The Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross (The Curious Affair Of, #2)
The paranormal answer to Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, Jesperson and Lane are turning the Victorian era upside down in this bewitching series from John W. Campbell Award winner Lisa Tuttle.“Witch!” cries the young man after stumbling unexpectedly into the London address of the consulting-detective partnership of Mr. Jasper Jesperson and Miss Lane. He makes the startling accusation while pointing toward Miss Lane . . . then he drops dead. Thus begins the strangest case yet to land—quite literally—on the doorstep of Jesperson and Lane.According to the coroner, Charles Manning died of a heart attack—despite being in perfect health. Could he have been struck down by a witch’s spell? The late Mr. Manning’s address book leads Jesperson and Lane to the shrieking pits of Aylmerton, an ancient archaeological site reputed to be haunted by a vengeful ghost. There they sift through the local characters, each more suspicious than the last: Manning’s associate, Felix Ott, an English folklore enthusiast; Reverend Ringer, a fierce opponent of superstition; and the Bulstrode sisters, a trio of beauties with a reputation for witchcraft.But when an innocent child goes missing, suddenly Jesperson and Lane aren’t merely trying to solve one murder—they’re racing to prevent another.

The Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross (The Curious Affair Of, #2) Details

TitleThe Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross (The Curious Affair Of, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 28th, 2017
PublisherHydra
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fantasy, Science Fiction Fantasy

The Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross (The Curious Affair Of, #2) Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    After the terrors of their first case, Jasper Jesperson and Di Lane return in this latest Victorian historical mystery, set in London and Norfolk. Their newest case literally lands on their doorstep in the earliest of hours. A strange man comes knocking on their door in a desperate hallucinating state seeking their help, and upon seeing Miss Lane, points at her, proclaiming her to be a witch and then proceeds to drop dead. He turns out to be Charles Manning, assumed to have suffered from heart f After the terrors of their first case, Jasper Jesperson and Di Lane return in this latest Victorian historical mystery, set in London and Norfolk. Their newest case literally lands on their doorstep in the earliest of hours. A strange man comes knocking on their door in a desperate hallucinating state seeking their help, and upon seeing Miss Lane, points at her, proclaiming her to be a witch and then proceeds to drop dead. He turns out to be Charles Manning, assumed to have suffered from heart failure, according to the police. Unconvinced that the death resulted from natural causes, the duo decide to investigate. Alexander Manning, the victim's brother, hires them to find out what happened to Charles, who had been residing in Aylmerton, close to Cromer, in Norfolk.Travelling to Norfolk, they stay with the vicar, Dr Ringer, and his family, where Charles lodged, in the hope of finding as much as they possibly could about him. Dr Ringer informs them that there have been three other mysterious deaths in the parish. They find Charles was close to Felix Ott, who heads the British School of Wisdom, venerating the ancient beliefs in fairies, magic, witches etc.. Charles was engaged to Ann, one of the sisters living at Wayside Cross, rumoured locally to be witches. Bella is a highly skilled herbalist and more, responsible for her two younger half sisters, Alys and Ann. A much desired unfathomable grimoire is kept in Bella's library, with magical attributes ascribed to it, a number of people want it. With the strong possibility that Charles was poisoned, they have a host of possible suspects, including a male witch. Alarmingly, the baby of a maid goes missing. The local area is full of the folklore of the shriek pits associated with witches, the community attest to still hearing the shrieks, thereby going out of their way to avoid them. Can Jesperson and Lane get to the bottom of what happened to Charles and find the missing baby?Lisa Tuttle captures the Victorian interest in the supernatural elements in this series. So we encounter fairies, poison rings (there is more than one type), magic, witchcraft and spells. People might remember Arthur Conan Doyle's obsession with fairies in this historical period. The shriek pits in Norfolk have associations with witches and fairies. Jesperson and Lane's investigation into Charles's death leads them into this strange and fantastical world, amidst which resides a killer. The opposite characters of Jasper and Di mesh well together, whilst demonstrating their differing strengths. This is a compelling and entertaining historical mystery which I thoroughly enjoyed reading. If the Victorian and the fantastical appeals to you, then this is the perfect novel for you. Many thanks to Quercus for an ARC.
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  • Lucy Banks
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from a Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.A fun Victorian suspense.I'll admit, I downloaded this not realising it was the second in a series - however, it stood up well as a standalone book, which is always a tricky thing to pull off. The story follows Miss Lane and Mr Jesperson - two detectives on the case to solve the puzzle of a mysterious death that happened on their doorstep. There are plenty of intriguing characters along the way, not least the Busls I received a copy of this book from a Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.A fun Victorian suspense.I'll admit, I downloaded this not realising it was the second in a series - however, it stood up well as a standalone book, which is always a tricky thing to pull off. The story follows Miss Lane and Mr Jesperson - two detectives on the case to solve the puzzle of a mysterious death that happened on their doorstep. There are plenty of intriguing characters along the way, not least the Buslstrode sisters, the maid with her missing baby and the peculiar Mr Ott. Overall, it worked nicely and kept me reading on, though there were a few sections where I found my attention wandering slightly. The author sticks to the Victorian way of speaking very successfully, and for the most part, captures the societal views of the era. A fun read.
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  • Lynn Williams
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 of 5 starshttps://lynns-books.com/2017/08/26/th...I only fairly recently read and enjoyed the first Curious Affair book in the series and so I was more than happy to discover that the second was available to request. The Witch at Wayside Cross was a really enjoyable, gothic feeling story that for me established this series as one that I definitely want to continue reading.The Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief was a great start to series, I had a few niggles but overall I enjoyed it, I had f 3.5 of 5 starshttps://lynns-books.com/2017/08/26/th...I only fairly recently read and enjoyed the first Curious Affair book in the series and so I was more than happy to discover that the second was available to request. The Witch at Wayside Cross was a really enjoyable, gothic feeling story that for me established this series as one that I definitely want to continue reading.The Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief was a great start to series, I had a few niggles but overall I enjoyed it, I had fun, and it was great to get back to Victorian era detecting. The second in series builds on the original premise, it takes the mystery outside of the streets of London and carries our main characters into the depths of the countryside where they are beset on all sides by folklore, shrieking pits, ghosts and witches not to mention a good bit of good old fashioned murder.We start the story with a man arriving at a late hour at the door of Jesperson and Lane. The man is quite obviously in the grips of terror and after pointing an accusing finger at Lane and calling her a witch promptly drops dead. Charles Manning, although a relatively young man in good health appears to all intents to have had a massive heart attack. Jesperson suspects poisoning may be involved and following a trail of crumbs locates Charles brother who ends up giving the pair of would-be detectives their next case. They swiftly travel to the village of Aylmerton and begin to track down Manning’s friends and acquaintances which turn into a most unlikely bunch.There are plenty of characters in this episode. Revered Ringer and his puritanical wife are where our duo take up rooms when they arrive in the village. Charles also stayed at the Vicarage and his belongings await his return. It seems that the Reverend liked Charles and tried to dissuade him from associating with Felix Ott. Ott is a folklore advocate who wants to establish a school to teach ancient beliefs before they’re lost to time. Of course the Reverend is strongly opposed to anything relating to superstition that opposes the Christian belief. On top of this we make the acquaintance of the Bulstrode Sisters, a coven no less – the elder sister being familiar with remedies and being befriended by a Crow make it easy to see where the whispers of witchcraft spring from. Could it be that Charles become romantically entangled with one of them. As you can see lots of potential leads to follow.I have to say that I loved the set up for this story, it takes its time a little but was a delicious build up, creepy settings, whisperings, talk of evil doings, country lanes, dark nights, foreboding forests and hints at the supernatural – not to mention fairy rings with red and white spotted mushrooms. Come on. I loved every minute of it and couldn’t get enough. Plus, there’s this whole Holmes/Watson vibe going on here – the detecting isn’t the same, don’t get me wrong, but there’s something about the era that makes me think of Conan Doyle not to mention that this story has the Baskerville Vibe going on with the move out of the City and into the country and Lane has become our very own Watson – at least that’s the way I’m reading things. She’s the one who narrates and she’s also the one who ends up in situations, dealing with issues, maybe even stumbling upon things by accident whilst Jesperson is off somewhere doing his thing.Now, niggles. Well, not much to mention to be honest. I think I would have preferred this if the mystery hadn’t doubled up to become two mysteries – I liked the focus of the first and in a way I think I would have enjoyed it if the supernatural possibilities therein had played out in that plot arc to become something more. As it is we have a second mystery which feels a little bit latched on at this point although it could be that all these elements are building into something more – at the moment it feels a little bit like there’s a struggle going on to blend the supernatural elements into the tale although, as I say, it could all be part of a bigger plan.I think this series is developing really well, I like the characters, although there’s clearly something mysterious with Jesperson that hasn’t yet been revealed (or at least I suspect there is) and I very much look forward to seeing what comes next.Finally – do me a favour and just look at those two covers – I love em!I received a copy courtesy of the publisher through Netgalley for which my thanks. The above is my on opinion.
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  • Koeur
    January 1, 1970
    https://koeur.wordpress.com/2017/09/1...Publisher: Random HousePublishing Date: November 2017ISBN: 9780399182204Genre: FantasyRating: 3.2/5Publishers Description: Witch!” cries the young man after stumbling unexpectedly into the London address of the consulting-detective partnership of Mr. Jasper Jesperson and Miss Lane. He makes the startling accusation while pointing toward Miss Lane . . . then he drops dead. Thus begins the strangest case yet to land—quite literally—on the doorstep of Jespers https://koeur.wordpress.com/2017/09/1...Publisher: Random HousePublishing Date: November 2017ISBN: 9780399182204Genre: FantasyRating: 3.2/5Publishers Description: Witch!” cries the young man after stumbling unexpectedly into the London address of the consulting-detective partnership of Mr. Jasper Jesperson and Miss Lane. He makes the startling accusation while pointing toward Miss Lane . . . then he drops dead. Thus begins the strangest case yet to land—quite literally—on the doorstep of Jesperson and Lane.Review: Not really sure why I looked forward to reading this novel in the evenings. There is just something about a Sherlockian team of investigators that draws me in. Although the characters lacked depth and Watson (Miss. Lane) was relegated to an uninformed position while narrating the novel, I still enjoyed the sudden shifts in the story line while ferreting out the mystery.So what is inside? Two murders, one kidnapping, three sisters who may be involved, a vanishing maid and a wealthy priest. Their story lines flow together quite well even with a bit of the fantastical thrown in. An interesting investigative duo within the bounds of Victorian propriety.
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  • David Harris
    January 1, 1970
    I'm grateful to the publisher for an advance copy of this book.If you loved the first Jesperson and Lane book, The Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief, you'll enjoy this - though Tuttle has written a rather different story, it's every bit as good.While The Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief was very much an action story with lashings of penny dreadful menace, this is a slower, more reflective book. It particularly showcases the abilities of Miss Lane: indeed, while Jesperson comes and goes on a r I'm grateful to the publisher for an advance copy of this book.If you loved the first Jesperson and Lane book, The Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief, you'll enjoy this - though Tuttle has written a rather different story, it's every bit as good.While The Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief was very much an action story with lashings of penny dreadful menace, this is a slower, more reflective book. It particularly showcases the abilities of Miss Lane: indeed, while Jesperson comes and goes on a rather erratic schedule, much of the discovery is driven by Lane and her ability to get alongside the inhabitants of the various dwellings - whether vicarage or wise woman's abode - where the clues to Mr Manning's death may be found. (My wife being a vicar, I was rather alarmed at the idea - which I think is accurate for Victorian days - that strangers could just turn up at a remote vicarage and expect to be put up!)The story that Lane draws out is fascinating, much of the book gradually exposing the range of views that Victorians might hold on witchcraft, cunning-men, fairies and the like. The Norfolk that Jesperson and Lane visit is a mesh of rivalrous arcane practitioners with Manning himself having been involved in something called the "School of British Wisdom" whose purpose is to revive the learning of the "druids". They, and pretty much everyone else our duo meet, have all sorts of views on the so-called "screaming pits" to be found in local fields and woods, as well as different attitudes to witchcraft, whether historical or modern. The book is a reminder - like The Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief - of the spread of opinion about the supernatural, and the blurred distinction between that and science, that obtained then. Like the Victorians, we're in real doubt whether or the events have a "natural" explanation (or even what that means).The key to Manning's death is apparently located somewhere in this complex web, which also draws in a missing baby, poisonings and the "good neighbours" (nothing to do with Ramsay St). But there are many false turns, misleading theories and a startling lack of hard evidence, so it's a tough case to crack with surprises right to the end.As I said earlier, there is less action in this story than in the previous book, and I felt at times that the conversations over tea in drawing rooms used, especially in the first half, to establish the facts of the case teeter on the edge of becoming long-winded. Teeter, but don't fall over - Tuttle avoids that, not least because alongside the investigation, there are darker veins running through the book.First, she maps the attitude of men towards women, seeing them as means to ends, whether those are commercial, such as obtaining property, or more "spiritual". This attitude comes out quite nakedly on a couple of occasions but is always simmering away. It's something Lane is alert to, and even the presence of her friend Jesperson makes her uneasy at one point:"His eyes glinted in the moonlight and I suddenly felt unaccountably nervous, and looked away at the empty, tree-lined road ahead".Apart from a sense of menace, the books shows women not being listened to. Often, men whom Lane is asking question of respond to Jesperson instead, and at one point we're told, "...the men were not so ready to believe she knew what she was talking about..." These moments give the story a real bite, counterpointed, of course, by the recurring debate about witchcraft and the treatment of women regarded as witches.As well as the treatment of gender, there are also some carefully observed class attitudes. One may draw a comparison between the treatment by the Rev and Mrs Ringer of their servant, Maria, and the superstitious attitude to the fairies (those "good neighbours"). You mustn't, you see, acknowledge or thank the fairies of they do you a good turn. Similarly, Maria's toil in the kitchen goes unremarked: when she's ill one evening and Jesperson and Lane do the work instead, nobody remarks on it. I'm reminded of George Orwell's observation of old women carrying firewood in North Africa: that it was just wood going by.So, within this apparently charming and engaging fantasy crime novel, there is a good deal of shrewd social commentary.Overall, a solid follow-up to The Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief, showing that Tuttle isn't simply planning to repeat a successful formula - popular though I'm sure that would be - but is letting this series evolve. I wonder what she'll do with it next?
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    4 starsMr. Jasper Jesperson and Miss Lane are stunned when responding to the door at 2 a.m. a man enters and drops dead at the foot of the stairs after pointing at Miss Lane and crying out, “Witch!” The dead man’s name is Charles Manning.They go to the home that Charles previously shared with his brother Alexander. There they learn that Charles came under the spell of a man named Felix Ott who ran the School of British Wisdom. Ott has some oddball ideas about philosophy and the occult. Alexander 4 starsMr. Jasper Jesperson and Miss Lane are stunned when responding to the door at 2 a.m. a man enters and drops dead at the foot of the stairs after pointing at Miss Lane and crying out, “Witch!” The dead man’s name is Charles Manning.They go to the home that Charles previously shared with his brother Alexander. There they learn that Charles came under the spell of a man named Felix Ott who ran the School of British Wisdom. Ott has some oddball ideas about philosophy and the occult. Alexander hires them to look into his brother’s death and his beliefs. Jesperson and Lane travel to Aylmerton and Cromer in Norfolk where the infamous School is located. On their journey, they speak to a cart driver who tells them of the “shrieking pits,” supposedly the old huts of long ago inhabitants. The legends about them go back generations. At the vicarage, the Reverend Dr. Ringer tells them that Charles did stay at the rectory and also tells them that there have been three unexplained deaths in the parish. For such a small village, this news seems incredible. Reverend Ringer is very much against the superstitious beliefs of Charles. Miss Lane goes to a house near the vicarage to visit the Bulstrode sisters, one of whom is purported to be courting Charles and another who is supposed to be a witch. She wishes to inform them of the death and learn whatever more she can about Charles and his life. She is surprised to learn that they already know about Charles’ death. They investigate the mysterious death of another of Mr. Ott’s associates. As they go about the investigations, Miss Lane has the uneasy feeling that she is being watched, and strange occurrences take place. Then the housemaid Maria’s baby daughter goes missing the suspense and tension in the novel increases. Mr. Jesperson and Miss Lane desperately look for the baby and seek clues as to its whereabouts. Maria goes missing herself. Ms. Tuttle craftily sneaks in some truths about society and their attitudes. The negative Victorian attitudes toward women and the relationships assumed between women and men. Women are fragile and whose sensibilities must be protected from the harsher realities of the real world. Women need not be taken seriously, or even listened to when they speak. The household staff is treated as though they weren’t there at all except to wait on “their betters.”This novel is very well written and plotted. The suspense started out immediately and continued, although somewhat languidly, throughout the book. This is my first Lisa Tuttle book, but I’ll most definitely look into her other books on Amazon. I truly enjoyed reading the book and look forward to reading more. I want to thank NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group – Hydra/Hydra for forwarding to me a copy of this very good book to read and enjoy.
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  • Jeanette Greaves
    January 1, 1970
    The Witch at Wayside Cross by Lisa Tuttle – a review by Jeanette GreavesThe Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross is the second book in the Jesperson and Lane detective series. You don’t have to have read the first book (The Curious Affair of the Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief) to follow the plot, but as I really enjoyed it, I would recommend that you catch up if you can.The Witch at Wayside Cross starts less than a day after the previous book finished. Fresh from their success in sol The Witch at Wayside Cross by Lisa Tuttle – a review by Jeanette GreavesThe Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross is the second book in the Jesperson and Lane detective series. You don’t have to have read the first book (The Curious Affair of the Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief) to follow the plot, but as I really enjoyed it, I would recommend that you catch up if you can.The Witch at Wayside Cross starts less than a day after the previous book finished. Fresh from their success in solving their first case, Jesperson and Lane are plunged into their second by the arrival of a dying man on their doorstep. As he dies, he points his finger at our Miss Lane, and cries ‘Witch’.Naturally, this stirs their curiosity, and a quick search of the body before the police arrive gives our detectives enough information to approach the next of kin. The deceased proves to be Mr Charles Manning, a resident of London who has recently spent a lot of time in Norfolk. Our heroes are swiftly hired by Manning’s older brother to investigate the cause of Charles’ mysterious death.So, Jesperson and Lane venture to Norfolk, and in the guise of business partners in a start up publishing business, they infiltrate Charles Manning’s overlapping social circles and investigate the how and why of a healthy young man’s death. Whilst Mr Jesperson concentrates on Manning’s male acquaintances, Miss Lane draws a great deal of information from the ladies of the vicarage, where Manning lodged, and the neighbouring household of Wayside Cross, where three sisters are in mourning for him.We’re introduced to a colourful cast of characters, a pet raven, Shrieking Pits, a stolen infant and a stolen book, and an attempt to revive the old religion of Britain. One of the interesting themes of the book is the repeated assertion that marriage brings an end to a woman’s career. The story is set in 1893, at at time when the UK labour movement was gaining a strong foothold but women still didn’t have the vote. Miss Lane’s professional need to communicate with her business partner is thwarted by her landlady’s suspicions that the relationship is more than it seems. The maid at the vicarage has to conceal a birth in order to keep her job. Both facts serve to remind us that these are times in which a young woman can be ‘ruined’ by a man. The social history and commentary is woven into a fast paced story that does not disappoint, with a satisfying ending.I am grateful to Jo Fletcher books for the review copy.The Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross is available now.You can find my review of The Curious Affair of the Somnambulist and the Psychic Thief here.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    The Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross is the second in the Jesperson & Lane series. The first in the series (The Curious Case of the Somnambulist & the Psychic Thief reviewed here) had a great set-up, and I remember being pleased and expectant as I read the first few pages, but ended up being terribly disappointed. "Maybe," I thought, "the next one will be better. The author will have a sense of direction and the characters will emerge as more than pawns."Alas, not so. Once ag The Curious Affair of the Witch at Wayside Cross is the second in the Jesperson & Lane series. The first in the series (The Curious Case of the Somnambulist & the Psychic Thief reviewed here) had a great set-up, and I remember being pleased and expectant as I read the first few pages, but ended up being terribly disappointed. "Maybe," I thought, "the next one will be better. The author will have a sense of direction and the characters will emerge as more than pawns."Alas, not so. Once again, an interesting beginning full of all kinds of possibilities and intriguing characters. Once again, a failure to take advantage of what worked and instead taking a ridiculous direction that seemed almost a spur-of-the-moment inclusion.Jesperson (who has a positive nimbus of red hair--?) is controlling, holding back information and failing to keep Lane fully apprised of his theories or knowledge. In spite of Lane being named as a partner in this psychic detective agency, the truth is that her purpose is largely to give a first person account of the cases they encounter. Rather than a partner as indicated on the calling card--Lane is a sort of attendant, in spite of her role while staying at Wayside Cross.The best characters in the book, the ones with such potential, are the three sisters at Wayside Cross, but rather than take advantage of all of interesting possibilities the sisters presented, by the end of the book, the sisters have been reduced to a pedestrian role. P.S. It seems that the reviews on Goodreads are quite positive. Well, we all have different opinions about the books we read. Read in August; blog review scheduled for Nov. 4.NetGalley/Random HouseMystery/Supernatural. Nov. 28, 2017.
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  • Blodeuedd Finland
    January 1, 1970
    Jesperson and Lane have a new case when a man drops dead on their doorstep and screams about witches. Intriguing. So they set out to Norfolk.Yes this is book 2, but I do feel like it works as a stand alone too. You just read it as a mystery then, and do not know how they come to become detectives together. But then who wants to miss out on that.It really is Miss Lane doing most of the groundwork and we see things from her POV. Jesperson is out there solving things (and finding some amazing answe Jesperson and Lane have a new case when a man drops dead on their doorstep and screams about witches. Intriguing. So they set out to Norfolk.Yes this is book 2, but I do feel like it works as a stand alone too. You just read it as a mystery then, and do not know how they come to become detectives together. But then who wants to miss out on that.It really is Miss Lane doing most of the groundwork and we see things from her POV. Jesperson is out there solving things (and finding some amazing answers, I did NOT expect that.) She is a clever woman. I like them both.As for the mystery. Yes who killed him. The 3 witches? Or are they witches? The man running the society of magic? Someone else? Oh and then this baby disappears too. Another puzzle to solve and yes I sure did not solve it. I can tell you that.A nice historical mystery.
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  • Patricia Romero
    January 1, 1970
    A Victorian Historical Mystery! Jesperson and Ms. Lane have just solved their first case as investigators and the second case literally falls in their doorway!Off to find the truth about their mysterious visitor, they find themselves embroiled in not just one death but two. It seems another man has also died mysteriously and they set out to see if the two are connected.This second book in the series had a little bit of everything. History, Religions, Superstitions, Fairies and Witches!I quite en A Victorian Historical Mystery! Jesperson and Ms. Lane have just solved their first case as investigators and the second case literally falls in their doorway!Off to find the truth about their mysterious visitor, they find themselves embroiled in not just one death but two. It seems another man has also died mysteriously and they set out to see if the two are connected.This second book in the series had a little bit of everything. History, Religions, Superstitions, Fairies and Witches!I quite enjoyed this second book as well as the first and hope the duo continues!Ms. Tuttle has written many books and short stories within the fantasy field. Her first novel, Windhaven, was written in collaboration with George R.R. Martin.Netgalley/Hydra/Random House   Release November 28, 2017
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  • Laurie Beemer
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. I have to honestly say I am not sure what I feel, in its entirety. The book started of very curious but I had a hard time with the chemistry and personality of the main characters. I an not sure if it would have made more sense if I was to read the other book in the series first to get a better understanding of Jesperson and Lane. The writing in this book and the mystery in this book was a fun read and a surprise though. Thank you NetGalley and Lisa Tuttle for allowing me to read this 3.5 stars. I have to honestly say I am not sure what I feel, in its entirety. The book started of very curious but I had a hard time with the chemistry and personality of the main characters. I an not sure if it would have made more sense if I was to read the other book in the series first to get a better understanding of Jesperson and Lane. The writing in this book and the mystery in this book was a fun read and a surprise though. Thank you NetGalley and Lisa Tuttle for allowing me to read this ARC and give a honest review.
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  • Annarella
    January 1, 1970
    Got this book from Netgalley in exchange for a honest reviewI have mixed feelings about this book. On one side it is historically accurate, well written and the plot is interesting and full of twists and red herrings to keep entertained. On the other side the two main characters seems a bit flat, sometimes out of context.I will surely read the next novels in this series
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  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks Quercus Books and netgalley for this ARC.I was hooked on this series from the first, and now I'm even more thrilled for more. I love the unorthodox relationship between our detectives. They are misunderstood, savvy, and determined. This series is unlike any others out there right now.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    The second installment in the Casebooks of Jesperson and Lane - a supernatural slant to a Sherlock/Watson-type pairing - take the duo out of London and out into a countryside full of folklore and myth: witches and screaming pits and fairies, oh my!After finding the narrator's voice a little grating at times in the first book, I was very pleased to see an improvement here. Still, the balance needed to have a female lead in a Victorian-era novel without her being either out-of-time modern or in-ti The second installment in the Casebooks of Jesperson and Lane - a supernatural slant to a Sherlock/Watson-type pairing - take the duo out of London and out into a countryside full of folklore and myth: witches and screaming pits and fairies, oh my!After finding the narrator's voice a little grating at times in the first book, I was very pleased to see an improvement here. Still, the balance needed to have a female lead in a Victorian-era novel without her being either out-of-time modern or in-time weak is a tough one to find - and I'd say we're maybe 90% successful here.I'll be looking out for the third in the series, as minor flaws aside, these are fun reads.Full review available on my blog.
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  • Allie Grace
    January 1, 1970
    Full review TBD.
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