Have Dog, Will Travel
In a lyrical love letter to guide dogs everywhere, a blind poet shares his delightful story of how a guide dog changed his life and helped him discover a newfound appreciation for travel and independence.At the age of thirty-eight, Stephen Kuusisto—who has managed his whole life without one—gets his first guide dog, a beautiful yellow labrador named Corky. Theirs is a partnership of movement, mutual self-interest, and wanderlust. Walking with Corky in Manhattan for the first time, Steve discovers he’s “living the chaos of joy—you’re in love with your surroundings, loving a barefoot mind, wild to go anyplace.”Have Dog, Will Travel is the inside story of how a person establishes trust with a dog, how a guide dog is trained. Corky absolutely transforms Steve’s life and his way of being in the world. Profound and deeply moving, theirs is a spiritual journey, during which Steve discovers that joy with a guide dog is both a method and a state of mind. Guaranteed to make you laugh—and cry—this beautiful reflection on the highs, lows, and everyday details that make up life with a guide dog provides a profound exploration of Stephen’s lifelong struggle with disability, identity, and the midlife events that lead to self-acceptance.

Have Dog, Will Travel Details

TitleHave Dog, Will Travel
Author
ReleaseMar 13th, 2018
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN-139781451689792
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Animals, Nonfiction

Have Dog, Will Travel Review

  • Evelina | AvalinahsBooks
    January 1, 1970
    Have Dog, Will Travel by Stephen Kuusisto is an incredibly touching love song to dogs – not just guide dogs as a means for a person to be enabled, to experience so much more freedom, but simply the ever loving nature of these wonderful creatures and how they can transform a person's life. You will not simply finish this book and walk away. It will lodge itself into the depth of your heart and never let you go. ★★★★✬ 4.5 stars. Stephen Kuusisto should have been declared legally blind as a chil Have Dog, Will Travel by Stephen Kuusisto is an incredibly touching love song to dogs – not just guide dogs as a means for a person to be enabled, to experience so much more freedom, but simply the ever loving nature of these wonderful creatures and how they can transform a person's life. You will not simply finish this book and walk away. It will lodge itself into the depth of your heart and never let you go. ★★★★✬ 4.5 stars. Stephen Kuusisto should have been declared legally blind as a child – the only reason he wasn't was because his parents thought their child would have a very hard life if he was considered blind. So they told him to hide it, to pretend (it's a common misconception that all blind people don't see at all – a person can be legally blind and see shapes or read text with the page right in their face.) How Stephen managed to live half of his life this way and even teach students remains a mystery to me – nothing short of a miracle. But the real miracle in his life isn't the fact that he spent half of it pretending to be able to see just fine – it's the fact that one day he had enough. And that's when he decided to request a seeing eye dog. And it changed EVERYTHING. Have Dog, Will Travel is the story of this change. And it's nothing short of amazing. The story goes through the exhillaration of freedom, freedom of movement, freedom of choice, so many freedoms suddenly within Stephen's grasp. But it's not just that. It's also the freedom to love and be loved. The freedom to be allowed to be yourself. To accept yourself. And to learn to find your footing. Read more about how guide dogs give the blind people more freedom and loving acceptance in my full review on my book blog here. There you will also find more from this book about how you should NOT treat a blind person and generally avoid being ableist.I thank Simon & Schuster for giving me a free copy of the book in exchange to my honest opinion. Receiving the book for free does not affect my opinion.Read Post On My Blog | My Bookstagram | Bookish Twitter
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  • Nikki (Saturday Nite Reader)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this ebook from NetGalley for my honest review.I was healing from a wounding failure to love my blindness.The author, Stephen Kuusisto, grew up hiding the fact that he was blind. It was not something easily hidden, but it was more a lack of acknowledgement and accommodation of his disability by his mother. He never knew how to embrace his disability, having been forced to hide it. For the first time at the age of 38, he would finally acknowledge his disability and start I received a free copy of this ebook from NetGalley for my honest review.I was healing from a wounding failure to love my blindness.The author, Stephen Kuusisto, grew up hiding the fact that he was blind. It was not something easily hidden, but it was more a lack of acknowledgement and accommodation of his disability by his mother. He never knew how to embrace his disability, having been forced to hide it. For the first time at the age of 38, he would finally acknowledge his disability and start his journey to acceptance and independence. His life would change after he chose to get a service dog, who would give him the confidence he needed to find his way in the world. In the condensed version of guide-dog life, all at once everything is reachable. Reachable is a word sighted people rarely have to think about – but it’s one of the main coordinates of independence. The book is written in way that you feel you are sitting in a coffee shop with Stephen and he is telling you about his story. It is very honest and real. I learned new ways of thinking about situations, not just involving disabilities, but how to be kind to all people. There are a few stories where Stephen could have easily been angry with those less tolerant of his disability, but he chose to diffuse the situations with kindness; the one thing the author portrayed was patience. He was often in situations where his conversations revolved around his disability, and further questioning about Corky’s role in aiding him. Because of his disability many people have treated him like he was less of a person. Not realizing that Stephen is person, just because he is disabled it doesn’t mean he can’t still think, have opinions and contribute to society.I was in the dining room at a prestigious arts retreat, in a room where Yoko Ono once ate spaghetti and instead of discussing the arts I was describing light – that blind can often see it, that many see colors. And that those who don’t see anything at all still understand the world richly.He had a beautiful relationship with Corky, and you learn just how much training and love goes into the process of training both the dogs and those in need of a guide dog. If anything, I learned so much of the training process and that these dogs are professionals and not pets and often need to be treated very differently by outsiders; the book describes the reasons why and Stephen provided many examples of situations he and Corky were in that give perspective to their working relationship.Many books about service animals suggest they heal wounded people but this is a bit of a misrepresentation. Disabilities never vanish. What a dog can do is entice you back into the world.Corky gave Stephen confidence. They both relied on each other. Corky was there to help guide Stephen and look out for dangers, but Stephen had to be in the lead. Guide dogs do not choose directions or make decisions, they take the lead from their owner. Stephen, through his words, is a voice for those who are struggling as he did early on. He is proof that if you open yourself up to love, you will receive love in return. Corky sounds like an amazing dog, thank you for sharing your story.
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  • Nick Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    This memoir is beautifully written. Being blind is not sad. Apart from all else, Stephen Kuusisto preaches this by example: when you’re a talented poet and you’re capable of writing in such an undramatic yet compelling voice, you have no reason to be sad.And the stories about Corky are just wonderful. Conveying the reality of living and working with a guide dog in a very imaginative way, the author brings it alive completely.Simply a great read!
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  • Jessica White
    January 1, 1970
    So Stephen Kuusisto was born blind in one eye and soon lost vision in the other eye.For 38 years, Stephen pretended he could see. He pretended he was normal. He graduated, went to college, and became a professor, all while pretending he didn't have a disability. See when he was growing up, people viewed disabilities as a disease. They didn't know how to react or speak to those with disabilities. So he had no choice but to mask his disability. But once his teaching gig didn't last forever, he dec So Stephen Kuusisto was born blind in one eye and soon lost vision in the other eye.For 38 years, Stephen pretended he could see. He pretended he was normal. He graduated, went to college, and became a professor, all while pretending he didn't have a disability. See when he was growing up, people viewed disabilities as a disease. They didn't know how to react or speak to those with disabilities. So he had no choice but to mask his disability. But once his teaching gig didn't last forever, he decided his life needed a new turn, one that could ultimately change his life for the better.He was getting a service dog.He had to go through intensive training in order to get his very own service dog.In Have Dog, Will Travel, Stephen outlines what was included in his training, as well as the training that the dogs have to go through, starting in their puppy days.He also talks about the stigma that goes along with blindness. He talks about the stress of putting your life in the hands of a dog, but once that dog becomes your lifelong partner, there is no hesitation. That dog is going to protect you with their life because that is what they are trained to do.Huge thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a copy of Have Dog, Will Travel!Even bigger thanks to Stephen Kuusisto for writing this fantastic book that helped me better understand service dogs!Have Dog, Will Travel hits shelves March 13th!Looking for other books on service dogs?Try:The Dog Lover Unit
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. Kuusisto takes readers on a journey from isolation and unemployment as a blind man to self-advocacy and inclusion, thanks largely to his first guide dog Corky. It's an important book, fast-reading, informative, and beautiful, and readers will have a newfound appreciation for the impressive work of guide dogs and the trust required of their owners. Kuusisto's chronicling of the training period with his guide dog is fascinating, and I appreciated the deftly woven research on gui I loved this book. Kuusisto takes readers on a journey from isolation and unemployment as a blind man to self-advocacy and inclusion, thanks largely to his first guide dog Corky. It's an important book, fast-reading, informative, and beautiful, and readers will have a newfound appreciation for the impressive work of guide dogs and the trust required of their owners. Kuusisto's chronicling of the training period with his guide dog is fascinating, and I appreciated the deftly woven research on guide dogs. The story is ultimately about how to live differently, how to move into the world as one never has before (in Kuusisto's case, from reticence to confidence) and there's something profoundly important and even universal there. And yet it's also a story of disability in an ableist world. Kuusisto captures the perils of life in the "town square," as he calls it, narrating several incidents of discrimination, even as his guide dog gives him greater freedom. But ultimately, Corky brings Kuusisto communion with the outside world in a remarkable way. The book made me want to scrape more funds from my budget for monthly donations to Guiding Eyes.
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  • Mom
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing, poetic, and enchanting tale! Someone called this a "love letter to guide dogs everywhere" and that it is. Born blind, Stephen Kuusisto was taught to hide his blindness, because his parents feared the discrimination that disabilities often brought forth. Then, at a turning point in his life when he was in his 30's, he decided to accept his disability. Soon he got his first guide dog, and his entire life changed. In this book , (more straight forward than his earlier stunning mem What an amazing, poetic, and enchanting tale! Someone called this a "love letter to guide dogs everywhere" and that it is. Born blind, Stephen Kuusisto was taught to hide his blindness, because his parents feared the discrimination that disabilities often brought forth. Then, at a turning point in his life when he was in his 30's, he decided to accept his disability. Soon he got his first guide dog, and his entire life changed. In this book , (more straight forward than his earlier stunning memoir Planet of the Blind) Kuusisto traces his early life and then the incredible changes that followed after he met and teamed up with his guide dog Corky. With Corky at his side, the author learned to accept his disability and to move forward with confidence and self-acceptance. He began to travel extensively, he met and fell in love with his now-wife, he grew spiritually and emotionally. What a lovely, poetic, eloquent, inspirational book!
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  • Emily Michael
    January 1, 1970
    There are not enough stars for this book! By turns practical and beautifully romantic, Have Dog, Will Travel is a nuanced and resonant tribute to Steve Kuusisto's first guide dog, Corky. This book not only touches the guide dog community but anyone who has ever found hope and love in a dog's wagging tail and welcoming eyes. Kuusisto interweaves facts and experiences, creating a work that raises awareness about disability and recommends love and acceptance for our fellow creatures.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. Stephen Kuusisto details his life with his Guide dog, Corky a beautiful yellow lab. He was always legally blind but didn't get his guide until he was 38. He gives a brief history of seeing eye dogs and the laws regarding service animals. He also gives helpful hints about how to interact with folks and dogs in public.
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  • Karen & Gerard
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this book was pretty good. I learned a lot about guide dog training and how people react to seeing someone with a guide dog. It is a very short book, only 232 pages. I loved Corky, his guide dog! (Gerard's review)
  • Lisa Francine
    January 1, 1970
    Stephen and Corky, Corky and Stephen - their partnership gave Stephen the courage to live more fully, take risks, and view life with laughter and at times as a Buddhist. I highly recommend this delightful and honest memoir!
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    A lyrical, wonderful memoir about claiming disability and the amazing love between a guide dog and her human. Highly recommend!
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This book was deeply touching. I enjoyed reading about how Corky came into Stephen’s life and the way she changed it for the better. A good read for all dog lovers.
  • Hapzydeco
    January 1, 1970
    Steve Kuusisto is a superb writer. In this novella, Steve, the poet, has composed a song to his first guide dog, Corky.
  • Ruthbc
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting in that it tells the training one goes through to get a guide dog and later how people react to guide dogs and their handlers.
  • Logan
    January 1, 1970
    Recommend if seeking insight into history and transformative experience of working with guide dogs. Charming, touching, easy read.
  • Janice
    January 1, 1970
    What an incredible story. The author has gone through tremendously difficult circumstances and yet his outlook is so uplifting. I enjoyed this book as a memoir but also as a dog lover. The bond between Corky and Stephen Kuusisto is not only beautiful but beautifully told. Well-written. Recommended.My thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an eARC in exchange for my honest opinion.
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