loggins soundtrack that drove its making. Starting in the mid-1960s, Nashawaty traces Caddyshack's genealogy starting with writers from the Harvard Lampoon forming National Lampoon magazine, the shift in emphasis from writing to acting with National Lampoon's radio show and albums, the loss of talent to hi Nashawaty (Crab Monsters, Teenage Cavemen, and Candy Stripe Nurses: Roger Corman, King of the B Movie) provides a thorough look at the 1980 golfing comedy classic and the sex, drugs, and Kenny Loggins soundtrack that drove its making. Starting in the mid-1960s, Nashawaty traces Caddyshack's genealogy starting with writers from the Harvard Lampoon forming National Lampoon magazine, the shift in emphasis from writing to acting with National Lampoon's radio show and albums, the loss of talent to higher-profile gigs on Saturday Night Live, and finally, National Lampoon regaining importance with the wildly successful film Animal House. By the time Caddyshack is given the green light (roughly 100 pages in), the reader has a comprehensive knowledge of the 1970s New York comedy scene. Among the book's large cast of characters (Chevy Chase, Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, Rodney Dangerfield), Doug Kenney stands out as the central, tragic figure—a boy genius who helped launch National Lampoon and who cowrote and produced Caddyshack but died mysteriously shortly after its release. VERDICT Casual readers will be better served by skipping the first half of this book and diving into the pot- and cocaine-fueled high jinks, cast and crew memories, and Hollywood drama collected here. [Library Journal]
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