Blood Moon
“Riveting...Engrossing...Mr. Sedgwick’s subtitle calls the Cherokee story an ‘American Epic,’ and indeed it is.” —H. W. Brands, The Wall Street JournalAn astonishing untold story from America’s past—a sweeping, powerful, and necessary work of history that reads like Gone with the Wind for the Cherokee.Blood Moon is the story of the century-long blood feud between two rival Cherokee chiefs from the early years of the United States through the infamous Trail of Tears and into the Civil War. The two men’s mutual hatred, while little remembered today, shaped the tragic history of the tribe far more than anyone, even the reviled President Andrew Jackson, ever did. Their enmity would lead to war, forced removal from their homeland, and the devastation of a once-proud nation. It begins in the years after America wins its independence, when the Cherokee rule expansive lands of the Southeast that encompass eight present-day states. With its own government, language, newspapers, and religious traditions, it is one of the most culturally and socially advanced Native American tribes in history. But over time this harmony is disrupted by white settlers who grow more invasive in both number and attitude. In the midst of this rising conflict, two rival Cherokee chiefs, different in every conceivable way, emerge to fight for control of their people’s destiny. One of the men, known as The Ridge—short for He Who Walks on Mountaintops—is a fearsome warrior who speaks no English but whose exploits on the battlefield are legendary. The other, John Ross, is descended from Scottish traders and looks like one: a pale, unimposing half-pint who wears modern clothes and speaks not a word of Cherokee. At first, the two men are friends and allies. To protect their sacred landholdings from white encroachment, they negotiate with almost every American president from George Washington through Abraham Lincoln. But as the threat to their land and their people grows more dire, they break with each other on the subject of removal, breeding a hatred that will lead to a bloody civil war within the Cherokee Nation, the tragedy and heartbreak of the Trail of Tears, and finally, the two factions battling each other on opposite sides of the US Civil War. Through the eyes of these two primary characters, John Sedgwick restores the Cherokee to their rightful place in American history in a dramatic saga of land, pride, honor, and loss that informs much of the country’s mythic past today. It is a story populated with heroes and scoundrels of all varieties—missionaries, gold prospectors, linguists, journalists, land thieves, schoolteachers, politicians, and more. And at the center of it all are two proud men, Ross and Ridge, locked in a life-or-death struggle for the survival of their people.This propulsive narrative, fueled by meticulous research in contemporary diaries and journals, newspaper reports, and eyewitness accounts—and Sedgwick’s own extensive travels within Cherokee lands from the Southeast to Oklahoma—brings two towering figures back to life with reverence, texture, and humanity. The result is a richly evocative portrait of the Cherokee that is destined to become the defining book on this extraordinary people.

Blood Moon Details

TitleBlood Moon
Author
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN-139781501128714
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, North American Hi..., American History, War

Blood Moon Review

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader & Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    5 rival stars to Blood Moon 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 I’ve read some great nonfiction during the last year, and I’ve always said, the best nonfiction reads as smoothly as fiction. Blood Moon fits right into this category. Who knew that two rival chiefs of the Cherokee caused turmoil and destruction, and so much so, that it would arguably exceed that caused by Andrew Jackson and The Trail of Tears. John Ross was the primary chief of the Cherokee for a number of years, and his polar opposite in stature, skin colo 5 rival stars to Blood Moon 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 I’ve read some great nonfiction during the last year, and I’ve always said, the best nonfiction reads as smoothly as fiction. Blood Moon fits right into this category. Who knew that two rival chiefs of the Cherokee caused turmoil and destruction, and so much so, that it would arguably exceed that caused by Andrew Jackson and The Trail of Tears. John Ross was the primary chief of the Cherokee for a number of years, and his polar opposite in stature, skin color, and beliefs about the future of the Cherokee would be The Ridge, who had also been Ross’ closest confidante and aide. These two would split and their decisions impacted every facet of Cherokee life for over 100 years. Following the birth of The Ridge all the way through the Civil War and just after, this book is epic in its scope, abundant in its research, and fulfilling in its storytelling. John Sedgwick is an author to watch. Thank you to John Sedgwick, Simon & Schuster, and Netgalley, for the opportunity to read and review this fine nonfiction novel.Blood Moon will be published on April 8, 2018.
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  • Dav
    January 1, 1970
    Jace Weaver's post from Facebook:"Warning: Simon & Schuster contacted Colin Calloway and me to review John Sedgwick's new book, Blood Moon: An Epic of War and Splendor in the Cherokee Nation. The book was already typeset in galleys. It was horrible. There were numerous factual errors and faulty interpretations by someone who knows nothing about Indians. It was also bought into romantic and trafficked in the worst stereotypes. Both Colin and I wrote detailed readers' reports to this effect. I Jace Weaver's post from Facebook:"Warning: Simon & Schuster contacted Colin Calloway and me to review John Sedgwick's new book, Blood Moon: An Epic of War and Splendor in the Cherokee Nation. The book was already typeset in galleys. It was horrible. There were numerous factual errors and faulty interpretations by someone who knows nothing about Indians. It was also bought into romantic and trafficked in the worst stereotypes. Both Colin and I wrote detailed readers' reports to this effect. I just saw the finished book today, which came out last week. The author only corrected most (but not all) the factual errors. He did nothing about tone or stereotypes. The worst of it is, we're thanked as "two of the most authoritative contemporary scholars of Native Americans." Arg! Avoid this book!"
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    In the Acknowledgments, Sedgwick writes that he asked two professors of Native studies for input. On April 16, 2018, Jace Weaver, one of the professors Sedgwick acknowledged, wrote this on his Facebook page:"Warning: Simon & Schuster contacted Colin Calloway and me to review John Sedgwick's new book, Blood Moon: An Epic of War and Splendor in the Cherokee Nation. The book was already typeset in galleys. It was horrible. There were numerous factual errors and faulty interpretations by someone In the Acknowledgments, Sedgwick writes that he asked two professors of Native studies for input. On April 16, 2018, Jace Weaver, one of the professors Sedgwick acknowledged, wrote this on his Facebook page:"Warning: Simon & Schuster contacted Colin Calloway and me to review John Sedgwick's new book, Blood Moon: An Epic of War and Splendor in the Cherokee Nation. The book was already typeset in galleys. It was horrible. There were numerous factual errors and faulty interpretations by someone who knows nothing about Indians. It was also bought into romantic and trafficked in the worst stereotypes. Both Colin and I wrote detailed readers' reports to this effect. I just saw the finished book today, which came out last week. The author only corrected most (but not all) the factual errors. He did nothing about tone or stereotypes. The worst of it is, we're thanked as "two of the most authoritative contemporary scholars of Native Americans." Arg! Avoid this book!"Prior to that, I had looked at the book and found stereotypes right away. I think the publisher should recall the book and remove the Acknowledgement because it misrepresents the two professors AND gives a false assurance to readers that the content is accurate.
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    Two Cherokee leaders John Ross and The Ridge, rivals, in disputes and wars, taken through their days up till the civil war and the removal of a nation.With all the details, the crimes, the removals, the wars, the briberies, and deals made, the forced integrations and the insidious diluting of a nation, a lack of concern for a culture and their ways to be preserved, to have them behave in what certain men think the right way. A detailed history of greed and need for monies, land and the toxic pul Two Cherokee leaders John Ross and The Ridge, rivals, in disputes and wars, taken through their days up till the civil war and the removal of a nation.With all the details, the crimes, the removals, the wars, the briberies, and deals made, the forced integrations and the insidious diluting of a nation, a lack of concern for a culture and their ways to be preserved, to have them behave in what certain men think the right way. A detailed history of greed and need for monies, land and the toxic pull of capitalism.There are facts, truth within and there maybe some stereotypes and untruths within this tale, I have read after finishing this, from comments from educated people in this field. Don’t burn these books, discuss, learn, and educate.The cerebral prose, the narrative was captivating, and kept me reading on its grand length, it took some reading to get through and was not the easiest non-fiction of recent.A portrait of a Cherokee Nation, a tragedy and drama of truth work, agreements signed and broken, love gained, tongues learned, doctrines learned, lives lost, the toxic promise of great monies and gunpowder tempting leaders to sign off their nations demise and doom.Review with excerpts @ https://more2read.com/review/blood-moon-by-john-sedgwick/
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  • Laurie Neighbors
    January 1, 1970
    See review here from American Indians in Children's Literature: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit...See discussion here on Twitter: https://twitter.com/debreese/status/9...
  • Bonnye Reed
    January 1, 1970
    GNab This is an absolutely must read for persons interested in the culture and lifestyles of native Americans before, during and after the influx of Europeans to North America. John Sedgwick takes you there, and lets you see the personalities, the agendas of the major roll-players prior to and during the French and Indian wars of 1754-1763 when the tribe backed the French, the War of Independence 1776-1783 and the War of 1812 when the Cherokee Nation aligned themselves with Britain. We watch as GNab This is an absolutely must read for persons interested in the culture and lifestyles of native Americans before, during and after the influx of Europeans to North America. John Sedgwick takes you there, and lets you see the personalities, the agendas of the major roll-players prior to and during the French and Indian wars of 1754-1763 when the tribe backed the French, the War of Independence 1776-1783 and the War of 1812 when the Cherokee Nation aligned themselves with Britain. We watch as their traditional lands go from covering most of seven states in 1700 to a little chunk that catches the very corners of Alabama, Tennessee, North Carolina and a little bigger piece of pie in Georgia in 1835. And then we have the Trail of Tears affecting the Cherokee through 1838 and the American Civil War. Sedgwick takes us through these conflicts and choices and the infighting between different factors of the tribe that over time decimated the Cherokee and set them adrift. These are all facts that have been out there but never before have I understood the underlying causes for the decisions made. Thank you John Sedgwick. This is a book I will add to my research shelf. I received a free electronic copy of this historical novel based on historical fact from Jessica Breen at S&S, author John Sedgwick, and Simon and Schuster in exchange for an honest review. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. Breen, Jessica pub date April 10, 2018Simon & Schuster
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Blood Moon is quite an intriguing and interesting read. I highly recommend it for all history buffs. 5 stars.
  • Carol Kean
    January 1, 1970
    With a Blood Moon looming at the end of January 2018, I requested an ARC of this book via NetGalley. Who could resist that title, that image on the cover? Three months later, I've finally finished reading this tale, which is riveting, compelling, heartbreaking, and splendidly written. What took me so long?Terrible things happen in this story, and they happened in real life, which makes me stop reading until I can summon the strength to come back for more. John Sedgwick has a gift for taking dry, With a Blood Moon looming at the end of January 2018, I requested an ARC of this book via NetGalley. Who could resist that title, that image on the cover? Three months later, I've finally finished reading this tale, which is riveting, compelling, heartbreaking, and splendidly written. What took me so long?Terrible things happen in this story, and they happened in real life, which makes me stop reading until I can summon the strength to come back for more. John Sedgwick has a gift for taking dry, dead history, breathing life into it, and spinning a tale of human passion and conflict, all the stuff that makes for great fiction. But it's not fiction, and I wish it were.Blood Moon: An American Epic of War and Splendor in the Cherokee Nation is splendid and epic, as the title promises. A history book that reads like fiction, "Blood Moon" brings to life the people who came before us. I'm amazed at the quantity, depth, and detailed research that went into this epic story of the Cherokee Nation. I had read and loved James Upton Terrell's "The Navajos"(1970) for the same kind of storytelling miracle. Years later I continue to remember Zarcillos Largos and how he died. Now, I will remember The Ridge, and Boudinot, and John Ridge, and the terrible ways they were killed.My Kindle is packed full of highlighted names, dates, quotes, and information. It has taken me a long, long time to read this, and I still haven't read every page."Meteorologists now see that a blood moon is actually lit by an unusual sunset glow picked up form the earth's atmosphere as the sunlight brushes past," Sedgwick explains in "A Note on the Title." The Cherokee, however, saw the blood moon as "an ill portent. The moon was red with rage over what lay below."Outsiders wrote and recorded most of what we know about the people who lived here before the Declaration of Independence launched a new nation. Sedgwick draws extensively from James Adair's "History of the American Indians," the first "and still the best" account of the Cherokee, in spite of Adair's emphasis on his observations as evidence that American Indians were a lost tribe of Israel.Sedgwick writes,"Adair was there one night when the moon disappeared from the sky during a lunar eclipse, and he had never seen the Cherokee in such squawking pandemonium. 'They all ran wild, this way and that, firing off their guns, whooping and hallooing...and making the most horrid noises that human beings possibly could.' They were afraid the moon was gone forever, devoured, they decided, by a monstrous bullfrog in the night sky."I especially love Sedgwick's brief history of Native Americans, or Indians, the term he uses throughout the book. On one side of the globe, people built the Pyramids, the Great Wall of China, the Parthenon; they created vast empires, and lost them; they invented writing, math, science, the printing press, musical instruments, politics, literature, fine china, table linens, jewelry, and all that. On the other side the globe, "maybe 20,000 years ago, when a few audacious souls ventured across the Bering Strait during an ice age," various tribes evolved in North America. Until 1492, the people on one side of the world had no idea the other side existed.Much of this history is already familiar, one would hope, to most readers. The smallpox epidemic, however, is described here with more explicit horror than I'd seen anywhere else.Sedgwick barely mentions a concept that Ian Frazier expounds on, in "On the Rez," the idea that our Founding Fathers were inspired by Native American models of self-government. "In the land of the free," Frazier writes, "Indians were the original free," known for "a deep egalitarianism that made them not necessarily defer even to the leading men of their tribes." The American character, known for outspokenness and disregard for titles and nobility, was largely inspired by "The freedom that inhered in Powhatan, that Red Cloud carried with him from the plains to Washington as easily as air--freedom to be and to say, whenever, regardless of disapproval." But Sedgwick's history is about the Cherokee in particular, the tenuous notion of a Cherokee "Nation," and a sort of identity crisis that comes from being a people so free and unencumbered by the stuff of books and maps. Without governments, documents, and maps, how were the natives to establish"ownership" preserve their place in a land of the free?I had heard of the British accepting the American terms for peace in Paris in 1783, but of a man named Dragging Canoe, I recall nothing from my college or high school history books. The Cherokee were allies of the British? Somehow I missed a lot of these intriguing details, most likely because they were never mentioned. Not in the small Midwest town of the 1970s where I was schooled.The history, the details, the people, the sense of time and place, are all captured in vivid detail in "Blood Moon," and it would take me all day and all night just to summarize this one slice of American history.War and Splendorin the same sentence may seem antiquated or oxymoronic to modern readers, schooled as we are in ideals of discourse instead of weapons. But the opening pages cannot fail to stir us, with prose that some would dare call purple, "This is the last big surprise of the Civil war: it was fought not just by the whites of the North and South, and by the blacks who mostly came in after the Emancipation." It was also fought by some 30,000 Indians, from the Seneca to the Seminole."Shaped by a warrior culture, most were used to violence, and they took to battle. Their long black hair spilling out from under their caps, their shoddy uniforms ill-fitting, their faces painted in harsh war colors, they surged into battle with a terrifying cry, equipped not just with army-issue rifles but also with hunting knives, tomahawks, and, often, bows and arrows. Even when mounted on horses, they exhibited a deadly aim..."Where are the pictures of that? Why do U.S. History classes overlook such an awesome episode while reciting dull summaries of idiotic battles where men shoot each other with cannons at close range or march toward each other in rows, mowing each other down with bullets? I hate war, the reasons for war, the methods, the casualties, the tombstones, and the documentaries my husband watches.But I love the skill and ferocity of our Native Americans, though I wince and cringe at the blood they shed, the scalps they raised to the sky. My dad's black and white TV Westerns never came close to capturing it, so it can only be the storyteller's gift of inspiring me with these images. Starting with "Black Elk Speaks," as the great Oglala Sioux warrior told it to John G. Neihardt, I moved to "Geronimo," the "Custer Died for Our Sins," "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee," on to the Navajos, and more, becoming increasingly outraged by America's lack of attention to Natives in our history books, political campaigns, movies and TV shows, not to mention a conspicuous absence of Natives in our every day lives, in most parts of the country.In popular music, the 1960s gave us "Cherokee Nation" (proper title, "Indian Reservation") by Paul Revere and the Raiders. Lead singer MarkLindsey, who also produced the song, is part Cherokee. This youtube video, https://youtu.be/caCvDB9ivOE, begins with photos of Natives from other tribes and drew the usual variety of interesting comments from viewers.I have said nothing about the stars of this book John Ross, his rival The Ridge, The Trail of Tears, the treachery, the battles, and the assassinations. It has taken me three months, on and off, to get through these bloody pages. Also, this ARC (Advance Reader Copy) comes with a DISCLAIMER from Simon & Schuster: Do not quote for publication until verified with the finished book.And so I will offer just my impression of this story as a magnificent addition to my library, and to any library anywhere, and I would make it mandatory reading if I were a history teacher. With one disclaimer: this book is LONG, and the minutiae of detail is overwhelming. I confess to skimming some of the political maneuverings and battle dates. (Sssh, don't tell my teacher.)Details, reams and reams of details aside, what student wouldn't love history class (or like it better), if more history books read like fiction--like "Blood Moon"--full of passion and conflict, with unforgettable and richly drawn characters?Thank you to John Sedgwick, Simon & Schuster, and Netgalley, for the opportunity to read and review this book.
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  • Mary Goutermont
    January 1, 1970
    I learned much while reading this book about the Cherokee Indians and their two prominent leaders of the 19th century. There was much I didn't know about their removal from Georgia and the surrounding states which is often known as "The Trail of Tears". Thank you author John Sedgwick for all of this information. I thoroughly enjoyed this book although I felt it would have been just as good or even better if it had been a bit shorter and concise.
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  • Dick Whittington
    January 1, 1970
    Well written and researched history of the Cherokee Indians and their two most visible, powerful and influential leaders throughout the 19th century before, during and after their removal from The Blue Ridge Mountains in NC/TN/GA to AK/OK via the Trail Of Tears. Enjoyed reading and learned a lot in the process, but felt it could have been even better if it were significantly shorter and covered the same period of time.
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  • Erin French
    January 1, 1970
    Enrolled member of Eastern BandI do not presume to speak for anyone other than myself in this review. I have read of controversy surrounding possible stereotypes of Indian people in this book. I found no indication of that. I consider myself a learned individual, though I freely admit to lacking the expertise of the Native scholars who were consulted in the creation of this book. I found this book to be an honest account of events, fully backed with sources. Certainly, it was as honest an accoun Enrolled member of Eastern BandI do not presume to speak for anyone other than myself in this review. I have read of controversy surrounding possible stereotypes of Indian people in this book. I found no indication of that. I consider myself a learned individual, though I freely admit to lacking the expertise of the Native scholars who were consulted in the creation of this book. I found this book to be an honest account of events, fully backed with sources. Certainly, it was as honest an account as could be made of events occurring with what documentation exists. I found the author was true to the historical facts, and they did not seem stereotypical at all, when taken in the proper context.The truth is that the Cherokee did practice scalping. The Cherokee did practice blood revenge. Cherokee children did go naked. These and any number of other things mentioned in the book are not perceived stereotyping, they are accurate accounts of a People's past that many other historical writers have failed to address at all, let alone faithfully. These things weren't accounted to condemn, or pass judgement. They helped paint a fuller picture of a society that is - for all intents - extinct due to white contact and the events leading up to the Trail of Tears. To ignore and gloss over this collective history does a greater disservice to our ancestors than any judgment borne of ignorance possibly could.My ancestors were simply people. They had a society that cannot be accurately judged in this century, especially when taken out of historical context. They were a rich and varied People who are greater than the sum of this book, or any other possible retelling. I feel that certain scholars have a need to apologize for our ancestors' collective actions. This does a great disservice to those who have gone before. I commend the author for tackling a point in history that the majority chose to ignore. It is only through efforts such as this that my People have a remembrance outside of tribal land, and the importance of continued research and reflection cannot be overstated. My only disappointment with this book is, like so many other accounts, it follows the Western Band exclusively. The rich experiences and various struggles of the Eastern Band is almost always overshadowed by our more populous cousins. The story of Tsali, the fight for the land trust, the members who returned home - all of these things are equally important to the full history of the Cherokee. I hope that someday we will have more recognition from popular authors, and that our continued struggle will also be recognized by enlightened outsiders to our tribe.[I am an enrolled member of the Eastern Band, born on the Qualla Boundary, in North Carolina. My Cherokee lineage is Eastern Band, but for a great grandfather of the Western Band, of Old Settler decent, pre-Removal Georgia]
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, this is a great historical read on one of the largest surviving Native American tribes. Take note. It has over 50 pages of notes, contesting to the depth and breadth of research in the work. John Sedgwick's work traces the documented history of what we know today as the three recognized Cherokee tribal nations, descended from the Eastern band who stayed what is now North Carolina and resisted removal, the original settlers who came to Oklahoma and were not part of the Trail of Tear First of all, this is a great historical read on one of the largest surviving Native American tribes. Take note. It has over 50 pages of notes, contesting to the depth and breadth of research in the work. John Sedgwick's work traces the documented history of what we know today as the three recognized Cherokee tribal nations, descended from the Eastern band who stayed what is now North Carolina and resisted removal, the original settlers who came to Oklahoma and were not part of the Trail of Tears, and the emigrants who suffered the long road of the Trail of Tears. And I say documented as the Cherokee were here for thousands of years prior to the beginnings of 18th and 19th century documented history and most of this is known through oral traditions. But I digress. The original New Echota Treaty that sold the eastern lands of the Cherokee for $5m to the US split the tribe in two with repercussions that has lasted into modern times. The Trail of Tears, in spite of the pain, death and suffering it caused, was followed by calamitous internecine warfare, and more loss during competing loyalties during the Civil War that left the Cherokees out west decimated. The Trail of Tears, Sedgwick concludes, was in reality, and in a metaphorical sense, far longer and far more brutal than we realize. But the descendants of the Cherokee and the Cherokee Freedmen survive in numbers to this day, and I just read about the long bike ride currently being done by 18 members of the Cherokee Nation known as "Remember the Removal" ride and they ride through 6-8 states to call attention to and remember the Trail of Tears. The history of this place that many of us call home is more complex, more layered, and more rich, beautifully and painfully, than we will ever know. We will all be better off knowing this, especially during these times when our country is being unfairly and unjustly divided amongst ethnic lines. From Albert Einstein, "A human being is part of the whole, called by us "Universe," a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest - a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. The striving to free oneself from this delusion is the one issue of true religion. Not to nourish the delusion but to try to overcome it is the way to reach the attainable measure of peace of mind."
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  • John Plowright
    January 1, 1970
    John Sedgwick’s well-regarded ‘War of Two’ was an account of the political duel between Hamilton and Burr, and his latest book, ‘Blood Moon’ details another intense rivalry between two men, namely The Ridge aka Major Ridge (c.1771-1839) and John Ross (1790-1866), two Cherokee leaders. As their names imply, the two were very different, with the former a respected warrior and traditionalist who spoke almost no English whilst the latter was a moderniser of mixed-blood heritage (being partly of Scot John Sedgwick’s well-regarded ‘War of Two’ was an account of the political duel between Hamilton and Burr, and his latest book, ‘Blood Moon’ details another intense rivalry between two men, namely The Ridge aka Major Ridge (c.1771-1839) and John Ross (1790-1866), two Cherokee leaders. As their names imply, the two were very different, with the former a respected warrior and traditionalist who spoke almost no English whilst the latter was a moderniser of mixed-blood heritage (being partly of Scottish descent), who spoke almost no Cherokee. Although initially allies they disagreed violently on the issue of Removal – the federal government’s proposal to push the Cherokee (and other tribes) westwards, out of their ancestral lands.It would be simplistic to claim that the competing visions of, and contest between, these two remarkable men wholly determined the fate of the Cherokee – the Trail of Tears ultimately depended upon the superior firepower at the disposal of the federal authorities – but it was clearly a very important factor then and later; helping to account for the fact, for example, that Cherokee fought on both sides in the Civil War. The conflict between Ridge and Ross provides a superb lens through which to tell the sad story of a proud people. Indeed, it is not too much to say that Ross and Ridge personified the basic choices of accommodation or resistance open to the Cherokee, and Sedgwick does an excellent job of telling their story and thus that of the people they represented.Although well researched the book does contain a few small omissions. For example, the Reverend Lyman Beecher is mentioned but his daughter Catharine Beecher’s campaigning against Removal goes unremarked. This does not, however, detract from the fact that the tragic story of the Cherokee is epic in scope and in Sedgwick has a very worthy and engaging chronicler.
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  • Darcia Helle
    January 1, 1970
    One of America's saddest legacies is the way European settlers and government combined to nearly wipe out an entire indigenous population. With Blood Moon, John Sedgwick shows us how Americans' greed and civil unrest tore the Cherokee Nation in half, while taking away their land, their homes, their culture, their beliefs, and often their pride. The amount of research and detail Sedgwick put into this book is remarkable. I felt like I really knew and understood John Ross and The Ridge, two Cherok One of America's saddest legacies is the way European settlers and government combined to nearly wipe out an entire indigenous population. With Blood Moon, John Sedgwick shows us how Americans' greed and civil unrest tore the Cherokee Nation in half, while taking away their land, their homes, their culture, their beliefs, and often their pride. The amount of research and detail Sedgwick put into this book is remarkable. I felt like I really knew and understood John Ross and The Ridge, two Cherokee leaders who found themselves on opposing sides when the US government demanded the entire Cherokee Nation relocate away from their homeland. The two leaders' inability - or, perhaps, stubborn refusal - to work together added to the Cherokees' confusion and inaction, inadvertently working in the Americans' favor. John Sedgwick's narrative is entertaining and immersive, and this nonfiction book often reads as smoothly as historical fiction. He walks us through the entire collapse of the Cherokee Nation, from beginning to end, so we see it unraveling in all its glory and misery. This is a comprehensive read, certainly not quick or light, but I felt all the detail enhanced the experience, providing tremendous insight into this historic event.*I received an advance ebook copy by the publisher, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest review.*
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  • Irene Adam
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free advance e-copy of this book and have chosen to write an honest and unbiased review. I have no personal affiliation with the author. In this amazing epic the author tells us the story of the Cherokee. They were forced off their land as European settlers moved into their lands. I feel ashamed by what our ancestors did to these people over time. Two leaders were able to negotiate with American presidents to protect their sacred lands and were friends and allies at the beginning. T I received a free advance e-copy of this book and have chosen to write an honest and unbiased review. I have no personal affiliation with the author. In this amazing epic the author tells us the story of the Cherokee. They were forced off their land as European settlers moved into their lands. I feel ashamed by what our ancestors did to these people over time. Two leaders were able to negotiate with American presidents to protect their sacred lands and were friends and allies at the beginning. They had promoted culture, and had become one of the more civilized tribes. They were both very proud. Over time the subject of ‘removal’ caused a great rift between the two and they became mortal enemies. They were on opposite sides during the War Between the States. Eventually they turned against each other. Murders were committed. Everything began to fall apart leading to the ruin of the Cherokee. It is obvious that the author did a great deal of research before writing this saga. This book is well written and very informative though tragic and sad but well worth the read. It is good to learn about some of the historical horrors from the past within our own country. Hopefully we can do better in the future. I look forward to reading more from John Sedgwick in the future.
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  • Tales Untangled
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of Blood Moon in exchange for my honest review.Blood Moon sucked me into history and the dilemmas faced by the Cherokee living among the European settlers. Both sides committed atrocities, and Sedgwick presents the facts in a balanced manner - showing both sides role in the decline in their relationships. The lifestyle was incredibly interesting to learn about. One particular scene highlights the traditional Cherokee legal principal of justice in the case of mur Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of Blood Moon in exchange for my honest review.Blood Moon sucked me into history and the dilemmas faced by the Cherokee living among the European settlers. Both sides committed atrocities, and Sedgwick presents the facts in a balanced manner - showing both sides role in the decline in their relationships. The lifestyle was incredibly interesting to learn about. One particular scene highlights the traditional Cherokee legal principal of justice in the case of murder, being blood vengeance, which is changed by The Ridge through persuasion. Another poignant insight was the Cherokee's spiritual beliefs surrounded by the rise of Christian missionaries. Traditionally they believed in a Spirit of all good and a being who was the author of all evil, who were at war with each other. They believed in a "heaven" which was visible for those who had undergone a change after death where there was plenty of fruit, game and beauty. The converse was also true that the wicked would be compelled to live with hunger, hostility and darkness.Another poignant moment was the divide within the Cherokee Nation was shown to have begun as early as...
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  • Casey Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free Kindle copy of Blood Moon by John Sedgwick courtesy of Net Galley  and  Simon and Schuster the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as the subject matter and the description sounded very interesting.  It is the first book by John Sedgwick that I have read.This is a well r I received a free Kindle copy of Blood Moon by John Sedgwick courtesy of Net Galley  and  Simon and Schuster the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as the subject matter and the description sounded very interesting.  It is the first book by John Sedgwick that I have read.This is a well researched and written book. It takes an interesting subject and keeps you attention with the engaging writing style of the author. The book is about the division within the Cherokee Nation with the two factions led by John Ross and the other by The Ridge. Ross was in favor of the Cherokees assimilating into America and becoming citizens with the history and culture eventually fading away. The Ridge was just the opposite. This struggle did more to divide the Nation than the infamous Trail of Tears.I recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in the history of Native Americans and the Cherokee Nation in particular.
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  • Joe Keefhaver
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story of the Cherokee Nation, from its first contacts with Europeans through its removal to Indian Territory and its disastrous involvement in the American Civil War. Early on, the Cherokee made great strides toward adoption of European American ways, earning them recognition as one of the Five "Civilized" Tribes. They fought alongside Andrew Jackson, but Jackson (as President) and the State of Georgia were merciless in their demands that the Cherokee give up their ancestral lands and This is a story of the Cherokee Nation, from its first contacts with Europeans through its removal to Indian Territory and its disastrous involvement in the American Civil War. Early on, the Cherokee made great strides toward adoption of European American ways, earning them recognition as one of the Five "Civilized" Tribes. They fought alongside Andrew Jackson, but Jackson (as President) and the State of Georgia were merciless in their demands that the Cherokee give up their ancestral lands and relocate to what is now Oklahoma. This issue split the Cherokees with Principal Chief John Ross fighting removal and prominent leader Major Ridge favoring the relocation for the good of the tribe. The dispute became a bitter personal battle that tore the tribe apart, and the author really gets bogged down in this details of this episode. Many of the prominent Cherokees owned slaves, both back East and after moving to Indian Territory, and pro- and anti-slavery Cherokees became involved in the American Civil War, once more bringing ruin.
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  • Willy Marz Thiessam
    January 1, 1970
    John Sedgwick is a professional and gives a very entertaining story about the history of the internal politics of the Cherokee Nation. Without a doubt it is entertaining. Also it is well researched. Sadly this is also the source of its deficiencies. Sedgwick loves dramatic, over the top and sensationalist description. He wants to weave a riveting yarn. I personally feel he does this at the expense of giving a clear, readable and respectful history of one of the most important societies and civil John Sedgwick is a professional and gives a very entertaining story about the history of the internal politics of the Cherokee Nation. Without a doubt it is entertaining. Also it is well researched. Sadly this is also the source of its deficiencies. Sedgwick loves dramatic, over the top and sensationalist description. He wants to weave a riveting yarn. I personally feel he does this at the expense of giving a clear, readable and respectful history of one of the most important societies and civilizations of the Americas. That said, there is very little out there to match the breadth of research and importance of the subject in respect to First Nations history. As such its well worth the read, although you may sigh occasionally as the to excitable and bizarre descriptive capacity of Sedgwick.
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  • Mary Keen
    January 1, 1970
    I'm listening to this book, but got to Part 10 of 17 n have to have a break --just too awful, which I already knew, but not the horrible unfair, cheating, never-ending details. The "Indians" never had a chance, but I admire them for putting up such a determined and mostly clever fight for their land and way of life.I'm glad that many tribes are still fighting in the courts at least for a pittance of what was taken from them. I saw in a museum today information about the combined language used fo I'm listening to this book, but got to Part 10 of 17 n have to have a break --just too awful, which I already knew, but not the horrible unfair, cheating, never-ending details. The "Indians" never had a chance, but I admire them for putting up such a determined and mostly clever fight for their land and way of life.I'm glad that many tribes are still fighting in the courts at least for a pittance of what was taken from them. I saw in a museum today information about the combined language used for all/most of the treaties --and there was even a dictionary in the museum bookstore --should have written down the name of the language as can't find it online.
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  • Jez
    January 1, 1970
    Sedgwick is quite the historian and storyteller. Thoroughly researched, Blood Moon was not only educational but immersive. But I had a couple of reservations. First, Sedgwick starts off, stating that he employs the language from the time periods discussed, which is understandable. However, I found terms like "well-meaning Quaker missionaries" and "negro manservant" euphemistic, especially in discussion with forced assimilation and servitude [during the Civil War]. And second, I found the epilogu Sedgwick is quite the historian and storyteller. Thoroughly researched, Blood Moon was not only educational but immersive. But I had a couple of reservations. First, Sedgwick starts off, stating that he employs the language from the time periods discussed, which is understandable. However, I found terms like "well-meaning Quaker missionaries" and "negro manservant" euphemistic, especially in discussion with forced assimilation and servitude [during the Civil War]. And second, I found the epilogue unnecessary. Sedgwick's analyzation of why the Cherokee's devastation was reiterative, given that his better narrative/storytelling told readers essentially the same message.
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  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    An informative study of the Cherokee Nation from 1771-1871, and the division created by two tribal leaders of the indigenous people who lived on a land mass which spread out over eight present day states. The heartless actions of Andrew Jackson, and his removal over assimilation policies, and the straight-out land theft by lottery by the ever encroaching immigrants of Georgia, a civil war, manifest destiny, and the politics of the day caused this inevitable and unspeakable tragedy and forever li An informative study of the Cherokee Nation from 1771-1871, and the division created by two tribal leaders of the indigenous people who lived on a land mass which spread out over eight present day states. The heartless actions of Andrew Jackson, and his removal over assimilation policies, and the straight-out land theft by lottery by the ever encroaching immigrants of Georgia, a civil war, manifest destiny, and the politics of the day caused this inevitable and unspeakable tragedy and forever links this tribe to what is known as the Trail of Tears.
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  • Tom
    January 1, 1970
    A decent book, but small problems of bad facts keeps it from being more than that ( Author alleges that Francis Scott Key wrote what became the "Star Spangled Banner" about the destruction of Washington int eh War of 1812, see also my comment about author's identification of the colony of West Virginia.) Is it too hard to provide decent end notes? This book like some many other "popular" histories provides scant end notes, making it hard to check its assertions.
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  • Gerard
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book...I am a huge history buff and I have learned a lot from reading this book. I enjoy reading about the Civil War era. I live in the South and have visited many of the areas mentioned in the book. Reading about the Cherokee Nation shed light on a part of history that I had not previously studied. I highly recommend this book!
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  • Robert Jones
    January 1, 1970
    Great book. I thought I knew some of this history since I live in the region. Once you meet the real characters the history is more nuanced than you know. The book is leading me to explore some nearby places that I had not been to.
  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing, depressing, distressing, and historically-accurate look at the Cherokee. Makes me want to take a road trip to honor them.
  • John Hively
    January 1, 1970
    Great book filled with political intrigue, assassinations and corruption in a history of the Cherokee nation.
  • Ashley Adams
    January 1, 1970
    I've recently come across some controversy about how factual the facts really are in this. It is a compelling read, nonetheless. As the Cherokee people adapted to the formation of the United States of America, civil strife was rampant. Through the biographical narrative of two opposed tribal families, Sedgwick tackles issues of assimilation, family, and national pride.
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  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so engrossing and thorough, I feel as though I’ve completed a college course on "everything you thought you knew about Indian history but didn’t". This is such a well-written, historically accurate and enjoyable read. I had no idea these two Cherokee leaders, The Ridge and John Ross, were so instrumental in the survival and productivity of the Cherokee nation, then as a result of their bitter hatred for one another, the ultimate downfall and despair of their beloved people. It’s a s This book is so engrossing and thorough, I feel as though I’ve completed a college course on "everything you thought you knew about Indian history but didn’t". This is such a well-written, historically accurate and enjoyable read. I had no idea these two Cherokee leaders, The Ridge and John Ross, were so instrumental in the survival and productivity of the Cherokee nation, then as a result of their bitter hatred for one another, the ultimate downfall and despair of their beloved people. It’s a sad read, because of course, given its history; we already know how it ended. Terribly, sadly, embarrassingly; an ending that America still hasn’t acknowledged or come to grips with.Through reading this, I met so many other colorful and interesting characters that could easily stand alone in their own book. Doublehead was the most impressive. How is it I’ve never heard of this man? What a colorful bloodthirsty warrior, fighting for whatever he, and especially he, wanted. John Sedgwick brings to life others we’ve heard of, but never as lively and humanely as shown here. For example, Tecumseh, Sequoyah, Harriet Ruggles Gold. And he sheds a less glamorous light on Andrew Jackson, well deserved after how he connived and treated the Indians.This is one of those books that I have to buy in hardback, there’s just too much to absorb and keep at my fingertips that can’t be done in eBook format. I love good historically accurate books, and this one surely outshines so many others.I appreciate the opportunity to read and review this engrossing novel, and I highly recommend it to anyone with any desire to learn about the Cherokee nation and their fight for survival during the formative years of America.(I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. Thank you to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for making it available.)
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