This is How I Save My Life
"Amy Scher is a brave warrior and a wonderful writer." - ELIZABETH GILBERT, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Eat, Pray, Love and Big MagicThe true story of a fiery young woman's heartwarming and hilarious journey that takes her from near-death in California to a trip around the world in search of her ultimate salvation. Along the way, she discovers a world of cultural mayhem, radical medical treatment, an unexpected romance, and, most importantly, a piece of her life she never even knew she was missing.When Amy B. Scher was struck with undiagnosed late-stage, chronic Lyme disease, the best physicians in America labeled her condition incurable and potentially terminal. Deteriorating rapidly, she went on a search to save her own life--from the top experts in Los Angeles and the world-renowned Mayo Clinic in Minneapolis to a state-of-the-art hospital in Chicago. After exhausting all of her options in the US, she discovered a possible cure--but it was highly experimental, only available in India, and had as much of a probability of killing her as it did of curing her. Knowing the risks, Amy packed her bags anyway and flew across the world hoping to find the ultimate cure.This Is How I Save My Life is a powerful and uplifting story of sheer determination for anyone who believes in--or doubts--the existence of miracles when it seems like all hope is lost.

This is How I Save My Life Details

TitleThis is How I Save My Life
Author
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherGallery Books
ISBN-139781501164958
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Self Help, Health

This is How I Save My Life Review

  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    After years of symptoms, of being misdiagnosed, even by the reknown Mayo Clinic, Amy finally gets a diagnosis. Stage four Lyme disease, with no known cure, just a slew of drugs that leave her in a pain filled non life. Unable to work, her relationship in tatters, she learns of a stem cell treatment in India that has successfully reversed paralysis in spinal injuries. Though it has not been used for her disease, she sees it as her last hope, applies and is accepted. Accompanied by her parents, sh After years of symptoms, of being misdiagnosed, even by the reknown Mayo Clinic, Amy finally gets a diagnosis. Stage four Lyme disease, with no known cure, just a slew of drugs that leave her in a pain filled non life. Unable to work, her relationship in tatters, she learns of a stem cell treatment in India that has successfully reversed paralysis in spinal injuries. Though it has not been used for her disease, she sees it as her last hope, applies and is accepted. Accompanied by her parents, she flies from California to Delhi, a whole new and strange world.I enjoyed the way this story was told, naturally, as if she were having a conversation face to face. Her past, her pains, the treatments and medicines that didn't work, her fears and her hope that this will work. The descriptions of India, the street scene, the busyness, the market, the food, all so strange and loud in the beginning, but embraced by the end. Her parents were wonderful, supporting, funny, though her dad suffers from depression, he is fully supportive of his daughter, enamored still of his wife. This is the best type of mrmoir, well told, relateable to those of us who suffer various issues. A good message to remember to never give up, there may be something out there. If not now, maybe in the future.ARC from Edelweiss
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  • ☘Misericordia☘ ✺❂❤❣
    January 1, 1970
    Quite good.Q:In the past, I would have been more self-conscious about something like this, but some of my modesty has faded. Now I look at my body and I think, I cannot believe it has survived so much. This perspective is a beautiful thing. I wish I had found it earlier than now. (c)Q:The obstacles of this life are plentiful, but so too are the opportunities to find peace. I feel this out in the city, but even more so in the wild uncertainty of my own unsteady heart. (c)Q:With the suitcase on my Quite good.Q:In the past, I would have been more self-conscious about something like this, but some of my modesty has faded. Now I look at my body and I think, I cannot believe it has survived so much. This perspective is a beautiful thing. I wish I had found it earlier than now. (c)Q:The obstacles of this life are plentiful, but so too are the opportunities to find peace. I feel this out in the city, but even more so in the wild uncertainty of my own unsteady heart. (c)Q:With the suitcase on my head and this new life before me, I ask myself, How does it feel to be on my own?The answer that comes surprises me.It feels necessary (c)Q:What I discover is this: Our physical bodies are the sum of our lives. Our lives are the sum of our thoughts, beliefs, and emotions. When we suppress our emotions, it can create stress on the physical body, causing emotions to show up as physical symptoms. This is how our body communicates with us, by using its very own language. (c)Q:I am afraid of a million other things.But mostly, I’m afraid of showing my feelings. I am afraid of my feelings. I am buried under them. And this has caused me to stifle my humanness—which, it turns out, is 100 percent of what I am made of.It is impossible to be me, like this.What I realize next is that I have needed illness. I have needed illness because it has protected me from all the things I don’t feel brave enough to say, feel, and be. It’s easier to be sick than to say no when that’s what I want to say. It is easier to be sick than to try to be perfect. It is easier to be sick and buried under emotions than to feel them. This is perhaps the hardest reality I’ve ever had toaccept, because who runs around the world looking for a cure if they really don’t want it? (c)Q:After just several months, I begin to sense a sturdiness inside of me that I’ve never had. I am less afraid than I’ve ever been. I am more relaxed. I start being kinder to myself. When I make a mistake, I forget about it. When I call myself a name, I stop. When I am upset, I share it, even though showing my insides is still not easy for me to do. Maybe most important, I am getting so good at being with my feelings. I do not ignore and persist. I listen. And I do it without too much judgment.I am becoming me. It’s getting easier. (c)Q:It was a long, slow, burning, uncontrollable yearning to simply meet myself once again. (c)Q:There will be days that you’ll prevail as the hero of your own story, and nights when you’ll barely scrape yourself up off the floor. But you must take it all as necessary steps and proceed. Keep asking the questions that point to the truth of who you are. When you hear the answers, listen. This is how you own your story. This is how you transform who you think you should be into who you really are. This is how you become the path you’ve been waiting for. This is how you do it. This is how you save your life. (c)
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  • Penelope Bartotto
    January 1, 1970
    Great things happen behind the scenes of our lives, often long before they become clear enough to actually see." ~ Amy B. ScherThere are many quotable statements that are so eloquently made throughout this book by Amy B. Scher. Scher opens the doors, the windows, the crawl spaces, and the attic for the reader into her life and how she went from a sick young woman, to a woman with conviction and faith. Scher brings to us her story of making a choice, and following through with it. This is not a w Great things happen behind the scenes of our lives, often long before they become clear enough to actually see." ~ Amy B. ScherThere are many quotable statements that are so eloquently made throughout this book by Amy B. Scher. Scher opens the doors, the windows, the crawl spaces, and the attic for the reader into her life and how she went from a sick young woman, to a woman with conviction and faith. Scher brings to us her story of making a choice, and following through with it. This is not a whine party about how anybody should pity her for having a chronic illness, it is also not a sermon on why you should do just as she did and you too can find salvation. It is, an honest account of a process, that is shared in a refreshing way.The book is segmented into three distinct parts. Part I focuses on some background information and the reasons why Scher decided to share her story. Part II, the main section is a personal journal via actual blog posts that allow us to walk with Scher on her journey. Part III is a nice wrap up, with some final thoughts. Each section is well written, and packs that proverbial punch, but in a truly refreshing way. Scher opens your eyes to new possibilities, as her eyes open to them. She brings you into her soul as she travels the bumps in the road, and the smooth sailing moments.As someone who also suffers from a chronic illness this book was especially poignant for me, as I begin a new year with no new answers, but doctor appointments to come. I want to be able to brave these days to come with even half the strength that Scher had as she made a very difficult decision to try a radical medical solution that many would not agree with, and many fight for the end of such actions.Bravo to Scher for...1. Being strong enough to travel this road.2. Have faith to try something new.3. Share your story so others can learn.4. Get better, and share your hope.
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  • Vivek Tejuja
    January 1, 1970
    Scher traveled to India for bold and controversial stem-cell treatments for her advanced Lyme disease after exhausting all options back home in the US of A. She had nearly spent a decade trying to find, research and even underwent several treatments, but no avail. She took a leap of faith and decided to travel all the way to India for a treatment - that could work or not. This book is about her life, her battles, her life in India and how she found a way to deal with every hindrance life threw a Scher traveled to India for bold and controversial stem-cell treatments for her advanced Lyme disease after exhausting all options back home in the US of A. She had nearly spent a decade trying to find, research and even underwent several treatments, but no avail. She took a leap of faith and decided to travel all the way to India for a treatment - that could work or not. This book is about her life, her battles, her life in India and how she found a way to deal with every hindrance life threw at her. I normally do not read books in this genre. Either they do not appeal to me or I get scared of breaking down while reading them. I do not know exactly why, but this time I allowed myself to weep and loved the read. This is most certainly not the typical sickness to health kind of book. In fact, how it is different is because Scher takes us through the journey with her and how she emerges as a more confident and independent person. If you ask me personally it had nothing to do with the country as much as it had to do with Scher. Having said that, the book chronicles India like never before to me as well. It isn’t exotic or flimsy as most books tend to do. I love Scher’s tenacity, her exuberance and most of all her enthusiasm toward life. “This Is How I Save My Life” is a book that makes you see life on a larger scale and not just limited to our bubbles or what we go through. Scher’s perspectives are unique and she extends it to the world that she encounters, relating it to her illness and recovery. Extremely inspiring and makes you want to live to the fullest, as cliché as it might sound.
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  • Sharon Chance
    January 1, 1970
    The subtitle for this book is "A true story of embryonic stem cells, Indian adventures, and ultimate self-healing." Amy Scher covers all this and so much more in this memoir of her search for restoring her health after dealing with Chronic Lyme disease. I was fascinated at the ... well - let's just say it - the guts that it took for this young woman to take a chance on a treatment that took her all the way to India to procure, and I was equally fascinated to follow her treatements that have been The subtitle for this book is "A true story of embryonic stem cells, Indian adventures, and ultimate self-healing." Amy Scher covers all this and so much more in this memoir of her search for restoring her health after dealing with Chronic Lyme disease. I was fascinated at the ... well - let's just say it - the guts that it took for this young woman to take a chance on a treatment that took her all the way to India to procure, and I was equally fascinated to follow her treatements that have been a roaring success for her! Say what you will about the controversy over using embryonic stem cells - when you are in so much pain you don't know how you will live the next moment in time - you grasp for anything that offers hope. I applaud Amy for her bravery and cheer for her recovery!Written in her own voice, this book is part diary/part travelouge - and one hundred percent entralling! I highly recommend it!
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  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    Amy Scher had a severe case of Lyme disease that left her in a lot of pain, with poor balance, and with an immune system so weak doctors were afraid a cold could kill her. In an effort to treat her disease, she reaches out to a doctor in India who is doing treatment with stem cells. I enjoyed reading about her journey and how she gradually noticed improvements. I also liked how she stated that this is not a treatment for everyone instead of passing off this treatment as a miracle cure-all. My gr Amy Scher had a severe case of Lyme disease that left her in a lot of pain, with poor balance, and with an immune system so weak doctors were afraid a cold could kill her. In an effort to treat her disease, she reaches out to a doctor in India who is doing treatment with stem cells. I enjoyed reading about her journey and how she gradually noticed improvements. I also liked how she stated that this is not a treatment for everyone instead of passing off this treatment as a miracle cure-all. My gripe comes about the part when she returns to the United States. She starts seeking treatment that is so far from orthodox I'd never heard of them: she consults a psychic doctor about whether she's having a relapse, has a test that checks for "toxins" given off of her body's energy flow, and decides she's cured after "unblocking" her energy flow. The ending was really hokey to me, but prior to that, I was cheering on Amy's successes.
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  • Angela Holtz
    January 1, 1970
    From Lilac Wolf and StuffThe book is brilliant. I'm in awe of this woman who spent so long losing a battle with Lyme Disease. She went to India for stem cell treatment. The stem cells used, are from a single embryo that was donated to the doctor from a couple who had embryos made up for fertility treatment. When they reached success, they wanted to give something back.It's a very easy going book, being that it's mostly made up of blog entries that Amy wrote while undergoing treatment. And readin From Lilac Wolf and StuffThe book is brilliant. I'm in awe of this woman who spent so long losing a battle with Lyme Disease. She went to India for stem cell treatment. The stem cells used, are from a single embryo that was donated to the doctor from a couple who had embryos made up for fertility treatment. When they reached success, they wanted to give something back.It's a very easy going book, being that it's mostly made up of blog entries that Amy wrote while undergoing treatment. And reading about her healing is just amazing. Why are we not doing this here???It's also a wonderful study of the culture shock when a San Francisco gal goes to one of the largest cities in India, Delhi. I'm still in love with India, but I'm less eager to move there. lolAmy doesn't really pull any stops. She's working her butt off to get rid of the Lyme and all the things that go along with it, and she's sharing it all right here with us.
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  • Micheal
    January 1, 1970
    I must say that this is not my usual genre of literature, but Thank You Goodreads for the ARC. I personally suffer from Trigeminal Neuralgia (a chronic illness) so reading Amy's story about advanced late-stage Lyme disease and her battle to travel across the United States to end up on the other side of the world in India in the hopes that the experimental research (stem-cell) to help her is truly inspirational and pretty accurate on what a person goes through when they feel like there is no hope I must say that this is not my usual genre of literature, but Thank You Goodreads for the ARC. I personally suffer from Trigeminal Neuralgia (a chronic illness) so reading Amy's story about advanced late-stage Lyme disease and her battle to travel across the United States to end up on the other side of the world in India in the hopes that the experimental research (stem-cell) to help her is truly inspirational and pretty accurate on what a person goes through when they feel like there is no hope for any kind of treatment and/or cure. One must find the acceptance of healing from within in order to be truly healed and I believe Amy has done that. Thank you for sharing story. You are a true warrior.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Amy’s story of healing is inspirational and her determination to overcome years of chronic illness is motivation for anyone looking to learn about and improve upon the life experience. My own life has changed for the better and beyond my wildest dreams in the short time I have known Amy. Her story has been pivotal in shifting the way I feel about my own experiences and the course my life has taken. She says it perfectly in her book- “One’s path will unfold in its own time, revealing pieces of th Amy’s story of healing is inspirational and her determination to overcome years of chronic illness is motivation for anyone looking to learn about and improve upon the life experience. My own life has changed for the better and beyond my wildest dreams in the short time I have known Amy. Her story has been pivotal in shifting the way I feel about my own experiences and the course my life has taken. She says it perfectly in her book- “One’s path will unfold in its own time, revealing pieces of the puzzle only as they are ready to be healed. It will not always be in your time, but it will happen.” The ups and downs in life all happen for a reason and help shape you into the person you are meant to be.
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  • Mary Wentworth
    January 1, 1970
    I bought this book hoping to gain some insight into dealing more successfully with chronic Lyme disease. I was not disappointed. I was inspired by Amy Scher's determination to do whatever it took to get well. It took her a while to embrace her Indian doctor's belief that she had the power to heal herself. When she finally knew this to be true, she was able heal. The author's life seems to have been changed forever by her healing journey. I appreciate all of the insights she shared about how she I bought this book hoping to gain some insight into dealing more successfully with chronic Lyme disease. I was not disappointed. I was inspired by Amy Scher's determination to do whatever it took to get well. It took her a while to embrace her Indian doctor's belief that she had the power to heal herself. When she finally knew this to be true, she was able heal. The author's life seems to have been changed forever by her healing journey. I appreciate all of the insights she shared about how she accomplished this healing of body, mind, emotions, and spirit. She now offers energy therapy for emotional healing. I have worked with her once via the phone. She was very insightful and kind. I plan to work with her more.
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  • Charlotte Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    The New Eat, Pray, Love!This book is quite simply a must read. It's a hugely inspirational and uplifting story but not in the usual sappy way you might expect-which makes it even better. Amy's voice is so unique-she'll make you laugh out loud and wipe away a tear in the same paragraph. She's down to earth, hilarious and wise all at the same time and you can't help falling in love with her and the way she sees the world.You just feel like a better person after reading it...and you'll probably rea The New Eat, Pray, Love!This book is quite simply a must read. It's a hugely inspirational and uplifting story but not in the usual sappy way you might expect-which makes it even better. Amy's voice is so unique-she'll make you laugh out loud and wipe away a tear in the same paragraph. She's down to earth, hilarious and wise all at the same time and you can't help falling in love with her and the way she sees the world.You just feel like a better person after reading it...and you'll probably read it in one sitting!This is a very special book and I can't recommend it enough.Go Amy! More please!
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  • Susie Rosenberg
    January 1, 1970
    The author's journey of illness (Lyme Disease) and healing is sparely and beautifully written. This book is heartening and thought-provoking for anyone whose sense of self is shaken by circumstance---not just Lyme Disease and not just illness.
  • Amy Rupert
    January 1, 1970
    I related to the stories since I accompanied my husband on a journey to the same clinic in India. Amy tells it like it is with humor, love and hope.
  • Lizenbyl
    January 1, 1970
    This book is about Amy Scher and her journey with advanced lyme disease. It takes you through the medical saga including a trip for stem cell infusions to India. Amy has a unique way of adjusting to the Indian experience and then to eventually finding self healing.Good read.
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  • Penelope Bartotto
    January 1, 1970
    Review Pending release at: The Library at the END of the Universe in January 2013
  • C C
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book. Whether you have dealt with chronic illness or know someone struggling with chronic illness, I'd say it's a must-read. Filled with the real deal. <3
  • Stephanie Weaver
    January 1, 1970
    Scher's book is inspiring, engrossing, and a wonderful read. As someone who has dealt with invisible illness for a long time, I related to so much of her story. The travel aspect also provides the armchair reader with an in-depth look at living in Delhi, which I found fascinating as well. Highly recommended.
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  • Caroline Herrmann
    January 1, 1970
    I sat down to read Amy's book and couldn't put it down until I got to the last page. I am so grateful she took me on her trip to India and introduced me to her whole loving family, by way of her words. I laughed, I cried, I loved. Amy, your bravery and insights are mind boggling. The real struggles you went thru and to share your wise words so eloquently. Thank you. Thank you for your gift. Thank you for sharing.
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  • Ginger Nelson
    January 1, 1970
    I have followed Amy's work for the past 7 years and I found this to be her best writing yet. She is far enough on the other side of her health challenges to write about her journey with humor, perspective and earned wisdom. An inspiring memoir, I quickly devoured this page turner in two days and was on the edge of my seat as her story unfolded.This books takes you on the sometimes bumpy but always inspiring journey that led Amy to study energy work and develop many of her own emotional healing t I have followed Amy's work for the past 7 years and I found this to be her best writing yet. She is far enough on the other side of her health challenges to write about her journey with humor, perspective and earned wisdom. An inspiring memoir, I quickly devoured this page turner in two days and was on the edge of my seat as her story unfolded.This books takes you on the sometimes bumpy but always inspiring journey that led Amy to study energy work and develop many of her own emotional healing techniques. (Refer to her last book, "How To Heal Yourself When No-one Else Can", which is a "how to" book for her approach.) Amy's honesty and humor throughout this memoir are refreshing and admirable. She is very personable and relatable and I deeply valued her honest sharing of all the ups and downs and backstories behind her experiences. (Plus, you'll also fall in love with her parents along the way!)Highly recommend to anyone who loves a good memoir - it's just a damn good story. And, if you have had your own health challenges, you will be especially inspired by her tenacity, grace and grit!
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  • Wendy Hines
    January 1, 1970
    This Is How I Save My Life is Amy's story with her diagnosis, mis-diagnosis, what she does about it and how her decision affects her life on different levels. She struggles for awhile before she makes the life-altering decision to journey to India where they are doing embryo stem cell treatment, something they aren't doing here. There, she has is presented with a totally different cultural, beliefs and makes new friends. She learns more about herself and how her story is really inspiring. For th This Is How I Save My Life is Amy's story with her diagnosis, mis-diagnosis, what she does about it and how her decision affects her life on different levels. She struggles for awhile before she makes the life-altering decision to journey to India where they are doing embryo stem cell treatment, something they aren't doing here. There, she has is presented with a totally different cultural, beliefs and makes new friends. She learns more about herself and how her story is really inspiring. For the most part, the book is comprised of blog entries, which really is easy to read and understand what is going on in Amy's thoughts. There's a forward, so to speak, where Amy explains why she decided to share her experiences and than a wrap-up. Amy's very candid, which I admire. She's also funny, ironic and honest. Her story rings true and is inspiring. You don't need to be suffering from a chronic illness to read her story, it's captivating and uplifting. I'd recommend it to anyone!
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    I read this amazing tome while recovering from intestinal and umbilical hernia surgery. It helped in getting me well again.Very informative about Lyme disease, Stem Cell Research, the horrors and insights into illness, and the ability and willingness to fight in self healing. I didn't annotate this book like I wanted to so bad. Since I am done, my sister is reading it. She had cancer a few years ago and reads books about illness and the will to live beyond it. After she gets done with this book I read this amazing tome while recovering from intestinal and umbilical hernia surgery. It helped in getting me well again.Very informative about Lyme disease, Stem Cell Research, the horrors and insights into illness, and the ability and willingness to fight in self healing. I didn't annotate this book like I wanted to so bad. Since I am done, my sister is reading it. She had cancer a few years ago and reads books about illness and the will to live beyond it. After she gets done with this book she plans to donate to our local hospital in Seymour, IN. We hope it will bring other patients the insights and strength it brought us. This was an incredible and educational book without being too textbook.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I received an arc of this book from a Goodreads giveaway. I really enjoyed reading about Amy's journey. Really interesting!
  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second memoir I've read depicting the courage and perseverance of a woman fighting late stage Lyme disease. (The other book was by Yolanda Hadid.) Scher's journey takes her to India for a stem cell treatment. On the whole, this trip is helpful, and Scher reacts positively. Nevertheless, something about her blogs describing this Indian experience made me cringe ___not the medical but the cultural aspects.Ultimately, Scher discovers that she has to search within for emotional as well a This is the second memoir I've read depicting the courage and perseverance of a woman fighting late stage Lyme disease. (The other book was by Yolanda Hadid.) Scher's journey takes her to India for a stem cell treatment. On the whole, this trip is helpful, and Scher reacts positively. Nevertheless, something about her blogs describing this Indian experience made me cringe ___not the medical but the cultural aspects.Ultimately, Scher discovers that she has to search within for emotional as well as physical release.
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  • Caroline Petro
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great book! I would recommend this to anyone who is suffering from chronic illness.Inspirational and dead on with the feels that can be brought on by chronic illness.
  • msleighm
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars.Thank you to GoodReads, the author Amy B. Scher, and @Gallery Books / Simon & Schuster for this Advanced Readers Copy to review.Over the years, several people have told me I should write about my journey with Lyme disease and chronic illness. Now I don't need to, Amy Scher has told a story that mirrors mine, except I'm hoping to try stem cell therapy in the next year or two; it's something I've been researching since I was first disabled in 2009. Almost ten years later, I'm almost re 5 stars.Thank you to GoodReads, the author Amy B. Scher, and @Gallery Books / Simon & Schuster for this Advanced Readers Copy to review.Over the years, several people have told me I should write about my journey with Lyme disease and chronic illness. Now I don't need to, Amy Scher has told a story that mirrors mine, except I'm hoping to try stem cell therapy in the next year or two; it's something I've been researching since I was first disabled in 2009. Almost ten years later, I'm almost ready to try it, and this book comes out. Synchronicity.What she writes could be a page out of my life (pg 163):"I could never do what you are doing."Honestly, I'm no superhero. You could totally rock this too, if you had to. In fact, we could all do anything if we absolutely had to. I once thought I could never do what I'm doing either, except for now I don't have a choice and that's exactly how I'm doing it in the first place. Some nights when I go to bed, I think to myself 'I cannot do this, not for one more day.' Eventually I fall asleep...and then...I wake up with a life that is just waiting for me to wade through all over again. You do it because even when -- especially when -- you think you can't you're somehow still making it happen. And you do it every minute of every day -- no breaks allowed -- because if you don't every single thing that you've barely been holding on to might fall apart too."The writing in this book is outstanding. The honesty is heart wrenching.I'm done, because I don't have the energy to type any longer. If you're chronically ill, or know someone who is chronically ill, you should read this book. If you have Lyme disease, this is a must.4/11-23/18
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  • Lydia Rodriguez
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to GR for a free ARC. This was an absolutely beautiful story and written equally as beautiful. Amy after years of not knowing what was wrong with her was finally diagnosed w/ late stage Lyme disease. She went to live in India for a couple of months to undergo new stem cell treatment that may or may not work. She was desperate and courageous and ended up okay but, not in the way I would have guessed. This book left me hopeful and sad but, I couldn't really tell you why.I'll just share s Thank you to GR for a free ARC. This was an absolutely beautiful story and written equally as beautiful. Amy after years of not knowing what was wrong with her was finally diagnosed w/ late stage Lyme disease. She went to live in India for a couple of months to undergo new stem cell treatment that may or may not work. She was desperate and courageous and ended up okay but, not in the way I would have guessed. This book left me hopeful and sad but, I couldn't really tell you why.I'll just share some quotes from the end that might sum the story up."I was so comfortably uncomfortable in my life that nothing inside of me would have changed until it felt like the whole damn world was caving in and no one was left to save me except me.""Saving my own life was not a single act of courage nor a random act of desperation. It was a long, slow, burning, uncontrollable yearning to simply meet myself once again."This book is worth the read and the inspiration.
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  • Linda Haas
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book from Goodreads about a young woman with an “incurable” disease who, after exhausting treatments in this country, travels to India to explore other options. At first, this writer had my sympathy for her condition. I found the writer’s description of her treatments and India itself to be fascinating. (I’ve never been there.). What I couldn’t understand is how a person who appeared at first to be so in tune with herself and her diet and medications ( mostly antibiotics) could just a I won this book from Goodreads about a young woman with an “incurable” disease who, after exhausting treatments in this country, travels to India to explore other options. At first, this writer had my sympathy for her condition. I found the writer’s description of her treatments and India itself to be fascinating. (I’ve never been there.). What I couldn’t understand is how a person who appeared at first to be so in tune with herself and her diet and medications ( mostly antibiotics) could just agree to go and get her nose pierced by a “young barefoot man with rusty pliers”. This just didn’t make any sense. After reading this, I was skeptical of the remainder of the book.
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  • amanda
    January 1, 1970
    There were certainly some great moments in this book, and I can’t say I’m sorry I read it. However, by the end, there are a few things that make someone like me (who has lived with chronic illness for 17 years) completely enraged. There’s a sense of mind over matter that she seems to be attributing her healing to, as well as moments when she is in despair at being well and how to go on in a state of health (!!!). For people who are sick and have exhausted every available means of treatment and w There were certainly some great moments in this book, and I can’t say I’m sorry I read it. However, by the end, there are a few things that make someone like me (who has lived with chronic illness for 17 years) completely enraged. There’s a sense of mind over matter that she seems to be attributing her healing to, as well as moments when she is in despair at being well and how to go on in a state of health (!!!). For people who are sick and have exhausted every available means of treatment and who don’t have seemingly bottomless pools of money to draw from or family and communities who will drop everything to help you, this story can be infuriating.
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  • Erica Eastman
    January 1, 1970
    Very fast read, I finished in one evening. Amy does a great job of capturing the roller coaster of chronic autoimmune disease and how illness derails your life, along with the constant obsession with finding the elusive cure for the multiple things wrong with you that doctors cannot fully understand. She also makes India come alive so you feel as if you are there with her. Her story is heart-felt and moving, and brings hope to all suffering that maybe others can also survive to finally figure ou Very fast read, I finished in one evening. Amy does a great job of capturing the roller coaster of chronic autoimmune disease and how illness derails your life, along with the constant obsession with finding the elusive cure for the multiple things wrong with you that doctors cannot fully understand. She also makes India come alive so you feel as if you are there with her. Her story is heart-felt and moving, and brings hope to all suffering that maybe others can also survive to finally figure out how to experience health again. Definitely a great read for anyone with chronic health issues or just a good memoir pick in general.
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  • Laura Zam
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a fascinating look into healing -- from anything. What power do we all have to create wellness? What all the (hidden) components that affect our health, or lack of it? In addition to finding the author's journey incredibly compelling, I loved the writing style, which was both poignant and funny. The way she handled character was particularly impressive. Unlike many memoirs where we are focused so much on the plot that we don't get to know the author in depth, I felt like the author This book is a fascinating look into healing -- from anything. What power do we all have to create wellness? What all the (hidden) components that affect our health, or lack of it? In addition to finding the author's journey incredibly compelling, I loved the writing style, which was both poignant and funny. The way she handled character was particularly impressive. Unlike many memoirs where we are focused so much on the plot that we don't get to know the author in depth, I felt like the author really shared herself with the reader in a generous and masterful way. And then there was the delight of getting to know India through this book. II highly recommend this memoir!
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