Life Inside My Mind
Your favorite YA authors including Kami Garcia, Ellen Hopkins, Maureen Johnson, and more recount their own experiences with mental illness in this raw, real, and powerful collection of essays that explores everything from ADD to PTSD.Have you ever felt like you just couldn’t get out of bed? Not the occasional morning, but every single day? Do you find yourself listening to a voice in your head that says “you’re not good enough,” “not good-looking enough,” “not thin enough,” or “not smart enough?” Have you ever found yourself unable to do homework or pay attention in class unless everything is “just so” on your desk? Everyone has had days like that, but what if you have them every day?You’re not alone. Millions of people are going through similar things. And many of them are people you know—you know them because they write the books that you’re reading.Life Inside My Mind is an anthology of true-life events from writers of this generation, for this generation. It takes aim at ending the shame of mental illness. With the intention of providing hope to those who are suffering, awareness to those who are witnessing a friend or family member battle mental illness, and opening the floodgates to conversations about mental illness, Side Effects tackles the stigmas around mental illness in a new and refreshing way.

Life Inside My Mind Details

TitleLife Inside My Mind
Author
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherSimon Pulse
ISBN-139781481494649
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Short Stories, Mental Health, Mental Illness, Health

Life Inside My Mind Review

  • Lydia
    January 1, 1970
    OMG someone else has these thoughts and feelings too
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Woah. Yes. Certainly taken as a whole the book (a collection of stories) is certainly overwhelming since the theme of the book is authors sharing their personal struggles with mental health in some capacity. For many it is depression or anxiety but it covers an older family members' struggle with Alzheimers, but then covers the negative affects of drug use and abuse as is Ellen Hopkins' story about her young grandson dealing with PTSD. They are powerful stories. Some authors discuss their medica Woah. Yes. Certainly taken as a whole the book (a collection of stories) is certainly overwhelming since the theme of the book is authors sharing their personal struggles with mental health in some capacity. For many it is depression or anxiety but it covers an older family members' struggle with Alzheimers, but then covers the negative affects of drug use and abuse as is Ellen Hopkins' story about her young grandson dealing with PTSD. They are powerful stories. Some authors discuss their medications while others share more holistic approaches to healing, recovery, or mere existence. They provide hope or experience and absolutely a person who they can say has it, gets it, understands it, helped me through it. The stories are so timely and so necessary. I applaud each author for sharing. And using their skills as writers to portray their stories with sincerity for a teen audience. I have already shared the cover with our health teacher and know that it can be used in the classroom! When we get back from break, it'll be in her hands! And copies purchased for our library.
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  • Amanda (StarDustPanda)
    January 1, 1970
    (Warning this book may upset you if you have or if you have someone you love who has these mental illness : Depression, Anxiety, OCD, ADD, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer, Bulimia, Anorexia, Addiction, Body Dystopia and Suicidal)Jessica is my favorite author so I was really excited when I learned about this book I’ve been dealing with my depression and anxiety since I was 18 though I think I had them long before that I just thought it was normal and they weren’t as severe back then so finding out my (Warning this book may upset you if you have or if you have someone you love who has these mental illness : Depression, Anxiety, OCD, ADD, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer, Bulimia, Anorexia, Addiction, Body Dystopia and Suicidal)Jessica is my favorite author so I was really excited when I learned about this book I’ve been dealing with my depression and anxiety since I was 18 though I think I had them long before that I just thought it was normal and they weren’t as severe back then so finding out my favorite author ever the woman that made me love reading was putting out a book with essays on mental illness with a bunch of different authors was a pretty big deal to me I’ll be honest while I loved this book and think everyone should read it I did have a few problems I had to put it down at times and just not read it because while it was wonderful to see so many people who had the same problems as me it was also hard to see as well and it made me go into my darker moods so if you have a mental or have someone close to you that does it may be difficult to read at times but for me it was worth it I related to so many of the stories even when me and the author weren’t facing the same problems I found a bit of myself in each and every story the one I related to most was Escape Clause By Jennifer L. Armentrout I had to put the book down during that one because it was really hitting me close to home with how similar we both feel Sometimes when I didn’t see myself I saw people who I love who have been there and when there was no one I knew I still felt so much because this was real all of them have went through this and still are and that made it powerful while sad and hard to read at times a felt a bit of hope as well yes I may have depression and anxiety for the rest of my life but I can learn to live with them and have a happy and full life yes there will be bed times when I just don’t wanna get up and think I’m though but there will always be something worth fighting for and that’s what’s important
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  • •Catherine•
    January 1, 1970
    This book does hit close to home, especially if you or someone you love suffers from mental illness but it is extremely relatable. That’s what made it so well done. It was wonderful to hear real stories from authors I admire and go “wow...so I’m not the only one.” This book is definitely something many people should have in their arsenal and I would especially recommend it to those who want to try to understand what their loved ones are going through.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Life Inside My Mind is a heart-warming book about mental illnesses. This book is made up of a series of essays. These essays are written by 31 authors and about their struggles being mentally disabled, or having someone who is mentally disabled close to them. It tells readers that they are not alone, how to live with mental illnesses, and what it means to have a mental illness. I recommend this book to anyone who has a mental illness or who is close to someone with a mental illness, it is very i Life Inside My Mind is a heart-warming book about mental illnesses. This book is made up of a series of essays. These essays are written by 31 authors and about their struggles being mentally disabled, or having someone who is mentally disabled close to them. It tells readers that they are not alone, how to live with mental illnesses, and what it means to have a mental illness. I recommend this book to anyone who has a mental illness or who is close to someone with a mental illness, it is very informative.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an honest, truthful look at mental illness from a variety of perspectives. Seeing how different people experience mental illnesses (that society tends to lump together as a singular experience) in such different ways was eye opening. I liked how no one prescribed a “right way” to live with mental illness, even subtly. Each essay expressed that the writer was sharing what worked for them, not what would work for every person. I think, especially in a book aimed at teenagers, that it This was such an honest, truthful look at mental illness from a variety of perspectives. Seeing how different people experience mental illnesses (that society tends to lump together as a singular experience) in such different ways was eye opening. I liked how no one prescribed a “right way” to live with mental illness, even subtly. Each essay expressed that the writer was sharing what worked for them, not what would work for every person. I think, especially in a book aimed at teenagers, that it was so crucial to show that each person struggles and survives in their own unique way, even when they may share a particular diagnosis. As someone who personally lives with depression, reading the views of those who don’t personally deal with mental illness but have watched someone else struggle was enlightening. I always worry about how my struggles affect my loved ones, so this showed me some of the issues they may be dealing with as well. Overall, I think this would be amazing for a teenager who is struggling to feel “normal” (whatever that is) and not so alone. Not all of the stories are wrapped up in a “happily ever after” which is so truthful. Still, all of them are encouraging that you can continue to live, and live well, with mental illness. Thank you to Netgalley for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Brandi
    January 1, 1970
    This title does a beautiful job of illustrating how mental illness affects everyone differently and makes clear that there is no single treatment that will be right for all. These essays are raw and powerful, but might be triggering for readers who suffer from the illnesses presented. Yet, each author implores readers to get help (professional help) and ultimately presents an “it can get better” mentality. An excellent resource for high school libraries.
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  • Jen Petro-Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Oh so important. Every essay in here is great.
  • Lisa Rowland
    January 1, 1970
    Overall, this was a pretty solid anthology of essays. I enjoyed the variety of experiences and advice, and I felt like the essays covered a pretty good range. Naturally I enjoyed some essays more than others, but while a couple made me think "that was weird" they were all pretty well written.My major issues with the book were actually editorial, and they were just a nuisance in the back of my mind as I read rather than a true hindrance. A) Let's be honest, how many young adults are going to sit Overall, this was a pretty solid anthology of essays. I enjoyed the variety of experiences and advice, and I felt like the essays covered a pretty good range. Naturally I enjoyed some essays more than others, but while a couple made me think "that was weird" they were all pretty well written.My major issues with the book were actually editorial, and they were just a nuisance in the back of my mind as I read rather than a true hindrance. A) Let's be honest, how many young adults are going to sit down and read 31 essays cover to cover? I'm not a young adult, but I couldn't do it. I'd be too depressed for one. I read a couple of chapters here or there, and I read it all, but it took a couple weeks. I think to best reach the target audience, teens struggling with mental illness, it would have been awesome to clearly label what mental illness was in which chapter. Just something at the beginning of each chapter like "Depression, anxiety, eating disorder" or something. I know many of these didn't deal with a single subject, but it'd make it easier for someone to skim through and latch on to stories that dealt with suicidal thoughts or bipolar disorder.B) I wanted to know about the authors. I'm a young adult librarian, and I didn't recognize half the names. Of those I did recognize I couldn't necessarily tell you what they wrote. All throughout the book I desperately wanted a paragraph at the start of each chapter letting me know if someone was a writer for ESPN or if they wrote fantasy, etc. It was actually almost more depressing when I got to the end of the book and...there it was! A whole section about the authors! Of course, this wasn't mentioned in the table of contents (which I hadn't read anyways), so if you're not someone that flips to the back of the book it was a hidden treasure trove. On the other hand I probably wouldn't have always flipped back and forth if I'd known it was there, but it would have been so nice if those blurbs had been included with the actual chapters.
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  • Adriana
    January 1, 1970
    I can't recommend this enough. It should be in every library, counselor's office, and classroom.If you have any kind of mental health problem, it will show you that you are not alone and that there is a way forward. Not every essay/author talks about the same problems, but they all point to the fact that there is a way to manage and survive with many kinds of mental health issues. There are tips, suggestions, and just plain old good vibes to light the way. There is always a way to go forward in I can't recommend this enough. It should be in every library, counselor's office, and classroom.If you have any kind of mental health problem, it will show you that you are not alone and that there is a way forward. Not every essay/author talks about the same problems, but they all point to the fact that there is a way to manage and survive with many kinds of mental health issues. There are tips, suggestions, and just plain old good vibes to light the way. There is always a way to go forward in managing and living with whatever your situation. It's such a positive thing to show younger readers and even older ones who might still be fighting their own demons.I would doubly recommend it if you're lucky enough to have evaded any sort of mental health issue. It's a very open view of what it's like to suffer thru issues that are often thought of as something that needs hiding. Every author is quick to point out that there is no shame in feeling a certain way, it is a sickness as pervasive as cancer and should be afforded the same respect. It's the kind of book that might open the eyes of those who don't understand the topic. It shows that there is no set type of individual who might suffer. It happens in any gender, age group, ethnicity, socioeconomic level, history, personality. The broad strokes presented by the different authors gives a great example of this. I am truly grateful to the authors who participated in this anthology for their candor. I'm sure that talking/writing about their problems and the lowest points in their ailments was not easy, but they go the extra mile to be open and supportive.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    In this collection of essays, several authors give insight into how mental illness has impacted their lives. While some essays focus on their personal struggle with mental illness, others express the impacts of friends and family with mental illness. This work created a well-rounded look at the ripple effect of mental illness within our lives and in society. Authors explain their journey to mental health and provide concrete explanations of what works for them currently. There is a strong focus In this collection of essays, several authors give insight into how mental illness has impacted their lives. While some essays focus on their personal struggle with mental illness, others express the impacts of friends and family with mental illness. This work created a well-rounded look at the ripple effect of mental illness within our lives and in society. Authors explain their journey to mental health and provide concrete explanations of what works for them currently. There is a strong focus on using prescription drugs to achieve health, this may turn some off, but I believe that it is all part of the process.I don't necessarily know if this work will appeal to the teen reader, especially because many of the life issues discussed in this book are more relevant to adults. I think this book would be perfect for a new adult reader, who has more autonomy in their life and can better relate to the work, husband, kid, issues brought up through these essays.
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  • Mara
    January 1, 1970
    Well done and timely collection of short stories by authors who suffer, or love someone who suffers, from mental illness. I can see how someone unfamiliar with the particulars of mental illness could feel overwhelmed reading this title. The authors take a variety of tones when writing about their individual situations but all are honest and give details that might make some readers uncomfortable. I do not think this should be a deterrent, however. Overall I found the book encouraging. The emphas Well done and timely collection of short stories by authors who suffer, or love someone who suffers, from mental illness. I can see how someone unfamiliar with the particulars of mental illness could feel overwhelmed reading this title. The authors take a variety of tones when writing about their individual situations but all are honest and give details that might make some readers uncomfortable. I do not think this should be a deterrent, however. Overall I found the book encouraging. The emphasis is on inclusion and recovery so readers don't feel isolated with their conditions. The authors write their stories so that their audience can see the possibilities for living with mental illness and can better define what exactly mental illness is. I really enjoyed reading about each author's singular experience. The take away for me was hope. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend this book.
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  • Alexis Stankewitz
    January 1, 1970
    This is amazing and definitely powerful anthology. I would recommend everyone read it. While I connected with some essays more then others, it deserves three stars just for tackling a tough subject matter, and how brave these authors are. (just a note: while all of these stories are dealing with mental health, some essays do deal with addiction, self-harm ect. so if you do suffer from these these things, please be mindful of your triggers while you read.).
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I confess, around page 200 I started skipping stories here and there, mainly the ones focused on anxiety because the majority of this anthology is how different people handle anxiety and it became pretty repetitive after a while. I did appreciate the two stories on bulimia and body dysmorphia, however.
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  • Jessica McAllister
    January 1, 1970
    Anthologies are so hard for me to rate. Overall, this was an ok read for me. It didn't blow me away but there were good pieces in here that were relatable. I received an ARC of the book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Amanda Ashby
    January 1, 1970
    So grateful to all the authors who went so deeply into their pain in order to share their experiences of mental health.
  • Kris
    January 1, 1970
    I tried. It was just too much. What I needed was some hope. I should have stopped after Maureen Johnson's story. I re-read that and let the book go.
  • Bickering Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDyRK...A powerful collection of essays about the effects of mental illness. A definite must read.
  • Emily Myhren
    January 1, 1970
    A place of refuge for those of us who are fighting, a place of understanding for everyone else.
  • Diana
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really excellent collection of essays on mental illness by YA authors. Brave, tender, enlightening - a really good read.
  • Erikka
    January 1, 1970
    It takes a lot to come out of the mental illness closet. Our country has the worst stigma when it comes to people whose minds don't operate at 100%. I know this because I am in a constant battle with anxiety, depression, and especially OCD. At times I feel completely overwhelmed and want to give up, but having a solid medication and a supportive family of my own creation (friends are the family you choose) makes it a worthwhile fight. These authors laid their stories out unapologetically and unc It takes a lot to come out of the mental illness closet. Our country has the worst stigma when it comes to people whose minds don't operate at 100%. I know this because I am in a constant battle with anxiety, depression, and especially OCD. At times I feel completely overwhelmed and want to give up, but having a solid medication and a supportive family of my own creation (friends are the family you choose) makes it a worthwhile fight. These authors laid their stories out unapologetically and uncensored and that is a brave step. I think this belongs in a teen nonfiction collection because it will let teens know that there's nothing to be ashamed of when it comes to mental illness.
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  • Sherri
    January 1, 1970
    These authors did a wonderful job telling their stories. The essays are moving and relatable. I can't stop mentioning this book to people. We need more of it out in the world helping those who would otherwise remain silent.I received a free digital copy of this book via NetGalley.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDyRK...A powerful collection of essay about mental illness from the perspective of people who have personally experienced or have a loved on who has experienced mental illness. Standout essays included those written by Jennifer L. Armentrout, Melissa Marr, Maureen Johnson, and Cindy L. Rodriguez. I received an eARC from the publish in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lindsey Swindlehurst
    January 1, 1970
    I gave this book a 4.5/5 stars. Thank you to netgalley for a EARC of this novel. Im normally not a huge fan of short Storie collections but there were so many amazing authors in this one I couldn't pass up reading it for review. This novel was great I enjoyed every story in their own ways. This book touches base on some things that are hard for me to read but the way it made me emotional is what kept me going and wanting to read more. I could understand some things others can't and I felt connec I gave this book a 4.5/5 stars. Thank you to netgalley for a EARC of this novel. Im normally not a huge fan of short Storie collections but there were so many amazing authors in this one I couldn't pass up reading it for review. This novel was great I enjoyed every story in their own ways. This book touches base on some things that are hard for me to read but the way it made me emotional is what kept me going and wanting to read more. I could understand some things others can't and I felt connected to the stories in that way. I would highly recommend this one to a friend I love it.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley for giving me an ARC in exchange for an honest review- you know the drill.This collection was a lot, but in a good way. Going to just quietly leave it on the table when I pass teens in the library.
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