Deadman's Tome
From the time we are young, we fear the monster under the bed or in the closet, making it impossible to sleep without a nightlight. Then, we hear stories of Bigfoot, and maybe even the Mothman around campfires. When we are adults, we wonder if there might actually be supernatural creatures lurking in the shadows. Are these tall tales and urban legends only metaphors for what horrific things humanity is capable of—or do monsters exist?Go to some terrifying places with this cast of authors. You will be dragged into mystifying realities where demonic fairies hide, where devil monkeys lure carnival-goers to their demise, where Goatmen seek to destroy their prey, and where the goddess of death puts out a hit on victims of her choice. These shocking tales will have you biting your nails and locating that childhood nightlight. Because, in the end, we all know monsters do exist.

Deadman's Tome Details

TitleDeadman's Tome
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 1st, 2017
PublisherDeadman's Tome
ISBN9781521468
Rating
GenreHorror, Anthologies

Deadman's Tome Review

  • Candace Robinson
    June 16, 2017
    When there are multiple stories by different writers it is super hard to rate because some I loved more than others. I really enjoyed Braun's story, but I have read another book of hers that I loved as well, so her writing just calls out to me. Another one that stood out to me was Demmer's story! I love pretty much anything to do with monsters, so I was ready to read this. It was a fun and awesome ride! Review on my blog https://literarydust.wordpress.com/20...
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  • Dianne
    June 9, 2017
    I admit it, I like to have the heck scared out of me. DEADMAN’S TOME: MONSTERS EXIST just happens to have a creepy collage of short stories guaranteed to at least have even the darkest minds looking over their shoulder looking for monsters. What kind of monsters, you ask? From rodents to dark legends to quite possibly your next door neighbor, for every imagination there lurks a monster and for every monster, there is an author doing their best to keep you up all night, locked in the safety of yo I admit it, I like to have the heck scared out of me. DEADMAN’S TOME: MONSTERS EXIST just happens to have a creepy collage of short stories guaranteed to at least have even the darkest minds looking over their shoulder looking for monsters. What kind of monsters, you ask? From rodents to dark legends to quite possibly your next door neighbor, for every imagination there lurks a monster and for every monster, there is an author doing their best to keep you up all night, locked in the safety of your room…Baltimore, Pete’s personal nightmare? A solitary walk becomes a living nightmare with a cast of thousands, thousands of rats, that is, converging for a feast…but who or what will the main course be?The games kids play, like chicken with an oncoming train. Good thing engineer Jackson’s quick thinking saved the life of one of the teens, but what he sees, what haunts him are the glowing eyes in the shadows; eyes he is certain belong to the legendary Goatman. Is he hallucinating, what draws him back to the tracks? With the help of a waitress and a cameraman, Jackson may be entering his worst nightmare… they say fools rush in where wise men fear to go… but do come out? Let’s not forget the joy of a carnival! Everyone loves a carnival, right? Maybe not if that carnival is designed to bring back one man’s past in all of its nightmarish detail…Have you ever looked down a dark well and wonder how far it is to the bottom? Ever thought about what or who could be down there?...and was that a voice you heard?What about the taxi driver who thought he got away with the perfect crimes? Will the dead come back to haunt him? Will they force him to kill again at their bidding? What if he does? Then what?These are just a few examples of the wicked imaginings of some very creative minds and there wasn’t a bad one in the bunch! So, sit back and dig in, and know, you have been warned…one man’s entertainment is another's future nightmare. Within the covers of this dark collection are tales of true monsters, but are they monsters of our own making? I received an ARC edition from Theresa Braun in exchange for my honest review.Publication Date: July 1, 2017Genre: Horror AnthologyPrint Length: 216 pagesAvailable from: AmazonFor Reviews & More: http://tometender.blogspot.com
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  • The Grim Reader (Beavisthebookhead.com)
    June 14, 2017
    I set the bar very high for anthologies. Why? because I’ve read some incredible books over the past 18 months and in these were some incredible short stories. Monsters Exist features a number of writers that I am acquainted with, though I never let this get in the way of me posting my honest opinion.I much prefer a themed anthology rather than one that merely collects a number of “horror” stories that have little connection with each other. Monsters Exist is about…wait for it….MONSTERS! I like m I set the bar very high for anthologies. Why? because I’ve read some incredible books over the past 18 months and in these were some incredible short stories. Monsters Exist features a number of writers that I am acquainted with, though I never let this get in the way of me posting my honest opinion.I much prefer a themed anthology rather than one that merely collects a number of “horror” stories that have little connection with each other. Monsters Exist is about…wait for it….MONSTERS! I like monsters quite a bit, so I was keen to dive into this. Cryptid horror, tales of myth and legend, it’s all good stuff, but where does this book stack up compared to other anthologies I have previously enjoyed? Well, as with a lot of anthologies and short story collections there are always some entries that speak to you more than others, and this is certainly the case with Monsters Exist. I felt a couple of the tales sort of wash over me a little, not necessarily leaving a bad taste in the mouth but more guilty of not being too memorable, more just okay. However, when it’s good, it’s real good and I have chosen to focus on a few of the stories that really worked for me.The anthology gets off to a solid start with Master Vermin by Wallace Boothill. The Rats by James Herbert is one of my favourite horror books. So, no real surprises as to what the story is about, but I did enjoy it and the ending is particularly good. Theresa Braun’s Goatman tale is also cool but it was Wicked Congregation by Gary Buller that I really enjoyed. Human sacrifice and fairies! A nice story, well-written, creepy and fun. I really enjoyed this one, five stars. It wasn’t what I expected at all, so kudos to Mr Buller. Playing Dead by S. E. Casey is also cool with its dark carny vibe. Eclipse at Wolfcreek is a Mothman story and a pretty damn good one too, and John Palisano’s tale of the Criatura was fun and gory. I really enjoyed Bitten by Christopher Powers. Spiders give most people the creeps, but especially when they are the size of dogs! Very cool, made me itch and the ending was a winner. A standout story for me. My favourite story goes to Leo Robertson with Kelpies. A weird tale about a man enticed into the water by a mysterious, seductive mer-woman thing! Loved it, especially the ending which is top, top draw. Final tale Bloodstream Revolution was interesting with its Chupacabras and a Mexican revolution, another solid story and a nice way to finish things off.Overall, I really quite enjoyed this. I was able to remember something positive about most of the tales when finished, and this is a good thing with an anthology. A few of the writers are familiar, though I had never read of their work until now, so I’m keen for more, and my attention has been brought towards others featured here as well. A diverse and interesting collection in which none of the stories are bad, but some stuck out more than others.4/5 boogeymen from the Grim Reader.
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  • Richard
    June 28, 2017
    Thanks to Leo X. Robertson (contributor) and to the staff at Deadman's Tome for this Advance Review Copy.The short stories in this anthology have as their unifying theme the existence of monsters taken from the folklore of various countries or even from pop culture. These include such cryptid creatures as goat-men, giant apes, preternaturally predatory spiders, vengeful fairies, seductive kelpies, bloodthirsty chupacabras and other entities that lurk on the fringes of existence and in the shadow Thanks to Leo X. Robertson (contributor) and to the staff at Deadman's Tome for this Advance Review Copy.The short stories in this anthology have as their unifying theme the existence of monsters taken from the folklore of various countries or even from pop culture. These include such cryptid creatures as goat-men, giant apes, preternaturally predatory spiders, vengeful fairies, seductive kelpies, bloodthirsty chupacabras and other entities that lurk on the fringes of existence and in the shadows of our childhood's darkest tales.Some common motifs run through these stories. There is the fear of grappling with aspects of reality which were not taken seriously before. Once the monsters become known to the human protagonist, said human is often the only one who believes. Not only must (s)he absorb the shock of these new (or not so new) revelations, (s)he must also deal with the further obstacle of other humans who do not believe, and who think the initiated one is just drunk, deluded, ridiculous or perhaps even afflicted with a psychological problem. Then there is a climactic scene in which the human either defeats the monster, succumbs to it, or (perhaps most horrifying of all) comes to a compromise with it. When all is said and done, the role and purpose of the monster is to make the human face his/her worst fears and to bring out courage, depravity or tragic weakness. These stories make us ask ourselves who the real monster is here. Is it the cryptid or the human?
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  • Leo Robertson
    June 18, 2017
    You might think, 'Oh, so Leo has a story in this and he's giving it 5*?' I see.But did you learn yourself the following possibilities:- I'm my own favourite author- I know the market and wouldn't see my story in a book I didn't think would turn out great, and this anthology is no exception?Well I am and I do it isn't xDThe brief was to take a mythology and contemporise it, and all authors did so wonderfully and made it their own. There's such a range of different styles and tones and yet the boo You might think, 'Oh, so Leo has a story in this and he's giving it 5*?' I see.But did you learn yourself the following possibilities:- I'm my own favourite author- I know the market and wouldn't see my story in a book I didn't think would turn out great, and this anthology is no exception?Well I am and I do it isn't xDThe brief was to take a mythology and contemporise it, and all authors did so wonderfully and made it their own. There's such a range of different styles and tones and yet the book is a cohesive whole.Who knew such a horrific book could bring so much joy??
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  • Rebecca Gransden
    July 25, 2017
    A fun anthology of monster mayhems. Mythological and cryptozoological critters variously terrorise and rudely interrupt. A coalition of creatures featured in chaos, they strike sometimes with shadowy stalk, other times with blatant ferocity. I liked the trigger of the shorthand familiar settings for the genre, the stories mainlining without pause, arriving impregnated with the magic snicker of horror history gloriously hand-me-downed. All the better for having that used musk attached.There are a A fun anthology of monster mayhems. Mythological and cryptozoological critters variously terrorise and rudely interrupt. A coalition of creatures featured in chaos, they strike sometimes with shadowy stalk, other times with blatant ferocity. I liked the trigger of the shorthand familiar settings for the genre, the stories mainlining without pause, arriving impregnated with the magic snicker of horror history gloriously hand-me-downed. All the better for having that used musk attached.There are a few standouts, as is inevitable, but the collection is overall strong and I found something to like in all the stories. There’s a great deal of love for the classic moves of the genre, and this is enjoyable drive-in spook stuff. The monsters within are a compelling menagerie, caged by the restraints of the book but left to run rampant from page to page.
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  • Curtis
    June 7, 2017
    This is such a great anthology about monsters of all shapes and sizes. This book holds monsters that we all have feared since our childhood. It is the things that go bump in the night. It is the stories we tell around campfires. They are the urban legends and the tall tales.Let me be straight forward with you now. I have never read any of these authors before. Now that I have, I will definitely be reading their other work. Each author brought something to the table. I thought the editors did a g This is such a great anthology about monsters of all shapes and sizes. This book holds monsters that we all have feared since our childhood. It is the things that go bump in the night. It is the stories we tell around campfires. They are the urban legends and the tall tales.Let me be straight forward with you now. I have never read any of these authors before. Now that I have, I will definitely be reading their other work. Each author brought something to the table. I thought the editors did a great job of ordering the stories as well. There was not a bad story in this anthology! With that being said, let's get to the stories.The anthology gets off to a strong start with Master Vermin by Wallace Boothill. This story is about rats taking over Baltimore. Think the bubonic plague with a twist! It is a great story!5/5 rabid vermin!Legend Trippers by Theresa Braun is amazing! Ever wonder why there is never any proof of urban legends? Read this story and you will know why! The story is about a Goatman. Great story!5/5 horns!The Murder of Crows by S.J. Budd is crazy cool! A mysterious lady gets into a serial killers cab. He tries to kill her, but he can't. Turns out he owes her a debt! I will never look at crows the same way again!5/5 crows!Wicked Congregation by Gary Buller is terrifying! This is about sacrifice and fairies. This story is told as a confession or a recounting of events. I have wanted to visit England for a while now, but I might hold off due to the fairies that reside there. Great story!5/5 wicked fairies!Playing Dead by S.E. Casey is amazing! Who doesn't like a circus that pops up overnight in your town? I don't know what it is about them, but you just have to check them out. Am I right? The story is set in New Hampshire at a circus. This story deals with loss, nightmares, and depression. Great story! Didn't see that ending coming!5/5 devil monkeys!Lake Monster by Mr. Deadman is crazy! Two friends go on a fishing trip, but things go terribly wrong! Great story!5/5 bloated carcasses!Never Sleep Again by Calvin Demmer is creepy! There is a serial killer on the loose. The serial killer has killed 4 people. The only thing left behind is dirt under the victims' beds. This story will make you want to leap from your bed. You never know what might be under your bed! Great story!5/5 sleepless nights!The Voice from the Bottom of the Well by Philip W. Kleaver is mind blowing! Johanna hears a voice at the bottom of an old well near her house in Massachusetts. The thing at the bottom of the well is hungry. Johanna must feed it, and boy did she! Awesome story!5/5 creepy wells!Eclipse of Wolfcreek by Sylvia Mann is eerie! I have heard of the Mothman, but this story takes the legend to the next level. Great story!5/5 red eyes!No. 7 by William Marchese is crazy! This story has zombies and soldiers. Great story!5/5 zombies!Criatura by John Palisano is great! He breaks down in the desert. He runs into La Criatura, a desert creature with white fur. He finally makes it to his destination the next day, but he is different. He has transformed. Great story! I honestly have never heard of a Criatura until I read this story.5/5 Criaturas!Bitten by Christopher Powers will make your skin crawl! Charles goes to the Congo Basin on a trip and gets far more than what he was looking for. He finds a new species of spider in the sausage tree. The spiders are great hunters. One spider has hunted Charles down. Great story!5/5 creepy-crawlies!Kelpies by Leo X. Robertson is wicked! This is the first time that I have ever heard the term Kelpie before. A Kelpie lures a man into the water. Turns out he can go home anytime he likes, but he doesn't. Years later he meets his son. Crazy story!5/5 wicked Kelpie!Bloodstream Revolution by M.R. Tapir was a good read! This story is about Chupacabras during the Mexican Revolution. I enjoyed this story!4/5 Chupacabras!This is a great anthology that everyone should read! This book doesn't have any low points because the stories are balanced out so well. I highly recommend this book to fans of horror, tall tales, and legends!5/5 bumps in the night!
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  • B.P. Gregory
    July 5, 2017
    What are we reading?: Deadman’s Tome, Monsters Exist, edited by Mr Deadman and Theresa Braun.Give me the short version: No, really, it’s all in the title.If you haven’t checked them out yet, online horror magazine Deadman’s Tome (founded 2008 as Demonic Tome) has been rapidly spreading its tentacles of outré horror. Monsters Exist is a wonderfully neat concept with wide appeal; short stories about monsters; and from a publisher known for edginess this collection is actually very accessible – you What are we reading?: Deadman’s Tome, Monsters Exist, edited by Mr Deadman and Theresa Braun.Give me the short version: No, really, it’s all in the title.If you haven’t checked them out yet, online horror magazine Deadman’s Tome (founded 2008 as Demonic Tome) has been rapidly spreading its tentacles of outré horror. Monsters Exist is a wonderfully neat concept with wide appeal; short stories about monsters; and from a publisher known for edginess this collection is actually very accessible – you can read it over lunch without losing it.People always want something different from stories and of course we all have our best and brightest cryptid. I’ve got a nose for what bends the brain so I’m calling out my favourites as:• The traditional brutal simplicity of Christopher Powers’ Bitten.• Some unexpected silver-tongued social critique in Leo X Robertson’s Kelpies.• Mr Deadman himself’s Lake Monster, with its quick-step dialogue and the hilariously great characterisation.• And my top highlight: to join SE Casey in a frictionless slide into the unnerving with Playing Dead is always a treat.Something which I haven’t seen much of in other anthologies, Monsters Exist popped author bios at the end of each story. This was super convenient and I loved being able to look the author up (and buy more stories) while still in the moment.My favourite bit: “The kissing tent’s side flaps were rolled up allowing a glimpse of Ms. Pinn, the retired town librarian, making out with a much younger man. Harry’s heart jumped at the sight of her grey hair that had been torn away from its bun, the feral kiss too deep and passionate to be appropriate in any context.” – Playing Dead, SE Casey.
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  • Nicki Markus
    July 1, 2017
    As always when rating anthologies, you have to try to find a happy medium, which is why I'm giving Monsters Exist four stars. There were a few stories that, on their own, would have merited five stars, but then there were also a few others that didn't impress me so much, so I've taken a middle ground. I should say straight up that I am not much of a horror reader these days and if the theme hadn't grabbed me when the review request came through, I'd probably have declined. In the end, I'm glad I As always when rating anthologies, you have to try to find a happy medium, which is why I'm giving Monsters Exist four stars. There were a few stories that, on their own, would have merited five stars, but then there were also a few others that didn't impress me so much, so I've taken a middle ground. I should say straight up that I am not much of a horror reader these days and if the theme hadn't grabbed me when the review request came through, I'd probably have declined. In the end, I'm glad I did accept as I found Monsters Exist to be an interesting collection with many different takes on the brief. None of the tales scared me to a huge extent; however, several were certainly creepy and stuck with me for a while after reading them. If this is a genre you like, I would definitely recommend giving the anthology a try--just keep your hands and feet well tucked in under the covers when you turn off the light!I received this book as a free eBook ARC from one of the editors/authors.
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  • Frances
    June 27, 2017
    I love books of this type. So often I find authors whose work I want to investigate further. This book was no exception. The only author I whose work I had read previously was Theresa Bruan. I was thrilled with the stories I found in Monsters Exist. There is a good mix of stories in this book. We start with rats which nearly killed me. I have been disturbed by rats ever since I watched the movies Willard and Ben. Anyone remember those movies? My skin was crawling and i knew not even a nightlight I love books of this type. So often I find authors whose work I want to investigate further. This book was no exception. The only author I whose work I had read previously was Theresa Bruan. I was thrilled with the stories I found in Monsters Exist. There is a good mix of stories in this book. We start with rats which nearly killed me. I have been disturbed by rats ever since I watched the movies Willard and Ben. Anyone remember those movies? My skin was crawling and i knew not even a nightlight was going to keep the fear away. The stories go on to include various thriller chillers. You are certain to find at least one story to keep you checking the floor under the bed before you get out of it. I usually pick a story or two that I found to be particularly frightening. With this book, I am truly unable to do this. I look back on them, decide on one only to remember the goosebumps another gave me and I change my mind. i enjoyed every story I read. I recommend this book to horror and campfire story fans. Thank you to BookTasters for bringing this book to my attention. The editor provided an ecopy for review purposes. The final copy may be slightly different. All opinions are honest ones.
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  • Eddie Generous
    July 7, 2017
    Unnerving Magazine ReviewThe collection opens with something right up my alley of preference thanks to a one Mr. James Herbert. Wallace Boothill brings the rats. This story is fast and yet somewhat sprawling, seeping from the norm into an oddity. It really was a bit of fun, probably my favorite of the bunch.The animals kept up with Theresa Braun’s tale of a dastardly behooved beast playing hell on dumbasses young and old. It’s a story that essentially boils down to tempting fate. From there, thi Unnerving Magazine ReviewThe collection opens with something right up my alley of preference thanks to a one Mr. James Herbert. Wallace Boothill brings the rats. This story is fast and yet somewhat sprawling, seeping from the norm into an oddity. It really was a bit of fun, probably my favorite of the bunch.The animals kept up with Theresa Braun’s tale of a dastardly behooved beast playing hell on dumbasses young and old. It’s a story that essentially boils down to tempting fate. From there, things begin to fan out in a variety of direction though always monstrous.Typically, stories with literal monsters involved, authors go one of two ways: getting into the characters’ minds and building on classic methods of terror, or spinning yarns of the literary equivalent of monster truck rallies–roaring, blood flying, claws out, teeth dripping. I prefer the prior probably because it’s rarer in short indie fiction. This collection is a mix, but definitely leans toward using visual tools rather than mental tools to draw the horror of the tales.Another great one of the collection, a real challenger for top spot with Boothill’s tale is a story by Philip W. Kleaver about a demanding well. It reminded me a bit of the stinky 80s flick The Pit. This one, those somewhat predictable, has a truly evil double tap finish. Perhaps the smoothest flowing of the stories was by John Palisano, it had fully formed characters and scenery that lent much to the atmosphere. Leo X. Robertson tells a humorous monster tale that plays on the idea of men helpless to their ravenous eyes and stiff peckers. Silly as hell, but lots of fun.To sum it together, this issue of Deadman’s Tome is mostly good and at a few times better than that. There’s action, nasty things, lots of backwater America, and full serving of things that go bump in the night.Like all collections, there are some I prefer more than others, and in most collections that reach beyond 10 authors, there are some I didn’t like at all. In Monsters Exist, there were only two that I didn’t care for, and that’s not bad at all.
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  • Gavin
    July 22, 2017
    I've always enjoyed reading anthologies, particularly those with a theme. Monsters Exist ticks that box nicely by having 14 tales all about Monsters. I was not familiar with any of the authors prior to reading this book, something which may be of benefit as I would then have no expectations based on previous reading experience.There are not many anthologies I've read that have had a 100% hit rate. In fact from memory there are 2, Clive Barker's Books of Blood and my current book of the year, Ric I've always enjoyed reading anthologies, particularly those with a theme. Monsters Exist ticks that box nicely by having 14 tales all about Monsters. I was not familiar with any of the authors prior to reading this book, something which may be of benefit as I would then have no expectations based on previous reading experience.There are not many anthologies I've read that have had a 100% hit rate. In fact from memory there are 2, Clive Barker's Books of Blood and my current book of the year, Richard Chizmar's A Long December. Monsters Exist is incredibly close to having all its tales hitting the spot, and I really do mean incredibly close. There were so many positives crammed within it's 148 pages, it was a blast discovering what Monsters Exist!Monsters Exist opens with Master Vermin by Wallace Boothill, a tale about rats in Baltimore. I loved how this had me shuddering at a couple of superb 'yuck' moments and then totally surprised at it's somewhat epic ending. Theresa Braun's Legend Trippers takes us into one of my favourite sub-genres, the urban legend. Here we have a tale about the Goatman who lures its victims in front of an oncoming train. It's a great story that was well paced. S.J. Budd gave us a tale about a woman who climbs into the back of a taxi who's driver has a dark secret in The Murder Of Crows. I really enjoyed the writing and the ending was very satisfying. Wicked Congregation by Gary Buller is one of the standout tales in the anthology for me! A shocking tale of fairies and human sacrifice. Echoes of Adam Nevill in the story's setting and an ending that would grace Tales Of The Unexpected at its peak. I have to add, there's a line in Wicked Congregation that really stood out for me 'Every 20 years they take a little of our future so we may keep the rest' Fantastic writing! Playing Dead by S.E. Casey is a dark tale about the devil monkey where you're never quite sure what's real or not. Superb! Mr. Deadmans Lake Monster has sublime characterisation and punchy dialogue. Just what would it take for Gary to believe in the Goat Man? Another standout tale is Calvin Demmer's Never Sleep Again, a clever use of the old monster under the bed trope. I for one won't be dangling hands or feet over the edge of the bed...or futon! I let out a sigh of relief at one point during Philip W. Kleaver's The Voice From The Bottom Of The Well, the author had me convinced Johanna was going to do something quite terrible only for the rug to be pulled out from under me. I really enjoyed this tale with its smile inducing ending. Eclipse At Wolf Creek is another well written urban legend tale, this time involving the Mothman. To be honest, I may have found Sylvia Mann's descriptions of poor old Grandma the most disturbing part of the story. No. 7 by William Marchese has moments of excellence with a tale of 'super' soldiers crossing paths with a bunch of kids. I did struggle with the tale to be honest, and even reread it in case I had missed something. There's a cracking story here, the author himself holds his hands up in this honest post that things could have been better. I'd be very interested to read any rework that appears in the future. A variant on the Bigfoot legend is the next tale in John Palisano's Criatura. This is a deliciously gory story that I had great fun reading. There's a wonderful sense of humour in the writing, with the line 'maybe because it was sticking out and is the easiest target' earning a genuine laugh. If spiders aren't your thing  then Bitten by Christopher Powers is going to make for an unpleasant reading experience. To add to your pain these spiders are the size of dogs, and in one scene (that had me proper squirming) the description of a spider 'probing and pushing into an ear deep enough to cause blood to seep out' is wrong on so many levels. Christopher Powers, I salute you! Kelpies by Leo X. Robertson is an unusual tale about a man lured into the water by a mysterious seductress. Any fellas may think twice about any 'momentary wavering' after reading this excellent piece of dark fiction. Lastly, in the final tale Bloodstream Revolution M.R. Tapia writes an engrossing tale involving Chupacabras in the time of the Mexican revolution. I thoroughly enjoyed this conclusion to Monsters Exist especially as it convinced me that it is actually humans that are the true monsters.As I said at the beginning of this review, I was not familiar with any of the authors prior to reading. Now that I have finished the book, I'll be looking out for each and every one of them in the future. Monsters Exist is a superb read with a variety of styles that works as a collective. I couldn't recommend it enough!
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  • Eric Heiden
    July 11, 2017
    What would make a serial killer stop dead in his tracks, terrified? What could drive a man to serve the entities that slaughtered his mother when he was a child? What kind of story could you possibly expect to get from the synopsis, "Willy Wonka meets Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son"?The answers to these and other questions await you in the horror anthology, Deadman's Tome: Monsters Exist.I heard of Monsters Exist through one of its authors, S.E. Casey (writer of the aforementioned Willy Wonka m What would make a serial killer stop dead in his tracks, terrified? What could drive a man to serve the entities that slaughtered his mother when he was a child? What kind of story could you possibly expect to get from the synopsis, "Willy Wonka meets Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son"?The answers to these and other questions await you in the horror anthology, Deadman's Tome: Monsters Exist.I heard of Monsters Exist through one of its authors, S.E. Casey (writer of the aforementioned Willy Wonka meets Saturn story) after the two of us had bonded over our mutual appreciation of the Jon Padgett horror collection, The Secret of Ventriloquism, and I decided to go ahead and check it out.As the title suggests, each of the book's 14 stories centers around a different, very memorable monster.How memorable are these creatures? Well, in one tale, we get a relentless carnivore who, once it's had a taste of your blood, will not be satisfied until it devours you–no matter how much time passes or how many barriers stand in its way. In another, there's a local boogeyman, an intelligent beast who won't just kill you but try to do so in a way that pins your death on your closest friend. In yet another, we're treated to a variation of Sasquatch that–instead of tearing you limb from limb and killing you outright–opts to go the route of Lucifer from Paradise Lost and The Joker from The Dark Knight, tempting you to bring your doom upon yourself.As you'd probably expect from a book about monsters, there's a lot of disturbing violence to be found. Sexual references and other harsh language are also present but largely kept to a minimum. See  my review of Padgett's The Secret of Ventriloquism if you want an idea on what kinds of language bother me and what kinds don't.While this had no impact on my rating (4 stars), I wish the editors had changed the order of the stories. 'Mr. Deadman' opens the book with a delightfully morbid introduction that channels not just Rod Serling but also Alfred Hitchcock. Besides the intro, Deadman also contributes a story (Lake Monster), and if that story had been the final one in the anthology, Deadman's 'About the Author' section at the end of the tale would have provided the perfect bookend for his already excellent introduction. As it is, it's in the middle, so the opportunity is missed. I understand that the stories are listed by the authors' surnames, but for the sake of that bookend, I wish Deadman had broken that rule for his own contribution.All in all, Monsters Exist is an imaginative, excellent and affordable read for anyone with a taste for the unsettling.
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  • Yvonne
    July 20, 2017
    This is an anthology, 14 authors have contributed shorts stories with the theme of Monsters Exist ? The stories explore various monsters, some feature in folklore, myth and urban legends, they are stories we are told as children to keep us in line such as; the monster under the bed, the monster in the lake or in the well.Monster stories have always been around. This collection of stories tap into what we believed as children, then challenges what we think we do not believe as adults. Are we real This is an anthology, 14 authors have contributed shorts stories with the theme of Monsters Exist ? The stories explore various monsters, some feature in folklore, myth and urban legends, they are stories we are told as children to keep us in line such as; the monster under the bed, the monster in the lake or in the well.Monster stories have always been around. This collection of stories tap into what we believed as children, then challenges what we think we do not believe as adults. Are we really sure that as adults monsters do not exist? Or do we choose to think this way so that we do not have to admit that really Monster’s Exist?At the end of each story there is a mini author bio and website details for each participant. On the whole I really enjoyed these stories, there were a couple that I didn’t like quite as much. I believe with anthologies, there will some stories you read that just have that extra something that will connect with the reader on a more personal level. There is a good selection of ideas and themes, also some very different writing styles.I find it hard to rate this type of book, some of the stories I would love to give a 5 star to, while others I found good/okay and would only give a 3 /3.5. So as I read I rated each story and then found the average of 4.5 stars.I would recommend to readers of short stories, anthologies, horror, adventure, folklore and urban legends.I would like to thank Theresa for bringing this book to my attention for an honest and unbiased review. All views expressed are my own.
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  • Sylvia Mann
    June 8, 2017
  • Mr. Deadman
    June 8, 2017
  • Theresa Braun
    June 7, 2017
  • M.R. Tapia
    June 9, 2017
  • S.J. Budd
    June 16, 2017
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